[Previous Thread] [Return to BigSpud: The Potato Recipe Collection Menu][Next Thread]

Subject: REQ:  Baked Potatos...how to
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Josh Robinson 
Date: Mon, 19 Apr 1999 11:31:13 -0700
--------
Hello, I know this may sound silly....but I don't have a cook-book, and I
have been guesing on how to bake potatos...This is what I remember for
seeing my Mom bake them:

1.  Wash them thoughly, and pre-heat oven ( but I am not sure what temp)
2.  Poke holes in them with a fork
3.  Wrap foil around them
4.  Put them in oven ( not sure how long though)
5.  Take out of oven, and eat...

Also, sometimes, I think my mom cooked the potatos in the microwave for a
few minutes before putting them in the oven...

Please tell me if I am wrong or wright...and tell me how you bake potatos...

============================

From: vox[at]vex.io.com (Vox Populi)
Date: 19 Apr 1999 20:42:51 GMT
--------
All sounds pretty good. Here's what I do:

- Wash potatoes, vent them with a fork
- Nuke them for 5-10 minutes in the microwave
- Continue baking them at 425F in the oven for 45+ minutes

No foil involved in my recipe, you'll note. It's a matter of personal
preference. I like the crispier skins. When checking a potato for its
doneness, open the oven and with an oven mitt gently squeeze one of the
potatoes. If it gives a bit, its probably done. If you overbake a potato
it will have a very tough outer skin but should still be mealy inside
(unless you overbake it for dozens of hours :) so it's a good thing to
prepare with other foods because it's hard to cook it for too long.

============================

From: aem 
Date: Mon, 19 Apr 1999 14:51:07 -0700
--------
First, buy russet potatoes, aka Idaho baking potatoes.   You
don't want to bake the thin skinned ones like White Rose and Red
Rose.   You can, though, buy Yukon Gold potatoes, if your market
has them.  They are very tasty, and good for both baking and
mashing.

Scrub them, because they grow under the ground and you're going
to eat the skin.

Oven temp -- 400 F, give or take 25.

Punctured -- yeah, to be safe, but just one or two jabs with a
fork is plenty.

Oiled or not -- oiled, they cook faster, the skin stays moister
but less crispy than dry.

How long -- they're done when they feel soft when you squeeze
them.  About an hour at 400.

Twice-baked -- a great American cook named James Beard (whose
book, American Cookery would be a good one for you to start with)
liked to bake them at 400 for two hours.  They shrivel up, but
the skin is really something -- very tasty and chewy -- and the
insides is still mealy.

Microwave -- you can cook them (on high, about six minutes for
one average size potato) but they will not have the same
consistency as baked, especially the skin, and unless you turn
them and invert them a few times during the cooking they will be
unevenly cooked.  You can use the micro to speed up the baking
process if you're short of time.  Prepare them, zap them until
about 2/3 cooked, then finish in the oven.  Not as good, but can
save time.

Toppings -- your choice.  First, stab it a bunch of times with a
fork, then hold both ends and push toward the center to fluff it
up.   We go through phases, sometimes wanting "everything,"
sometimes just a little butter, salt and pepper, when we want to
really enjoy the potato itself.  Especially with Yukon Golds.  Do
pick up some fresh chives at the market the next time you buy
potatoes.  Rinse them, snip them (easiest with scissors) into the
fluffed up potato.

============================

From: stan[at]tempest.temple.edu (Stanley Horwitz)
Date: 19 Apr 1999 22:13:20 GMT
--------
Baking potatoes is easy. Use a Russett or Idaho potato. Wash the 
potato under cold running water. Turn up the oven to 500 degrees (yes, I 
said 500). Poke a few holes in the potato with a knife. Put the potatoe 
in the middle of the oven. Close the oven door. Come back in 30 minutes 
to turn the potato over. Wait 30 minutes more. Your potato is done. I am 
assuming a large potato here. 

DO NOT WRAP THE POTATOES IN FOIL! Doing so traps the steam in the potato 
and results in what is really a boiled, not baked potato.

============================
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Baked Potatos...how to
============================

From: Dimitri G Criona 
Date: Mon, 19 Apr 1999 14:31:37 -0700
--------
Josh Robinson wrote:

>1.  Wash them thoughly, and pre-heat oven ( but I am not sure what temp)

Good Idea - 350 to 400 degrees

>2.  Poke holes in them with a fork

A must - or they can explode

>3.  Wrap foil around them

Optional - Only good if you want to keep them warm in the oven for a long
time.

