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Subject: Gravy on French Fries?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 2 Feb 2003 11:06:30 -0600
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I've heard about it.  Never gave it much thought.  Last night I broiled some
ground round patties.  Then put them in a pan to simmer, covered, in a brown
gravy with some onion, garlic, black pepper, a dash of cayenne, some chopped
parsley, probably something else I don't recall at the moment.  I didn't
feel like fussing with mashed potatoes so I threw some frozen "steak fries"
in the oven.  I had steamed some broccoli earlier in the day so I had some
of that as well.  When it was all ready I plated a serving of the beef and
spooned a little gravy over the top.  I added fries to the plate.  Thought,
what the hell, I'll spoon some gravy on the fries, too.  Hmmm.  Not bad!

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From: Jenn 
Date: Sun, 2 Feb 2003 12:37:39 -0500
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Yup, gravy on fries is pretty darn good.  Another thing I absolutely love
(especially when I'm PMSing) is fries (from a fryer, not the oven, with lots
of salt) dipped in chocolate pudding.  Now, before everyone says "EEEWWWW",
think of all the people who go to Godiva and buy potato chips coated with
chocolate....basically the same thing.  (Everyone I tell about this says
eeww...until they try it!)  It's gotta be better than deep fried oreos!

============================

From: John Gaughan 
Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 13:50:12 -0600
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Jenn wrote:
> Yup, gravy on fries is pretty darn good.  Another thing I absolutely love
> (especially when I'm PMSing) is fries (from a fryer, not the oven, with lots
> of salt) dipped in chocolate pudding.  Now, before everyone says "EEEWWWW",
> think of all the people who go to Godiva and buy potato chips coated with
> chocolate....basically the same thing.  (Everyone I tell about this says
> eeww...until they try it!)  It's gotta be better than deep fried oreos!

My wife gets weird cravings. Right now she is on Subway sandwhiches (not 
weird, I know), last month it was McDonald's fries dipped in a chocolate 
shake. Her cravings are so weird and frustrating at times I understand 
the idea of the couple being pregnant, not just the woman. I am always 
running around putting some strange concoction together for her. Fried 
chicken dipped in ketchup and chocolate? Or how about Arby's curly fries 
dipped in a mixture of Honey Mistard and Horsey sauce? I actually like 
that one though.

I have not tried deep fried Oreos... could you please elaborate?

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From: Jack Schidt 
Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 17:43:51 GMT
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Jill McQuown wrote:
> spooned a little gravy over the top.  I added fries to the plate. Thought,
> what the hell, I'll spoon some gravy on the fries, too.  Hmmm.  Not bad!

Cronin & Phelan, an Irish pub in Astoria, Queens, has been serving fries
with brown gravy for as long as I can remember.  That's how they arrive; you
don't hafta ask.

Jack Astor

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From: blake murphy 
Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 18:18:17 -0500
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Jack Schidt wrote:
>Cronin & Phelan, an Irish pub in Astoria, Queens, has been serving fries
>with brown gravy for as long as I can remember.  That's how they arrive; you
>don't hafta ask.

is this an east coast thing?  

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From: projectile vomit chick 
Date: Wed, 05 Feb 2003 19:17:38 GMT
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blake murphy wrote:
> is this an east coast thing?

I've seen fries served with brown gravy in Minnesota.

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From: barry_grau[at]yahoo.com (Barry Grau)
Date: 5 Feb 2003 14:40:06 -0800
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blake murphy wrote:
> is this an east coast thing?  

I naver saw it or heard of it growing up in NYC. But I had a sheltered
upbringing. I first saw it from a girl I dated when I moved to Chicago
(25 years ago (ouch)).

