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Subject: Re: Baked potato in microwave
Newsgroups: alt.cooking-chat,rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Leah Zeldes Smith 
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 13:34:33 -0600
--------
Peter wrote:
> Can anyone help me? I have no clue how to cook a baked potato in the
> microwave. I know it can be done but how long and with what I'm not
> sure. Any help would be appreciated.

Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
(semantic snippiness deleted)
> Baked potatoes, (baked anything) requires dry heat in an oven.  This is what
> makes baked potatoes so good,  the outside is crispy and the inside is
> fluffy and soft. This takes about an hour at 400 degrees.
> 
> If you are short on time, and want a mediocre substitute, you can cook one
> in the microwave.  Wash, place in the mw, high for 6 minutes, stand for
> about 6 minutes. Two potatoes will take 8 to 9 minutes.  Standing time is
> important.

While it is true that a baked potato is better
than a microwaved one, a middle ground is possible
and tasty.  Prick and nuke the potato as usual, or
maybe a minute or two less, meanwhile preheating
the oven to 450 degrees (a toaster oven works very
well).  In lieu of the standing time, bake the
parcooked potato in the oven for about 10 minutes.

============================

From: agiosnick[at]aol.com (Steve)
Date: 14 Jan 1998 20:23:04 GMT
--------
What I do is wash the potato, prick it two or three times with a fork and put
it in the microwave for, depending on the size, 3 minutes. Then I turn it
around and nuke it for another three (or 4) more minutes. I remove it, wrap it
in foil and set it aside until they are served. Wrapping in foil keeps it hot.

============================

From: haxton[at]scican.net (Victoria "Lee")
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 21:04:46 GMT
--------
Well, I like micro potatoes better than the oven baked ones.  I think
the latter are too dry and a bit tough.  But I bake them differenly.
What I do is soak the potato for about 15 minutes in water (this makes
the potato easier to wash, more moist, and the extra moisture helps it
to bake faster).  Then I wash, prick with a fork, butter, wrap in
Saran Wrap, and bake until it's done - about half of the time you
would bake without Saran Wrap.

============================

From: stan[at]thunder.temple.edu (Stan Horwitz)
Date: 14 Jan 1998 22:27:17 GMT
--------
If you use a good Idaho (Russett) potato and bake it in the center of your
oven at around 475 degrees until its soft, the inside of the potato will
not be dry at all. There's only one way to get a baked potato, and that's
to bake it in an oven. Microwaved potatoes are not baked although they may
well taste fine; they're actually steamed. The biggest difference is the
skin. The skin of a nicely baked potato should be dry and crispy whereas
the skin of a nuked potato is wet and soggy. There's just no substitute 
for a real baked potato!

============================

From: Alex (A.) Rigby 
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 12:31:42 +0000
--------
Stan Horwitz wrote:
> The skin of a nicely baked potato should be dry and crispy whereas
> the skin of a nuked potato is wet and soggy. There's just no substitute
> for a real baked potato!

Got to admit I agree, in fact I'ld go as far as saying that there is no
place in a decent kitchen for a microwave. Yes they are good for fast
cooking but it doesn't come out right (personal opinion), and they are
good for reheating pre cooked dishes, but that implies a lack of
freshness - certain styles of cooking require serving immediately they
are cooked . Imagine Thai or Chinese food cooked, refrigerated for a day
or two then nuked when required. Yuch!

But if people like their spuds nuked, then let them nuke their spuds.

============================

From: mardi[at]wctravel.com (Mardi Wetmore)
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 02:53:12 GMT
--------
I microwave and bake my potatoes.  I microwave them until they are
about 3/4 done and then bake them in a hot oven (about 475 degrees)
for about 10-15 minutes.  The hot oven gives them a crisp skin and
makes the interior fluffy like a baked potato should be rather than
pasty like a totally microwaved potato ends up.  Total cooking time is
usually less than 30 minutes.

============================

From: brettell[at]erols.com (Steve)
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 03:05:15 GMT
--------
Microwaves are very good for cooking fish.  It's a good poaching
system.  Steaming vegetables works well too, and it's hard to beat for
cooking rice.

