Return to BigSpud Menu

Subject: Finally my SUPER CRISPY fried potatoes SECRET and recipe.
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Pandora <mirybranca[at]alice.it>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 11:33:48 +0200
--------
My friend, you know I have had many problems with fried potatoes (it's since 
about 7 years I try). They came out so soft!!! This is because we don't have 
good potatoes (here we are in Italy and not in Germany). And you know I 
become very angry when I can't make a good dish. So I have turned on my 
brain and I have begun to think. After racking my brains I have invented an 
expedient; I don't know if "invented" is the proper term because I remember 
(but I have remembered after 7 years) that my mother used to make like this! 
To make very crispy fried potatoes: cut them with the proper machine at the 
same dimension. Then put the potatoes in a bowl, covered with water. Then 
let them stay for about one hour or more: this is the secret. A secret you 
will never read on magazines or cookbooks. After, you  must dry perfectly 
your chips before you double fry (preferably in a fryer).
DOUBLE FRYING (very important):
Light your fryer and turn the temperature at 350F (180C). When it is 
ready, put inside your dry potatoes and cook till they become golden but not 
brown (it will take about 5-6 minutes). Then dry them very well on cooking 
paper and let them stay till you are ready to serve them in table (this is a 
VERY TIP! Because you can prepare them with great advance ...and if you have 
guests...you know what I mean ...you will need only few minutes to have 
CRISPY fryed potatoes on your table). Few minutes before serving, put again 
your potatoes in your fryer (this time the temperature will b of 375F 
(190C) and fry till they become golden-brown and very crispy.
TRY TRY TRY! It's true and I Am so happy!
Perhaps someone of you will think I Am the second person who discovered 
America (as we say in Italy ...:DDDD). But  if, till yesterday, someone 
would have told me to soak potatoes for more then 10 minutes, I would have 
told him he was crazy!!!! :DDDD
Wating for comments...

============================

From: Paul M. Cook <pmcook[at]gte.net>
Date: Tue, 07 Aug 2007 10:07:57 GMT
--------
My only comment is that you'd have been my slave had you tasted my potato 
chips.  I too discovered the secret, just by trial and error.  I would use a 
mandolin to shave the chips into ice water and let it sit for an hour give 
or take. A sprinkle of sea salt.  Then two fryings, because the oil cools so 
fast.  It worked for all kinds of shapes, my favorite being waffle cut.  And 
before I knoew it was fashionable I ate them with mayo mixed with mustard.

I'd have owned you after one chip.  And you know what they say about potato 
chips.

But to be fair, the Belgians got there first.

============================

From: Pandora <mirybranca[at]alice.it>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 12:27:03 +0200
--------
Paul M. Cook ha scritto:

> My only comment is that you'd have been my slave had you tasted my potato 
> chips.

Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!

I too discovered the secret, just by trial and error.

Just like me :)

>  I would use a
> mandolin to shave the chips into ice water

Ice water????? Ohhh! Tell me! Is it a new secret?

>  and let it sit for an hour give
> or take. A sprinkle of sea salt.

Also a sprinkle of sea salt???? Is it a new secret? tell me also this tip, 
please!

>  Then two fryings, because the oil cools so
> fast.  It worked for all kinds of shapes, my favorite being waffle cut.

I have never made waffle cut because I don't have the machine. But I have a 
tool (I have bought it 30 years ago when I went in London) which cut 
potatoes in wavy sticks: it's my favourite shape! But I have set aside it 
since I have had problems with fresh potatoes (I only fryed frozen potatoes, 
because they became more crispy than the fresh ones I bought!)

>   And
> before I knoew it was fashionable I ate them with mayo mixed with mustard.

Ohh! So do I! I don't like potatoes In Mc. Donald's style:  with mayo, 
Cutsup or other sauces.

> I'd have owned you after one chip.  And you know what they say about 
> potato chips.

Yesss!!!

> But to be fair, the Belgians got there first.

Oh! I didn't know!
Thank you for your comment, my dear. We will meet together after the second 
chip...it's better ...   :DDDDDD

============================

From: Paul M. Cook <pmcook[at]gte.net>
Date: Tue, 07 Aug 2007 11:31:22 GMT
--------
Pandora wrote:

> Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!

My slave, yes, but I'd do the dishes for you.

> I too discovered the secret, just by trial and error.
>
> Just like me :)

Si.  Great minds think alike. Experience is the best tutor.  Exploring is 
the greatest adventure.

