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Subject: BAKED POTATO
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking,alt.cooking-chat

============================

From: -jacob- 
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 08:18:25 -0400
--------
O.K. well I would like to know how to bake a simple potato.

I've tried nuking it in the microwave, but the texture of it when it
comes out is nothing like an oven.

It may be simple to do them, but I sure would like to know how.

thanks

(and any twists and turns you may add for flavouring)

============================

From: Rainey41[at]ix.netcom.com
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 08:53:43 +0000
--------
I tried baking the potatoe in the microwave and turns good sometimes.
Here's what I do: wash the potatoes and then use a fork to poke holes in
it one on each side and center of it should be 4 when poking around it.

Then, put your put inside the morcrowave for 12 minutes but turning it
over when it reaches 6 minutes click on stop and turn the potatoes over
to the other side and click start to continues baking for the of the
6 minutes remaining on the time also when it's done feel the potatoes to
see if it's done enough for you or not ok?

============================

From: aquari[at]aol.com (Libby)
Date: 27 Sep 1999 16:34:16 GMT
--------
Wash well and dry.

Rub all over with bacon grease or shortening or oil.

Poke two ro three times with a fork so it won't explode.  DO NOT WRAP IN FOIL.
Aside from changing the baked potato to a steamed potato, it clutters up Mother
Earth with foil clumps and wasters your money.

Bake in center of oven 425 - 450 . You will know it is done when you can poke a
fork in and it feels like a cooked baked potato. In my oven (Amana
propane-operated at altitude 6500 ft.) it takes about an hour or a bit more,
but I start checking it at about 45 minutes.

Cut open, add butter, salt and pepper.  Some like sour cream, scallions, salsa,
cheese sauce and broccoli, etc.  It is up to you.  (I've gotten on to the fat
free sour cream that comes in the container that looks like cow hide.  I think
it tastes good and it is guilt free!)

The best part of the potato is the crisp skin with butter, salt and pepper,
IMO.

============================

From: Becca 
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 07:39:26 -0500
--------
Part of microwaving a potato includes a resting phase of several minutes
afterwards.  Here is a link to cooking potatoes, not specifically
microwave cooking, this is just about potatoes in general.

The Baked Potato Recipe Collection
http://www.panix.com/~donwiss/potato/

============================

From: Friend  
Date: 27 Sep 1999 17:37:26 -0400
--------
Baking a potato is indeed versy simple, but you need some time in order to
do it right. The trick is to use the proper type of potato. I use Russett,
which has a brownish, dirt colored porous skin. Just wash the potato off
with cold water. Pierce a few holes in the skin with a knife. Put in an
oven set at 500 degrees. Yup, that's 500 degrees Fahranheit! Close the
oven and wait an hour if the potato is medium size or longer if the pototo
is larger. After about an hour, poke the spud with a fork. If the fork
goes in with little effort, the potato is done. This yields a potato with
a fluffy interior and crisp skin. Do not wrap the potato in aluminum foil
(as that just teams it) and for goodness sakes, do not let it get anywhere
near a microwave oven!

============================

From: Goomba 
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 09:51:10 -0400
--------
-jacob- wrote:
> O.K. well I would like to know how to bake a simple potato.
> I've tried nuking it in the microwave, but the texture of it when it
> comes out is nothing like an oven.

First off, microwaves don't bake the tater.. it kinda steams it?? 
Start off with a baking potato.. those big honking things.  Wash well
and prick a few times with a strong fork to let steam out as it bakes so
that it won't explode.  Some folks like to rub down with oil, some not. 
Do NOT put in foil as that ruins the nice skin totally. 
Bake at 375-400 for an hour or more (it varies by size, and water
content I suppose) and just bake till the skin is dry and flaky and the
inside can be speared into.  You'll have a great potato with fluffy
innards and a skin that is heavenly buttered and seasoned with salt and
pepper.  You should use fork tines to cut the potato open with, not a
knife. Cross cut and squeeze open.. or dig out the innards to get the
skin separate.  The skin is my fave part.