============================

From: benji[at]fc.hp.com (Jeff Benjamin)
Date: 1998/01/15
--------
>     Imagine Thai or Chinese food cooked, refrigerated for a day
> or two then nuked when required. Yuch!

Come on -- you mean you've never had left-over Chinese? :-)  Some dishes
can still be quite tasty a day later.

I lived without a 'wave for a couple of years and did just fine.  I
have one now, and although I seldom actually "cook" with it, it has
a deserved place in my kitchen for a number of tasks:

* Defrosting meat
* Heating stock, milk, etc. for making sauces etc.
* Melting butter
* Reheating tortillas
* Sometimes partially cooking veggies to speed up making a conventionally
  prepared dish
* Melting cheese, when a browned top isn't necessary or it's too darn
  hot to fire up the broiler :-)

And of course, reheating leftovers.

============================

From: Alex (A.) Rigby 
Date: 1998/01/16
--------
Jeff Benjamin wrote:
> And of course, reheating leftovers.

Each to their own (tho' I'ld refry my left over chinese, and yes a day
or two down the line can improve its flavour - chillis experience this -
and its bacterial content.

If you like nuked food then go ahead and nuke it - its a free world.

Love and a whole range of cooking techniques

============================

From: Susie Driscoll 
Date: 1998/01/16
--------
I don't like microwave potatoes either, so what I do is nuke for about 6mns
( poke first), and then I throw it in the oven on 400 for about 20 to 30
minutes. And they taste just great.

============================

From: mardi[at]wctravel.com (Mardi Wetmore)
Date: 1998/01/16
--------
> The skin of a nicely baked potato should be dry and crispy whereas
> the skin of a nuked potato is wet and soggy. There's just no substitute
> for a real baked potato!

I microwave and bake my potatoes.  I microwave them until they are
about 3/4 done and then bake them in a hot oven (about 475 degrees)
for about 10-15 minutes.  The hot oven gives them a crisp skin and
makes the interior fluffy like a baked potato should be rather than
pasty like a totally microwaved potato ends up.  Total cooking time is
usually less than 30 minutes.

============================

From: brettell[at]erols.com (Steve)
Date: 1998/01/16
--------
Microwaves are very good for cooking fish.  It's a good poaching
system.  Steaming vegetables works well too, and it's hard to beat for
cooking rice.

============================

From: haxton[at]scican.net (Victoria "Lee")
Date: 1998/01/17
--------
You can also bake sweet potatoes in the microwave.

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: 1998/01/17
--------
Victoria Lee wrote 
>You can also bake sweet potatoes in the microwave.

No you can't.  You need an oven.

============================

From: Tae 
Date: 1998/01/17
--------
Joe Rocca wrote:
> I cook baking potatoes in the microwave (prick first with a fork in
> several places) for 10 to 15 minutes.  Check with a fork to see if

It must depend on the microwave. If I was to leave an average sized
potato in mine for that long, it'd be pretty leathery. I usually nuke
for about 7 minutes.

============================

From: Laura 
Date: 1998/01/17
--------
Victoria Lee wrote:
> You can also bake sweet potatoes in the microwave.

There *almost* sexual that way aren't they.   For desert  (:-0 ) top
with butter and about 1t to 1T brown sugar.. Mmmmmm.

============================

From: Joe Rocca 
Date: 1998/01/17
--------
I cook baking potatoes in the microwave (prick first with a fork in
several places) for 10 to 15 minutes.  Check with a fork to see if
they're soft.  Then I put them in the toaster oven at 400 for 10
minutes.  That last step crisps up the skin, so they're more like a real
baked potato,

============================

From: luddite[at]cadvision.com (Brian Barnson)
Date: 1998/01/18
--------
Joe Rocca says:
>I cook baking potatoes in the microwave (prick first with a fork in
>several places) for 10 to 15 minutes.  Check with a fork to see if
>they're soft.  Then I put them in the toaster oven at 400 for 10
>minutes.  That last step crisps up the skin, so they're more like a real
>baked potato,

        I do something similar, but on the gas grill, which in this part
of the world is called a barbecue.  I slice the potatoes in half lengthwise
and nuke them until they're mostly done.  Then they go on the top
rack of the bbq while the meat is cooking below.  This crisps and
browns them and they might pick up some of those yummy carcinogens
from the burning animal fat.  Of course this is a summer activity, today is 
the first day this year that the temperature is expected to rise above
freezing and at 23 minutes after noon it ain't happened yet.