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From: nadine 
Date: Thu, 06 Feb 2003 04:13:00 GMT
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having lived in the north of england i can tell you gravy is very popular
over the top of fries when purchased at a fish and chip shop. mind you so is
curry sauce too.the same sauce as used to make curries is often sold poured
over the fries, asboth are held at the front of the shop in big pans in a
bain marie-water bath-

============================

From: Grandad 
Date: Sun, 9 Feb 2003 19:37:37 +1100
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nadine wrote:
> having lived in the north of england i can tell you gravy is very popular
> over the top of fries when purchased at a fish and chip shop. mind you so is
> curry sauce too.the same sauce as used to make curries is often sold poured
> over the fries, asboth are held at the front of the shop in big pans in a
> bain marie-water bath-

Bloody L! I left Blighty in 1966 and then you'd get vinegar and salt and
maybe a pickled onion on your chips. At age 11 I ate so many wallies (big
gherkins) that I was off them for life - almost - just starting to get a
taste back for them now nearly 50 years later! Salt and sour went with
chips. I can handle gravy - but curry sauce???
yech,

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 07:18:33 -0700
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Grandad wrote:
> Bloody L! I left Blighty in 1966 and then you'd get vinegar and salt and
> maybe a pickled onion on your chips. At age 11 I ate so many wallies (big
> gherkins) that I was off them for life - almost - just starting to get a
> taste back for them now nearly 50 years later! Salt and sour went with
> chips. I can handle gravy - but curry sauce???
> yech,

LOL! Curry sauce indeed! Comes in huge tins. Very popular in
Asian neighbourhoods in London. Haven't seen any other gravy
with chips in the Southeast though, so may be a Northern
thing. Pickled onion juice or 'Greek' lemon dressing is
available in some chip shops.

In Holland, a much wider variety of sauces is served with
chips, including sate and chile sauces. However, not usually
put on top; rather to dip the chips into.

============================

From: Bob 
Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2003 04:21:15 GMT
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I lived in New Jersey, New York state, California and Hawaii and it wasn't
until I got transferred to Scranton, Pennsylvania that I saw gravy on french
fries.  Been here for 10 years and I still think it's weird.

============================

From: NO_SPAM_TO_dpharris[at]gci.net (Dennis P. Harris)
Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2003 01:08:43 -0900
--------
Bob wrote:
> until I got transferred to Scranton, Pennsylvania that I saw gravy on french
> fries.  Been here for 10 years and I still think it's weird.

if you want really weird, go to montreal and try poutine.  fries
with cheese curds and gravy...

============================

From: Siobhan Bouzane 
Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2003 12:46:35 -0330
--------
Dennis P. Harris wrote:
> if you want really weird, go to montreal and try poutine.  fries
> with cheese curds and gravy...

yum!  That has got to be the best way to eat fries, unless you are from
Newfoundland, Canada (pronounced NewFUNland, rhymes with understand).  Here
we have fries with 'dressing' and gravy.

Dressing here is bread crumbs, summer savoury, and finely chopped onions,
salt and pepper and small amount of margarine, often cooked as a stuffing
for poultry.

Prince Edward Island, Canada,(potato capital of Canada) also has a special
treat for French fry lovers.  Fries with the 'Works'.  Fries, cooked ground
beef, green peas, corn niblets, fried onions and gravy.

============================

From: stan[at]temple.edu
Date: 18 Feb 2003 13:11:57 GMT
--------
Bob wrote:
> I lived in New Jersey, New York state, California and Hawaii and it wasn't
> until I got transferred to Scranton, Pennsylvania that I saw gravy on french
> fries.  Been here for 10 years and I still think it's weird.

Of course! Esp. in Pennsylvania, the home of Heinz Ketchup, the
only logical condiment to use on french fries is Heinz Ketchup.

============================

From: Jack 
Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 10:48:17 -0700
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>   When it was all ready I plated a serving of the beef and
>spooned a little gravy over the top.  I added fries to the plate.  Thought,
>what the hell, I'll spoon some gravy on the fries, too.  Hmmm.  Not bad!

standard fare in the best New Jersey diners...

"chili dog wit spuds, one all the way one"

ah the memories

Jack
Tucson, Arizona

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From: Nancy Young 
Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 13:02:18 -0500
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Jill McQuown wrote:
>   When it was all ready I plated a serving of the beef and
>spooned a little gravy over the top.  I added fries to the plate.  Thought,
>what the hell, I'll spoon some gravy on the fries, too.  Hmmm.  Not bad!