============================

From: sportkite1[at]aol.comfly (SportKite1)
Date: 27 Sep 1999 14:02:04 GMT
--------
>O.K. well I would like to know how to bake a simple potato.

First start with a nice brown skinned potato they call baking potatoes at the
market. Avoid the really huge ones, they taste too starchy and old. The medium
sized ones are the best.

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Give your potato a good washing/rinsing under cold
water, then rub all over with kosher salt. Now some people take a knife and
prick it with the tip to allow the steam to escape so it won't blow up in the
oven, but I've never had a problem with that and I prefer the texture of an
unvented potato.  Okay, place your potato on a rack in the middle of the oven
for 45-50 minutes (an hour is good for 4 potatoes so I guess you can reduce the
time for one). 

Crack that puppy open, butter, salt and pepper it and chow down on the best
tater you ever ate. 

NEVER wrap in Foil by the way....lol.

============================

From: Steve Calvin 
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 10:38:16 -0400
--------
SportKite1 wrote:
> Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Give your potato a good washing/rinsing under cold
> water, then rub all over with kosher salt. Now some people take a knife and
> prick it with the tip to allow the steam to escape so it won't blow up in the

This one's got my vote.... the only thing that I change is to crank
the temp up to 500 dF.  (and I do poke it with a fork a couple
of times)

============================

From: msouth[at]fulcrum.org (Joyce South)
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 10:25:59 -0400
--------
I can tolerate microwave baked potatoes if I wrap them in a wet paper
towel first (don't forget to poke them with a fork).  Make sure you don't
overcook them because they become leathery.  It took me a few tries to
know how long since all microwaves are different.

In the oven is the best.  I usually poke them once with a fork, wrap in
foil and bake at 350 for 40-60 minutes.  I think you can bake them at
lower temperatures like 325, but am usually in a hurry. 

My MIL rubs a little shortening on the outside of hers and doesn't wrap
them in foil.  This makes the skins kind of crispy and really yummy.

============================

From: JESSOOO[at]webtv.net (JESS \(Mim\) SUTHERLAND)
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 11:04:30 -0400 (EDT)
--------
I worked in a steak house and the potatoes were never baked every
morning they wrap umteen taters in foil and boil them until done then
put them in a steamer drawer they're pretty good i still do it.

============================

From: Pete McKenna 
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 11:58:23 -0400
--------
I prefer baking potatoes in the oven.  Since we all enjoy them, I bake alot
of them in the oven, and then heat up the leftover ones in the microwave.
The insides are still fluffy and the outsides are firm.  Sometimes I just
pour salsa over one -- cheap, low in calories (I hope:o)) and super fast if
I'm STARVING!  Jeanne

============================

From: Miriam Posvolsky 
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 12:01:52 -0300
--------
Hi Jacob

Try cooking them in the microwave just for a few minutes.
Take them out before they are done and bake them in a regular oven until
they are cooked through and crisp.
can't tell the exact time as it depends on the size of the potatoes and the
quantity.
Hope to have helped

============================

From: wvriter 
Date: Tue, 28 Sep 1999 07:55:19 -0400
--------
I served my favorite pub food for supper Friday night.  Ordinary potatoes,
not big bakers, cooked at 450 F until nicely dried, crunchy skin, split the
top in a cross.  Two to the customer.  Cover lavishly with shrimps
mayonnaise -- which I seasoned with Old Bay and a squirt of lime.  A nice
green salad, a glass of white....yummy.
When alone, I bake in the microwave for 5 minutes then in the oven for 15
minutes at 500 F.

============================

From: Wade Garza 
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 11:33:24 -0500
--------
Take a washed and dried potato and rub it with oil.  Sprinkle it with a
bit of Kosher salt.  Bake in a 400-425 degree oven for an hour or until
done.  To test, take the potato in your hand (use a towel, the potato
will be hot) and gently squeeze.  If you feel the potato give easily, it
is done.  In my experience, poking holes in the potato is not necessary.

