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Subject: Baked Potatoes: What's The Secret?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Chuck Hildebrandt 
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 21:23:04 GMT
--------
OK, I really suck at these, so I need help ...

I downloaded some recipes for how to do baked potatoes.  Here's what I
learned:

 - Wash 'em
 - Poke holes in 'em
 - Spray veggie oil on 'em
 - Salt 'em
 - Wrap 'em in foil
 - Put them in a pre-heated over of 400 degrees for 45-60 minutes

And when they come out -- they're still ROCK HARD!

I want 'em nice and fluffy.  What am I missing here?

Thanks for your help!

Chuck

============================

From: Bob Westcott 
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 21:28:36 GMT
--------
don't wrap them in foil...that steams them.  How big are your potatoes?
I'd say 400 for a minimum of 60 minutes for a nice crispy jacket

============================

From: PollyThePenguin[at]Yahoo.com (FMGAL)
Date: 16 Mar 2003 19:10:31 -0800
--------
Bob Westcott wrote:
> How big are your potatoes?

That's a bit personal...;-)  I par-microwave them, and then pop them
in a hot oven.  Shaves a lot of time from the cooking process, and
they come out fluffy.

============================

From: Deacon 
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 21:29:55 GMT
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
>And when they come out -- they're still ROCK HARD!

What variety of potato?

Have you had your oven calibrated?

============================

From: ktsheehy3624[at]cs.com (Ktsheehy3624)
Date: 16 Mar 2003 21:34:31 GMT
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
>And when they come out -- they're still ROCK HARD!

Wask 'em - ok
Poke holes - ok
Spray vegetable oil - I like to rub them with olive oil. I'm not sure it
  really does anything, but I like to think that it makes the cooked
  skin sort of crisp/soft. Maybe spray vegetable oil does the same thing.
  I also think you could skip this step entirely.
Salt 'em - if you like - I do.
Wrap 'em in foil - I'd skip this. Tends to steam the potato. Put them in
  the oven naked.
Preheated 400F oven for 45 to 60 minutes - I think the old basic
  recipe was 1 hour at 350F. I find this makes for an underdone
  potato with a hard texture and a raw starch flavor. I do 1-1/2 to
  2 hours at 350F. Makes for a fragrant, soft textured result.

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 15:47:31 -0600
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
> And when they come out -- they're still ROCK HARD!

I  rub them with butter and then salt them heavily.  DO NOT wrap in foil.
Bake at 400-425F for at least an hour.  And make sure you have "baking
potatoes", not waxy potatoes like yukon gold or red potatoes.

They come out fluffy inside and nicely crispy outside.  I eat the potato
skins.  Delicious!

============================

From: pink ataraxia 
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 21:48:36 +0000 (UTC)
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt is lime and limpid green:
>  - Wrap 'em in foil

this seems to be the step which is not allowing the heat to penetrate
your potato.  Make sure you're using a dry potato too, such as a
russett.

I coat the outside in real butter instead of oil, but yea it basically
does the same thing.

============================

From: AliceFromHell 
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 23:22:54 GMT
--------
pink ataraxia wrote:
> I coat the outside in real butter instead of oil, but yea it basically
> does the same thing.

I use real butter too and instead of poking the potatoes I just make a
slit lengthwise along the top.

============================

From: zxcvbob 
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 15:57:58 -0600
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
>  - Wrap 'em in foil
>  - Put them in a pre-heated over of 400 degrees for 45-60 minutes

Leave off the foil, and depending on how big the potatoes, they may take
longer than an hour.   I sometimes give them a head start in the
microwave oven if I'm only baking a couple of potatoes.  When they are
hot and starting to make steaming noises, I take them out and butter or
olive oil the skins and transfer them in the real oven.   Make
sure you use baking potatoes [russet, for instance] and not boiling
potatoes [red, for instance].

Best regards,
Bob

============================

From: Sheryl Rosen 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 02:21:53 GMT
--------
zxcvbob wrote:
> Leave off the foil, and depending on how big the potatoes, they may take
> longer than an hour.   I sometimes give them a head start in the
> microwave oven if I'm only baking a couple of potatoes.  When they are
> hot and starting to make steaming noises, I take them out and butter or
> olive oil the skins and transfer them in the real oven.   Make
> sure you use baking potatoes [russet, for instance] and not boiling
> potatoes [red, for instance].

not heresy at all, Bob.
I cannot detect a difference when I start them in the microwave and finish
in the oven for 30 min or more, and when I cook the entire thing in the
oven. Except in time, of course.

