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Subject: Green Potato's
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: baranick[at]epix.net (R.J. Baranick)
Date: Tue, 08 Apr 1997 01:38:53 GMT
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Found a few green-tinged potato's in my bin today.
Seem to remember something about
green potato's being toxic......

Can any potato expert help me?

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From: kwilhite[at]ezinfo.ucs.indiana.edu (kevin john wilhite)
Date: 8 Apr 1997 04:57:34 GMT
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The following is from:
http://www.epicurious.com/db/dictionary/terms/indexes/dictionary.html

go to the above web site and click on p .  Follow to potato section.

green tinge is indicative of excessive exposure to light caused by the 
alkaloid solanine, toxic if eaten in quantity.  Cut or scrape away and 
the spud can be eaten.

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From: Dominique <hk[at]fix.net>
Date: Tue, 08 Apr 1997 08:33:20 -0700
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Just because the green is only on the outside doesn't mean that the
toxins are not further into the potato. ONly the outside is capable of
turning green. The solanine is also under the skin and is toxic. It is
dangerous in large quantities, can build up and get stored in the body
and trimmings of these potatoes should definately be kept from all pets
and farm animals.
   I used to always listen to my husband who wanted me to be frugal and
not throw them out ( we used to give them to the chickens instead) but
being the extra cautious type I did research at the library about this.
Trimming occasionally is no big deal but be aware that alkaloid solanine
is stored in the liver.
  Dominique the cautious

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From: Mitch Smith <smithm[at]mvp.net>
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 1997 18:52:07 -0500
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The green in a potato skin contains an alkaloid poison - solanine, that
consummed in large enough quantities, can affect your health. Though a
little bit won't bother most people, it should be avoided. The potato is
still usable, but the green should be removed until not visible.
Likewise, if a potato begins sprouting, these also contain the poison
and should be removed also. [Foundations of Food Preparation by Peckham]

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From: Tanja Wiebe <twiebe[at]oln.com>
Date: 12 Apr 97 14:23:47 GMT
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Someboday watched Oprah yesterday!!

TJ

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From: lea[at]sirius.com (Lea)
Date: Sat, 12 Apr 1997 20:05:03 GMT
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Toss em.  This is very unlikely to kill you, but it can give you a
nasty bellyache and a general feeling of indegestion after a nice meal
and potatoes are cheap.  Keep them from the light and toss them when
they are this old.  If the potato isn't GREEN at all, (and you need to
wash it and look under a good light,to tell),  it is ok to remove
small eyes, with a paring knoife.  I toss potatoes with major sprouts
as well.  If you live in an area that has lots of loose potatoes it
may not always be a brgain to buy them in large bags.

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From: idlewild[at]webspan.net (Idlewild)
Date: 13 Apr 1997 11:48:05 EDT
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i have a beautiful sprouting sweet potato in my vegetable bowl - no
'green' bits in sight, but if i sever the sprouts, can i still eat it
w/o a problem...?

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From: mmt[at]ionet.net ( Mar)
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 1997 18:27:29 GMT
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Idlewild wrote:
>i have a beautiful sprouting sweet potato in my vegetable bowl - no
>'green' bits in sight, but if i sever the sprouts, can i still eat it
>w/o a problem...?

Don't know about eating it, but when I was a kid, we used to put them in a
glass of water and let them grow- mine smothered Mom's african violets, was
down to the floor and heading for the cat when Mom decapitated it and threw
it out.


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