============================

From: Indigo 
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 13:24:02 -0400
--------
If you want to cook it in the microwave, wash the potato, prick it with a
fork a few times, wrap it in a papertowel.  My microwave has preset buttons,
and I found that it works best when cooked for one and a half times the
preset.  After cooking, wrap the potato in aluminum foil and let sit for 10
minutes.  This lets in finish cooking without turning it to leather.  If you
want to eat the skin, rub on butter or oil before wrapping in the foil.

============================

From: Emma W. 
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 14:32:00 -0400
--------
There are two main schools of thought for baking potatoes:

The Foil School
and
The No Foil School

I belong to the latter and can't fathom the thought processes of the
former  so here is my favorite method:

1 large potato

set the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit
poke several holes in the potato with a fork
place the potato on the middle rack in the oven
(no baking sheet) and bake for 1 hour.
After an hour, pierce the potato deeply with a fork.
If it feels tender in the center, it's done.
Split in half and butter.

This makes a crispy skin that's pretty yummy.

============================

From: Dimitri 
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 14:18:33 -0700
--------
Emma W. wrote:
>There are two main schools of thought for baking potatoes:
>
>The Foil School
>and
>The No Foil School

There is also the Oiled skin school -  which may be a branch of the no foil
school.

============================

From: Alan Boles 
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 23:01:32 GMT
--------
The advantage of no foil, and using oil is that you can scoop out the
potato and mash it with other good things like diced green/red peppers,
onions, bacon bits, cheese, etc... . Then put it back in the skin...
But having a tator explode in the oven is a bad thing. So poke it with
a forkbefore cooking. It is really messy and burning tator doesn't smell
nice.

============================

From: penmart10[at]aol.com (Sheldon)
Date: 27 Sep 1999 23:52:08 GMT
--------
Alan Boles writes:
>The advantage of no foil, and using oil is that you can scoop out the
>potato and mash it with other good things like diced green/red peppers,
>onions, bacon bits, cheese, etc... . Then put it back in the skin...
>But having a tator explode in the oven is a bad thing. So poke it with
>a forkbefore cooking. It is really messy and burning tator doesn't smell
>nice.

Potato baked 'au jus', without (f)oil, will result in thicker crispier skin
which facilitates removal of innards as well as easier re-stuffing.

============================

From: sbenjami[at]netcom.com (Susan Benjamin)
Date: 28 Sep 1999 16:42:46 GMT
--------
Dimitri wrote:
> There is also the Oiled skin school -  which may be a branch of the no foil
> school.

There are also the Temperature Cults:
The 350 degree cult
The 400 degree cult
The 450 degree cult
The 500 degree cult

But no matter what school and/or cult you belong to, the potato
is always baked for *one hour*!  And it's perfect.

Susan B.
(No Foil, Oiled Skin, 350 Degrees)

============================

From: dtwright[at]texas.net.spambegone (David Wright)
Date: Tue, 28 Sep 1999 16:57:02 GMT
--------
Susan Benjamin wrote:
>There are also the Temperature Cults:
>The 350 degree cult
>The 400 degree cult
>The 450 degree cult
>The 500 degree cult

I think the potatoes are laughing at us. :-0)

David

============================

From: "Paul F Austin" 
Date: Tue, 28 Sep 1999 20:28:40 -0400
--------
I don't know how you managed this but after baking potatoes for years
(400/90 minutes, so there) with no hazard, I read today about puncturing the
skins to ward off Dread Exploding Spuds. I ignored the comment since _I_
never had to clean potato off the inside of my oven...

Sure enough, tonight I heard a dull thump from the kitchen. I _knew_ what
that noise was. I just want to know how you did it.

============================

From: penmart10[at]aol.com (Sheldon)
Date: 29 Sep 1999 01:25:46 GMT
--------
Nothin' so good as a Weber-Baked spud!   Did 4 BIG Long Guylanders tonight, on
the top rack while beneath a butterflied chicken seasoned with Penzeys Balti
was a'grillin.

