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Subject: how to cook potato chips [and sub-thread]
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: gourmetluv <gourmetluv.ec3b55[at]foodbanter.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2007 23:33:06 +0100
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I decided to make my own chips at home and was wondering what oil and
types of potatoes are best? I plan to cook them in 2 deep fryers, one
to cook them thru and another to crisp them. any tips?

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From: Steve Wertz <swertz[at]cluemail.compost>
Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2007 23:25:28 GMT
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gourmetluv wrote:
> I decided to make my own chips at home and was wondering what oil and
> types of potatoes are best? I plan to cook them in 2 deep fryers, one
> to cook them thru and another to crisp them. any tips?

Yeah - you only need one fryer.  They're french fries.

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From: Steve Wertz <swertz[at]cluemail.compost>
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2007 09:56:41 GMT
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Steve Wertz wrote:
> Yeah - you only need one fryer.  They're french fries.

Oops, I meant:                           ^^^ not


And since you're posting from Ontario, I assume you mean potato
chips, not French fries.

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From: hahabogus <invalid[at]null.null>
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2007 11:01:30 GMT
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Steve Wertz wrote:
> And since you're posting from Ontario, I assume you mean potato
> chips, not French fries.

If you are talking french fried potatoes as in Fish and Chips...I like to 
cut them up then soak them in lightly salted water for a while, overnight 
is the best but a hour or two will work. This remove some of the starch. 
I cut mine too a smaller size than the english pub style more like  a 
shoe string size. I prefer to use a waxy red or yukon gold type potato.  
Then you follow the fried twice method. Peanut oil works the best but 
canola works too.

The same potato and soaking applies to Potato chip or Crisps except you 
only need to fry them once. I use a food processor to slice them up. And 
peanut oil to cook them in...go with the hotter setting (the one for the 
first fry for french fries).

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From: aem <aem_again[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2007 17:13:59 -0700
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gourmetluv wrote:
> I decided to make my own chips at home and was wondering what oil and
> types of potatoes are best? I plan to cook them in 2 deep fryers, one
> to cook them thru and another to crisp them. any tips?

Is that "chips" English style, meaning what Americans call "French
fries" or "chips" American style, meaning what the English call
"crisps"?

I'm assuming the former, from your description of the two-stage frying
method (and because I've never tried to make the latter).   Use
russets/Idaho/baking potatoes, not the waxy red or white kind.

As to oil, there's health and then there's taste.  Animal fats will
give you best taste.  If not some suet, then lard, or a simulation
like Crisco.  Canola oil is probably the healthiest, but peanut oil is
not unhealthy and will taste better.  I have also used safflower oil
with good results.  Fast food joints probably use soybean oil.

When you are through, save the oil (filter it) because the fries will
taste better the second time you use it.

You can use just one fryer, of course.  Cook the potatoes first at 300
- 325F for about six minutes, then remove and drain them while raising
the oil temperature to 365 - 375F.  Fry again for two or three
minutes.  I like these better than those that are fried just once.
Besides, you have to do something different from the fast food places
to justify the trouble of doing them yourself.    -aem

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From: The Golfer's Wife
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2007 12:33:44 +1200
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gourmetluv wrote:
>I decided to make my own chips at home and was wondering what oil and
>types of potatoes are best? I plan to cook them in 2 deep fryers, one
>to cook them thru and another to crisp them. any tips?

You need floury or mashing-type potatoes - not waxy ones.  If you are
in the US I think it is an Idaho potato.   If you are where I am in
New Zealand it is Ilam Hardy or Agria.   

I actually cook them in the oven without deep frying them.  They are
thus not strictly French fries but oven chips.   We like them best
this way because they are more healthy eating.

Good luck.

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Subject: Suet - for frying (was potato chips)
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Steve Y <steveremove[at]wanadoo.fr>
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2007 21:51:27 +0200
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> As to oil, there's health and then there's taste.  Animal fats will
> give you best taste.  If not some suet, then lard, or a simulation
> like Crisco.  Canola oil is probably the healthiest, but peanut oil is
> not unhealthy and will taste better.  I have also used safflower oil
> with good results.  Fast food joints probably use soybean oil.

I use suet when I can find it as an ingredient but have never actually 
used it for frying , does it really work ?

Steve

PS Lard for cooking chips in really works, takes me back to my childhood.

aem wrote:
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From: aem <aem_again[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2007 13:58:09 -0700
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Steve Y wrote:
> I use suet when I can find it as an ingredient but have never actually
> used it for frying , does it really work ?

Yes, it works, but there was some effort involved (I've only done it a
couple of times).  First you have to find a butcher who has it (it's
also sometimes called beef tallow), then you have to render it over
medium heat, then strain through layers of cheesecloth.  Throw the
solid strained bits out for the birds.  Once rendered, it can be
frozen and kept for at least a month if not longer.

I used it once for fries and once for fried onion rings.  The onion
rings were fantastic.   -aem

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From: Steve Wertz <swertz[at]cluemail.compost>
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2007 16:38:51 -0500
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Steve Y wrote:
> PS Lard for cooking chips in really works, takes me back to my childhood.

There was something on one of the History Channel's food programs
that said there was quite a demand for lard-fried PC's in....
Pennsylvania, I think.  Was it Wise or Herr's?

I've never tried it myself.  I buy 'em in the bags for $1.49
rather than smelling up the house.

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From: Steve Y <steveremove[at]wanadoo.fr>
Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2007 08:28:22 +0200
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I was talking real chips not crisps, should have been clearer.

My father used to work on a mobile fish and chip wagon and they used 
pure lard for frying


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