>>  I would use a
>> mandolin to shave the chips into ice water
>
> Ice water????? Ohhh! Tell me! Is it a new secret?

It is, but too much for tonight.  All will be revealed in time.

>>  and let it sit for an hour give
>> or take. A sprinkle of sea salt.
>
> Also a sprinkle of sea salt???? Is it a new secret? tell me also this tip, 
> please!

OK, yes, I will tell you.  A fine grain of fine salt, sprinkled on the 
potatoes before frying will permeate the potatoes and make for a much more 
tantalizing, succulent, delicious result.  Sea salt is my favorite for 
subtlety, tanginess and complexity.

>>  Then two fryings, because the oil cools so
>> fast.  It worked for all kinds of shapes, my favorite being waffle cut.
>
> I have never made waffle cut because I don't have the machine. But I have 
> a tool (I have bought it 30 years ago when I went in London) which cut 
> potatoes in wavy sticks: it's my favourite shape! But I have set aside it 
> since I have had problems with fresh potatoes (I only fryed frozen 
> potatoes, because they became more crispy than the fresh ones I bought!)

Ah this is easily fixed.  Every mandolin/slicer has a "crinkle cut" knife. 
If you pass each stroke through the knife you get a parallel crinkle cut. 
But if you rotate the food about 45 degrees between each cut, you get the 
famous waffle cut.

> > And
>> before I knoew it was fashionable I ate them with mayo mixed with 
>> mustard.
>
> Ohh! So do I! I don't like potatoes In Mc. Donald's style:  with mayo, 
> Cutsup or other sauces.

Horseradish and mayo dressing is awesome with fried potatoes.  Another Dutch 
invention that I love.

>> I'd have owned you after one chip.  And you know what they say about 
>> potato chips.
>
> Yesss!!!

Great minds do think alike, my dear.

>> But to be fair, the Belgians got there first.
>
> Oh! I didn't know!
> Thank you for your comment, my dear. We will meet together after the 
> second chip...it's better ...   :DDDDDD

;)

Paul

============================

From: "Pandora" <mirybranca[at]alice.it>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 14:05:32 +0200
--------
Paul M. Cook ha scritto:

> Si.  Great minds think alike. Experience is the best tutor.  Exploring is 
> the greatest adventure.

Oh! I love to explore!!!!

> It is, but too much for tonight.  All will be revealed in time.

I can pay in Euro :DDDDDDD!!!!!

> OK, yes, I will tell you.  A fine grain of fine salt, sprinkled on the 
> potatoes before frying will permeate the potatoes and make for a much more 
> tantalizing, succulent, delicious result.  Sea salt is my favorite for 
> subtlety, tanginess and complexity.

Ohh! "Tantalizing" !!! What a poetic term you use!!! I love it! Many 
compliments to you!
And many thank you for this tip. I thought salt could soften potatoes (..I 
don't know why)!

> Ah this is easily fixed.  Every mandolin/slicer has a "crinkle cut" knife. 
> If you pass each stroke through the knife you get a parallel crinkle cut. 
> But if you rotate the food about 45 degrees between each cut, you get the 
> famous waffle cut.

Ohhh! I Am very confused! And surprised! I will shaw you a pic. So we will 
understand if I have understood :)
You are very kind to have all this patience to explain to me all these 
things:)
Thank you

> Horseradish and mayo dressing is awesome with fried potatoes.  Another 
> Dutch invention that I love.

Well! We coudn't never be married :((((( ((( 
:DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD

> Paul

Thank you very much Paul I enjoyed very much to have met you and I have 
enjoyed very much your VERY interesting comments on fried potatoes!!!

Fondly
Pandora 

============================

From: Paul M. Cook <pmcook[at]gte.net>
Date: Tue, 07 Aug 2007 12:47:15 GMT
--------
Pandora wrote:

> Oh! I love to explore!!!!

Me too!!!!

> I can pay in Euro :DDDDDDD!!!!!

You have a deal, my friend.  I can be bought.   Money, food, it's all good.

> Ohh! "Tantalizing" !!! What a poetic term you use!!! I love it! Many 
> compliments to you!
> And many thank you for this tip. I thought salt could soften potatoes (..I 
> don't know why)!