No timing, no (f)oil, no BS... Oh Baby, was dem spuds good, good, GOOD!  

============================

From: aasregular at anti-aol dot org (J.J.)
Date: Tue, 28 Sep 1999 18:36:37 GMT
--------
Once upon a midnight dreary, Susan Benjamin opined:

>But no matter what school and/or cult you belong to, the potato
>is always baked for *one hour*!  And it's perfect.
>
>Susan B.
>(No Foil, Oiled Skin, 350 Degrees)

Not necessarily always one hour -- I bake mine at 350 degrees for 1 
1/2 hours, washed, no f(oil). It makes the skin thick and crunchy, 
which the hubby and I love...

============================

From: penmart10[at]aol.com (Sheldon)
Date: 27 Sep 1999 21:24:59 GMT
--------
Emma W. writes:
>1 large potato

Huh?  You actually light your oven, crank it all the way up to 400 F., just to
bake 1 spud?!?!? 

============================

From: Emma W. 
Date: Tue, 28 Sep 1999 12:27:34 -0400
--------
Sheldon wrote:
>Huh?  You actually light your oven, crank it all the way up to 400 F., just to
>bake 1 spud?!?!?

I tend to cook one spud at a time, sometimes 2.
Is there a better way?  Do you use a lower temp or do
you use the microwave?

I'm open to new ideas.

============================

From: penmart10[at]aol.com (Sheldon)
Date: 28 Sep 1999 18:57:31 GMT
--------
Emma W. writes:
>I tend to cook one at a time, sometimes 2.
>Is there a better way?  Do you use a lower temp or do
>you use the microwave?
>
>I'm open to new ideas.

Errm, that's admirable, because it appears you've gotten potatoes confused with
penises. ehhhhehehehe. . . .

============================

From: Emma W. 
Date: Wed, 29 Sep 1999 12:22:51 -0400
--------
Sheldon wrote:
>Errm, that's admirable, because it appears you've gotten potatoes confused with
>penises. ehhhhehehehe. . . .

Not possible, because the potatoes tend to be crunchier when
I bite into them... at least I   _thought_  that was a potato!

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 21:36:52 -0400
--------
-jacob- wrote:
> I've tried nuking it in the microwave, but the texture of it when it
> comes out is nothing like an oven.

You can cook a potato in a microwave, but you need an oven to bake one.
Size will determine the time, but the average ruset potato takes about an
hour at 400 degrees.  All I do is wash them, pop them in the oven, or even a
toaster oven.

You will get a crispy skin and a smooth, flakey interior.  Do NOT wrap in
foil as it makes the texture too mealy.  I hear of rubbing them with cooking
oil, but that does not improve the result IMO.

As for eating, butter, salt, eat.  Nothing more needed. That is real butter,
not some tub stuff.

============================

From: the Fleming 
Date: Mon, 4 Oct 1999 10:28:25 +0100
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
>As for eating, butter, salt, eat.  Nothing more needed. That is real butter,
>not some tub stuff.

I'm *so* relieved to hear this stipulation - believe it or not, a bit of
butter as a natural product is loads healthier than any kind of margarine -
especially when you've read the description of how liquid veg. oils are
converted into a solid spread....   Of course, a *lot* of butter is
even tastier... ;o)

My personal favourite (I eat the Hay Way - sometimes also referred to as the
Food Combining Diet) for a starch meal:

take one large baking potato; scrub; prick to pierce the skin at least a few
times; put in polythene bag, place in microwave oven; cook on high for as
many minutes as you reckon it will need twice of; turn; cook for a minute
shorter than first half.  Take out of bag, test how 'done' it is (should be
giving way when squeezed but not falling apart spontaneously); dry, drizzle
with virgin olive oil & season with freshly ground salt, shove in dish in
pre-heated oven or even under the grill.  Bake/toast, turning a few times,
until the skin is golden and crisped.  Split.  If you want to cut back on
butter, add a tablespoonful or two of milk to the flaked potato flesh (which
adds moistness) before forking in the butter.  Add some more salt.
Meanwhile, have cooked a mound of sweetcorn.  Combine both on a plate.
Attack.  Most satisfying!