>4.  Put them in oven ( not sure how long though)

A medium potato will take about 50 to 60 min @ 375 depending on how many you
are cooking.

>5.  Take out of oven, and eat...

Not yet - some or all of the following : Butter, salt, pepper, bacon bits,
sour cream, chives, cheese (preferably cheedar).

Optional: If you like crispy skin use 1 A) dry the potato and rub the skin
with oil.

>Also, sometimes, I think my mom cooked the potatos in the microwave for a
>few minutes before putting them in the oven...

Not a great idea - they tend to cook unevenly - can work pretty well if you
poke holes all over the potato.

============================
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: REQ: Baked Potatos...how to
============================

From: Vintik 
Date: Mon, 19 Apr 1999 23:16:28 GMT
--------
You can even bake them *completely* in microwave, without using the oven at
all. Depending on how powerful the microwave is and how big the potato is, it
will take anywhere between 5 and 15 minutes. Just wash the potato, make lots
of holes with a fork, wrap it in aluminum wrap and put it into microwave.
Since when you try it the first time, you do not know how much time your
misrowave needs, take it out in 5 minutes or so and see if it's cooked or
not. If not, put it in for some more.

Some people claim that baking them in the oven is better, but I think oven and
microwave baked, they taste virtually the same.

============================

From: damsel_in_dis_dress[at]my-dejanews.com (Damsel in dis Dress)
Date: Mon, 19 Apr 1999 23:42:37 GMT
--------
vintik eloquently stated:
>You can even bake them *completely* in microwave, without using the oven
>at all. Depending on how powerful the microwave is and how big the potato
>is, it will take anywhere between 5 and 15 minutes. Just wash the potato,
>make lots of holes with a fork, wrap it in aluminum wrap and put it into microwave.

CAREFUL .... this will only work with some of the newer, metal-friendly
microwave ovens.  In most, it will cause the most awesome lightning display
you've ever seen.  

Damsel, who once put a maple syrup bottle with a foil label in her
microwave oven .... whoa!

============================

From: aem 
Date: Mon, 19 Apr 1999 17:18:48 -0700
--------
vintik wrote:
>   Just wash the potato, make lots
> of holes with a fork, wrap it in aluminum wrap and put it into
> microwave.

Maybe it's impolite to say so, but this is twice doubtful.  Most
microwaves will not handle a big lump of aluminum foil.  You can
do a lot of damage that way.  Second, microwave cooking is more
like steaming than baking.  You can tell the difference in the
skin from across the room -- no way will the skin of a zapped
tater be even close to the texture and taste of a baked one.

============================

From: ncarey[at]harlequin.com (Nicholas Carey)
Date: Tue, 20 Apr 1999 02:04:25 GMT
--------
vintik wrote:
> Some people claim that baking them in the oven is better, but I think oven and
> microwave baked, they taste virtually the same.

Ah...but 'baking' them like you describe isn't baking them --
it's steaming them.

============================

From: Janet Bostwick 
Date: Tue, 20 Apr 1999 10:15:48 -0600
--------
I was amazed to find pre-baked potatoes in the produce section of my grocery
store.  They were incredibly expensive, about $2 a piece.  They came in a
package with instructions on how to re-heat them.

============================

From: Karen O'Mara 
Date: Tue, 20 Apr 1999 09:12:42 -0800
--------
Nicholas Carey wrote:
> Ah...but 'baking' them like you describe isn't baking them --
> it's steaming them.

Especially when the crispy skins [from hi-temp reg oven] are your
favorite part...

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: Tue, 20 Apr 1999 22:33:49 -0400
--------
vintik wrote:
> You can even bake them *completely* in microwave, without using the oven at
> all.

Oh no you cannot!  Baking required the application of heat such as in an
oven.  Microwaves can cook a potato, but they have no baking abilities.

There is a difference in the terminology and a difference in the results.

============================

From: stan[at]tempest.temple.edu (Stanley Horwitz)
Date: 23 Apr 1999 18:44:01 GMT
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
> Oh no you cannot!  Baking required the application of heat such as in an
> oven.  Microwaves can cook a potato, but they have no baking abilities.
> 
> There is a difference in the terminology and a difference in the results.

