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Subject: (   French???)   Fries     Nooooooooh!
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Debaene Franky 
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2001 11:09:37 +0100
--------
Something is bothering me..
What I do not understand is why fries are called FRENCH fries in the US.
As being a Belgian and thus European and living very closely to France, I
must say, it is very rare that you find realy good fries all over France.  I
do admit that the fries you can buy at Mc Donalds all over the world are
coming close to what we in Belgium call "good" fries.
I also travel to the US once in a while and I must say, I have eaten fries
in the most various sizes, forms and tastes but nothing as we have here in
Belgium (that is world famous for its fries).
I have followed the threads on the MC Donalds fries in this newsgroup  and I
see that a lot of people are anxcious to learn how the real fries are realy
made.

first of all you need a potato of a respectable size (that is no problem in
the US, I have seen that!). The potatoe type is also important. The best
result you will get with the variety "BINTJE". The small amount of sugar in
this variety   will turn the fries prefectly gold.
You can NEVER use very freshly  harvested potatoes. The potatoes must be at
least a couple of weeks old.
You peel and cut the potatoe into thin fries and throw them into fresh cold
water. Thake the fries out and dry them good.
Heat up Corn oil or (what is best) hard ox fat and let it heat up to
150°C(!!! this is the secret!!!!) Dump a small portion of fries in the hot
oil or fat and let it sit  until the fries are soft and tender and start to
colour very lightly. (watch the foaming, I said dry them good!!)
Thake the fries out of the oil and let them cool down for a few minutes. In
the meantime you heat up the oil to about 190°C ( sorry no conversion to
°F ). When the oil is hot you drop the fries in there for the second time.
Beware! everything will go very quickly now and the fries will become crusty
on the outside and "mashed potatoe like" on the inside (I dont believe in
fries made from mashed potatoe like they say Mc Donalds makes them). The
colour will become nicely gold. Thake them out and let the oil or fat leak
out of the fries. It is sometimes best to dry the fries by throwing them
into the air with a "chef like" gesture.
You serve them with a little salt and... Yes... MAYONAISE and no ketchup
(yuck)!!
this is how its done in the land of the fries.... Belgium.
So lets get a deal, from now on please call french fries BELGIAN fries.
Thanks;
: )))))))))) lol

Franky

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2001 06:02:07 -0600
--------
>I have followed the threads on the MC Donalds fries in this newsgroup  and I
>see that a lot of people are anxcious to learn how the real fries are realy
>made.

I was going to comment on the McDonald's Fries threat with this very
thought!  I don't know where the term "French" fries came from.  They are
indeed Belgian fries, and rest assured that has been brought up here before.
However, the thread was about what is served at an American fast food chain.
Still, I agree with you and thanks for pointing out the method of twice
frying once again.  Your post won't change the USians calling them French
Fries, but the method of cooking them is a winner!

============================

From: DJKathyA 
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2001 10:23:02 -0500
--------
Just a guess here, but I have always assumed the French invented the process
of thinly cut potatoes fried in hot oil. "Pomme Frittes" or something to
that effect....am I close to being correct here? I'd like to credit the
French with perfume, great bread, and french fries. Nothing else however...
;0)  DJKathyA

============================

From: alsandorz[at]netcom.ca (Michel Boucher)
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2001 15:51:54 GMT
--------
DJKathyA a écrit dans:
>Just a guess here, but I have always assumed the French invented the
>process of thinly cut potatoes fried in hot oil. "Pomme Frittes" or
>something to that effect....am I close to being correct here? 

No.  It is the cut, "french cut", so in fact they are not French fries, 
but frenched fries.  The term "french cut" is used in English only.  
The term "French fries" or "fries" is used in Norf America.  In 
Britain they use the word "chips" as in "fish and chips".  The process 
of cutting fries into this shape and boiling them in hot oil originated 
in Belgium.  