============================

From: Angela Ketterman 
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 18:45:32 -0700
--------
Here is how to bake a potato according to my Le Cordon Bleu textbook...
1) scrub the potatoes and pierce the ends with a skewer or fork to allow
steam to escape.
2) leave potatoes dry or drizzle with a little vegetable oil if a crisp skin
is desired.
3) place on a sheet pan in 400 degree oven until done, about 1 hr.  test for
doneness by squeezing potato gently.  (I just stick a fork in it.)

so there it is folks, good luck.

============================

From: John Doe 
Date: Mon, 27 Sep 1999 23:27:08 -0300
--------
All right, everybody thinks they know how to bake a potato huh ? Well, this
is how we do it with the scouts...

First you take your potato and don't bother washing it, or oiling it, or
greasing it, or salting it. All you do is cover it in thick mud about a half
an inch all around and drop it in to the coals of your cook fire. By the
time you finish cooking the rest of your meal, your potato will be ready.
Just flick it out with a stick, then whack it with the stick to break the
dried mud coating and eat the guts. We don't usually bother with the skin
much  :o)

============================

From: Steve Calvin 
Date: Tue, 28 Sep 1999 07:58:47 -0400
--------
John Doe wrote:
>All you do is cover it in thick mud about a half
> an inch all around and drop it in to the coals of your cook fire.

ah yes, I'd forgotten that..... accompanied by a steak. make a 
"pocket" in the coals, throw a steak in the pocked (no foil or anything)
cover it up with coals. In about 3 minutes, presto. and believe it
or not it's actually GOOD. 

============================

From: dweller[at]ramtops.demon.co.uk (Doug Weller)
Date: Wed, 29 Sep 1999 23:24:28 +0100
--------
keeling@nbnet said...
> All right, everybody thinks they know how to bake a potato huh ? Well, this
> is how we do it with the scouts...
 
Resin baked potato. Wrap your potato in newspaper, drop in a a large cauldron 
of bubbling resin, cook until done.

Delicious (or at least that's what I remember -- my grandfather used to do 
these).

============================

From: Nan 
Date: Fri, 1 Oct 1999 19:47:07 -0000
--------
Hi, I can't believe that know one told you the way to cut the baking time in
half, is push a nail in the potato.  for some reason it heats through
better.  That's the way I bake mine and they come out great in the oven.

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: Sun, 3 Oct 1999 22:49:52 -0400
--------
Nan wrote:
> Hi, I can't believe that know one told you the way to cut the baking time in
> half, is push a nail in the potato.  for some reason it heats through
> better.  That's the way I bake mine and they come out great in the oven.

The reason is heat transfer.  The metal nail conducts the heat better than
the potato itself and decreases the cooking time.  Used to do this years ago
and for some reason, stopped.  You could buy aluminum nails sold for this
purpose a while back, but I've not looked for them for years.
Ed

============================

From: abel[at]sonoma.edu (Dan Abel)
Date: Mon, 04 Oct 1999 09:00:03 -0700
--------
Ed Pawlowski wrote:
> The reason is heat transfer.  The metal nail conducts the heat better than
> the potato itself and decreases the cooking time. 

When I was a kid, long before microwave ovens were invented, my parents
would often have baked potatoes as a late night snack.  They had these
aluminum dinguses.  One end was pointed to stick in the potato.  The other
end was wrapped in a coil.  The idea was that the coil would extract heat
from the hot air in the oven and transfer the heat to the inside of the
potato.  This cut the cookinig time in half.