I thought about it, why didn't that sound good to me, gravy on french
fries.  Of course, it's because I prefer my fries crispy.  But steak
fries aren't usually crispy, so I imagine they were good.  Ordinary
french fries I just put salt, usually.  Maybe ketchup, maybe not.
If ketchup, I salt the ketchup.  Not very adventurous.  However, I 
much prefer tarter sauce or even just mayo.   

============================

From: jen 
Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 11:05:12 -0800
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> I've heard about it.  Never gave it much thought.  [...]  Thought,
> what the hell, I'll spoon some gravy on the fries, too.  Hmmm.  Not bad!

i lived on fries and gravy while i was a teenager. it's very 
canadian (forget the cheese curd ... poutine didn't make it to BC 
until the 90s).

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From: Synic 
Date: Mon, 3 Feb 2003 03:41:19 +0800
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Jill McQuown wrote:
> I've heard about it.  Never gave it much thought. [...]

It's standard cafe food in Australia. Chips (without salt) 
with cheapo gravox gravy made with pepper. Very cheap fare 
and is second cousin to the 'chip butty' (chips in a roll 
with tomato sauce/ketsup).

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From: patscga[at]aol.com (Patscga)
Date: 02 Feb 2003 20:12:50 GMT
--------
In Baltimore in the 50's FF's with gravy were the "in" thing.  Remember the
movie "Diner"?
Pat in Atlanta

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From: George 
Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 20:19:09 GMT
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Jill McQuown wrote:
>   When it was all ready I plated a serving of the beef and
>spooned a little gravy over the top.  I added fries to the plate.  Thought,
>what the hell, I'll spoon some gravy on the fries, too.  Hmmm.  Not bad!

Traditional diner style fries when I was growing up here in PA. If you
didn't want a ladle of gravy on your fries you had to make sure and specify
that when you ordered.

============================

From: a.l 
Date: Mon, 03 Feb 2003 00:57:20 GMT
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George wrote:
> Traditional diner style fries when I was growing up here in PA. If you
> didn't want a ladle of gravy on your fries you had to make sure and specify
> that when you ordered.

And now it is an extra $3.50 and you have to make sure and specify when you
order, or else no gravy.  lol

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 18:14:54 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>   When it was all ready I plated a serving of the beef and
>spooned a little gravy over the top.  I added fries to the plate.  Thought,
>what the hell, I'll spoon some gravy on the fries, too.  Hmmm.  Not bad!

jill, you should get out more.

============================

Subject: Poutines rule - Re: Gravy on French Fries?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: ~ rob ~ 
Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 17:16:05 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>   When it was all ready I plated a serving of the beef and
>spooned a little gravy over the top.  I added fries to the plate.  Thought,
>what the hell, I'll spoon some gravy on the fries, too.  Hmmm.  Not bad!

Can't imagine where you've been...not in Canada I expect.

See:

http://www.avivalasvegas.com/Pages/poutinetalk6.htm

http://www.yrth.net/insects/poutine.php

http://www.thumper.net/tlkmag/archive/fun/poutine/

etc on Google...

And...remember to visit here at least once:

http://www.johnsonlakeresort.com/

-rj-

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 2 Feb 2003 11:27:40 -0600
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~ rob ~ wrote:
> Can't imagine where you've been...not in Canada I expect.

Thanks for the links!  I haven't been to Canada since 1971.  And that was
merely to visit my Scottish great aunt Maggie, who lived in a town near
Niagara Falls.  It was the first place I ever tasted malt vinegar on chips.
Now you're telling me gravy on chips (poutine) is all the rage?  I liked it
well enough :-)

============================

From: hahabogus 
Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 17:34:03 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Now you're telling me gravy on chips (poutine) is all the rage?  I
> liked it well enough :-)

poutine is more than gravy on chips...There's the cheese curds to be 
considered and then the BBQ-flavour to the gravy is another.

============================

From: rms[at]hywaaay.not (rms)
Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 17:34:49 -0000
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>Now you're telling me gravy on chips (poutine) is all the rage? 