A potato will be mostly cooked after 3-4 min (depending on size) in the
microwave. But the skin leaves a lot to be desired.

A baked potato in the oven is one of life's simple pleasures, but I'll be
damned if I leave the oven on for over an hour when I can leave it on for 45
min.  I only make baked potatoes when I bake meatloaf or something else.
And that needs an hour or so. By nuking the potato first, it "only" takes an
hour for it to be soft, fluffy and crispy.  The dry oven heat only has to
crisp up the skin, the "cooking" of the inside is already done by the mw.

It works.  I'm a big proponent of nuking potatoes before baking them.

============================

From: terraXXX[at]myrealbox.com (Terra)
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 06:26:18 GMT
--------
Using only crude tools and determination, Sheryl Rosen wrote:

> It works.  I'm a big proponent of nuking potatoes before baking them.

I've never tried that, but I'll have to keep it in mind for 
times when I'm running late on putting the spuds in. I noticed
that at my local Fred Meyer, they're selling a washed spud in
heavy plastic, just for the microwave. Interesting...

============================

From: stan[at]temple.edu
Date: 16 Mar 2003 23:15:59 GMT
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
>  - Wash 'em
>  - Poke holes in 'em
>  - Spray veggie oil on 'em
>  - Salt 'em
>  - Wrap 'em in foil
>  - Put them in a pre-heated over of 400 degrees for 45-60 minutes

Baked potatoes are ridiculously easy to make. Use Idaho potatoes or 
similar ones. Follow the steps you outlined above, except do not bother 
wrappping the potatoes in foil (that steams them). Bake the potatoes in a 
450 degree oven for about one hour for a large baking potato. That's it.

============================

From: Chuck Hildebrandt 
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 23:45:39 GMT
--------
Wow -- great advice, fast, and unanimous!  Thank you!

============================

From: wardna[at]aol.com (Neil)
Date: 16 Mar 2003 23:50:19 GMT
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
>And when they come out -- they're still ROCK HARD!
>I want 'em nice and fluffy.  What am I missing here?

The main prerequisite is actually your choice of the potato.  The variety is
not all that important, but it IS important that the potato be high-moisture,
which is to say it should be fresh, quite hard to the touch (when raw) rather
than soft and in decline.

What seems to make potatoes "fluffy" when baked is the moisture inside them
steaming out.  If they aren't fresh, that won't happen.

Poking them with a fork hasn't ever made much difference, as far as I can tell.
Wrapping them in foil makes sense, as far as assisting in this "steaming"
effect, but I've never done it.

375 degrees is what I use, for an amount of time that varies with respect to
the size of the potato.

============================

From: Kajikit 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 12:52:50 +1100
--------
WardNA dazzled us with brilliant prose:
>What seems to make potatoes "fluffy" when baked is the moisture inside them
>steaming out.  If they aren't fresh, that won't happen.
>
>Poking them with a fork hasn't ever made much difference, as far as I can tell.

It doesn't make any difference until you get a potato with a tough
skin and no holes in it... (cook, cook, cook, cook, cook, cook,
cook... BLAM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!) The holes are more of a 'just in case'
than a necessity.

============================

From: RoboCheese 
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 18:12:23 -0800
--------
WardNA offered the following:
$ The main prerequisite is actually your choice of the potato.  The variety is
$ not all that important, but it IS important that the potato be high-moisture,
$ which is to say it should be fresh, quite hard to the touch (when raw) rather
$ than soft and in decline.
$ 
$ What seems to make potatoes "fluffy" when baked is the moisture inside them
$ steaming out.  If they aren't fresh, that won't happen.
$ 
$ Poking them with a fork hasn't ever made much difference, as far as I can tell.
$ Wrapping them in foil makes sense, as far as assisting in this "steaming"
$ effect, but I've never done it.
$ 
$ 375 degrees is what I use, for an amount of time that varies with respect to
$ the size of the potato.

 Easily the vaguest musing on baked potatoes.

  Oh wow. You need to post about Brining!

============================

From: Doug Weller 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 18:16:00 +0000
--------
WardNA wrote:
>Poking them with a fork hasn't ever made much difference, as far as I can tell.

You've never had the pleasure of having an unpoked one exploding on you
then I gather. 