I couldn't agree more! A potato that's fully cooked in a microwave oven
might taste good to some people, but its an entirely different result than
letting it bake in a regular oven. The microwaved potato has a slightly
gummy texture and it doesn't taste quite the same. The skin is also not
dry and crispy. 

============================

From: Karen O'Mara 
Date: Tue, 20 Apr 1999 09:11:21 -0800
--------
vintik wrote:
> will take anywhere between 5 and 15 minutes. Just wash the potato, make lots
> of holes with a fork, wrap it in aluminum wrap and put it into microwave.

I didn't know you could use aluminum foil in the microwave like that. 

============================

From: ncarey[at]harlequin.com (Nicholas Carey)
Date: Tue, 20 Apr 1999 18:23:42 GMT
--------
Karen O'Mara wrote:
> I didn't know you could use aluminum foil in the microwave like that. 

It's exciting! We used to get CDs w/operating system updates
every month -- the old ones got fed to the microwave. About 20
seconds and a lot of lightning and you had some really beautiful
crazed designs in the foil substrate.

NOTE: DON'T TRY THIS. I'M PRETTY SURE IT'S A FIRE HAZARD.

============================

From: vox[at]vex.io.com (Vox Populi)
Date: 20 Apr 1999 18:40:19 GMT
--------
Nicholas Carey wrote:
>NOTE: DON'T TRY THIS. I'M PRETTY SURE IT'S A FIRE HAZARD.

Several of these adorn my workspace, by the way. The hazards of too
much Twinkie consumption and access to industrial microwaves.

And to keep this on topic, thanks you guys for bringing up Taco Hell
repeatedly. Gave me a craving and I had to have it for lunch today.
Grumble. Grumble. Grumble.

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: Tue, 20 Apr 1999 22:39:50 -0400
--------
> will take anywhere between 5 and 15 minutes. Just wash the potato, make lots
> of holes with a fork, wrap it in aluminum wrap and put it into microwave.
> Since when you try it the first time, you do not know how much time your
> misrowave needs, take it out in 5 minutes or so and see if it's cooked or
> not. If not, put it in for some more.

The post is frought with many errors.  Aluminum reflects microwaves.  You
can wrap a chocolate bar in foil and put it in the mw.  Nothing happens as
teh waves cannot penetrate the foil.

Five minutes in not enough time to tell if a potato is properly cooked.
Cooks that use them  properly allow standing time to complete the cooking
process.  Microwaved potatoes can be wrapped in a towel and still be hot and
cooked through a half hour later.  Notice I said cooked, not baked.  Baking
required a dry heat source such as an oven.

============================

From: stan[at]tempest.temple.edu (Stanley Horwitz)
Date: 23 Apr 1999 18:38:03 GMT
--------
Karen O'Mara wrote:
> I didn't know you could use aluminum foil in the microwave like that. 

My ten year old microwave oven certainly won't handle aluminum foil.
Perhaps newer microwave ovens will. 

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Fri, 23 Apr 1999 14:43:36 -0400
--------
Stanley Horwitz wrote:
> My ten year old microwave oven certainly won't handle aluminum foil.
> Perhaps newer microwave ovens will.

It was easily 8-9 years ago that I was telling a coworker that I was
surprised to see a microwave recipe calling for protecting the corners
of a square baking dish with foil.  I had to bring in the article to
convince them.  I never tried it, myself. 

============================

From: ncarey[at]harlequin.com (Nicholas Carey)
Date: Sat, 24 Apr 1999 00:48:11 GMT
--------
You can actually get away with the [judicious] use of aluminum
foil/metal in a  'nuke -- you have to maintain a sufficient
distance between the metal and the walls of the oven. It's a
useful technique if you want to cook some parts of the food and
not others.

'Sufficent distance' means the metal has to be far enough away or
positioned so that there is no spark gap between the metal and
the oven wall.

Determination of 'sufficent distance' is, of course, left as an
exercise for the reader.

============================

From: Pondscum 
Date: Tue, 20 Apr 1999 20:05:42 GMT
--------
Josh Robinson wrote:

> 1.  Wash them thoughly, and pre-heat oven ( but I am not sure what temp)

400, or 450 if you want to speed up the process a bit.