>I'd
>like to credit the French with perfume, great bread, and french
>fries. Nothing else however... ;0)  DJKathyA

If you are unwilling to credit the French for anything else, then you 
can kiss your own country goodbye.  But of course, you meant this in 
jest and there was certainly no intent to tout stupidity over facts, 
I'm sure of that :-)

============================

From: "H. Paul Jacobson" 
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2001 12:59:07 -0800
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Still, I agree with you and thanks for pointing out the method of twice
> frying once again.  Your post won't change the USians calling them French
> Fries, but the method of cooking them is a winner!

The twice frying has been in the Joy of Cooking recipe for years.  The
only place where I know I've had twice fried potatoes is a food stand at
the Cedar Point Ammustment park in Ohio that only serves Fries.

============================

From: Paige Oliver 
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 17:02:21 -0500
--------
> The
> only place where I know I've had twice fried potatoes is a food stand at
> the Cedar Point Ammustment park in Ohio that only serves Fries.
> Paul

Cedar Point is the only place I've been that you can get your deep fried
Cheese-on-a-Stick with Cheese Sauce!    Heaven.
(From she who loves roller coasters and cheese)

============================

From: j-lattie[at]neiu.edu ()
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 22:14:49 GMT
--------
As an alternative, from someone who does not like to fry in all that
oil, but still likes crispy "french fries" -- same shape, anyway. --

Clean the potatoes -- firm red potatoes work better than whote,
Idaho's.  Trim spots, but leave mostof the skin on.    Place in salted
water either on the stove or microwave, and cook til about halfway
done (still form, not soft.)

Immediately drain in colandar in the sink, and drain with fresh cold
water to cool down and stop the cooking process.

meantime, ove nas been preheatring to about 400 degrees.  Spread out
potatoes on a jelly roll pan or broiler pan or whatever.  Non-stick,
or sprayed with Pam or whatever.  Place in oven (not broiler),
turning/stirring occasionall, until golden and done to your desired
level of crispness.  Thinner cuts will be crisp throughout, thicker
ones will have a crisp outside and softer inside.  All different
tastes and preferences.

Sometimes, fo r the thicker ones ('cottage fries'), halfway through
cooking I may spray them with olive oil. maybe then spinkle any herbs
and spices over them -- use your imagination.  I've even used this
procedure for small baby potatoes, or cut up chunks.

Just play and experiment.

============================

From: cmc6789[at]webtv.net (chris clemons)
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2001 11:03:17 -0500 (EST)
--------
Well, I know wh they calln them that... It's because of the way they are
cut. Theyare French long-cut. I hope this Explains it. 
            You're welcome,
                                  Beth

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From: Martha Hughes 
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2001 16:08:50 GMT
--------
Debaene Franky wrote:
(snipped great method of cooking fries)

I make them the way you do, Debaene, except the mayo. Ketchup is the way to
go.

============================

From: Kate 
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2001 19:59:42 GMT
--------
Martha Hughes wrote:
> I make them the way you do, Debaene, except the mayo. Ketchup is the way to
> go.

Ketchup is merely okay.  Mayonnaise, particularly a spicy mayonnaise isn't
bad but dijon mustard is my favorite way to go!  I fry 'em twice too.  Once
at 350F and the second at 375F.

============================

From: Paige Oliver 
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 17:03:11 -0500
--------
Kate wrote:
> Ketchup is merely okay.  Mayonnaise, particularly a spicy mayonnaise isn't
> bad but dijon mustard is my favorite way to go!

I'll vote for Ranch Dressing as my favorite fry dip.

============================

From: "D.W." 
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2001 09:30:39 -0800
--------
Debaene Franky wrote:
> this is how its done in the land of the fries.... Belgium.
> So lets get a deal, from now on please call french fries BELGIAN fries.

Yeah, how can they be french?  I mean, they aren't rude and they don't smell
bad.

============================

From: Stan Horwitz 
Date: 22 Jan 2001 18:24:18 GMT
--------
Debaene Franky wrote:
> Something is bothering me..
> What I do not understand is why fries are called FRENCH fries in the US.
> As being a Belgian and thus European and living very closely to France, I
> must say, it is very rare that you find realy good fries all over France.  

