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Subject: Getting Fried Breakfast Potatoes Crispy
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2007 18:24:14 -0500
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I wanted to call them hash browns, but someone said they are usually 
shredded.

Mine were russets cut in smallish cubes. Last time I made these, I put the 
onions in at the same time and they never got crispy. This time I sauteed 
the onions separated and added them at the last minute.

The end result was nice--velvety insides with lightly crispy bits, just as I 
wanted.

What I did:

Heated a Calphalon skillet dry on "high" on my glasstop range until it was 
pretty hot.

Put in 1/4 cup light olive oil, enough to cover the bottom and rise a bit on 
the sides, put the heat on high and got it hot. (A drop of water jumped 
around a lot when I added it to the pan.)

Plunked the potatoes in and tossed them to coat with the olive oil. Left the 
heat on high.

Resisted the urge to turn them.

Resisted the urge to turn them.

Turned them. Brown, but not quite crispy on that side.

Waited twice as long to turn the next time and ahhhh! Very nice crusty 
crispy results.

Repeated until they were crispy enough and tossed in the sauteed onions.

The key is, get the pan hot, get the oil hot, and be patient. Don't turn too 
soon.

Served them with diced ham and scrambled eggs, and toast with blackberry 
jam. 

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From: Gregory Morrow <gregorymorrow[at]earthlink.net>
Date: 27 Jan 2007 17:30:05 -0800
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cyberPUKE wrote:
> The end result was nice--velvety insides with lightly crispy bits, just as I
> wanted.

Jeez, if it weren't for the subject line we'd think you were talkin' 
'bout yer twot...

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From: Gloria Puester <puester[at]worldnet.att.net>
Date: Sun, 28 Jan 2007 01:39:30 GMT
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Gregory Morrow wrote:
> Jeez, if it weren't for the subject line we'd think you were talkin' 
> 'bout yer twot...

Why on earth did I ever take you off my plonk list?

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From: Gregory Morrow <i[at]ok.cz>
Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2007 18:42:56 GMT
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Puester wrote:
> Why on earth did I ever take you off my plonk list?

No worries, luv, cyberpuke can dish it out and she can take it   :-)

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From: Lobster Man <photodoglv[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2007 21:25:44 -0700
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cybercat wrote:
> Mine were russets cut in smallish cubes. Last time I made these, I put the 
> onions in at the same time and they never got crispy. This time I sauteed 
> the onions separated and added them at the last minute.

Yep, that's the trick! Works with almost anything you want to be golden 
brown and delicious... steaks, chops, potstickers, potatoes, etc.

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From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2007 23:37:20 -0500
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Lobster Man wrote:
> Yep, that's the trick! Works with almost anything you want to be golden 
> brown and delicious... steaks, chops, potstickers, potatoes, etc.

Cool, another secret revealed! :) 

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From: projectilevomitchick[at]netzero.com
Date: 27 Jan 2007 21:42:57 -0800
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cybercat farted:
> Very crusty results.

Try using soap, cunt.

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From: Steve Y <steverubbish[at]wanadoo.fr>
Date: Sun, 28 Jan 2007 12:57:30 +0100
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I happened on a "Two Fat Ladies" episode yesterday where the one that is 
still with us was making Bubble and Squeak. She said secret to making 
it, which I assume might apply to your need, is to use beef dripping or 
lard, they being two fats you can get really hot and to leave the 
mixture to really cook before turning.  B+S is one of those dishes that 
I remember fondly from childhood but have never really managed to cook 
for myself. Might try again now we have a supply of lard.

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From: Bertie Doe <montebrasite4[at]ntl.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Jan 2007 18:48:04 -0000
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Steve Y wrote:
>   She said secret to making 
> it, which I assume might apply to your need, is to use beef dripping or 
> lard, they being two fats you can get really hot and to leave the 
> mixture to really cook before turning.

That's a good idea, as lard and dripping can take much higher temps than 
olive oil. I made a version of B &amp; S a couple of weeks ago, but followed a 
recipe for Rosti. I sandwiched a layer of cabbage between the 2 shredded 
layers of potato, before frying. I chopped some onion into the cabbage, to 
liven it up a bit. Fried in lard - quite nice.

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From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Jan 2007 14:23:41 -0500
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Steve Y wrote:
>   She said secret to making 
> it, which I assume might apply to your need, is to use beef dripping or 
> lard, they being two fats you can get really hot and to leave the 
> mixture to really cook before turning.

Makes sense! Maybe I will start saving the beef fat I skim from my stews
and trim from my roasts. Especially since olive oil is so expensive now.
Thanks. 


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