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Subject: One leftover baked potato...
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 04:25:13 -0600
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I have one large leftover baked potato.  I could (of course) reheat the
potato and simply eat it as a baked potato.  Or (s)mash it.  But (as usual)
I've got a hankering for soup.  Baked potato soup.  I've made baked potato
soup before, but this would be more along the lines of "baked potato soup
for 2" since I have only the one potato.  So I'm ruminating here, and these
thoughts are very basic at best (it's 4 a.m., bear with me):

1 large baked potato, cut into chunks
2 cups chicken stock or broth
2 cups water
1 stalk celery, chopped
2 Tbs. onion, diced
1 clove garlic, minced
2 Tbs. butter
salt &amp; pepper
dash of something...
1/4 c. milk or half &amp; half
2 Tbs. grated cheddar cheese
bacon bits?

Saute onion, celery and garlic in butter until soft.  Place in pot with just
boiling stock and water; add potato, salt, pepper, [whatever seasoning].
Reduce heat; heat through, then add milk and cheese.  Top with bacon bits?

Notes to self:  don't try to think like this early in the morning.  Find the
gloves you misplaced yesterday.

If you wanted to make baked potato soup from a single leftover potato, what
would you do?

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From: tqq <tqq3000[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 10:33:37 GMT
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i would sautee diced carrot also.  sounds like a good idea!  the next time i
have an extra one, i'll google for your recipe.

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From: Shelby <shelbyjmarsh[at]bham.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 10:45:20 GMT
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tqq wrote:
> i would sautee diced carrot also.  sounds like a good idea!  the next time i
> have an extra one, i'll google for your recipe.

Throw in some broccoli?

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From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 05:00:47 -0600
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Shelby wrote:
> Throw in some broccoli?

Good idea, too bad I don't have any ;-)

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From: Shelby <shelbyjmarsh[at]bham.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 11:47:42 GMT
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Jill McQuown wrote:
> Good idea, too bad I don't have any ;-)

Ok, I'm thinking.

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From: Phil <goldpnr[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 09:31:37 -0700
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maybe add a little finely chopped sauteed cabbage?

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From: Muckerheide <muckerheide[at]mediaone.net>
Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 23:26:31 GMT
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And to think I might have chucked the damn thing out!  It is possible that
no humble, lone, cold baked potato has ever inspired the interest of so
many.  Seventeen responses and counting.

Remarkable!

Linda

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From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 17:44:48 -0600
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Muckerheide wrote:
> And to think I might have chucked the damn thing out!  It is possible that
> no humble, lone, cold baked potato has ever inspired the interest of so
> many.  Seventeen responses and counting.

Heheh... occasionally I have a good idea.  (And to think I had this one at 4
a.m.!)  Apparently I'm not the only person who winds up with a leftover
baked potato ;-)

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From: forcooksonly[at]aol.com (ForCooksOnly)
Date: 05 Feb 2002 13:49:57 GMT
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>It is possible that no humble, lone, cold baked potato has ever inspired the
>interest of so many. 

Slice it with the skin on and fry it with onions. 

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From: Damsel in dis Dress <damselicious[at]bigfoot.com.invalid>
Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 13:37:45 GMT
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Jill McQuown said:

>If you wanted to make baked potato soup from a single leftover 
>potato, what would you do?

I'd do exactly as you're doing, except I'd garnish it with chives.

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From: arianej[at]pepper.eajenkins.earthlink.net (Ariane)
Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 16:27:10 GMT
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Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
>I'd do exactly as you're doing, except I'd garnish it with chives.

Chives sound great to me, too!  Maybe a touch of sour cream or yogurt.

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From: stenni[at]noSpam.vision1mm.com (Hag &amp; Stenni)
Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 13:47:13 GMT
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more onions, more onions, Id use heavy cream if I had it on hand, the
whole 1/2 pint, and did I mention, more onions...LOL...Hag k

My golden rules

1.  If it dosnt taste good or get you laid dont do it (apply your own criteria)
2.  If it smells bad dont eat it.
3.  When life hands you shit Grow roses!

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From: C Brevis <cbrevis[at]intertekk.com>
Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 13:47:19 GMT
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Jill McQuown writes:
>If you wanted to make baked potato soup from a single leftover potato, what
>would you do?

I've never made a baked potato soup, but I'd likely do close to what 
you're doing above, except leave out the water (maybe increase the stock 
to 3 cups), use just a little bit of celery and increase the amount of 
onion!...Sour cream might be good on top with the bacon bits..Also some 
chopped chives if you had them.  

Sounds good!  I'll have to try this some time.  I usually have most of the 
ingredients on hand.

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 02 Feb 2002 15:14:04 GMT
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Jill McQuown writes:
>If you wanted to make baked potato soup from a single leftover potato, what
>would you do?

Hmm, ye olde Stone Soup routine... okay, mash the potato for a thickener.

I donate one pound of fresh ground beef chuck.

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From: "rosie[at]readandpost" <readandpostNOT[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 08:34:35 -0800
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Jill McQuown writes:
>If you wanted to make baked potato soup from a single leftover potato, what
>would you do?

my hubby would chop it up, fry it quickly with some bacon grease, and eat it
with eggs for breakfast!

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 02 Feb 2002 16:12:01 GMT
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rosie@readandpost writes:
>my hubby would chop it up, fry it quickly with some bacon grease, and eat it
>with eggs for breakfast!

Me too, I'd add it to a Denver Omelet.

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From: John Oglesby <john[at]pacificstorm.net>
Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2002 10:56:28 -0800
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Sheldon wrote:
> Me too, I'd add it to a Denver Omelet.

that's exactly what I'd do, large dice it, fry it up and season it with some
oregano, salt, white pepper, sautee some sliced onions  (white and green),
julienned bell peppers (yellow or red) up with it, then I'd mix it up with
some spicy sausage.

