Return to BigSpud Menu

Subject: Help?  Gordon Ramsey's Potato-Onion Gratin [and sub-thread]
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2007 18:22:15 -0400
--------
Seems I threw out the September 2007 issue that has this
recipe.  Ooops.

Does anyone have it and can help me out?

============================

From: PeterLucas <Peter[at]home.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2007 22:34:19 +0000 (UTC)
--------
<a href="http://recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-detail.asp?recipe=127111">http://recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-detail.asp?recipe=127111</a>

Potato Onion Gratin

from Gordon Ramsay

Ingredients

2 lbs Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and sliced thin
4 cups thinly sliced onion
1 tbsp fresh thyme
1 tsp fresh rosemary
3/4 tsp salt
3/4 tsp pepper
3 tbsp olive oil, divided plus more for brushing
3 large cloves garlic, chopped
1 1/4 cup reduced sodium chicken broth

Directions
In skillet, saute garlic in 2 tbsp olive oil. Add onions, sprinkle with 
salt and pepper to taste, and cook until tender, about 8 minutes. Add 
rosemary and thyme and cook for 2 minutes.
Brush 13x9x2 pan with olive oil. Layer 1/3 of potatoes. Sprinkle with 
1/4 tsp salt and pepper. Add half of onion mixture. Repeat and top with 
last 1/3 of potatoes. Pour broth over the mixture. Drizzle with 1 tbsp 
oil. Cover with foil and bake in oven preheated to 425 for 30 minutes. 
Remove foil and bake until potatoes are tender and start to brown.

Number of Servings: 8

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2007 18:46:40 -0400
--------
PeterLucas wrote
> http://recipes.sparkpeople.com/recipe-detail.asp?recipe=127111

Thank you!  I don't know why I had so much trouble finding it.
I think being a little guilty over tossing the magazine made me
blind.  Heh.  I'm usually the one mad over stuff being thrown out.

============================

From: PeterLucas <Peter[at]home.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2007 23:17:58 +0000 (UTC)
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Thank you!  

No sweat. Google is my friend :-)

> I don't know why I had so much trouble finding it.
> I think being a little guilty over tossing the magazine made me
> blind.  Heh.  I'm usually the one mad over stuff being thrown out.

LOL!! Same same. 

But, in the interest of converting to a 'minimilist' life (yeah, 
right!!) I've taken to not throwing my old cookbooks/magazines out, but 
instead taking them to a book swap shop/St. Vinnies/Community Center... 
so that others can get some benefit from them.

Funnily enough, I dragged a box out of the storage shed yesterday and it 
contained about 30 cookbooks/magazines. I think I kept about 5. The rest 
will be recycled to one of the places mentioned above.

============================

From: Gregory Morrow <gregorymorrow[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2007 19:54:03 -0700
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Thank you!  I don't know why I had so much trouble finding it.
> I think being a little guilty over tossing the magazine made me
> blind.  Heh.  I'm usually the one mad over stuff being thrown out.

Wow, I'm looking for exactly such a dish for this weekend, I have all
the ingredients on hand, too...

So thanx, Nancy...!!!

What else would you serve with it, I'm looking for a not *real* heavy
Sunday eve supper kinda thang...

It will be around 80 here on Sunday in Chicawgo so it doesn't have to
be an ultra - heavy winter thing...maybe just a salad...???

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2007 23:01:32 -0400
--------
Gregory Morrow wrote
> Wow, I'm looking for exactly such a dish for this weekend, I have all
> the ingredients on hand, too...
>
> So thanx, Nancy...!!!

(laugh)  One person I didn't wind up annoying, at least.

> What else would you serve with it, I'm looking for a not *real* heavy
> Sunday eve supper kinda thang...

I really don't know, I haven't thought about it at all.  A salad
sounds good to me, but then meatloaf sounds good to me, too.

> It will be around 80 here on Sunday in Chicawgo so it doesn't have to
> be an ultra - heavy winter thing...maybe just a salad...???

Oh, never mind, then I would definitely stick with the salad.
80, huh.  Damn, I was hoping this weather would stop.

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2007 21:14:56 -0600
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
>Oh, never mind, then I would definitely stick with the salad.
>80, huh.  Damn, I was hoping this weather would stop.

It's starting to get chilly here..real fall weather here
now..finally!!!   

I fixed porchetta this weekend, since it seemed nice and fallish.  I
still have lots of roast pork now to use up...