============================

From: ktsheehy3624[at]cs.com (Ktsheehy3624)
Date: 17 Mar 2003 18:26:01 GMT
--------
Doug Weller wrote:
>You've never had the pleasure of having an unpoked one 
>exploding on you then I gather. 

Don't know about WArdNA's experience. I've never had the
pleasure of having an unpoked potato explode. However, I have
had the pleasure of having a poked potato explode. Only once
in about 39 years of cooking. 

And somehow, I've got the sense that this talk about poking and
pleasure is going to tempt out some of the wags.

============================

From: Brian Rodenborn 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 20:03:24 GMT
--------
Doug Weller wrote:
> You've never had the pleasure of having an unpoked one exploding on you
> then I gather.

I one go kablooey once. The remains of the exploded potato that stayed
in the skin and didn't spew all over the inside of the oven were quite
good though, amazingly fluffy!

============================

From: Nexis 
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 16:00:27 -0800
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
> I want 'em nice and fluffy.  What am I missing here?

Here's what I do:
Choose good size Idaho or Yukon Gold potatoes and wash them thoroughly. Rub
the outside of the potato with olive oil and poke a couple holes in it. Roll
it in kosher salt. Do NOT wrap in foil....that is steaming, not baking. Bake
in 400-450*f oven until fork tender. Split down the center and squeeze
slightly, then fluff with a fork. Add butter or whatever condiments you
prefer....butter, paprika, a bit of garlic salt or celery salt and lots of
pepper for me! ;-)

kimberly

============================

From: Alan Raeder 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 00:07:01 GMT
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
>  - Wrap 'em in foil

Everyones said don't use tin foil. And I agree. But  a "fluffy" baked
potato is too much to ask. Mashed potatoes are "fluffy". You want some nice
starch and be able to "mash" them with your fork if you want too. But they
will still be "crunchy", and that's pretty good. It's the starch and the
texture of baked  potato that makes them so great.

============================

From: sf 
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 16:45:23 -0800
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
>  I want 'em nice and fluffy.  What am I missing here?

All I do is wash them and shove them in a hot oven, but they
turn out fine.  What type of potato are you trying to bake? 

Remember, even well cooked potatoes are not as fluffly as a
mashed potato.  They will appear "hard" the moment you cut
them open, but you have to loosen the insides by pinching
and then fluff with a fork.

============================

From: hahabogus 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 02:28:00 GMT
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
>  I want 'em nice and fluffy.  What am I missing here?

I wash the spuds (I use red potatoes).
Then I poke holes in them (so they don't explode).
Then I rub them with cooking oil (canola for me others like olive oil).
The oil helps the salt to stick to them.
I sprinkle them with salt.
Put the spuds in a preheat 400F oven for around 1 hr. (depends on size of 
spuds.
I test by quickly and lightly squeezing the skins Listen for a ruseling 
noise as I like crisp skins.

I find the skins are crisp and the insides are fluffy.

I like to then scoop out the cooked potato and coarsely mash it with some 
butter,cracked pepper, shredded cheeses and crumbled bacon then possibly 
small onion and bell pepper bits. Put the mashed potato filling mixture  
back in the potato skins and place some additional good melting cheese on 
top and return to oven to re-heat and nicely melt the cheese topping. 

good eating.

============================

From: Alan Raeder 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 02:36:21 GMT
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> I like to then scoop out the cooked potato and coarsely mash it with some
> butter,cracked pepper, shredded cheeses and crumbled bacon then possibly
> small onion and bell pepper bits. Put the mashed potato filling mixture
> back in the potato skins and place some additional good melting cheese on
> top and return to oven to re-heat and nicely melt the cheese topping.

Between cooking them, scooping them, adding your ingredients, then putting
them back in their skins, are they still the lovely baked potato?  They
sound more like twice baked potatoes.

============================

From: sf 
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 21:28:12 -0800
--------
hahabogus wrote:
>  I find the skins are crisp and the insides are fluffy.
>  
>  I like to then scoop out the cooked potato and coarsely mash it 

These terms are contradictory.  How can one coarsely mash a
"fluffy" potato?  Mashed potatoes are fluffy, unmashed
potatoes are not.

============================

From: RoboCheese 
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 22:41:26 -0800
--------
sf offered the following:
$ These terms are contradictory.  How can one coarsely mash a
$ "fluffy" potato?  Mashed potatoes are fluffy, unmashed
$ potatoes are not.

That's pretty bright of an observation  - for a woman!  (Run, Duck, Hide,
Make funny faces.)