============================

From: lscanlon[at]erols.com (Leo Scanlon)
Date: 1998/01/18
--------
Joe Rocca wrote:
>I cook baking potatoes in the microwave (prick first with a fork in
>several places) for 10 to 15 minutes.  Check with a fork to see if
>they're soft.  Then I put them in the toaster oven at 400 for 10
>minutes.  That last step crisps up the skin, so they're more like a real
>baked potato,

I always wrap mine in foil for five minutes after nuking them for 10
minutes.  But the skin in still somewhat squishy.  I'll try your idea
tonight.  Thanks, Joe!

============================

From: merrypoo[at]odyline.com (Karyl Bleddyn)
Date: 1998/01/19
--------
Alex (A.) Rigby wrote:
> Got to admit I agree, in fact I'ld go as far as saying that there is no
> place in a decent kitchen for a microwave.

Au contraire! It's excellent for heating veggies without overcooking them.

============================

From: Sheldon D 
Date: 1998/01/20
--------
I regularly cook(bake?) both sweet and yukon gold potatoes in the
microwave. After scrubbing skins and removing any bad spots I dredge
them in extra virgin olive oil and set them on plate or shallow bowl.
During cooking time I ensure the skin stays covered with thin layer of
oil by rolling them in the little bit of oil on the plate.  They come
out beautifully, the skin is delicious on the sweet as well as the
regular potato.  Without the oil the flavor is not as good and there
is some shrivelling and the skin is not as nice.  I suspect the oil
heating on the skin acts as a "mini bake oven".  It certainly keeps in
the flavour.

============================

From: auwen[at]convex.hp.com (John David Auwen)
Date: 1998/01/20
--------
>Got to admit I agree, in fact I'ld go as far as saying that there is no
>place in a decent kitchen for a microwave.

I wouldn't go that far.  It's a tool and very useful for certain things.
For example, I use it to melt chocolate and it's a lot better than doing
it on a stovetop where you have to constantly stir and it can easily burn.

I also use it to heat water for bread-making.  For the bread
recipes I use, I can precisely hit 110F every time without messing 
around. 

Also, of course, it's the best when it comes to rewarming some foods.
How would we survive at work without a microwave?  It allows us to eat
a decent, hot lunch that we've brought from home.

Dave

============================

From: nancy-dooley[at]uiowa.edu (Nancy Dooley)
Date: 1998/01/20
--------
Laura wrote
>Edwin Pawlowski wrote
>>Victoria Lee wrote

>>> You can also bake sweet potatoes in the microwave.
>> No you can't.  You need an oven.
> huh??

What Ed means, is that you don't "bake" potatoes in the nuker, you
steam them.  Baked potatoes = bake in the oven.

============================

From: Louis Hlavenka 
Date: 1998/01/20
--------
A microwave and an oven are different creatures.  You bake in one and
nuke in the other.  There is a place in the kitchen for both.  BUT you
do not bake a potato in a micro wave.  Also you  do not wrap a baked
potato in aluminum, before during or after baking it.  Lou 

============================

From: kris[at]vilnya.demon.co.uk (Kris)
Date: 21 Jan 98 01:31:50 GMT
--------
Steve wrote:
> Imagine Thai or Chinese food cooked, refrigerated for a day
>or two then nuked when required. Yuch!

