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Subject: Excellent baked potatoes
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Systemrecovery 
Date: 28 Feb 2006 14:53:18 -0800
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The best baked potatoes, are rubbed in olive oil and butter, then
spinkled with kosher course salt. If you clean the peeling really well,
you WILL eat the skin...plus i know it's supposed to be good for you

once you've had them this way...you'll never cook them plain again

the flavor difference is like night and day, i like the skin better
than the meat
it has a whole new texture, sort of like a potatoe skin from TGI Fridays

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From: aem 
Date: 28 Feb 2006 15:16:58 -0800
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To each his own, and I have no idea which is more popular, but I much
prefer the skin baked without oil, butter or salt.  Then I salt and
pepper and butter the potato after it's baked.  (And I always eat the
skin.)  Your way makes the skin much tougher and chewier.  That might
be a good thing if you're making some kind of potato skin snack, but
not for my baked potato, thanks.     -aem

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From: elaine 
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2006 18:30:57 -0500
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aem wrote:
> To each his own, and I have no idea which is more popular, but I much
> prefer the skin baked without oil, butter or salt.  Then I salt and
> pepper and butter the potato after it's baked.  (And I always eat the
> skin.)  Your way makes the skin much tougher and chewier.  That might
> be a good thing if you're making some kind of potato skin snack, but
> not for my baked potato, thanks.     -aem

I just finished a baked potato.  Scrubbed the outside, popped in the oven at 
350 for about 1 1/2 hours - no tin foil or anything.  Butter/sour cream on 
top and I love the crispy skin!

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From: Sandy 
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2006 18:35:42 -0500
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aem wrote:
>    Your way makes the skin much tougher and chewier.  That might
> be a good thing if you're making some kind of potato skin snack, but
> not for my baked potato, thanks.     -aem

Actually, I always bake mine the way you do--plain, not rubbed with
oil--and I notice that the skins are dry and tough. Do you wrap yours
in foil or not?

Barry, how about you?

I have had the kosher salt on the skin--the better steakhouses
do bakers that way.

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From: Systemrecovery 
Date: 28 Feb 2006 15:43:54 -0800
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Sandy wrote:
> Barry, how about you?

oh no...i would NEVER wrap mine

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From: Sandy 
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2006 19:52:13 -0500
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Systemrecovery wrote:
> oh no...i would NEVER wrap mine

I don't either. It tends to steam the potato, so the inside is sodden.

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From: aem 
Date: 28 Feb 2006 18:56:24 -0800
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Sandy wrote:
> Actually, I always bake mine the way you do--plain, not rubbed with
> oil--and I notice that the skins are dry and tough. Do you wrap yours
> in foil or not?

Definitely not wrapped in foil -- that would steam it rather than
baking it.  Exception:  in a campfire's coals.

> [snip] I have had the kosher salt on the skin--the better steakhouses
> do bakers that way.

Better restaurants use more salt (and more butter) than you or I do on
everything.  It's part of the 'splurge' of eating out, don't ya
know....  ;-)       -aem

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From: Jen 
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2006 23:20:19 GMT
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Systemrecovery wrote:
> The best baked potatoes, are rubbed in olive oil and butter,

Do you melt the butter, and brush on to the potatoes, or what?  I don't know 
if I know of Kosher salt, I'll have to look for it next time I go shopping. 
I only ever use table salt.

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From: Systemrecovery 
Date: 28 Feb 2006 15:26:33 -0800
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Jen wrote:
> Do you melt the butter, and brush on to the potatoes, or what?  I don't know
> if I know of Kosher salt, I'll have to look for it next time I go shopping.
> I only ever use table salt.

The salt has a star of David on the box, it's a blue box, by mortons.
it's a Jewish Kosher thing, I don't know what makes it kosher..

sure...just melt the butter and stir it into the olive oil
I imagine you could get creative and add other seasonsing, but we
wouldn't wanna gaum now would we

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From: Sandy 
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2006 18:33:38 -0500
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Systemrecovery wrote:
> The salt has a star of David on the box, it's a blue box, by mortons.
> it's a Jewish Kosher thing, I don't know what makes it kosher..

It is also the salt used for the rim of Margaritas.

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From: Bob Myers 
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 00:45:43 GMT
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Systemrecovery wrote:
> The salt has a star of David on the box, it's a blue box, by mortons.
> it's a Jewish Kosher thing, I don't know what makes it kosher..

The salt itself is not especially "kosher" (or rather, it's
no more "kosher" than any other salt); the name comes
from the fact that this pure, coarse-grained salt is used
in the process ("kashering") which makes meat kosher.
(The salt is used to draw away the surface blood, or at
least that is the reason given for its use here.)