How about something grilled, Greg?  That way the kitchen wouldn't be
heated up too much with the baking of this potato dish... 

I don't know why, but grilled sausages keep on coming to mind...but
that might be too much for that weather.

If it is a salad, are you thinking main dish salad?

============================

From: Gregory Morrow <gregorymorrow[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 19 Oct 2007 15:45:24 -0700
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> How about something grilled, Greg?  That way the kitchen wouldn't be
> heated up too much with the baking of this potato dish...

Just seconds ago I checked my email, our corner bar is having a cook -
out with a Bloody Mary bar, etc. on Sunday...

> I don't know why, but grilled sausages keep on coming to mind...but
> that might be too much for that weather.

A coupla folks are going to a Peoria Packing, a packing house - retail
outlet here in Chicago to pick up ribs, sausage, etc...

You might be interested in checking out this "Peoria Packing Photo
Essay" from www.lthforum.com , a local Chicago food board.  They
literally use EVERY part of the pig, from snouts to ears to tails,
it's all there in great abundance.  The place is basically a giant
walk - in meat locker, pretty amazing from what I hear.  If it's
possible I'll go with the gang tomorrow when they go get the meat, I'm
interested in seeing it:

[NOTE:  If you are a vegetarian, best to skip this link...!!!]

<a href="http://lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?t=2804">http://lthforum.com/bb/viewtopic.php?t=2804</a>

"I brought Mom2 whose father was a butcher, which kept them fed during
the depression. She had never seen anything like it. The entire room
is refrigerator cold. All customers are expected to wear plastic
gloves at all times. There are bits of the animal and cuts of meat, I
have only read about or had in a restaurant and assumed they could
only be special ordered. Fat bellies are there, which are convenient
for making bacon. I assume the bits needed to make guanciale are
present, whether it is the cheeks or the jowl; it is there. If it
isn't, well, maybe you should come earlier in the day...

Peoria Packing House can be a devil to get into just before major
holidays. They sometimes hire security to meter customers into the
store with a line waiting outside...

[...]

"Nice shots. I've always loved the place. Whole hogs and hogs in every
state of disrepair. Other things to know: thay claim to sell more
whole goats than any other place in the city (which means, maybe
country) selling largely to Mexican, Carribean, etc. There are many
fine and very cheap hot links of the sort that are found only in
chicago (lots of sage and red pepper). If you want a whole dressed
animal, be persistent. Quite literally, many of the stock folks will
tell you you can't buy a whole hog retail because they don't want to
go across the street and haul it over. Tipping helps.

And, in spite of the great photos, pictures can't do justice to the
scale of the place. There's a lot of pig parts in that building."

Peoria Packing Butcher Shop
1300 West Lake Street
Chicago, IL 60607
312-738-1800
Monday - Saturday: 6am-5pm
Sunday: 9am-3pm"

</>
-------------

Despite the weather I *think* I can bear along okay...

:-)

[Two weekends ago I declined to attend the "Oktoberfest" that friends
held in their backyard, it was simply GAWDAWFUL hot.  That's the
Sunday they had to cancel the Chicago Marathon because of the heat,
people were literally dropping sick or dead from the heat -
unprecedented!  The poor gal who did the grilling for that I think
lost ten lbs. from sweating over the grill.  I locked myself here at
home in the a/c and watched a bunch of old _Outer Limits_ episodes on
DVD and had a smoothie for dinner.]

> If it is a salad, are you thinking main dish salad?

I've been asked to make potato salad and baked beans, but I'll still
make the gratin.  I've everything to make it, should be a winner.

I've some lovely English cukes, I think I'll make a cuke - sour cream
salad as one person recommended in that "German Side Dishes" thread I
started...

I've told folks I'm heartily sick of making summer stuff like tater
salad, coleslaw, baked beans, peanut noodles, etc., until next summer,
but hey.  The stuff gets raves and is always snarfed down, no
leftovers...plus if the "do" is at our bar I get free drinks, you
can't beat that.

;-D

We counted and I made sides for at least seven cookouts this
summer...and I never make less than four - five pounds of a side dish
salad or whatever.

OH, that reminds me that long ago I promised Rosie my peanut noodle
recipe...I'm putting up a post - it note on the monitor to remind me,
I'll get it up this weekend.

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2007 07:24:54 -0400
--------
Pennyaline wrote
> <no fear of being too warm for cooking here... 37 degrees now, and snow in 
> the Salt Lake valley already this morning>

Wow, I haven't the vaguest idea why I had you pegged for the Virginia/DC
area.  I'm not ready for 37 yet, it was 44 when I woke up earlier this week
and I was freezing.  Not complaining, just freezing.