        Hey, I've had chinese food that was in the fridge for a night,
then nuked. You have to pick and choose your nukeables. (Leftover rice
is pretty much a lost cause ime, at least from resturaunts, unless
you actually bother to rewrap it as soon as you get home to keep it
from drying out. It just doesn't reheat well. :)

        Seriously, for people like my grandmother and my boyfriend,
with limited mobility, microwaves are quite useful. Without a specially
adapted kitchen, my bf cannot cook normally (wouldn't be safe, for
one thing), whereas the ability to pop things in the microwave at least
gives him some independance. So, with that in mind... Does anyone have
any *good* recipes for the microwave? (No fish, though. He is decidedly
anti-fish. :) I'd like to have some on hand so that he could do his
own thing once in a while, rather than constantly having to depend
on what someone else has cooked and left for him. :)

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 1998 23:03:25 -0500
--------
John David Auwen wrote ...
>Also, of course, it's the best when it comes to rewarming some foods.
>How would we survive at work without a microwave?  It allows us to eat
>a decent, hot lunch that we've brought from home.

Agree Dave.  I take a good lunch all the time and nuke it.  Sometimes, since
I have no baking facilities, I'll cook a potato in it.  Not as good as
baked, but best I can get under the circumstances.

============================

From: Omfray 
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 06:47:29 GMT
--------
Karyl Bleddyn wrote ...
>Au contraire! It's excellent for heating veggies without overcooking them.

I agree!  There is no better way to heat corn or peas.

============================

From: Alex (A.) Rigby 
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 13:21:42 +0000
--------
I feel I'm going to have to make a distinction here between cooking and
heating things up. Bear in mind that once again this is a personal
opinion - good to see such a simple querydevelop into such a lively
thread.

I really get off on cooking, and for me it's a total experience (what a
pretentious toss pot, can't even believe I'm saying this myself). You
are involved in it the whole way: tracking down those more exotic
ingrediants, preparing the ingrediants, then cooking them, adjusting
levels of heat and seasoning as you go, teasing that sauce into the
perfect texture. Man is at one with his stove/oven/hotplate, a pure
symbiosis of person, ingrediants and cooking range. you don't just leave
it there to heat through, you have an almost constant input (except
maybe for the simmering and roasting between basting stages). With a
mice, you just slam it in, press the button and voila it heats it up. No
more, no less. That's not cooking.

Now a mice does have it's place (good example is for heating you lunch
up in the workplace), but to confuse it with cooking. Oh no. Yes in
these days of people rushing around being too busy to spend that much
time in the kitchen, it does present itself as an extremely advantageous
convenience. But cooking. Oh no.

Sometimes when I'm too busy, I'll eat out. But that's not cooking.

Just a little rant.

============================

From: luddite[at]cadvision.com (Brian Barnson)
Date: 21 Jan 98 17:29:31 GMT
--------
I find the old nuker useful for one kind of "cooking". the kind of
things that your mother always told you to use a double boiler for.  
Custard and tapioca have a terrific tendency to burn on the stovetop but 
they work well if made with a little nuking and a little stirring and
a little more nuking, etc. It's easier on your stirring arm too.

============================

From: michelle.campbell[at]stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Miche)
Date: 28 Jan 1998 04:15:28 GMT
--------
sandee98 writes:
> I've tried nuking potatoes and they just don't taste as good to me as in
> the oven.  Can you give some tips on making them taste as good?

It doesn't matter what you do, they will never be the same because the
cooking process isn't the same.  I don't refer to microwaved potatoes
as 'baked' because they're _not_ baked - they're steamed.

============================

From: Sandee 
Date: 28 Jan 98 04:31:49 GMT
--------
I've tried nuking potatoes and they just don't taste as good to me as in
the oven.  Can you give some tips on making them taste as good?

============================

From: tonypo[at]ultranet.com (Tony Pelliccio)
Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 22:48:25 -0500
--------
I like what a regular oven can do to the skin on the potatoe. So what I 
do is run the oven heat up to about 450 or so, pop the potatoe in for 10-
20 minutes or so. Then I pop it in the microwave for the recommended 
time.

I realize this takes nearly a half hour, but it's the best compromise. 

============================

From: barbara_skolones[at]quickmail.yale.edu (Barbara Skolones)
Date: 28 Jan 1998 14:02:48 GMT
--------
My favorite way of making "baked" nuked potatoes is after cooking them in
the micro I put them either in the broiler or on my grill and get the skin
nice and crispy. Usually I make a potato with steak or fish, so I can do
them at the same time. Usually 5 mins on a side. I love the way they come
out.