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From: Nancy Young 
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2006 19:52:58 -0500
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Sandy wrote:
> It is also the salt used for the rim of Margaritas.

Jen, you might know it as coarse salt.

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From: Mr Libido Incognito 
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 01:50:00 GMT
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Nancy Young wrote:
> Jen, you might know it as coarse salt.

Coarse pickling salt is the same stuff at a reduced cost.

-Alan

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From: Jen 
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 04:13:35 GMT
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Alan wrote
> Coarse pickling salt is the same stuff at a reduced cost.

  Thanks.  I'l keep an eye out for both of those.

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From: Jen 
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2006 23:36:59 GMT
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Systemrecovery wrote:
> The salt has a star of David on the box, it's a blue box, by mortons.
> it's a Jewish Kosher thing, I don't know what makes it kosher..

I'm in Australia, we probably have different packaging here, if we even have 
the same product.  Thanks though.  I'll look.

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From: Yogi Gupta 
Date: 28 Feb 2006 15:49:36 -0800
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Everyone has their own recipe to bake potatoes. I use only Idaho. Then
I soak them in water with salt for about half an hour at room
temerature. Then I scrub them with mean green. Rub olive oil on the
skin. Bake in the oven at 375 F in a pan with Rock salt.
Soaking in salted water gives them a swwet flavor. The oiled skin has a
nice meaty texture. When I came to this country about 43 years ago, I
worked in a restaurant in NYC. Thats how they baked the potatoes. I
liked them then and now. Yes the skin is very eduble

============================

From: sarah bennett 
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 02:48:31 GMT
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Systemrecovery wrote:
> The salt has a star of David on the box, it's a blue box, by mortons.
> it's a Jewish Kosher thing, I don't know what makes it kosher..

all salt is kosher. "kosher salt" is a coarse-grained salt that is used 
in the process of preparing meat according to Jewish dietary laws.

> sure...just melt the butter and stir it into the olive oil
> I imagine you could get creative and add other seasonsing, but we
> wouldn't wanna gaum now would we

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From: Donald Martinich 
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 18:56:58 -0800
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sarah bennett wrote:
> all salt is kosher. 

And if anybody argues with you, just show them a box of Diamond Crystal 
canning, pickling, and table salt. The word Kosher is not used. The 
grain size is that of regular table salt and has one additive: yellow 
prussate of soda. Right next to the ingredient list is the symbol for 
the Union of Orthodox Rabbis and a capital letter P.

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From: Peter Aitken 
Date: Thu, 02 Mar 2006 17:37:13 GMT
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Donald Martinich wrote:
> And if anybody argues with you, just show them a box of Diamond Crystal
> canning, pickling, and table salt. The word Kosher is not used. The
> grain size is that of regular table salt and has one additive: yellow
> prussate of soda. Right next to the ingredient list is the symbol for
> the Union of Orthodox Rabbis and a capital letter P.

"Kosher" salt really means "koshering" salt. It is not meant to indicate 
adherece with Jewish dietary laws - as you say, all salt is kosher. Rather 
it is similar in grain size to the salt that is traditioanlly used when 
processing kosher meats.

============================

From: jay 
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2006 23:51:16 GMT
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Systemrecovery wrote:
> The best baked potatoes, are rubbed in olive oil and butter, then
> spinkled with kosher course salt. If you clean the peeling really well,
> you WILL eat the skin...plus i know it's supposed to be good for you

> a potatoe skin from TGI Fridays

That was sounding pretty good until you mentioned TGI Friday..

I poke 'em about half way through..seams to make crispier one.

BTW..I think the Rabbi causes the kosher thing to happen however most
goyims don't know this stuff.

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From: Systemrecovery 
Date: 28 Feb 2006 16:10:18 -0800
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jay wrote:

> That was sounding pretty good until you mentioned TGI Friday..

their good for a cold brew and a power snack
however! as a rule, I don't do corporate
(unless it's in the freezer section at the grocer)

> I poke 'em about half way through..seams to make crispier one.

yeah, small detail nice effect

> BTW..I think the Rabbi causes the kosher thing to happen however most
> goyims don't know this stuff.

darn heathens, lol

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From: sarah bennett 
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 02:51:56 GMT
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jay wrote:
> BTW..I think the Rabbi causes the kosher thing to happen however most
> goyims don't know this stuff.

