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Subject: Potatoe cake recipe needed
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Tony 
Date: 6 Jan 1996 16:07:03 GMT
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Since dad took to combing his hair with assorted kitchen utensils, match 
books and etceteras I've been deprived of his rather delicious potatoe 
cake. I guess I should have been paying attention all those years... 
Anyway, I'm looking for a plain traditional (Russian or eastern 
European style) POTATOE CAKE recipe.

Thanks all

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From: Martha McLemore 
Date: 7 Jan 1996 06:26:50 GMT
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I will check my Mennonite cookbook to see what I can find. I know I have 
a recipe for potato doughnuts and other sweet cakes. Or, is it savory 
dishes you want, like potato latkes or potato pancakes? I'll look up 
both kinds and get back to you.

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From: Tony 
Date: 7 Jan 1996 14:05:59 GMT
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Ken Jones & Martha McLemore wrote:
>I will check my Mennonite cookbook to see what 
>I can find. I know I have a recipe for potato doughnuts and 
>other sweet cakes. Or, is it savory dishes you want, like 
>potato latkes or potato pancakes? I'll look up both kinds and 
>get back to you.

I know latkes, potatoe pancakes and sweet cakes are not what I'm looking 
for though I'm unsure of how to describe accurately what it is that I am 
looking for. But I'll try: All I remember is that my dad used to stand 
over a great big oven pot shredding potatoes for all he was worth. When 
the concoction came out of the oven it was like a big solid cake (browned 
on top and still potatoe white in the center) and he would slice it up to 
serve it hot with sour-cream and butter. I also clearly remember that I 
liked it better the next day, after it had cooled he'd slice it up then 
re-heat it in a frying pan (at this point much of it had turned grey) and 
I'd eat it with jam or even maple syrup... but that's just me.    

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From: smenapac[at]postoffice.ptd.net (Susan)
Date: 7 Jan 1996 21:10:39 GMT
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The Polish people here in PA make something like potatocakes but they 
bake the batter instead of frying it and sometimes add bacon. Its is 
basically grated potato and onion, with flour and eggs added to hold the 
mixture together. I don't have a recipe for it but can ask some friends.
Suzanne

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From: Tony 
Date: 8 Jan 1996 13:06:49 GMT
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smenapac@postoffice.ptd (Susan) wrote:
>The Polish people here in PA make something like potatocakes but they 
>bake the batter instead of frying it and sometimes add bacon. Its is 
>basically grated potato and onion, with flour and eggs added to hold the 
>mixture together. I don't have a recipe for it but can ask some friends.

This sounds pretty darn close to what I'm looking for, though my dad 
(Lithuanian... incidentally) didn't use onions or bacon I do remember 
waiting forever for his potatoe cake to come out of the oven. I'd really 
appreciate it if you could hunt down such a recipe and if you could email 
to me in addition to posting it (It seems the postings here move 
extremely fast).

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From: plgold[at]ix.netcom.com (Pat Gold)
Date: 7 Jan 1996 22:47:01 GMT
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I don't know if this is what you are looking for but it sounds as
though it's a close relation.

Roesti (Swiss) Potatoes

6 to 8 medium potatoes, partially boiled in their skins
1/4 pound butter or more
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon or more freshly ground pepper

The potatoes should be about two-thirds cooked. They should not be
mealy but should still havea little crispness to them. Cool, and shred
them coarsely. Melt the butter in a skillet over medium heat. Add the
potatoes and form into a cake, or into several small cakes. Cook rather
quickly. Add salt and pepper. Watch carefully until a crust forms on
the bottom. Turn with two spatulas or invert on another pan and slide
back into the skillet to brown the other side. You will need additional
butter. Slide onto a hot platter and serve at once.

The Roesti are really better if they are done in an 8-inch skillet with
rounded sides. Even if you have to use two skillets at a time, the
finished article is easier to handle and looks better.

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From: Tony 
Date: 8 Jan 1996 13:11:27 GMT
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Pat Gold wrote:
>I don't know if this is what you are looking for but it sounds as
>though it's a close relation.
>
>Roesti (Swiss) Potatoes

Though this doesn't seem to be exactly what I'm after it sounds pretty 
good and I intend to try it.