Salt and potatoes go together like a man and woman.  Seemingly incompatible, 
but truthfully inseparable - independent but conjoined, unique but only in 
comparison.  Some things are just a natural match and are lost without each 
other.

> Ohhh! I Am very confused! And surprised! I will shaw you a pic. So we will 
> understand if I have understood :)
> You are very kind to have all this patience to explain to me all these 
> things:)

Not at all, it's my pleasure.  I can understand what a potato can do to the 
human soul;  especially perfectly fried, crispy on the outside and tender on 
the inside.  And so do you.  Perhaps in another place, in another time?

> Well! We coudn't never be married :((((( ((( :DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD

Perhaps that is true, my dear, but think of how good the potatoes would 
taste.?  A life of sin could taste as sweet.  Idaho, russets, reds, Yukon 
Gold, whites, purple - all could be ours.  But perhaps the stars just are 
not in our favor?

> Thank you very much Paul I enjoyed very much to have met you and I have 
> enjoyed very much your VERY interesting comments on fried potatoes!!!

I will always remember tonight, it was magical in a starchy, crispy kind of 
way.  I am so glad to know I am  not alone in my love of the potato.  Few 
can understand, but you however, know of what I speak.  I can never be the 
same man again no matter what potato pancake recipe I use.  It was magic, my 
mysterous friend.

============================

From: Pandora <mirybranca[at]alice.it>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 15:28:05 +0200
--------
Paul M. Cook ha scritto:
> You have a deal, my friend.  I can be bought.   Money, food, it's all 
> good.

OKKKK!!!!! I will pay you in nature ...
..(nature food. Ofcourse :DDD)

> Salt and potatoes go together like a man and woman.  Seemingly 
> incompatible, but truthfully inseparable - independent but conjoined, 
> unique but only in comparison.  Some things are just a natural match and 
> are lost without each other.

OHHHHHHHHH! What beautiful words yuo say!!
I love very much salt on fried potatoes. But I know people which prefer them 
without. It's awful, IMO!

> Not at all, it's my pleasure.  I can understand what a potato can do to 
> the human soul;  especially perfectly fried, crispy on the outside and 
> tender on the inside.  And so do you.  Perhaps in another place, in 
> another time?

I AGREE!!! Crispy out and tender inside : just like me :DDDDDDDD!!!!!
Tell me. How much do you want to tell me ? :DDDDDDDD

> Perhaps that is true, my dear, but think of how good the potatoes would 
> taste.?  A life of sin could taste as sweet.  Idaho, russets, reds, Yukon 
> Gold, whites, purple - all could be ours.  But perhaps the stars just are 
> not in our favor?

Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh! Potatoes like stars!!!!! My life 
it's a big potatoe...with or without you... (like U2) I think :))))

> I will always remember tonight, it was magical in a starchy, crispy kind 
> of way.  I am so glad to know I am  not alone in my love of the potato. 
> Few can understand, but you however, know of what I speak.  I can never be 
> the same man again no matter what potato pancake recipe I use.  It was 
> magic, my mysterous friend.

OHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!
Pleased to have met you my "mysterious friend" too!!!! Yes. From now we will 
have a lot of Crispy and good potatoes ;)
You are very very NICE! Have a good day my dear and thank you for this nice 
conversation :)

Many and many Kisses
Pandora 

============================

From: me[at]privacy.net (TammyM)
Date: Tue, 07 Aug 2007 14:00:16 GMT
--------
Paul M. Cook wrote:
>My only comment is that you'd have been my slave had you tasted my potato 
>chips.  I too discovered the secret, just by trial and error.  I would use a 
>mandolin to shave the chips into ice water and let it sit for an hour give 
>or take. A sprinkle of sea salt.  Then two fryings, because the oil cools so 
>fast.  It worked for all kinds of shapes, my favorite being waffle cut.  And 
>before I knoew it was fashionable I ate them with mayo mixed with mustard.

You had me right up until the part with mayo mixed with .... <gag>
mustard!

>I'd have owned you after one chip.  And you know what they say about potato 
>chips.

Provided that YOU provided the proper condiments of either malt
vinegar or tomato ketchup!

>But to be fair, the Belgians got there first.

