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Subject: fritatta with potatoes
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: elaine 
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 10:01:02 -0500
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This recipe comes from the Christine Cushing Live show which I just happened
to tune into this morning.  It was really easy and delicious.  I didn't have
olives and substituted feta for the goat cheese. Sure beat the usual mess of
fried eggs that I either break or battle with to prevent them from sticking
to the bottom of the pan!

FRITATTA WITH POTATOES AND BLACK OLIVES
Yield:4; Christine Cushing Live; Food Network


Frittata is just a version of a Spanish omelette. You start cooking the
frittata on the stove and finish cooking it in the oven or under the
broiler. Usually boiled potatoes are added to a frittata but to make this a
speedy  and save time, grated potatoes are sautéed in the pan just before
adding the eggs. Substitute your favourite cheese for the goat cheese.

  a.. 8 eggs
  b.. 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley (60 ml)
  c.. 1/2 tsp Spanish paprika (2 ml)
  d.. coarse salt and freshly cracked black pepper, to taste
  e.. 2 tbsp olive oil (30 ml)
  f.. 1 small onion, thinly sliced
  g.. 1 to 2 small Yukon gold potatoes, peeled and grated
  h.. 1 clove garlic, chopped
  i.. 1/2 small red pepper, diced
  j.. 3 ounces firm goat cheese, crumbled or manchego cheese (85 grams)
  k.. 1/4 cup kalmata olives, pitted, cut in half (60 ml)

Directions:

1.       Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

2.       Combine eggs in medium bowl with the parsley and paprika. Stir with
fork only until blended. Season the mixture with salt and pepper.

3.       Meanwhile, heat 2 tbsp. olive oil in a 10-inch non-stick skillet
with heat proof handle over medium high heat. Add the onions and sauté until
soft, about 3 minutes. Add grated potatoes and sauté for 2 minutes more. Add
garlic and red pepper and sauté for 1 minute. Immediately pour egg mixture
over top and reduce heat to low.

4.       Let frittata set for about 5 minutes on low heat or until firm but
still wet on top. Add cheese and olives.

5.       Transfer frittata to oven. Finish cooking the frittata until eggs
are set and frittata is golden, about 2 to 3 minutes.

============================

From: azazello[at]koroviev.de (Victor Sack)
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 23:47:40 +0100
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elaine wrote:
> FRITATTA WITH POTATOES AND BLACK OLIVES
> Yield:4; Christine Cushing Live; Food Network
> 
> Frittata is just a version of a Spanish omelette.

Frittata is Italian; Spanish omelette is called tortilla (not to be
confused with the Mexican flat bread of that name).  That Cushing person
probably has never visited either Italy or Spain...

============================

From: elaine 
Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2004 18:38:57 -0500
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Victor Sack wrote:
> Frittata is Italian; Spanish omelette is called tortilla (not to be
> confused with the Mexican flat bread of that name).  That Cushing person
> probably has never visited either Italy or Spain...

I think she's Italian - anyhoo, it was a good breakfast.

============================

From: Luca Pinotti 
Date: Thu, 4 Nov 2004 18:45:18 +0100
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Victor Sack wrote:
> Frittata is Italian; Spanish omelette is called tortilla (not to be
> confused with the Mexican flat bread of that name).  That Cushing
> person probably has never visited either Italy or Spain...

Right!

============================

From: sf 
Date: Sat, 06 Nov 2004 03:33:57 GMT
--------
Luca Pinotti wrote:
>  Right!
 
When I first learned to make it, I was told it's called
torta (made on the stove top in a frying pan, not baked in
the oven)... so that's what I've called it for the last 30
years.  

Here in SF, Hispanics call sandwiches served at a tacqueria
"torta" (that's what it says on the menu board).  Maybe
"hot" sandwich is the clue, but I'm not sure.