============================

From: sf 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 15:58:41 -0800
--------
RoboCheese wrote:
>  That's pretty bright of an observation  - for a woman!  

It's elementary, my friend!

>  (Run, Duck, Hide,
>  Make funny faces.)

You can run, but you can't hide for long.  You'll pop up to
make those faces and I'll get you then.  heheheheh.

============================

From: terraXXX[at]myrealbox.com (Terra)
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 06:23:08 GMT
--------
Using only crude tools and determination, Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
> I want 'em nice and fluffy.  What am I missing here?

My "recipe":

- Wash 'em
- Poke a nail through 'em
- Put them in a 350 degree oven for 1.5 to 2 hours

We call these "crunch" potatoes because the skin is usually crispy, 
and the inside is fluffy...

============================

From: Paul M. Cookę« 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 09:29:13 GMT
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
> I want 'em nice and fluffy.  What am I missing here?

I take a nice big spud, wash it and poke it with a sharp knife.  Then I nuke
it for 5 minutes and pop it into a 425F oven for about 45-60 minutes.  I get
the most delectable crispy and crunchy yet tender skin and fluffy insides.

============================

From: CaptCook 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 10:41:23 -0600
--------
Paul M. Cook
> I take a nice big spud, wash it and poke it with a sharp knife.  Then I nuke
> it for 5 minutes and pop it into a 425F oven for about 45-60 minutes.  I get
> the most delectable crispy and crunchy yet tender skin and fluffy insides.

While that does seem like way too long, my last 2 potato purchases have had
hard spots when they were supposedly done.  One I put back into the
microwave for a few more minutes but no change.  Some of the potatoes do
have internal dime sized discoloration spots, perhaps a blight causes the
effect.

============================

From: Grahamster Webber 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 11:02:15 -0000
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
>  - Put them in a pre-heated over of 400 degrees for 45-60 minutes
>
> And when they come out -- they're still ROCK HARD!
>
> I want 'em nice and fluffy.  What am I missing here?

cook it for much longer (usually do around 2 hours) - you really have to try
hard to overcook a baked tatoe...

============================

From: Begon[at]webtv.net (Joyce-MN)
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 11:16:03 -0600 (CST)
--------
Try this - I printed from another group. It says "try this recipe once
and you'll never bake medicore spuds again".  I tried it and its very
true.  Bury it in a food quality rock salt (the kind used in ice cream
makers) You will also need a very deep metal baking pan or loaf pan
large enough to hold he number of potatoes you intend to bake with
plenty of room to spare.  I use a breadpan just for myself.  The salt
does NOT make the potato salty.  It seems to create a miniature "brick
oven" that keeps the potato flesh moist and fluffy white and the potato
skin becomes crisp and golden.  Wash potatoes thorougly with vegetable
brush.  Dry.  Apply thick coating of veg oil (Pam works well) to potato
skin.  Pour just enough rock salt into the baking pan to cover the
bottom.  Arrange the potatoes on top of the salt layer with a bit of
space between them.  Cover the potatoes completely with rock salt,
filling betwen them as well.  Bake at 425 degrees F. for one hour.
Remove from oven.  Carefully brush aside top salt layer and lift each
potato out with a fork or tongs.  Brush away any salt that may have
stuck to the potato skin.  Serve with butter, sour cream and freshly
snipped chives. Eat the skins, too.  Afer dinner, save the rock salt for
the next time.  It can be reused ten times or more.   Good luck.

============================

From: Chris and Bob Neidecker 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 15:13:03 -0500
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
> I downloaded some recipes for how to do baked potatoes.  Here's what I
> learned:
>
>  - Wash 'em

Do you guys dry your potatoes?  I notice that when I'm very careful to dry
them well, they come out better than when I shake the water off them and
toss them in the oven.

I dry them like crazy.

============================

From: ęThe Wolf 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 23:04:22 GMT
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
> - Put them in a pre-heated over of 400 degrees for 45-60 minutes

Check the thermostat in your oven, or try 450 degrees.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 18 Mar 2003 01:24:16 GMT
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt opined:
> - Wrap 'em in foil

Get rid of the friggin' foil.