> 2.  Poke holes in them with a fork

I use the tip af a paring knife. One or two pokes about an inch deep.

> 3.  Wrap foil around them

Maybe if you're roasting 'em on the grill. Do that in the oven and you've got
a steamed, not baked, potato

> 4.  Put them in oven ( not sure how long though)

About an hour, a little more maybe for a huge spud.

> 5.  Take out of oven, and eat...

Don't forget the SC, butter & Chive.

> Also, sometimes, I think my mom cooked the potatos in the microwave for a
> few minutes before putting them in the oven...

I've done this before. About 5 min. nuking will cut the baking time down to
about 20 minutes.

============================

From: Tania Hewes 
Date: Wed, 21 Apr 1999 09:42:22 -0400
--------
This is my preferred method for baking potatoes, as well.

But tell me, I've noticed that when I am baking potatoes, about
40 minutes into the baking time the whole house starts
smelling like I'm baking a chocolate cake.  Has anyone
else experienced this, or am I crazy?

============================

From: stan[at]tempest.temple.edu (Stanley Horwitz)
Date: 23 Apr 1999 18:45:01 GMT
--------
Tania Hewes wrote:
> But tell me, I've noticed that when I am baking potatoes, about
> 40 minutes into the baking time the whole house starts
> smelling like I'm baking a chocolate cake.  Has anyone
> else experienced this, or am I crazy?

No, and possibly yes! :)

============================

From: stan[at]tempest.temple.edu (Stanley Horwitz)
Date: 23 Apr 1999 18:41:29 GMT
--------
Pondscum wrote:
> Don't forget the SC, butter & Chive.

Yucky! For a truly sublime potato, use only butter as a topping and dip 
in some Heinz Ketchup! Yum! I think I might have a baked potato tonight, 
especially since I have to run to the supermarket after work anyway!

============================

From: pattee[at]CUBoulder.Colorado.EDU (Donna Pattee)
Date: 23 Apr 1999 13:00:52 -0600
--------
Stanley Horwitz wrote:
>  For a truly sublime potato, use only butter as a topping and dip 
>in some Heinz Ketchup! Yum! I think I might have a baked potato tonight, 
>especially since I have to run to the supermarket after work anyway!

Warnings should be provided for posts like this. I almost lost my lunch -
it's pathetic the ways people can think of to ruin perfectly good food.

============================

From: Pat 
Date: Fri, 23 Apr 1999 21:48:31 GMT
--------
Just poke one hole in them in a 400 deg oven for one hour.
This will give you a crisp shell.
I love to eat the shells with butter on them.

If you want a soft shell, poke a hole in each one, and then rub
with a little oil and wrap in tin foil and cook one
hour in 400 deg.

If you are cooking a roast, just do as above and put them in the oven along
side the roast pan at 350 deg oven for about 2- to 2-1/2 hours. Test them for
tenderness around 2 hours.  They stay warm, just throw a towel over them
until the roast is cooked.

============================
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: REQ: Baked Potatos...how to -- correction
============================

From: vintik[at]my-dejanews.com
Date: Tue, 20 Apr 1999 01:12:56 GMT
--------
> will take anywhere between 5 and 15 minutes. Just wash the potato, make lots
> of holes with a fork, wrap it in aluminum wrap and put it into microwave.

Sorry, I did not mean to say anything about wrapping it into aluminum wrap --
that would not be good. You *should not* wrap it if you use microwave to cook
it. I was thinking about foil while typing and I guess that's how it got into
my message. Sorry again.

============================

From: rdyoung[at]wcc.net (Bob Y.)
Date: Tue, 20 Apr 1999 12:48:23 GMT
--------
vintik wrote:
>Sorry, I did not mean to say anything about wrapping it into aluminum wrap --
>that would not be good. You *should not* wrap it if you use microwave to cook
>it.

Actually you shouldn't wrap a potato in aluminum foil even in the oven. Instead
of getting  nice fluffy insides and a crisp skin (pass the butter, salt and
pepper), you get a soggy, insipid steamed potato. If that's what you want, you
can probably get it faster using a steamer on top of the stove.

If I'm in a hurry, I'll microwave it and then transfer to the oven to finish it.


[Previous Thread] [Return to BigSpud: The Potato Recipe Collection Menu][Next Thread]