============================

From: Luca Pinotti 
Date: Sat, 6 Nov 2004 10:22:34 +0100
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sf wrote:

> When I first learned to make it, I was told it's called
> torta (made on the stove top in a frying pan, not baked in
> the oven)... so that's what I've called it for the last 30
> years.

There are many variants of frittata or torta with potatoes.
Frittata 99% is made with eggs, torta is a "tart" or "cake" and can be done 
with or without eggs.
When I was a child the mother of a friend made a very good "torta" with 
mashed potatoes, mozzarella and prosciutto cotto.

My family makes a frittata di patate using boiled potatoes cut in small 
pieces, parmigiano, eggs and milk (or cream).

As you know italian cooking as so many variations to be very hard to codify 
a "popular recipe". It's easier to codify a "traditional recipe".

> Here in SF, Hispanics call sandwiches served at a tacqueria

SF! I've been there this summer and I'll be back next year.
Can you suggest a good restaurant? Not the ones claiming to serve 
european/french/italian food, but good american food.
I had just one night to spend in SF and I've been to Fog City Dinner.

============================

From: Bob 
Date: 6 Nov 2004 06:02:13 -0600
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Luca wrote:
> SF! I've been there this summer and I'll be back next year.
> Can you suggest a good restaurant? Not the ones claiming to serve
> european/french/italian food, but good american food.

Any of these:

http://www.garydanko.com/
http://www.farallonrestaurant.com
http://www.chezpanisse.com/

All of them specialize in preparing local high-quality ingredients in what 
is called "New American" cuisine.

============================

From: Luca Pinotti 
Date: Sat, 6 Nov 2004 21:32:57 +0100
--------
Bob wrote:
> All of them specialize in preparing local high-quality ingredients in
> what is called "New American" cuisine.

Thanks for the suggestion Bob, but I would like OLD american cuisine... :-)
In Europe we had enough of the "new wave" and "nouvelle cuisine"... small 
food fo r a lot of  money...

============================

From: sf 
Date: Sat, 06 Nov 2004 19:49:26 GMT
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Luca Pinotti wrote:
>  SF! I've been there this summer and I'll be back next year.
>  Can you suggest a good restaurant? Not the ones claiming to serve 
>  european/french/italian food, but good american food.
>  I had just one night to spend in SF and I've been to Fog City Dinner.

LOL!  I guess you've figured out that's like trying to find
a needle in a haystack around here.  

My favorite downtown spot isn't "exactly" downtown, but it's
located directly across from the Giant's baseball park and
you can't get any more American than that!  If you sit on
their patio, you'll have a view of both the ballpark and the
bay.  Their inside seating is very, very nice if the weather
is a bit too nippy during your visit.

MoMo's
760 2nd Street
San Francisco style American cuisine

Let me know when you plan to come.  It sounds like you'll be
here on business and will be busy, but if you aren't booked
for dinner... my husband and I would love to meet you at
whatever restaurant you decide on.


Other suggestions:

Tadich Grill
240 California St (financial district)
San Francisco style seafood

House of Prime Rib
1906 Van Ness Avenue
(meat, meat, meat... mainly prime rib)
and reservations are a must

Blue
2337 Market St (at Noe)
American "Comfort Food"

Brother-in-Law's Bar-B-Que
705 Divisadero St

PlumpJack Cafe 
3127 Fillmore Street (between Union and Lombard)
The menu is California/Mediterranean style. 

Original Joe's
144 Taylor St (Market)
Get your burger on sourdough bread here - steak & fries too.
The rest of the menu is SF Italian style.

sf
Practice safe eating - always use condiments

============================

From: Luca Pinotti 
Date: Sat, 6 Nov 2004 21:41:42 +0100
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sf wrote:

> LOL!  I guess you've figured out that's like trying to find
> a needle in a haystack around here.