I haven't the slightest idea of how that name came about. 

We have something in the states called "Belgian waffles" too. This is a
waffle that is round and fairly thick. Its often served as a dessert or
for breakfast with fruit, ice cream, and whipped cream on top. Do you
Belgians have this food there?
 
> I also travel to the US once in a while and I must say, I have eaten fries
> in the most various sizes, forms and tastes but nothing as we have here in
> Belgium (that is world famous for its fries).

There was a frite shop on South Street in Philadelphia that closed a few
months ago. It was only opened for about a year. The owner claimed to sell
genuine Belgian style frites (or french fries). This is all the store
sold. There was a wide variety of toppings. Frites were sold in paper
cones. There was a large size and small. I think the small was $4.50 and
it was very good. The fries were quite a bit longer than what you see in
McDonads and maybe about twice as thick and much more tasty. Is this the
way they're sold in Beligium?

> I have followed the threads on the MC Donalds fries in this newsgroup
> and I see that a lot of people are anxcious to learn how the real fries
> are realy made. 

If you ever get to Wildwood, NJ which is a very popular tourist spot for
young teenaged Europeans to come work at for the summer, you can taste
some of the best fries in the world! Curly's fries! They're not curlie.
The owner takes Idaho potatoes with skins on. Puts them through a hand
operated machine which slices them into fries with the crinkle cuts on
them, fries them in a vat of hot peanut oil, salts, and serves them. The
customer can add whatever condiments he or she wants such as vinegar,
additional salt, or ketchup. I opt for the ketchup. These taste so good!

============================

From: "Debaene Franky" 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 20:04:09 +0100
--------
Stan Horwitz wrote:
>We have something in the states called "Belgian waffles" too. This is a
>waffle that is round and fairly thick. Its often served as a dessert or
>for breakfast with fruit, ice cream, and whipped cream on top. Do you
>Belgians have this food there?

Yes indeed we have these great waffles! But real Belgian Waffles are
rectangular and about one inch thick.
They are very crisp and normaly served with powder sugar or whiped cream and
different kinds of fruit. Yummi!!!
We have several food items that are called after Belgium all over the world:
-Brussels sprouts
-Belgian endives (very tastefull when coocked, rolled in a slice of ham and
served in a cheese sause. Then put into the oven after been coverded with
mozarella cheese)

>There was a frite shop on South Street in Philadelphia that closed a few
>months ago. It was only opened for about a year. The owner claimed to sell
>genuine Belgian style frites (or french fries). This is all the store
>sold. There was a wide variety of toppings. Frites were sold in paper
>cones. There was a large size and small. I think the small was $4.50 and
>it was very good. The fries were quite a bit longer than what you see in
>McDonads and maybe about twice as thick and much more tasty. Is this the
>way they're sold in Beligium?

Belgium is know for its "frietkoten"
To be honest these are our genuine fastfood shops. They were here long
before Mc Donalds oer Quick
We have several toppings and meatsauces to pour on top. They used to be
served in paper cones or plastic plates> They should be eaten without a
fork!

>If you ever get to Wildwood, NJ which is a very popular tourist spot for
>young teenaged Europeans to come work at for the summer, you can taste
>some of the best fries in the world! Curly's fries! They're not curlie.
>The owner takes Idaho potatoes with skins on. Puts them through a hand
>operated machine which slices them into fries with the crinkle cuts on
>them, fries them in a vat of hot peanut oil, salts, and serves them. The
>customer can add whatever condiments he or she wants such as vinegar,
>additional salt, or ketchup. I opt for the ketchup. These taste so good!

I would like to try this!!! At the end of this year I hope to fly to Mass.
Would that be a long drive to Wildwood?
I am normaly in the tri- state area (Berkshires)

Regards!!

============================

From: Debbie 
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 02:51:05 GMT
--------
Debaene Franky wrote:
> -Belgian endives (very tastefull when coocked, rolled in a slice of ham and
> served in a cheese sause. Then put into the oven after been coverded with
> mozarella cheese)

How do you cook the endives..steam, boil???  Is the cheese sauce just a
basic one?  Thanks.