Too true.  Best fries I've ever had were in Belgium.  Served with
mayo.  I cheated and used some malt vinegar on mine :-)

============================

From: Pandora <mirybranca[at]alice.it>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 17:48:06 +0200
--------
TammyM ha scritto:
>>But to be fair, the Belgians got there first.
>
> Too true.  Best fries I've ever had were in Belgium.  Served with
> mayo.  I cheated and used some malt vinegar on mine :-)

Hello my dear Tammy! I Am so happy to see you again on this NG!
Sorry, but the gustibus...:))) 

============================

From: Paul M. Cook <pmcook[at]gte.net>
Date: Wed, 08 Aug 2007 03:52:40 GMT
--------
TammyM wrote:

> You had me right up until the part with mayo mixed with .... <gag>
> mustard!

It was good.  It was a little Coleman's dry mixed in with the mayo.  Very 
tasty, subtle and rich.

> Provided that YOU provided the proper condiments of either malt
> vinegar or tomato ketchup!

I think we could work out something.  I could even arrange for some BBQ 
sauce, if you're into that kind of thing.

> Too true.  Best fries I've ever had were in Belgium.  Served with
> mayo.  I cheated and used some malt vinegar on mine :-)

You're so naughty!

============================

From: hahabogus <invalid[at]null.null>
Date: Tue, 07 Aug 2007 11:16:07 GMT
--------
Pandora wrote:
> I would have 
> told him he was crazy!!!! :DDDD
> Wating for comments...

I add salt to the water

============================

From: Pandora <mirybranca[at]alice.it>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 13:27:16 +0200
--------
hahabogus ha scritto:
> I add salt to the water

What is the use of salt in the water for potatoes? Could you explain to me?
TIA

============================

From: hahabogus <invalid[at]null.null>
Date: Tue, 07 Aug 2007 11:31:00 GMT
--------
Pandora wrote:
> What is the use of salt in the water for potatoes? Could you explain
> to me? TIA

I just add the salt, it seems to make for a tastier french fry. I added 
the salt the first time because I wanted to. I have explaination I just 
salt my soaking water. Not a lot of salt is added say maybe 1/2 tsp at a 
guess.

============================

From: Pandora <mirybranca[at]alice.it>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 13:47:37 +0200
--------
hahabogus ha scritto:
> I just add the salt, it seems to make for a tastier french fry. I added
> the salt the first time because I wanted to. I have explaination I just
> salt my soaking water. Not a lot of salt is added say maybe 1/2 tsp at a
> guess.

Ohhh! Then I must try! I will let you know.
Thank you

============================

From: Peter Aitken <paitken[at]CRAPnc.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 08:57:44 -0400
--------
Pandora says...
> My friend, you know I have had many problems with fried potatoes (it's since 
> about 7 years I try). They came out so soft!!! This is because we don't have 
> good potatoes (here we are in Italy and not in Germany). And you know I 

This is indeed a great recipe but it is hardly a secret - soaking in 
water and double frying have been around since before dirt.

============================

From: Pandora <mirybranca[at]alice.it>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 15:29:19 +0200
--------
Peter Aitken ha scritto:
> This is indeed a great recipe but it is hardly a secret - soaking in
> water and double frying have been around since before dirt.

Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh! But it is a pity nobody told me! :DDDDD

============================

From: Pandora <mirybranca[at]alice.it>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 15:30:29 +0200
--------
Peter Aitken ha scritto:
> This is indeed a great recipe but it is hardly a secret - soaking in
> water and double frying have been around since before dirt.

And over all: how many minutes of soaking. This is important!

============================

From: Peter Aitken <paitken[at]CRAPnc.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 11:17:56 -0400
--------
Pandora says...
> And over all: how many minutes of soaking. This is important!

I don't know. I don't think it matters too much. The purpose is mainly 
to wash the extra starch off the surface.

============================

From: Pandora <mirybranca[at]alice.it>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 17:59:43 +0200
--------
Peter Aitken ha scritto:
> I don't know. I don't think it matters too much. The purpose is mainly
> to wash the extra starch off the surface.

Oh! Yes ! Ofcourse!
But I think it is very important to soak cut potatoes beyond 1 hour!

============================

From: Dan Abel <dabel[at]sonic.net>
Date: Tue, 07 Aug 2007 08:59:52 -0700
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
> This is indeed a great recipe but it is hardly a secret - soaking in 
> water and double frying have been around since before dirt.

If they didn't have dirt, how did they grow the potatoes?