I think this dish will turn out well, I'll be making it soon.

============================

From: ChattyCathy <cathy1234[at]mailinator.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2007 14:03:16 +0200
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> I think this dish will turn out well, I'll be making it soon.

Heh. I might even make it today... Funny thing is whenever I see the 
word 'gratin' I always associate it with cheese - and lots of it. DH is 
no cheese fan (unlike me) - but I am sure he'll like this! Thanks for 
'bringing it to my attention' ;)

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2007 08:19:34 -0400
--------
ChattyCathy wrote
> Heh. I might even make it today... Funny thing is whenever I see the word 
> 'gratin' I always associate it with cheese - and lots of it. DH is no 
> cheese fan (unlike me) - but I am sure he'll like this! Thanks for 
> 'bringing it to my attention' ;)

In the clumsiest of ways, too!  (laugh)  Actually, that was the draw
of this dish, it didn't have cheese.  I saw plenty of gratins full of
cheese in my search for the lost recipe.

============================

From: ChattyCathy <cathy1234[at]mailinator.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2007 14:23:39 +0200
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> In the clumsiest of ways, too!  (laugh)  Actually, that was the draw
> of this dish, it didn't have cheese.  I saw plenty of gratins full of
> cheese in my search for the lost recipe.

No matter how 'clumsy' I'm glad you did - I've saved this to my recipe 
software, just in case ;)

============================

From: Steve Y <steveremove[at]wanadoo.fr>
Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2007 16:02:35 +0200
--------
ChattyCathy wrote:
> Heh. I might even make it today... Funny thing is whenever I see the
> word 'gratin' I always associate it with cheese - a

I wasn't sure about this being called this a "gratin" because of the 
lack of cheese so had a quick Google. Consensus seems to be that a 
"gratin" dish is one that is browned under a grill, "normally" but not 
always with a topping of cheese or breadcrumbs.

============================

From: kilikini <kilikini1[at]NOSPAMhotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2007 10:09:08 -0400
--------
ChattyCathy wrote:
> Heh. I might even make it today... Funny thing is whenever I see the
> word 'gratin' I always associate it with cheese - and lots of it. DH
> is no cheese fan (unlike me) - but I am sure he'll like this! Thanks
> for 'bringing it to my attention' ;)

I thought gratin meant cheese, too.  I was surprised that this didn't 
include cheese, but it does sound like a great recipe.  I've saved it.

============================

From: Pan Ohco <ohco[at]hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2007 10:14:16 -0500
--------
kilikini wrote:
>I thought gratin meant cheese, too.  I was surprised that this didn't 
>include cheese, but it does sound like a great recipe.  I've saved it.

Gratin is any dish topped with cheese or bread crumbs,then place in
the oven or under the broiler, until brown and crispy.
Food Lover's Companion

============================

From: Amarantha <kyliejohnson[at]NOSPAMhotmail.com>
Date: 18 Oct 2007 00:11:21 GMT
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Seems I threw out the September 2007 issue that has this
> recipe.  Ooops.
> 
> Does anyone have it and can help me out?

Does this look like it?

<a href="http://19k30wife.livejournal.com/268950.html">http://19k30wife.livejournal.com/268950.html</a>

============================

Subject: Report::Gordon Ramsey's Potato and Onion Gratin
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 18:27:19 -0400
--------
Absolutely delicious, a keeper.

<a href="http://19k30wife.livejournal.com/268950.html">http://19k30wife.livejournal.com/268950.html</a>

2 lbs Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and sliced thin
4 cups thinly sliced onion
1 tbsp fresh thyme
1 tsp fresh rosemary
3/4 tsp salt
3/4 tsp pepper
3 tbsp olive oil, divided plus more for brushing
3 large cloves garlic, chopped
1 1/4 cup reduced sodium chicken broth

In skillet, saute garlic in 2 tbsp olive oil.  Add onions, sprinkle with 
salt and pepper to taste,
and cook until tender, about 8 minutes.  Add rosemary and thyme and cook for 
2 minutes.
Brush 13x9x2 pan with olive oil.  Layer 1/3 of potatoes.  Sprinkle with 1/4 
tsp salt and pepper.

Add half of onion mixture.  Repeat and top with last 1/3 of potatoes.  Pour 
broth over the mixture.