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From: Martha McLemore 
Date: 9 Jan 1996 01:12:59 GMT
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Tony wrote:
> All I remember is that my dad used to stand over a great big 
>oven pot shredding potatoes for all he was worth. When the 
>concoction came out of the oven it was like a big solid cake 
>(browned on top and still potatoe white in the center) and he 
>would slice it up to serve it hot with sour-cream and butter.  

That sounds like a giant version of what my mom called hash 
browns.  She used to grate raw potatoes, skins on, into a bowl, 
mix in a little finely diced green onions (scallions), hot 
paprika and white pepper, then fry small mounds of the mixture 
in hot butter.  She had one cast iron skillet she used only for 
biscuits and those hash browns.

I'm sorry your Dad isn't able to make them for you anymore.  
Maybe someone else in the group will have just the recipe you 
need.  Good luck.

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From: Ashley 
Date: Sun, 14 Jan 1996 10:24:33 +1100
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Tony wrote:
> I know latkes, potatoe pancakes and sweet cakes are not what I'm looking 
> for though I'm unsure of how to describe accurately what it is that I am 
> looking for. But I'll try: All I remember is that my dad used to stand 
> over a great big oven pot shredding potatoes for all he was worth. When 
> the concoction came out of the oven it was like a big solid cake (browned 
> on top and still potatoe white in the center) and he would slice it up to 
> serve it hot with sour-cream and butter. I also clearly remember that I 
> liked it better the next day, after it had cooled he'd slice it up then 
> re-heat it in a frying pan (at this point much of it had turned grey) and 
> I'd eat it with jam or even maple syrup... but that's just me.    

What you are describing sounds to me like a Lithuanian recipe called 
Kugelis (not sure of the spelling).  It is usually about three large 
potatoes to one onion grated into a bowl.  Add two eggs, salt to taste 
and mix well.  Pour into a greased casserole or baking dish.  Dot top 
with butter.  Bake at 180C until set in the middle (knife comes out clean).
Serve hot with sour cream or sour cream with cooked diced bacon pieces 
added.  You can also omit the onion from the main mixture and add a small 
amount of diced, fried and cooled onion to the sour cream mixture if you 
prefer.  One of my favourite dishes!

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Subject: potatoe cake
From: GILBERTEK%DFL[at]dfmail.usafa.af.mil (ELIZABETH K. GILBERT)
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 1996 20:25:43 GMT
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I remember this from my childhood--kind of a comfort food.  Sorry I don't 
have the exact measurements for the ingredients, but this is what I recall.  
Wash and peel about eight or nine potatoes.  Grate them on one of those 
stainless steel grater things.  When you get a whole big bowl 
full, add an egg, some flour, salt and pepper, some onion, and some 
horseraddish (the kind that comes prepared in a jar). Mix well.  Taste, and 
adjust the seasonings if necessary. Pour into a well-greased loaf pan and 
bake at 350 degrees for about an hour.  Insert a toothpick in the center.  
If it comes out dry, it's done.  Let cool.  To serve, slice and fry in a 
frying pan with a little butter.  I like mine with ketchup, but plain is 
just fine too!  I hope this helps and that you enyoy!

Liz

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Subject: potatoe cake
From: Tony 
Date: 11 Jan 1996 12:58:37 GMT
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Yeah this is it! This is what I've been looking for. Is there any way you 
can find the proper proportions?  

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Subject: POTATOE CAKES
From: genesis[at]express.ca (GN)
Date: Mon, 08 Jan 1996 23:27:35 GMT
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	    LATKES

2lbs potatoes
1/2 cup self-rising flour
2 eggs
1 tbsp onion, grated
fresh nutmeg, grated
salt and ground fresh pepper
oil, for shallow frying

Soak the grated potatoes in plenty of cold water for about an hour, 
then drain well and pat dry with a clean tea towel.

Beat together the flour, eggs, onion and nutmeg, then mix in the potatoe.
Season well.

Heat a thin layer of oil in a heavy (cast iron) frying pan and drop about a
tablespoon of potatoe batter into the pan, squashing it flat, if necessary.

Cook the potato until golden grown, then flip over and cook the other side.
Drain on kitchen paper towel and keep warm, uncovered in the over. Repeat
with the rest of the mixture.


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