============================

From: DJKathyA 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 17:27:27 -0500
--------
Stan Horwitz wrote:
> We have something in the states called "Belgian waffles" too. This 
>is a waffle that is round and fairly thick. Its often served as a 
>dessert or for breakfast with fruit, ice cream, and whipped cream 
>on top. Do you Belgians have this food there?

I had a wonderful Belgian Waffle in Flanders Belgium. It was very tender,
big like ours, and not as sweet. They topped it with powdered sugar. So I
guess "yes" is the answer.
DJKathyA :0)

============================

From: Ranee Mueller 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 14:33:54 -0800
--------
Stan Horwitz wrote:
> We have something in the states called "Belgian waffles" too. This is a
> waffle that is round and fairly thick. Its often served as a dessert or
> for breakfast with fruit, ice cream, and whipped cream on top. Do you
> Belgians have this food there?

   As I understand it, the Belgian waffle was actually created in the 
US, by an American.  World's fair, 20s/30s, I don't remember all details 
at the moment.  

============================

From: "Martha Hughes" 
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 14:48:35 GMT
--------
Ranee Mueller wrote:
>    As I understand it, the Belgian waffle was actually created in the
> US, by an American.  World's fair, 20s/30s, I don't remember all details
> at the moment.

This made me think about past world's fairs. Lots of new inventions used to
get their debuts at world's fairs. Tea in a bag is another invention that
did. I know there are several others.

Waffles are great treats in Denmark as well, btw.

============================

From: Dan Quale 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 13:06:31 -0800
--------
Debaene Franky wrote:
> first of all you need a potato of a respectable size (that is no problem in
> the US, I have seen that!). The potatoe type is also important. The best

I can't seem to get it right: Is it POTATOE OR POTATO?

============================

From: Stan Horwitz 
Date: 22 Jan 2001 22:08:32 GMT
--------
Dan Quale wrote:
> I can't seem to get it right: Is it POTATOE OR POTATO?

I hope our new president numbers spelling as one of his most
serious problems! :)

============================

Subject: Re: ( French???) Fries Nooooooooh!
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: brendaenglish[at]my-deja.com
Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2001 16:28:42 GMT
--------
My grandmother came from France in the early 1900s.  My mother often
spoke of the french fries she made for them through their entire
childhood.  She said they were absolutely delicious.  I can't say,
unfortunatley, she passed away before I was born.  But, I guess the
French make them also.

============================

From: Anthony Bruck 
Date: 21 Jan 2001 18:13:22 GMT
--------
brendaenglish@my-deja.com wrote:
> . . . I guess the French make them also.

"The Escoffier Cook Book", in its English translation, has an
entry for "Pont-neuf potatoes (French fried potatoes)".  Same
recipe also in "Le Repertoire de la cuisine" (Saulnier).  But
the name "pommes de terre Pont-Neuf" may no longer be current 
even if these really were "French fries" as we now know them.

============================

From: brendaenglish[at]my-deja.com
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 03:55:21 GMT
--------
D.W. wrote:
> Yeah, how can they be french?  I mean, they aren't rude and they don't smell
> bad.

Hmmmmmm what a rude comment!  Does that mean you are french?

============================

From: "D.W." 
Date: Mon, 22 Jan 2001 19:12:03 -0800
--------
> Hmmmmmm what a rude comment!  Does that mean you are french?

IT'S CALLED HUMOR, CHECK IT OUT SOMETIME.

============================

From: alsandorz[at]netcom.ca (Michel Boucher)
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 13:09:21 GMT
--------
D.W. wrote:
>IT'S CALLED HUMOR, CHECK IT OUT SOMETIME.

No it isn't.  Humour (note proper spelling) is funny.  Your comment was 
just rude and annoying.

============================

From: gzywicki[at]my-deja.com (Greg Zywicki)
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 13:44:15 GMT
--------
Michel Boucher wrote:
> No it isn't.  Humour (note proper spelling) is funny.  Your comment was
> just rude and annoying.