Drizzle with 1 tbsp oil.  Cover with foil and bake in oven preheated to 425 
for 30 minutes.

Remove foil and bake until potatoes are tender and start to brown.

============================

From: Gregory Morrow <gregorymorrow[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 16:28:41 -0700
--------
Thank you, Nancy!  I was going to make this a coupla weeks for a
cookout, but it was 80 degrees and so I made summer picnic stuff
instead.  This is on my "list" for my first cold - weather dinner
party...next week it's *finally* supposed to get below 70 degrees here
in Chicawgo.

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 18:56:02 -0500
--------
Nancy Young said...
> Absolutely delicious, a keeper.
 
> 4 cups thinly sliced onion

Which kind of onions? A gourmet like Ramsey should mention which.

I'd be willing to try it!

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 20:46:44 -0400
--------
Andy wrote
> Which kind of onions? A gourmet like Ramsey should mention which.

My go to onion is yellow.  Tastes like onion in most dishes, to me.

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 20:04:22 -0500
--------
Nancy Young said...
> My go to onion is yellow.  Tastes like onion in most dishes, to me.

I'm tempted to e-mail him about which onions he used.

Thanks for passing on the recipe, no matter.

Seems kinda/sorta like the typical "secret" withheld ingredient like my 
grandma might've done, to friends NOT relatives.

============================

From: Gregory Morrow <gregorymorrow[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 19:27:23 -0700
--------
Andy wrote:
> I'm tempted to e-mail him about which onions he used.
>
> Thanks for passing on the recipe, no matter.
>
> Seems kinda/sorta like the typical "secret" withheld ingredient like my
> grandma might've done, to friends NOT relatives.

What on earth are you talking about?  When I read the recipe I read
"onion" as a standard yellow cooking onion, no more, no less.  If he
had meant red onion, or shallots or green onions or whatever, he would
have said so. If I didn't have yellow onion for the recipe, I 'spose
white onion would do...Vidalia or Maui or another sweet onion would
work okay too.

In any case, it's not some "secret ingredient" in the recipe, it's
pretty plainly stated...

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 21:45:19 -0500
--------
Gregory Morrow said...
> What on earth are you talking about?  When I read the recipe I read
> "onion" as a standard yellow cooking onion, no more, no less.  If he
> had meant red onion, or shallots or green onions or whatever, he would
> have said so. If I didn't have yellow onion for the recipe, I 'spose
> white onion would do...Vidalia or Maui or another sweet onion would
> work okay too.
> 
> In any case, it's not some "secret ingredient" in the recipe, it's
> pretty plainly stated...

You're way out of mental bounds. If there's a sense of humor pill, "Take 5"

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 20:04:41 -0700
--------
Andy wrote:
>You're way out of mental bounds. If there's a sense of humor pill, "Take 5"

Sorry Andy, I am with Greg on this.  When just onions are mentioned,
without specifying which type, regular onions are the ones you used.
If something else is wanted, then it is specified.

Try it with regular onions... If you don't like it, try another type.
It's not really that hard..... ;)

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 22:15:10 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney said...
> Sorry Andy, I am with Greg on this.  When just onions are mentioned,
> without specifying which type, regular onions are the ones you used.
> If something else is wanted, then it is specified.
> 
> Try it with regular onions... If you don't like it, try another type.
> It's not really that hard..... ;)

OK, define "regular" onions?

Ramsey IS a 1st rate chef or so I assume. What's so hard to mention which 
onions?

I didn't see the show. :(

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 20:19:17 -0700
--------
Andy wrote:
>OK, define "regular" onions?

Regular yellow onions, which you find almost anywhere. 

Are you really trying to be obtuse on this Andy?  It really isn't
hard. Just go to your supermarket or wherever you shop and look in the
onion bin.  Those are the ones you want.... The ones you usually
get..regular old yellow onions. Just labled onions.   Use those.  You
do buy those, right?

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 22:29:01 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney said...
> Regular yellow onions, which you find almost anywhere. 
> 
> Are you really trying to be obtuse on this Andy?  It really isn't
> hard. Just go to your supermarket or wherever you shop and look in the
> onion bin.  Those are the ones you want.... The ones you usually
> get..regular old yellow onions. Just labled onions.   Use those.  You
> do buy those, right?

Don't get me started Christine! I'm just trying to solve vidalia onions. 
Chat?

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 20:30:06 -0700
--------
Andy wrote:
>Don't get me started Christine! I'm just trying to solve vidalia onions. 
>Chat?