Poutine has cheese as well.  Gravy on chips/fries/pomme frites is much 
more spread.  In Oz gravy is the norm at fast food places and ketchup/
tomato sauce is kept for the septics.  In the US gravy on fries was a 
50's thing and some diners will have it and other places will supply 
it on demand.  One place I frequent has "sloppy fries".  Proper 
cheddar curds are hard to come by some places.  rms

============================

From: Rhonda Anderson 
Date: Mon, 03 Feb 2003 11:18:37 GMT
--------
rms wrote: 
> Poutine has cheese as well.  Gravy on chips/fries/pomme frites is much
> more spread.  In Oz gravy is the norm at fast food places and ketchup/
> tomato sauce is kept for the septics.  

Gravy is available at many takeaway places, but tomato sauce isn't just for 
US tourists!! Tomato sauce on chips is quite popular too, as is barbecue 
sauce on chips. I like all of them, and also like vinegar on chips - which 
one I pick just depends on the day, and how I feel at the time.

-- 
Rhonda Anderson
Penrith, NSW, Australia

============================

From: hahabogus 
Date: Tue, 04 Feb 2003 02:01:24 GMT
--------
Rhonda Anderson wrote:
> Gravy is available at many takeaway places, but tomato sauce isn't
> just for US tourists!! Tomato sauce on chips is quite popular too, as
> is barbecue sauce on chips. I like all of them, and also like vinegar
> on chips - which one I pick just depends on the day, and how I feel at
> the time. 

HP sauce is good on fries too. It isn't just for eggs.

============================

From: Sheryl  Rosen 
Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 18:21:46 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Now you're telling me gravy on chips (poutine) is all the rage?  I liked it
> well enough :-)

Isn't Poutine cheese curds, in addition to the gravy, on fries?

============================

From: Gabby 
Date: Sun, 2 Feb 2003 16:04:04 -0400
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Now you're telling me gravy on chips (poutine) is all the rage?  I liked it
> well enough :-)

Poutine (AKA Cardiac arrest on a plate) can be had just about anywhere in
Canada.  Not enjoyed by all, mind you (just looking at it makes me want to
hurl -- but I also hate anything that will make my fries soggy, ketchup is
always on the side).  And not made the same way everywhere.  Real poutine
involves cheddar cheese curds, fresh things that squeak when you bite into
them and that melt readily when covered with hot gravy.  I've found that
most places outside Québec use mozzarella instead.  The poutine purist would
look down his/her nose in disgust.

============================

From: Michel Boucher 
Date: 2 Feb 2003 21:01:04 GMT
--------
Dans un moment de folie, "Gabby" écrivit:
>Jill McQuown wrote:
>> Now you're telling me gravy on chips (poutine) is all the rage?  I liked it
>> well enough :-)

You might try looking up the true history of poutine from previous 
posts of mine:

Message ID: 34dc639c.5894633@nntp.netcom.ca

Message ID: Xns92A6A76F6E8F3mortimertherat@130.133.1.4

This is such basic stuff it should be added to the FAQ.

> Poutine (AKA Cardiac arrest on a plate) 

That is so 1990's!  Poutine is neither here nor there.  It's nowhere 
nearly as bad as a Big Mac.

> can be had just about
> anywhere in Canada.  

But the only good poutine is made in Québec.  Fitting.

> Not enjoyed by all, mind you (just looking at
> it makes me want to hurl -- but I also hate anything that will
> make my fries soggy, ketchup is always on the side).  

Properly cooked fries do not become soggy in poutine.  They may 
become soft, but to become soggy, they would have to absorb liquid 
which is nigh on impossible.

> And not made
> the same way everywhere.  

Essentially, there are fundamentals to poutine.  If one uses cheez 
whiz or sliced cheese it isn't poutine.

> Real poutine involves cheddar cheese
> curds, fresh things that squeak when you bite into them and that
> melt readily when covered with hot gravy.  

In fact the only good ones are made fresh daily and a true poutinier 
knows that.

> I've found that most
> places outside Québec use mozzarella instead.  

I look down my nose in disgust at this barbaric practice!

> The poutine purist
> would look down his/her nose in disgust.

QED


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