============================

From: Peter Aitken 
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 03:01:11 GMT
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt opined:
> - Spray veggie oil on 'em
> - Salt 'em
> - Wrap 'em in foil
> - Put them in a pre-heated over of 400 degrees for 45-60 minutes

No oil, no salt, and NO FOIL! Foil results in steamed potatoes, not baked.
Here's what I do: Use russets - other types do not bake well. Wash and dry,
poke a couple of holes in them. Put right on the rack of a 375 oven for 1
hour 15 minutes. You can use 450 if you are in a hurry, but 375 gives better
results - really fluffy with a nice chewy skin.

============================

From: Spindrift[at]dontgotmail.com
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 21:57:51 +1200
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
>No oil, no salt, and NO FOIL! Foil results in steamed potatoes, not baked.
>Here's what I do: Use russets - other types do not bake well. Wash and dry,
>poke a couple of holes in them. Put right on the rack of a 375 oven for 1
>hour 15 minutes. You can use 450 if you are in a hurry, but 375 gives better
>results - really fluffy with a nice chewy skin.

I use this method myself, but I do brush a little salted butter over
the potatoes half-way through (if Im around and remember!)   If you
are really in a terrific hurry and want baked spuds (using 2
medium-sized) poke some holes in them and m/wave on high for about 3
mins.   This seems to deal with cooking the real centre of the potato.

I use Agria potatoes - large and fluffy when cooked this way - and
wonderful for mashed potatoes.   Floury and solid. 

============================

From: Dimitri 
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 00:34:58 GMT
--------
Chuck Hildebrandt wrote:
> OK, I really suck at these, so I need help ...

Now here's the truth from the

http://www.idahopotato.com/Tips/tips_baking.html

Read all about the beautiful Idaho potato.


For conventional oven baking, the most common folly is to wrap the potato in
aluminum foil. Covering the potato holds in moisture, steaming the potato.
The result is a less crispy skin and the texture of a boiled potato. The
best way to bake a potato is to scrub it, pierce the skin two or three times
with a fork, and place the potato directly on the oven rack, at 450░F for 50
to 60 minutes. For a crispier skin, rub the potato skin with a light coating
of vegetable oil, olive oil, margarine or butter.
Potatoes are ready when their internal temperature reaches 208 to 211
degrees Fahrenheit. A fork easily pierces a baker when it's done. If the
potato is hard, bake a little longer. However, watch out for over-baking, or
drying of the underskin will occur.
When baking a number of Idaho Potatoes at a time, choose potatoes that are
similar in size and shape for uniform cooking.
If potatoes have been baked to doneness and are being held for over 10
minutes, wrap those potatoes in foil for holding. This will enhance the
appearance of the skin by reducing shriveling.
Never use a knife for opening a baked potato; it flattens the surface and
alters the normal fluffy texture of a baked Idaho spud. Instead, pierce the
potato with a fork, once lengthwise and crosswise. Press the potato at both
ends and it will "blossom".
If you use metal skewers for baking potatoes, heat the skewers first. This
seals the potato and prevents the center of the potato from turning dark.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 18 Mar 2003 01:34:33 GMT
--------
Dimitri writes:
>If you use metal skewers for baking potatoes, heat the skewers first. This
>seals the potato and prevents the center of the potato from turning dark.

Yes, I was thinking exactly the same treatment for Saddom, a few dozen red hot
potato skewers, well placed by moi.  A bit of reality TV.

============================

From: RoboCheese 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 18:46:39 -0800
--------
Sheldon offered the following:
$ Yes, I was thinking exactly the same treatment for Saddom, a few dozen red hot
$ potato skewers, well placed by moi.  A bit of reality TV.

Hell, I'd not mind doing the both of you at the same time.

============================

From: terraXXX[at]myrealbox.com (Terra)
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 01:38:05 GMT
--------
Using only crude tools and determination, Terra wrote:
> Ahhh, no wonder I see so many foil-wrapped spuds in restaurants. 
> I wondered why they did that.
> 
> Am I the only person here who uses potato nails instead of poking 
> with a fork (or similarly sharp object)..?

D'oh! Had I read Dimitri's post all the way through, I'd have
seen this part:

"If you use metal skewers for baking potatoes, heat the skewers first. 
This seals the potato and prevents the center of the potato from turning 
dark."

I've never had the dark potato problem myself, but at least I
know I'm not the only one using potato nails...

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 18 Mar 2003 01:55:44 GMT
--------
Terra writes:
>Ahhh, no wonder I see so many foil-wrapped spuds in restaurants. 
>I wondered why they did that.