:-)

============================

From: Dee Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 09:02:45 -0400
--------
Pandora wrote:
> My friend, you know I have had many problems with fried potatoes (it's 
> since about 7 years I try). They came out so soft!!! This is because we 
> don't have good potatoes (here we are in Italy and not in Germany). And 
> you know I become very angry when I can't make a good dish. So I have 

When I was a wee child, and my dad had a 9-5 job, my mom would put the 
potatoes to soak everynight for about an  hour.  Some people nowadays will 
use ice water, but she used the coldest water available always.

 In those days, she used a cast iron skillet/pot crispy fried potatoes.

The method of double frying is written about in a number of books; I thought 
you probably knew about it.  I'm glad you found it.

============================

From: Pandora <mirybranca[at]alice.it>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 15:32:37 +0200
--------
Dee Dee ha scritto:
> When I was a wee child, and my dad had a 9-5 job, my mom would put the 
> potatoes to soak everynight for about an  hour.  Some people nowadays will 
> use ice water, but she used the coldest water available always.
>
> In those days, she used a cast iron skillet/pot crispy fried potatoes.
>
> The method of double frying is written about in a number of books; I 
> thought you probably knew about it.  I'm glad you found it.

Dee Dee. I knew about double frying. But I didn't know to soak potatoes for 
one hour and more.!
I didn't know also of iced water. Could you tell me why?

============================

From: Dee Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 09:50:54 -0400
--------
Pandora wrote:
> I didn't know also of iced water. Could you tell me why?

Cook's Illustrated under "French Fries" it say that it is very important to 
first rinse the starch off the surface by putting the cut fries and runing 
cold water until clear.  They say it makes a real difference.  Then you fill 
the bowl with clear water, ADD ICE, and REFRIGERATE the potatoes for minimum 
of 30 minutes.

It says that "when the potatoes enter the oil, they are nearly frozen; this 
allows a slow, thorough cooking of the inner potato pulp."

============================

From: Pandora <mirybranca[at]alice.it>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 17:44:34 +0200
--------
Dee Dee ha scritto:
> Cook's Illustrated under "French Fries" it say that it is very important 
> to first rinse the starch off the surface by putting the cut fries and 
> runing cold water until clear.

I didn't kmow of *running* cold water!

>   They say it makes a real difference.  Then you fill
> the bowl with clear water, ADD ICE, and REFRIGERATE the potatoes for 
> minimum of 30 minutes.

You say I must add ice aftewr running water fr 30 minutes?  I must try!!!!

> It says that "when the potatoes enter the oil, they are nearly frozen; 
> this allows a slow, thorough cooking of the inner potato pulp."

OKKKKK!!!
Thank you very much! I will try!

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 10:03:23 -0400
--------
Pandora wrote
> Dee Dee. I knew about double frying. But I didn't know to soak potatoes 
> for one hour and more.!
> I didn't know also of iced water. Could you tell me why?

Just guessing, seems like it would crisp up the cell structure
so the outside would fry up crispy and the inside wouldn't just
soak up the oil and become limp.

============================

From: Pandora <mirybranca[at]alice.it>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 17:50:49 +0200
--------
Nancy Young ha scritto:
> Just guessing, seems like it would crisp up the cell structure
> so the outside would fry up crispy and the inside wouldn't just
> soak up the oil and become limp.

OHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH Nancy! Thank you for this answer!
Yes! It is possible!
Tomorrow I will try also with iced water!
Thank you

============================

From: me[at]privacy.net (TammyM)
Date: Tue, 07 Aug 2007 14:09:58 GMT
--------
Pandora wrote:
<snip delightful journey>

>Wating for comments...

Pandora, my friend, it is always a delight to read your culinary
adventures.  You have a way with words! <this is a compliment>

It's cool enough here for me to fry tonight, so I shall make up some
nice super crispy potatoes a la Pandora in tribute :-)

>Kisses and cheers
>Pandora 

Hugs, and ciao for now,
TammyM

============================

From: Pandora <mirybranca[at]alice.it>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 17:57:26 +0200
--------
TammyM ha scritto:
> Hugs, and ciao for now,
> TammyM

Tammy!  My BEST friend!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! You are so kind and I wonder 
when we will meet!
Thank you to try potatoes alla Pandora :DDDDD
Tell me if they are good :)
Many many kisses
Ps, I would like to be there with poatoes, Tammy and friends!
Spend a lucky and happy evening and night.