The only thing that a rabbi has to do with something being kosher is 
supervision in a circumstance (most, these days) where someone who keeps 
kosher is not preparing the food themselves. Kashrut is a set of laws 
pertaining to how kosher food must be prepared- anyone who is Jewish can 
do it, not just a rabbi. (i.e. they don;t bless the food) And that would 
be "goyim". the "im" suffix indicates a plural :)

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From: jay 
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 03:15:56 GMT
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sarah bennett wrote:
> The only thing that a rabbi has to do with something being kosher is 
> supervision in a circumstance (most, these days) where someone who keeps 
> kosher is not preparing the food themselves. Kashrut is a set of laws 
> pertaining to how kosher food must be prepared- anyone who is Jewish can 
> do it, not just a rabbi. (i.e. they don;t bless the food) And that would 
> be "goyim". the "im" suffix indicates a plural :)

Thanks for the heads up... I did say that most of US don't know.  It is
funny that in this group if you make fun of yourself nobody gets it.  I
made fun of Texans a day or two ago..got sorta zapped..and I R one. Some
of my best and most favorite friends do know this stuff, just like you do. :)  

PS..They are trying to learn me but it's not that easy for them.

============================

From: sarah bennett 
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 03:19:23 GMT
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jay wrote:
> PS..They are trying to learn me but it's not that easy for them.

I was just trying to clarify, FYI, ya know. I spent the bulk of my 
childhood and adolescence having all of this data crammed into my brain, 
it seems a shame to not put it to use when the opoportunity knocks :)

============================

From: jay 
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 03:36:24 GMT
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sarah bennett wrote:
> I was just trying to clarify, FYI, ya know. I spent the bulk of my 
> childhood and adolescence having all of this data crammed into my brain, 
> it seems a shame to not put it to use when the opoportunity knocks :)

Absolutely..good work. It worked well for most of my friends.. they are
all rich! :) 

============================

From: sarah bennett 
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 03:44:25 GMT
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jay wrote:
> Absolutely..good work. It worked well for most of my friends.. they are
> all rich! :) 

Well, I'm not sure how you mean... not all of those of us of semitic 
descent have the beaucoup bucks...

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From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 1 Mar 2006 02:12:30 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Systemrecovery?
> The best baked potatoes, are rubbed in olive oil and butter, then
> spinkled with kosher course salt. If you clean the peeling really well,
> you WILL eat the skin...plus i know it's supposed to be good for you

I've been baking them this way for years.  The whole thing is delish!

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2006 17:10:55 -0800
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>I've been baking them this way for years.  The whole thing is delish!

Even better, is rubbing them with bacon fat.  ;)  Not as healthy, but
they taste wonderful.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 1 Mar 2006 02:17:54 +0100
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Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Christine Dabney? 
> Even better, is rubbing them with bacon fat.  ;)  Not as healthy, but
> they taste wonderful.

Agreed, but for that reason I don't do it very often.  Although I'm guilty
of adding crumbled freshly cooked bacon as a topping.  Which is worse? 
Probably the latter.  

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From: Systemrecovery 
Date: 28 Feb 2006 18:21:44 -0800
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Christine Dabney wrote:

> Even better, is rubbing them with bacon fat.  ;)  Not as healthy, but
> they taste wonderful.

what a fabby idea! probably less fat than one slice of cooked bacon...
that's not bad, only problem here for me, I usually buy the precooked
bacon
so, i don't have a little bowl of grease on the stove, lol

I like potatoe cakes from left over mashed potatoes
i've never made the cakes, seems like something gets added to the
potatoes
maybe not, but i bet they brown up nice in bacon drippings.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 1 Mar 2006 03:29:22 +0100
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Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Systemrecovery?
> I like potatoe cakes from left over mashed potatoes
> i've never made the cakes, seems like something gets added to the
> potatoes
> maybe not, but i bet they brown up nice in bacon drippings.

Mom called those "potato patties".  She added a bit of flour, an egg, and a 
bit of chopped onion, chilled mixture, then shaped them into patties.  I 
haven't had those in years, but they were really good!

============================

From: Old Mother Ashby 
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 17:55:35 +1100
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Christine Dabney wrote:
>Even better, is rubbing them with bacon fat.  ;)  Not as healthy, but
>they taste wonderful.

Duck fat is best!

Christine

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From: Boron Elgar 
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2006 20:15:18 -0500
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>I've been baking them this way for years.  The whole thing is delish!

This evening we had a rib roast done in the Ronco Rotisserie. We put
fingerling potatoes underneath so they got basted by the roast. 

Heavenly.

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From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 1 Mar 2006 02:24:51 +0100
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Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Boron Elgar? 
> This evening we had a rib roast done in the Ronco Rotisserie. We put
> fingerling potatoes underneath so they got basted by the roast. 

That sounds so good!  I love those little potatoes, but they're often hard
to find here.  Does your Ronco give your roast a nice crusty exterior? 
I've been contemplating... 

============================

From: Boron Elgar 
Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2006 20:48:47 -0500
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>That sounds so good!  I love those little potatoes, but they're often hard
>to find here.  Does your Ronco give your roast a nice crusty exterior? 
>I've been contemplating... 