Hmm, wonder if I Alcoa wrapped my pecker after sex... ;)

============================

From: terraXXX[at]myrealbox.com (Terra)
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 02:04:47 GMT
--------
Using only crude tools and determination, Sheldon wrote:
> Hmm, wonder if I Alcoa wrapped my pecker after sex... ;)

I dunno -- are appearances that important once the sex is over?

Boy, there are some weird conversations in this group... ;-)

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 18 Mar 2003 02:47:19 GMT
--------
Terra writes:
>I dunno -- are appearances that important once the sex is over?

Gee, wouldn't you say it's worth a shot to reduce shriveling, think of the
possibilities... I know, next thing someone will bring up alzhiemers of the
pecker head, like it'll really forget it's way.  Imagine an SNL skit portraying
an institution for lost pecker heads. hehe

============================

From: Niki 
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 13:25:16 GMT
--------
Sheldon wrote:
: Hmm, wonder if I Alcoa wrapped my pecker after sex... ;)

Sorry, but a self hand job doesn't count as sex.

============================

From: Dimitri 
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 14:26:25 GMT
--------
Niki wrote:
> Sorry, but a self hand job doesn't count as sex.

As opposed to?

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 18 Mar 2003 14:53:11 GMT
--------
Dimitri writes:
>As opposed to?

Niki's Ever Ready battery boy toy! 

============================

From: Niki 
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 15:27:52 GMT
--------
Sheldon wrote: 
: Niki's Ever Ready battery boy toy! 
 
Sorry. You could never compete with BOB.

============================

From: Niki 
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 15:29:45 GMT
--------
Dimitri wrote:
: As opposed to?

Watching Sheldon wrap his inadequate manhood in Alcoa after he hand beat himself off, (since the
mixer was in the shop for repair).

============================

Subject: Re: Baked Potatoes: PING Miche and any other Kiwi's
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Frenchy 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 09:33:40 +1200
--------
Deacon wrote:
> What variety of potato?

Miche

If you can get hold of KARAKA variety spuds, give them a try.  Best darned
baked potato or chips I have ever had.

I think they are out of Hawkes Bay and are labelled as a General Purpose
spud!

============================

From: Miche 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 09:38:14 +1200
--------
Frenchy wrote:
> If you can get hold of KARAKA variety spuds, give them a try.  Best darned
> baked potato or chips I have ever had.

So noted.  Desirees are OK for that purpose, but I'm always on the 
lookout for something better.  :)  Thanks!

============================

From: Frenchy 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 10:00:30 +1200
--------
Miche wrote:
> So noted.  Desirees are OK for that purpose, but I'm always on the
> lookout for something better.  :)  Thanks!

IMHO the Karaka is about 10 times better than Desiree.

============================

From: Miche 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 10:26:34 +1200
--------
Frenchy wrote:
> IMHO the Karaka is about 10 times better than Desiree.

Well, there ya go then.  :)  I'll definitely keep an eye out for them.

============================

From: Spindrift[at]dontgotmail.com
Date: Tue, 18 Mar 2003 22:03:45 +1200
--------
Frenchy wrote:
>If you can get hold of KARAKA variety spuds, give them a try.  Best darned
>baked potato or chips I have ever had.
>
>I think they are out of Hawkes Bay and are labelled as a General Purpose

Sorry Miche but here in Auckland I never buy a General Purpose potato,
because I am likely to find something very poor from Pukekohe and with
no specific label.

I have been very impressed with the larger number of varieties of
potoatoes now available here.  Is this due to the food writers
specifying certain species?   For most of the year I can now choose
among Rua, Karaka, Desire, Agria and Red Rascal - to name a few.   In
summer months we can now obtain those lovely South Island summer
Jersey Bennies and associated types as well.

I shall have a go at Karaka variety when I see them - but so far not.
I will be travelling from Auckland to Wellington via the Hawkes Bay
next week - and will press The Husband to call into fresh produce
places!  

============================

From: Miche 
Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 08:40:40 +1200
--------
Spindrift wrote:
> Sorry Miche but here in Auckland I never buy a General Purpose potato,
> because I am likely to find something very poor from Pukekohe and with
> no specific label.

Why are you apologizing to me?  I didn't write the above.

============================

From: Spindrift[at]dontgotmail.com
Date: Wed, 19 Mar 2003 12:14:37 +1200
--------
Miche wrote:
>Why are you apologizing to me?  I didn't write the above.

I do so appreciate the polite responses from regulars on n/gs when
someone makes a provenance mistake.


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