Just try plain old regular yellow onions, which are the ones labeled
as onions in the onion bin.  

And right now, I am cooking..I will chat later.

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 22:36:30 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney said...
> Just try plain old regular yellow onions, which are the ones labeled
> as onions in the onion bin.  
> 
> And right now, I am cooking..I will chat later.

I've had a million onions in my life. Would you like a little steak with 
some? You CAN'T have steak without onions, imho. What steak would you like 
to go with your onions?

============================

From: Lin <grafixbunny2007[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 20:38:51 -0700
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Just try plain old regular yellow onions, which are the ones labeled
> as onions in the onion bin.

Personally, I avoid "plain old regular" yellow onions. Why should I
get the stock item when the Texas Sweets, Vidalia, and Mayan (my
personal favorite) are so readily available right now? Plain yellow
makes me cry ... While it may elicit a hug out of Bob, I prefer "cry-
free" onions. Besides, I think the sweets just taste better. Personal
taste, of course.

Out of curiosity ... how many of you know how to pick a sweet, tears-
free (or close) onion. I do!

============================

From: Bob Terwilliger <virtualgoth[at]die_spammer.biz>
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2007 12:15:06 -0700
--------
Lin wrote:
> Personally, I avoid "plain old regular" yellow onions. Why should I
> get the stock item when the Texas Sweets, Vidalia, and Mayan (my
> personal favorite) are so readily available right now? Plain yellow
> makes me cry ... While it may elicit a hug out of Bob, I prefer "cry-
> free" onions. Besides, I think the sweets just taste better. Personal
> taste, of course.

Heh... I just read this, after painstakingly chopping up a bunch of "plain 
old regular" yellow onions for onion soup au gratin.

Yellow onions have more flavor than sweet onions. Both have identical sugar 
content, but the yellow onions have a higher sulfur content, which equates 
both to more flavor and to more tears.

<a href="http://www.foodsubs.com/Onionsdry.html">http://www.foodsubs.com/Onionsdry.html</a>

> Out of curiosity ... how many of you know how to pick a sweet, tears-
> free (or close) onion. I do!

So do I!

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2007 10:13:36 -0400
--------
Andy wrote:
> Don't get me started Christine! I'm just trying to solve vidalia onions.

Hey, Andy, I never buy regular old yellow onions.  I've worked through them, 
and the white ones, and am writing up the vidalia myself. ;-))

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2007 10:11:17 -0400
--------
Andy wrote:
> OK, define "regular" onions?
>
> Ramsey IS a 1st rate chef or so I assume. What's so hard to mention which
> onions?
>
> I didn't see the show. :(

I suppose 'regular' onions are yellow because that's all I ever saw for 
years-years-years.  Then I discovered, hey, there's red, white, sweet 
(Peruvian,Maui, Vidalia.)

I've not looked, but in Julia's famous onion soup recipe, does she call for 
"regular"?

============================

From: Gregory Morrow <gregorymorrow[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 20:36:55 -0700
--------
Andy wrote:
> You're way out of mental bounds. If there's a sense of humor pill, "Take 5"

I'm really not meaning to be "flip" here, but how *old* are you...???

============================

From: Andy <q>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2007 22:40:13 -0500
--------
Gregory Morrow said...
> I'm really not meaning to be "flip" here, but how *old* are you...???

As Bill Cosby once said "I'm older than air!"

============================

From: Little.Malice[at]g33mail.com (Little Malice)
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2007 16:33:22 GMT
--------
One time on Usenet, Nancy Young said:
> My go to onion is yellow.  Tastes like onion in most dishes, to me.

I like yellow, unless I'm looking for a sweet onion. We don't cook 
with reds because DH has a bad reaction to them. I do like them 
though...

Jani in WA

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2007 12:08:28 -0400
--------
Little Malice wrote
> I like yellow, unless I'm looking for a sweet onion. We don't cook
> with reds because DH has a bad reaction to them. I do like them
> though...

That's interesting about the reds for your DH.  We've had a bad reaction to 
something in the onion/garlic family ourselves (both of us!), but since it 
is totally unbelievable, I will not go into it ;-))

But thanks for telling of this.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2007 06:34:12 GMT
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Absolutely delicious, a keeper.

I made something like this but it was a vegan recipe and called for 
vegetable broth.  My recipe didn't call for onions but I added them because 
I tend to add them to everything.  It was really good! 


Return to BigSpud Menu