Costco has been carrying the fingerlings and at the most reasonable
pricing I have seen. If you have one near by, check there. They have
only been there about a month or so.

The Ronco is better for a smaller roast  than what we made (we cook
for 4 or 5 - two of them teen boys -plus planned next meal/
leftovers). 

It gets the outside nicely crisp, but the first few slices on either
end had no pink in them whatsoever. We took it out at an inside temp
of 130. We're a med rare family around here, but I think to get the
outer slices more rare, we'd have to take it out at 120 and that would
mean too rare in the middle. Too expensive a roast to experiment on
with the Ronco. Next time I would only do a small roast. 

Add I cannot tell you the weight of what we cooked, because we bought
a huge boneless rib of maybe 15 lbs and cut a roast off and sliced the
rest into steaks. Six lbs maybe?

When I cook it in the oven , I use the automatic timer/thermometer on
my oven and it goes to 140, BUT it is more evenly med rare all the way
through.

Still, I really like the rotisserie.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 1 Mar 2006 02:59:12 +0100
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Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Boron Elgar? 

> Costco has been carrying the fingerlings and at the most reasonable
> pricing I have seen. If you have one near by, check there. They have
> only been there about a month or so.

I will check Costco.  I shop there about twice a month, but usually in and
quickly with specific targets.  I'll spend more time looking next time. 
 
> The Ronco is better for a smaller roast  than what we made (we cook
> for 4 or 5 - two of them teen boys -plus planned next meal/
> leftovers). 

Thanks, Boron.  Unless I cook for guests, I'm just cooking for two, so the
Ronco might be just the ticket for a smaller roast.  I don't cook for
leftovers, as David won't eat them.  What little there might be left would
be perfect for just me.  That, and the fact that we like our beef more
medium than rare. 

============================

From: Mr Libido Incognito 
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 02:03:11 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Thanks, Boron.  Unless I cook for guests, I'm just cooking for two, so
> the Ronco might be just the ticket for a smaller roast.  I don't cook
> for leftovers, as David won't eat them.  What little there might be
> left would be perfect for just me.  That, and the fact that we like
> our beef more medium than rare. 

I enjoy my G. Foreman rotisserie a great deal...use it on chicken and pork 
roasts 3 or 4 times a week. Also it is great in the summer if you get bored 
with grilling...take it outside.

-Alan

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 1 Mar 2006 03:17:17 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Mr Libido Incognito? 
> I enjoy my G. Foreman rotisserie a great deal...use it on chicken and
> pork roasts 3 or 4 times a week. Also it is great in the summer if you
> get bored with grilling...take it outside.

Is this the one you have, Alan?  Do you use the gizmo on top?

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0002YE6KE

I've been reading about 4 different brands, the G. Foreman, Ronco, Hamilton 
Beach, and DeLonghi, and haven't come to any conclusions yet.

============================

From: Mr Libido Incognito 
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 02:28:19 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Is this the one you have, Alan?  Do you use the gizmo on top?
> 
> http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0002YE6KE

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00005B6Z3 is the one I have...I enjoy what it does...But the  
metal rod and piercing gizmoes are hard to clean. I suspect the ronco no 
stick would work out better.

-Alan

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 1 Mar 2006 03:40:19 +0100
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Mr Libido Incognito? 
> http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00005B6Z3 is the one I have...I enjoy what it does...But
> the  metal rod and piercing gizmoes are hard to clean. I suspect the
> ronco no stick would work out better.

Thanks, Alan.  Yet another model to put in the comparison bin.  I hope to 
buy some kind within a month or so.

============================

From: Systemrecovery 
Date: 28 Feb 2006 18:24:10 -0800
--------
Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
> I enjoy my G. Foreman rotisserie a great deal...use it on chicken and pork
> roasts 3 or 4 times a week. Also it is great in the summer if you get bored
> with grilling...take it outside.

about meat, I eat it as often as I want...

I tried an all vegetable diet for about a month. I got the shakes,
bloating, cramping, headaches...I felt weak..you know...and I had
juiced many many Lbs of hearty vegetables...I also had bread and
soups...but just no meat...very little fat.

Finally! I sped to sonics and got a big greasy burger and WOW! all my
symptoms seemed to disappear.

I think a body needs meat.

============================

From: King's Crown 
Date: Wed, 01 Mar 2006 05:40:03 GMT
--------
Systemrecovery wrote:
> The best baked potatoes, are rubbed in olive oil and butter, then
> spinkled with kosher course salt. If you clean the peeling really well,
> you WILL eat the skin...plus i know it's supposed to be good for you

http://www.howtobakeapotato.com/

There is a website for just about anything isn't there.

Lynne 


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