============================

From: Jeffrey V. Atherton 
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 18:17:59 -0500
--------
Another good idea is to use the "Micro Steamer" from Tupperware.  Just add a
bit of water in the bottom....nuke it....and you have a great tasting potato

============================

From: Bridget 
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 09:51:26 -0500
--------
I like nuked potatoes this way:  Nuke on high for 6 min (one potato) let
stand for 2 min.  Place in oven along with whatever else you are roasting
for 15 - 30 min (depending on temp)  This way potatoes bake much faster and
still taste baked.

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 1998 23:08:04 -0500
--------
Sandee wrote...
>I've tried nuking potatoes and they just don't taste as good to me as in
>the oven.  Can you give some tips on making them taste as good?

If there was a way, I'd do it.  Anything else is a compromise. You can
nuke/bake, but it is still not the same. You can coat the skin with oil, but
that is sort of frying them on the outside.

============================

From: jschexnayder[at]aisp.net (Julaine Schexnayder)
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 22:06:16 GMT
--------
I start the potatoes, white, which I've sprayed with PAM, in the
mocrowave while the oven is heating to 400 degrees F.

Then I put them into the regular oven until they are soft enough to
pierce with a cooking fork.  Really shortens the cooking time but the
skins get cooked (roasted).  NEVER  put baked potatoes in aluminum
foil!!!

============================

From: Steve[at]nospam.com (Steve)
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 02:15:19 GMT
--------
Julaine Schexnayder wrote:
>I start the potatoes, white, which I've sprayed with PAM, in the
>mocrowave while the oven is heating to 400 degrees F.

Does the Pam give them a crispy skin?  Crispy skin is the one thing I miss 
with nuked potatoes.

============================

From: Bob Y. 
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 08:09:54 -0600
--------
Steve wrote:
> Does the Pam give them a crispy skin?  Crispy skin is the one thing I miss
> with nuked potatoes.

Actually, I think it is the dry heat in the regular oven that does the
trick. I've seen recipes that say it you want a softer skin to rub the
potatoes with oil or margarine before baking.

============================

From: Bob Y. 
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 08:12:24 -0600
--------
Julaine Schexnayder wrote:
>NEVER  put baked potatoes in aluminum foil!!!

If you wrap potatoes in foil when you "bake" them, you are in fact
steaming them.

============================

From: lscanlon[at]erols.com (Leo Scanlon)
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 16:07:41 GMT
--------
I've always nuked potatoes for 10 minues, then wrapped them in foil
for another five minutes or so.  That's what my microwave cookbook
recommends.

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 23:52:32 -0500
--------
Leo Scanlon wrote...
>I've always nuked potatoes for 10 minues, then wrapped them in foil
>for another five minutes or so.  That's what my microwave cookbook
>recommends.

That's fine if you want a mw potato.  If you want oven baked, the foil will
steam it and give it taste and texture of a steamed potato.  High volume
restaurants use foil as they will not dry out as fast.

I read about a Chicago steak house (sorry, don't recall the name) that put
the potato in the oven when you arrived and it was done when your steak was
served.

============================

From: itzsven[at]aol.com (Itz Sven)
Date: 1 Feb 1998 11:03:59 GMT
--------
>I've always nuked potatoes for 10 minues, then wrapped them in foil
>for another five minutes or so.  That's what my microwave cookbook
>recommends.
>
>Leo

CAN YOU SAY "BOOM"

============================

From: jackn2mpu[at]aol.com (Jack)
Date: 1 Feb 1998 14:05:45 GMT
--------
Sven babbled:
>CAN YOU SAY "BOOM"

What Leo means is the potatoes just sit in the foil for 5 or so minutes to
finish cooking. They don't get heated in the microwave in the foil (duh)!

============================

From: Nikki Oliver 
Date: 3 Feb 1998 03:36:21 GMT
--------
Julaine Schexnayder wrote:
>NEVER  put baked potatoes in aluminum foil!!!

You are right there!  I use wax paper on mine in the microwave.  It makes
them fluffier!