What are you laughing for??? I'm an alien...
I'd like to see u looking for a good restaurenat in Milano.. :-)

> My favorite downtown spot isn't "exactly" downtown, but it's
> located directly across from the Giant's baseball park and
> you can't get any more American than that!  If you sit on
> their patio, you'll have a view of both the ballpark and the
> bay.  Their inside seating is very, very nice if the weather
> is a bit too nippy during your visit.

I just had the nasty fog in that day. Like Milano in Novemnber  :-(

> MoMo's
> 760 2nd Street
> San Francisco style American cuisine

Sounds nice...

> Other suggestions:

All addresses noted in my laptop an on the GPS Nav.
Thanks from the deep of my stomach... :-)

> Practice safe eating - always use condiments

I always do..

============================

From: sf 
Date: Mon, 08 Nov 2004 01:17:18 GMT
--------
Luca Pinotti wrote:

>  What are you laughing for??? I'm an alien...

I laughed because it isn't easy finding a restaurant that
fits your criteria - we pride ourselves on being a
multi-cultural city.

Did you stay at the Hyatt Regency during your stay?  It's a
stone's throw away from Fog City Diner.

>  I'd like to see u looking for a good restaurenat in Milano.. :-)

It wouldn't be too hard... so I'd probably think they were
ALL good!  I'd be dining with tourist standards, not native
standards so, let's face it... I'm afood snob - maybe you're
right.  

:)  

============================

From: Luca Pinotti 
Date: Wed, 10 Nov 2004 11:45:27 +0100
--------
sf wrote:

> Did you stay at the Hyatt Regency during your stay?  It's a
> stone's throw away from Fog City Diner.

No, I was at the Hilton in O'Farrel.

>>  I'd like to see u looking for a good restaurenat in Milano.. :-)
>
> It wouldn't be too hard... so I'd probably think they were
> ALL good!  I'd be dining with tourist standards, not native
> standards so, let's face it... I'm afood snob - maybe you're
> right.

Many are good, few are very good, most are "standard".
Well... if you just look for pizza or a dish of pasta wou'll find thousand 
restraurants for you. ;-)

============================

From: Jim Davis 
Date: Sat, 06 Nov 2004 14:45:31 -0800
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sf wrote:
>Original Joe's
>144 Taylor St (Market)
>Get your burger on sourdough bread here - steak & fries too.
>The rest of the menu is SF Italian style.

Oh you touched such a tender chord!!!  I don't live in the area any more 
but miss it greatly.  Especially remember going to OJs for lunch back 
many years ago, getting a burger (which was so big it snagged the 
corners of my mouth and made them bleed), and a water glass of red wine, 
all for a great price.  Used to sit at the counter and watch them make 
it.  The waiters all in Tux's and surly as they come.  Only SF! 

============================

From: sf 
Date: Mon, 08 Nov 2004 01:17:21 GMT
--------
Jim Davis wrote:
>   The waiters all in Tux's and surly as they come.  Only SF! 

:) 

I'd call that attitude "brusk", but not surly.

============================

From: cj.green[at]worldnet.att.net (Christopher Green)
Date: 8 Nov 2004 13:04:44 -0800
--------
sf wrote:
> When I first learned to make it, I was told it's called
> torta (made on the stove top in a frying pan, not baked in
> the oven)... so that's what I've called it for the last 30
> years.  
> 
> Here in SF, Hispanics call sandwiches served at a tacqueria
> "torta" (that's what it says on the menu board).  Maybe
> "hot" sandwich is the clue, but I'm not sure.

A Mexican torta can be any sandwich (cold or hot) on a hard roll
(bolillo). The most interesting tortas are elaborate creations with a
hot filling, pressed sort of the same way Italian panini are. A torta
with birria de chivo, guacamole, frijoles, and salsa would have to
rank as one of the world's messiest take-away snacks. It's one of the
most widespread fast foods in Mexico; there's even a Torta Festival in
Mexico City. Some think it became popular during the French occupation
under Maximilian, when French breadmaking was introduced.


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