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Subject: REC: A Mediterranean potato casserole
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Arthur Simon <aasimonjr[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 00:05:57 GMT
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Will wonders never cease? If this dish already
exists, I guess I can still claim independent
discovery rights.... or something....

Noting that I had some Yukon Gold potatoes
that were getting a bit *iffy* ( sprouts starting,
etc) I decided to make a virtue of necessity.
At first I thought _potato salad_, but a Mar2Ni
set me right. The result follows.

1> Take two healthy springs of sweet basil, maybe
16 small leaves. Ditto flat-leaved parsley. Two cloves
fresh garlic, smashed to peel them and then smashed again.
1/2 tsp Kosher salt. Mince the herbs, put all in a mortar
and grind well to release the oils. Transfer to a small
bowl and add 1/3 cup olive oil. Let sit for 4-6 hours.

2> Peel the potatoes and gently boil them whole until
tender. Drain and pat dry. Put into a large workbowl
(I used a large Corning casserole) and mash a little. Do
not overmash, as you need the texture to be preserved.
Gently fold in 1/3 cup finely grated Parmesan or Asiago
(I happened to have Parmesan available) and 12-15
Calamata olives, pitted and minced.

Take 1/3 cup room temperature sour cream and whisk in
a like amount of chicken broth. Place in blender. Add
4 cloves mushy roasted garlic and 1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt.
Add 1/3  stick unsalted butter, melted. Blend until smooth.

Fold this liquid into the potatoes. If it seems too wet, add a
tsp or two of Italian Style Bread Crumbs (available under
the Progresso brand). This should be the consistency of
mashed potatoes.... not to creamy, not too thick.

Press this into a cast-iron skillet ( a 7 incher should
be about right, depending on the size of the potatoes)
pre-greasing with a little olive oil.

Bake as you would potatoes Jannsen, finishing by
turning on the broiler toward the last to brown the
top.

Serve. Drizzle the olive oil (section 1) onto the potatoes
at the table.

Also good  cold. I ate this for breakfast this AM when
Ari and Holly wanted to go outside. Incredible!

Enjoy!

A-

OBFood: For dinner tonight..... Chicken thighs pan
roasted with rosemary, roasted garlic and white wine.

FWIW: Did you know that Carbonnade de Boeuf
Flamande makes a *dynamite* filling for omelets?

Tis true.

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From: lurline4[at]earthlink.net
Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 00:27:29 GMT
--------
Arthur Simon wrote:
> Noting that I had some Yukon Gold potatoes
> that were getting a bit *iffy* ( sprouts starting,
> etc) I decided to make a virtue of necessity.

I was always told not to eat any potato that had sprouts on it or that
were green as they could make you very ill.
If i ever see them just through them out.

============================

From: Arthur Simon <aasimonjr[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 02:16:15 GMT
--------
lurline4 wrote:
> I was always told not to eat any potato that had sprouts on it or that
> were green as they could make you very ill.
> If i ever see them just through them out.

Well, dear reader....

There is a note of truth to this.

Potatoes are Solanaceous plants, with relates them to the
deadly nightshade, the belladonna, and the tomato.

The leaves are loaded with toxic alkaloids, indeed the
nightshade was used (in a rub in fat) to induce visions
for witches in earlier times.

When potato skins turn *green*, they are beginning to
become photosynthetic, and therefore begin to produce
toxic alkaloids.

The alkaloids are in the skin.

Peel this off, and you're ok. It's a good idea to do this
early on, for safety's sake. As I see it, the conversion does
not begin until the sprouts are well into development.

Catch it early.

My casserole was absolutely delicious, and I am still here, and
I am *not* hallucinating..... <G> Am I?

BTW: Made that puppy last night, and wrote the recipe today.
I am *not* dead, as far as I can tell. But then, maybe the Mar2Ni
made the difference. <G>

My grandmother used to say that one could *never* put tomatoes
into the refrigerator in the original  can/tin. She always told me that
it would be poison. I queried her, but that's the only answer I *ever*
got.

============================

From: Ranee Mueller <raneem[at]harbornet.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 10:12:52 -0800
--------
Arthur Simon wrote:
> My grandmother used to say that one could *never* put tomatoes
> into the refrigerator in the original  can/tin. She always told me that
> it would be poison. I queried her, but that's the only answer I *ever*
> got.

   My mom says the same thing.  So, I always put it into a new 
container.  DH, OTOH, covered the can and thought nothing of it.  I told 
him not to do that anymore, and now he doesn't, but there's no reason I 
know of, except that that was what my mom said to do.

   Regards,
   Ranee

============================

From: R.D. Young <rdyoung[at]wcc.net>
Date: Sun, 01 Apr 2001 14:09:30 -0500
--------
Ranee Mueller wrote:
>   My mom says the same thing.  So, I always put it into a new 
>container.  DH, OTOH, covered the can and thought nothing of it.  I told 
>him not to do that anymore, and now he doesn't, but there's no reason I 
>know of, except that that was what my mom said to do.

Probably goes back to the days when the seams of tin cans were
soldered using lead solder. The acid in the tomatoes would leach the
lead out of the solder and into the tomatoes/juice. And we all know
how good lead is for you.

Bob Y.

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From: ndooley[at]blue.weeg.uiowa.edu (Nancy Dooley)
Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 19:40:14 GMT
--------
>My grandmother used to say that one could *never* put tomatoes
>into the refrigerator in the original  can/tin. She always told me that
>it would be poison. I queried her, but that's the only answer I *ever*
>got.

I don't know about the cans they use today - some are coated inside
with white enamel or something.  BUT, in the "old days," anything
acidic like tomatoes - or even not acidic - would react with the
inside of the can once it was opened, and the stored food would get a
metallic taste.

N.

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Subject: Re: A Mediterranean potato casserole
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Cowdrey <rcowdrey[at]REMOVEtelusplanet.net>
Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 03:00:49 GMT
--------
Arthur Simon wrote:
> Noting that I had some Yukon Gold potatoes
> that were getting a bit *iffy* ( sprouts starting,
> etc) I decided to make a virtue of necessity.
> At first I thought _potato salad_, but a Mar2Ni
> set me right. The result follows.

Sounds good and has been saved for reference.  But is it essential that the
potatoes are Yukon Gold and sprouting??

Robin ( :) just kidding!!)

============================

From: Arthur Simon <aasimonjr[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 28 Mar 2001 03:20:02 GMT
--------
Yeah, got to be! <GGGG>

Thinking about making this the next time with a
litte bit of minced shallot, in with the gartlic.

Just a little, mind you..........

Use it, cook it, and claim you made it... <G>

A -


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