============================

From: Rev Paul Gilman, Ph.D. 
Date: 9 Feb 1998 19:44:18 GMT
--------
Try this one.
Put the potato in the nuke for approx 5-6 min.
then place it in a toaster oven for approx 25 min.   (400)
makes the best baker you will ever have.

============================

From: Low Choy 
Date: 10 Feb 1998 02:34:49 GMT
--------
Rev Paul Gilman, Ph.D. wrote
> Put the potato in the nuke for approx 5-6 min.
> then place it in a toaster oven for approx 25 min.   (400)
> makes the best baker you will ever have.

Good way to shorten cooking time and
still be able to brush with oil and salt to
crisp the skin.
 
============================

From: moosmeat[at]sttl.uswest.net (moosmeat)
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 22:13:23 GMT
--------
We attended a cooking school (One week-evenings) some years ago in
Riverside, California that was put on by a major Micro-wave
nanufacturer.  She (the instructor), said to prick the potato, nuke it
for from 5 to 7 mins (depends upon size of the potato), wrap it
quickly in foil and let it set/sit on the counter for maybe 10 or more
mins.  Turns out great every time.

============================

From: Pete 
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 11:08:39 -0500
--------
First off, all microwave owner's should also own one of those plastic
steamer
bowls. Mine is a round plastic bowl about 8" wide by 6" with a plastic
basket insert which raises the contents of basket about 1" from the
bottom.
With that said...


1.) Pour a couple of teaspoons of water into steamer bowl. Cover
bowl and cook on high for about 45 seconds just to get the
water steamy.

2.) While that is cooking wash the potato.

3.) Place potato in preheated steamer bowl. Cover and cook on 
high for about 4-6 minutes depending upon size of potato.
You can check for doneness by piercing with fork. It should
feel soft down through to the center. 

  Note: Steaming it in this manner gives you a more evenly
        cooked potato with less a tendency to dry it out.
        You can even slice a wedge from the top, pierce the
        potato with vertical slits, add a little butter
        place wedge back on and nuke it another 30-60 seconds.

4.) If you can wait, allowing potato to sit in steamer basket
    for additional time will allow potato to cook more and
    keep it steamy hot.

============================

From: Priscilla 
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 1998 20:57:19 -0600
--------
Or if you do not have a toaster oven wrap the microwaved potato in aluminum
foil and let it sit in the foil for about 10 minutes. It helps it taste more
like a "real" baked potato.

============================

From: kris[at]vilnya.demon.co.uk (Kris)
Date: 25 Jan 98 00:06:26 GMT
--------
Nancy Dooley wrote:
>What Ed means, is that you don't "bake" potatoes in the nuker, you
>steam them.  Baked potatoes = bake in the oven.

        Hrm. Shall we all be more careful next time this thread
rolls around and refer to microwaved potatoes as "baked" potatoes,
whilst oven-cooked potatoes are baked potatoes? :)

        Even if you[1] don't like microwaves, I'd suggest making the
effort to master a few things with them (reheating, nuking potatoes,
etc.) because you never know when you'll be stuck with that as your
main cooking appliance, and unable to afford eating out. (Like when
you're a student.  :) (Or, on a more serious note, if you or a
loved one is in hospital; my experiance in this country has been that
there's almost always a microwave around to use if you look hard
enough and ask the right people, but hospital cafeteria type places
close early, and often aren't open at all on weekends[2].)

-Kris
        (Who thinks that nuked potatoes are acceptable fare, but there's
no way they satisfy the need for a properly done baked potato, complete
with nice crispy skin and fluffy, not-too-dry-or-moist innards. Yum. :)

[1]- Generic you. Not aimed at anyone in particular.
[2]- At least, I found this to be the case at one of the major hospitals
in London, when my boyfriend was there for an extended stay this past
summer. I'd rather spend my time visiting him than trekking all over
looking for the burger king before *it* closes, so nuked potatoes it
was.)

============================

From: redbible1[at]mindspring.com (Heidi)
Date: Sun, 01 Feb 1998 03:32:32 GMT
--------
Dipping them in melted butter and rolling them in koasher salt before
cooking is good to, to add more flavor. 


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