He had the Propouuur Speuuuulliuunuuunung, Michel.  And his comment
wasn't just rude and annoying, it was also funny.  You must have been in
a bad humour to have missed it.

============================

From: alsandorz[at]netcom.ca (Michel Boucher)
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 22:41:12 GMT
--------
Greg Zywicki wrote:
>He had the Propouuur Speuuuulliuunuuunung, Michel.  And his comment
>wasn't just rude and annoying, it was also funny.  You must have
>been in a bad humour to have missed it.

Actually, I found it unfunny because it's unfunny.  I don't mind taking 
a slice out of the French (from France) every now and then, but that 
was not even remotely a good one.  Now, if he had said Belgian...

============================

From: "D.W." 
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 19:49:17 -0800
--------
Michel Boucher wrote:
> Actually, I found it unfunny because it's unfunny.  I don't mind taking
> a slice out of the French (from France) every now and then, but that
> was not even remotely a good one.  Now, if he had said Belgian...

Whatever................is your whining supposed to represent the sound of
non-laughter?

============================

From: Bob Y. 
Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 15:10:42 -0600
--------
Michel Boucher wrote:
>No it isn't.  Humour (note proper spelling) is funny.  Your comment was 
>just rude and annoying.

I hate to bring this up, but I would venture to say that more people spell
the word humor that those who spell it humour. And, of course, what some
folks consider funny, others consider either assinine or offensive.

============================

From: alsandorz[at]netcom.ca (Michel Boucher)
Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 23:39:09 GMT
--------
Bob Y. wrote:
>I hate to bring this up, but I would venture to say that more people
>spell the word humor that those who spell it humour. 

Among which group?  If you include the former British Empire, which 
includes India, and therefore numbers well into a billion speakers, I 
daresay that humour outranks humor 4:1.  If you mean here on this 
newsgroup, you may well be right, for now, but that doers not mean one 
must insist on repeating the mistake :-)

============================

From: "D.W." 
Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 16:49:37 -0800
--------
But can you spell pissing contest?

============================

From: Michel Boucher 
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 16:03:08 GMT
--------
Martha Hughes wrote:
> This made me think about past world's fairs. Lots of new inventions
> used to get their debuts at world's fairs. Tea in a bag is another
> invention that did. I know there are several others.

Hot dogs.  Quote:

>Today's hot dog on a bun was probably introduced during the St. Louis
>"Louisiana Purchase Exposition" in 1904 by Bavarian concessionaire,
>Anton Feuchtwanger. He loaned white gloves to his patrons to hold his
>piping hot sausages. Most of the gloves were not returned, and the
>supply began running low. He reportedly asked his brother-in-law, a
>baker, for help. The baker improvised long soft rolls that fit the
>meat--thus inventing the hot dog bun.

http://www.hot-dog.org/hd_history.htm

============================

From: Young 
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 11:14:04 -0500
--------
Michel Boucher wrote:
> >Today's hot dog on a bun was probably introduced during the St. Louis
> >"Louisiana Purchase Exposition" in 1904 by Bavarian concessionaire,

Wasn't the ice cream cone debuted at a World's Fair?

nancy

============================

From: Barry Grau 
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 16:53:11 GMT
--------
qwerty@mail.monmouth.com wrote:
> Wasn't the ice cream cone debuted at a World's Fair?

And telephones that show video of the person on the other end of the wire?

From Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary

Wireless
Function:	noun
Date:	1903
1 : WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY
2 : two-way wireless transmission of sound using radio waves
3 chiefly British : RADIO
--
-bwg

============================

From: jcmweb[at]aol.com (John)
Date: Tue, 23 Jan 2001 17:37:09 GMT
--------
Debaene Franky wrote:
> Yes indeed we have these great waffles! But real Belgian Waffles are
> rectangular and about one inch thick.

When I worked in Brussels, they served two type of waffles- Belgian and
Liegian (???).  The 'Gaufre de Liege' (my spelling is undoubtedly
wrong) were smaller, thinner and stickier, and also to die for.


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