============================

From: GrumpGrump[at]gmail.com
Date: Tue, 07 Aug 2007 18:27:56 -0000
--------
Pandora wrote:
> My friend, you know I have had many problems with fried potatoes (it's since
> about 7 years I try). They came out so soft!!! This is because we don't have
> good potatoes (here we are in Italy and not in Germany). And you know I
> become very angry when I can't make a good dish. So I have turned on my

You can also get a super crisp effect by boiling them for 2-3 mins in salted
water and drain and deep fry.

Also after the crispy "chips" are ready to serve, sprinkle them with grated
garlic and chopped parsley.  Your guests will rave about them.

Works wonders for Roasted whole potatoes as you would have with the typical
British "Sunday Roast and Veggies"

Try boiling them next time and then roast the peeled whole potatoes in an
inch of oil in an electric frypan..

Frenchy

============================

From: Pandora <mirybranca[at]alice.it>
Date: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 22:05:33 +0200
--------
GrumpGrump ha scritto:
> Also after the crispy "chips" are ready to serve, sprinkle them with grated
> garlic and chopped parsley.  Your guests will rave about them.

It's a recipe! Thank you I will try very soon!

> Works wonders for Roasted whole potatoes as you would have with the typical
> British "Sunday Roast and Veggies"

> Try boiling them next time and then roast the peeled whole potatoes in an
> inch of oil in an electric frypan..

"Whole potatoes"? In a frypan? Are they too big to be frying?

cheers and very thank you
Pandora

============================

From: Nancy2 <nancy-dooley[at]uiowa.edu>
Date: Tue, 07 Aug 2007 12:23:55 -0700
--------
Pandora wrote:
> My friend, you know I have had many problems with fried potatoes (it's since
> about 7 years I try). They came out so soft!!! This is because we don't have
> good potatoes (here we are in Italy and not in Germany). And you know I
> become very angry when I can't make a good dish. So I have turned on my

I think I should say your English is really great since you've been
hanging out in this group.  I am envious of anyone who has a second -
or third - language skill.  The sum total of my Italian is a common
word for "dirty old man," which I learned after my friends and I got
some relatively harmless pokes and pinches on a public bus in
Rome. ;-)

As to crispy potatoes, I've always soaked them in ice water - you
could try that once - I don't think you would have to soak them that
long.

Ice water is also good for soaking onion rings (before you dip them in
batter and fry them).  It keeps them really crispy.

============================

From: Joseph Littleshoes <jpstifel[at]isp.com>
Date: Tue, 07 Aug 2007 17:27:53 -0700
--------
Pandora wrote:
> To make very crispy fried potatoes: cut them with the proper machine at the 
> same dimension. Then put the potatoes in a bowl, covered with water.

Unless you want to make "hash  browns" then after shredding the potatoes 
you squeeze as much water out of them as you possibly can.

And then if you have one of those smaller Mexican tortilla deep fryer 
basket thingy's you can fill it with shredded potatoes and make a fried 
potato basket to put other things in.

But that's only presentation, some well squeezed shredded or sliced 
potatoes can make a nice coating for a piece of fish, deep fried to be 
served with a nice sauce.

I particularly like to take thinly sliced potatoes and use them to coat 
a small roast.  First cooked high to brown &amp; set the potato coating and 
then longer and lower to cook the meat.  Basting optional, Roti de porc 
ala boulangere, ala Tuscano starts the  seasoned potatoes at the 
beginning, the bakers wife adds them about half way through the roasting.

With the proper roasting container of just the dimensions to fit the 
roast, the container, often ceramic, may be lined with potatoes and a 
cover of potatoes over the top,  the potatoes seasoned with not only s &amp; 
p but grated cheese as well, given the container, some are meant to be 
served from as well as cooked in so one does not need to worry about 
dislodging the coating from the meat or de - moulding or otherwise 
transferring the roast form one container to another.

IMO any of the "meat pies" are enhanced by an application of these 
thinly sliced potatoes as the "crust" of the pie.  It can look very nice 
in an ordinary pyrex pie plate but even nicer IMO in a glazed ceramic 
"pie plate" made to resemble a pie crust, a quiche plate will work also.

One of these days im going to have to make some layers of thinly sliced 
potatoes among the cabbage leaves i wrap around a ball of meat loaf mix 
and secure in a cheesecloth bag for my boiled meat loaf, sou fassum 
provancale.  I do likes me collcannon.


Return to BigSpud Menu