============================

From: penmart10[at]aol.com (Sheldon)
Date: 04 Oct 1999 20:18:57 GMT
--------
Dan Abel writes:
>When I was a kid, long before microwave ovens were invented, my parents
>would often have baked potatoes as a late night snack.  They had these
>aluminum dinguses.  One end was pointed to stick in the potato.  The other
>end was wrapped in a coil.

I was thinking you were gonna say ya plugged 
yer dingus into the 'lectric socket. ;)
Errm, did they even have 'lectric sockets that long 
ago, when ya first discovered yer dingus? 

============================

From: Michael Edelman 
Date: Tue, 05 Oct 1999 09:24:48 -0400
--------
My recipe for a quick potato: Wash, rub with olive
oil, microwave 10-20 minutes, depending on oven
and number of potatos.

I finished up with house remodeling activities
very late last night, so I cooked 4 Yukon Jacks
this way and followed up with some fruit.

Tasty and filling. At least until breakfast.

============================

From: penmart10[at]aol.com (Sheldon)
Date: 05 Oct 1999 16:29:17 GMT
--------
Michael Edelman writes:
>I finished up with house remodeling activities
>very late last night, so I cooked 4 Yukon Jacks
>this way and followed up with some fruit.

As per usual, you musta spent the night boozing and hallucinating, *alone*...
them Yukon *Jacks* musta cooked yer potato... you friggin' *Gold* plated
embarrassment!

============================
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: baked potato
============================

From: THEODOREFORBUG[at]webtv.net (TED STROTHER)
Date: Tue, 28 Sep 1999 23:11:00 -0500 (CDT)
--------
wash potato wrap in aluminum foil bake in oven @ 450 for 30 min. will
come out perfect promise , but dont get real big potatoes,.

============================

From: Marilyn Bourdow 
Date: Wed, 29 Sep 1999 16:00:13 -0400
--------
TED STROTHER wrote:
>wash potato wrap in aluminum foil bake in oven @ 450 for 30 min. will
>come out perfect promise , but dont get real big potatoes,.

I never put them in foil!!!   We like the skins crispy.  After scrubbing
the potatos thoroughly, I rub the skins with cooking oil and pop them in
the oven.   Ummm.

============================
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking,alt.cooking-chat
Subject: Re: BAKED POTATO - via crockpot
============================

From: cmquinn[at]primenet.com (Charles Quinn)
Date: Sat, 02 Oct 1999 15:20:53 GMT
--------
-jacob- wrote:
>O.K. well I would like to know how to bake a simple potato.

Wrap in foil and put in the crockpot - low for 8 hours, 4 hrs on high.

============================

From: Wim van Bemmel 
Date: Sat, 02 Oct 1999 21:15:14 +0200
--------
I tried to resist... made some nice oxtail to divert myself... searched
for a nice Apple-pie recipe... 
But, sorry, I can't help myself, I have to scream (sorry for that):

WHAT IS A CROCKPOT !!!

-- 
Regards, Groeten,

  Wim.

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sat, 2 Oct 1999 15:33:38 -0500
--------
Wim van Bemmel wrote...
>WHAT IS A CROCKPOT !!!

It's an American slow-cooker.  We get lazy.  Don't worry about it.  Just use
your oven ;-)  400 degrees, brushed with oil or not (your preference),
salted or not (again, your preference).  Wrapped in foil or not (do this if
you like the skin moist, I like mine crispy)... BAKE for 1 hour and enjoy.
Simplesse!

============================

From: rdyoung[at]wcc.net (Bob Y.)
Date: Sun, 03 Oct 1999 18:09:39 GMT
--------
Wim van Bemmel wrote:
>WHAT IS A CROCKPOT !!!

It is an electrical appliance. Normally you have a metal shell which includes a
heating element, a removable stoneware crock and a lid. Usually has two heat
settings, High and Low. You put the food into the crock an select the heat. High
usually cooks in 4 hours while Low takes 8 hours. The idea is you can put supper
into the pot, turn it on, and it will be ready when you get home from work.