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From: Kathy Reece <kreece[at]pld.com>
Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 11:31:17 -0800
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Jill McQuown wrote:
> I have one large leftover baked potato.  I could (of course) reheat the
> potato and simply eat it as a baked potato.  Or (s)mash it.  But (as usual)
> I've got a hankering for soup.  Baked potato soup.  I've made baked potato
> soup before, but this would be more along the lines of "baked potato soup
> for 2" since I have only the one potato.  So I'm ruminating here, and these
> thoughts are very basic at best (it's 4 a.m., bear with me):

I'd leave out all of the water and chicken stock.  The potato is already
cooked so you don't need it to cook the potato in and it could just as
easily heat up in milk as water.  It makes for a richer soup.  I would also
start with real bacon and cook it until the fat begins to cook out and then
cook the onion, celery, etc. in the bacon fat, then add the potatoes and
milk and heat thru.

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From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 11:42:07 -0600
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Kathy Reece wrote:
> I'd leave out all of the water and chicken stock.  The potato is already
> cooked so you don't need it to cook the potato in and it could just as
> easily heat up in milk as water.  It makes for a richer soup.  I would also
> start with real bacon and cook it until the fat begins to cook out and then
> cook the onion, celery, etc. in the bacon fat, then add the potatoes and
> milk and heat thru.

Thanks.  At what point did I say the bacon wouldn't be "real"?  I said
"bits" (as in crumbled).

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From: Kathy Reece <kreece[at]pld.com>
Date: Sat, 2 Feb 2002 14:03:02 -0800
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Jill McQuown wrote:
> Thanks.  At what point did I say the bacon wouldn't be "real"?  I said
> "bits" (as in crumbled).

Opps, sorry, I thought you meant the kind that comes in a jar, some of it's
real, some ain't.  And what I meant be "real" bacon is bacon that isn't
cooked yet.  Better?

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From: C Brevis <cbrevis[at]intertekk.com>
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2002 00:08:21 GMT
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Previously, in rfc, Kathy Reece wrote:
> I'd leave out all of the water and chicken stock.  The potato is
> already cooked so you don't need it to cook the potato in and it could
> just as easily heat up in milk as water.  It makes for a richer soup. 
> I would also start with real bacon and cook it until the fat begins to
> cook out and then cook the onion, celery, etc. in the bacon fat, then
> add the potatoes and milk and heat thru.

I left for the country soon after this thread began, and thought about 
baked potato soup on the way to the house.

When I arrived, I put 4 large scrubbed potatoes into a 425 degree oven and 
baked for close to an hour.  The skins were very well done. I cut the 
potatoes in half and scooped out, in chunks, the potato.  Then I cut one 
potato's worth of skins into strips.

I sauteed 2 finely diced onions and half a stalk of diced celery with 3 
strips of chopped bacon in olive oil and butter.  Added a quart of chicken 
stock and brought to a boil.  Added the potato, 2 chopped scallions, about 
half a cup of milk and simmered for maybe 20 minutes.  I then added the 
strips of potato peel, some chopped parsley and cracked black pepper.  

Cooked another few minutes and served with very thin slices of sharp 
cheddar cheese on top.

It was a delicious, smoky, flavorful broth with hunks of potato and bacon.  
The cheese was perfect, and I do wish I'd had sour cream in the house (one 
of the problems with going between two houses is that its hard to remember 
what ingredients you've got waiting, and easy to forget something 
important.) Next time I try this I'll be sure to add a little bit of sour 
cream before serving.

It was a very different soup than I've ever made.  Yummy.

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From: modom <modom[at]koyote.com>
Date: Sat, 02 Feb 2002 11:31:42 -0800
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Jill McQuown wrote:
>I've got a hankering for soup.  Baked potato soup.  I've made baked potato
>soup before, but this would be more along the lines of "baked potato soup
>for 2" since I have only the one potato. 

I'd probably do something with what you've used, but leave out the
cheese and celery, substituting a seeded and chopped roasted poblano
and cumin.

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From: debbiegrrrl[at]aol.com (DebbieGrrrl)
Date: 03 Feb 2002 17:02:13 GMT
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Jill McQuown writes:
>I have one large leftover baked potato.  I could (of course) reheat the
>potato and simply eat it as a baked potato

Im sure by now youve already done whatever you were going to dowith your lefy
over tater, but should you ever find yourself in the same situation:
I would smash it and fry it up with some bacon, cabbage &amp; onion as sort of a
"bubble &amp; squeak" or smash it and cook it with onions, bell peppers &amp; eggs like
an omelet or a frittata or Spanish Tortilla.  :)

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From: Shelby <shelbyjmarsh[at]bham.rr.com>
Date: Sun, 03 Feb 2002 17:58:12 GMT
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DebbieGrrrl wrote:
> I would smash it and fry it up with some bacon, cabbage &amp; onion as sort of a
> "bubble &amp; squeak" or smash it and cook it with onions, bell peppers &amp; eggs like
> an omelet or a frittata or Spanish Tortilla.  :)

Got it Jill. I'd stuff it with tuna, cheese. More cheese on top, and broil.

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From: Bryan Clouse <bwclouse[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2002 00:24:59 GMT
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>I have one large leftover baked potato.  I could (of course) reheat the
>potato and simply eat it as a baked potato

I like them for breakfast. Slice them up and fry in a very hot pan.
This will give you a nice crunchy coating. I'm not that fond of
uncooked onions, so I use a clove or two of garlic, butter, vegi-salt,
and pepper. Yummy!


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