============================

From: crs[at]quail.sdc.org (Charlie Sorsby)
Date: 17 Oct 1999 13:35:20 -0600
--------
= >I've tried nuking it in the microwave, but the texture of it when it
= >comes out is nothing like an oven.

= Wrap in foil and put in the crockpot - low for 8 hours, 4 hrs on high.

Opinion alert!

I must agree with the person who said you can cook a potato in a
microwave but to bake it you must use an oven.

I also don't believe that you can bake a potato wrapped in foil.
That produces a steamed potato that is nothing like a properly
baked potato.

Regarding the crockpot--have you ever tried it without the foil?
Just curious.  I'm not sure if that would produce what I consider a
baked potato or not.

The key is hot and dry--i.e. the hot oven with nothing to trap
moisture so that the potato is baked rather than steamed.

============================

From: Steve Graves 
Date: Mon, 18 Oct 1999 09:29:24 -0400
--------
Charlie Sorsby wrote:
> The key is hot and dry--i.e. the hot oven with nothing to trap
> moisture so that the potato is baked rather than steamed.

I agree.........a good baked potato is easy. Wash it, poke a few holes with fork,
rub with olive oil, sprinkle wiht Kosher salt and cook in a 400F oven for one hour.
Can't beat it.

============================

From: Karina Wright 
Date: Tue, 19 Oct 1999 22:10:07 -0400
--------
Steve Graves wrote:
> I agree.........a good baked potato is easy. Wash it, poke a few holes with fork,
> rub with olive oil, sprinkle wiht Kosher salt and cook in a 400F oven for one hour.

Bad Steve.  Bad, bad Steve.  

This trend towards the Kosher salt on potatoes that has cropped everywhere
is getting really irksome.  Yes, it somewhat improves the taste of the
inside of the potato, but they didn't exactly suck before.  And, if one
happens to actually like the skin (where, by the way, all the vitamins are),
IT'S RUINED.  And, when the salted potato rubs up against your perfectly
good steak...eeewwww!!!

ttfn/Karina

============================

From: aem 
Date: Tue, 19 Oct 1999 20:44:19 -0700
--------
Karina Wright wrote:

> This trend towards the Kosher salt on potatoes that has cropped everywhere
> is getting really irksome.

Yes.

> Yes, it somewhat improves the taste of the
> inside of the potato,

No.

> but they didn't exactly suck before.  And, if one
> happens to actually like the skin (where, by the way, all the vitamins are),
> IT'S RUINED.

Yes.

> And, when the salted potato rubs up against your perfectly
> good steak...eeewwww!!!

Yes.

> ttfn/Karina

There are certain things that are already perfect and do not need to be
experimented with.

============================

From: Rick Hackett 
Date: Thu, 21 Oct 1999 01:36:06 -0500
--------
Karina, here's one for ya - Sea Salt in lieu of the Kosher salt (grin).

============================

From: Mary 
Date: Sun, 31 Oct 1999 03:25:51 -0600
--------
Rick Hackett wrote:
> Karina, here's one for ya - Sea Salt in lieu of the Kosher salt (grin).

I use Lowry's Seasoning salt after I grease 'em up.

============================

From: katlin 
Date: Mon, 18 Oct 1999 20:01:31 -0000
--------
I do them in the crock pot alot. I don't wrap them in foil, I just put a
little water in bottom, It steams them first and then evaporates and skins
get crisp.

============================

From: HappyCat 
Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 00:05:48 GMT
--------
Or you can do what my father did every winter.  Rub the potato with a
piece of bacon, wrap the bacon around the potato, wrap it all up in a
piece of foil.  What really made it great is the cooking.  

Get a good roaring fire going - preferably in a fire place.  Place the
wrapped potato in the back of the fire where the wood coals are dropping
and let sit for 45 minutes.

============================

From: batwom 
Date: Thu, 28 Oct 1999 10:08:17 +0800
--------
Or you could start them off in the microwave, and then pop them on the
barbeque, to finish off always crispy and delicious.


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