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Subject: Re: greasing outside of baked potato?(Green Potatos   ?)
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: ruby2sd[at]webtv.net (webbee)
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 03:37:29 -0500 (EST)
--------
Is it dangerous to use potatoes that are greenish? My grocer delivered
10 lbs, I hate to waste them, but I think I read somewhere that they're
"bad" for some reason.. Thanks..

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From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 09:03:37 GMT
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webbee wrote:
> Is it dangerous to use potatoes that are greenish? My grocer delivered
> 10 lbs, I hate to waste them, but I think I read somewhere that they're
> "bad" for some reason.. Thanks..

The green skins contain a toxin.  However, if the potatoes are peeled 
leaving no trace of green, they can be used as usual with no problem.

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From: nobody[at]nevermind.com (Frogleg)
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 12:06:25 GMT
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Thierry Gerbault wrote:
>The green skins contain a toxin.  However, if the potatoes are peeled 
>leaving no trace of green, they can be used as usual with no problem.

See:

http://www.chestnut-sw.com/fastfact/ff0825.htm

You're not gonna die, writhing in agony, from a little bit of green
potato. However, the green indicates improperly stored potatoes, and a
less than optimum product. If "your grocer delivered," tell him/her to
come and pick 'em up and give you a fresh 10lb bag.

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From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 11:47:27 -0600
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Frogleg wrote:
>    However, the green indicates improperly stored potatoes, and a
> less than optimum product. If "your grocer delivered," tell him/her to
> come and pick 'em up and give you a fresh 10lb bag.

Agreed.  And, where can I find a grocer who will deliver?! 

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From: aintlifegrand[at]yup.com
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 19:02:02 GMT
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Jill McQuown wrote:
>Agreed.  And, where can I find a grocer who will deliver?! 

If you move to Florida, you can have Publix supermarket deliver. Order
your groceries online at publixdirect, and they'll deliver them, and
carry them into your kitchen.  :-)

ttfn,
jan

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From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 16:09:29 -0600
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aintlifegrand wrote:
> If you move to Florida, you can have Publix supermarket deliver. Order
> your groceries online at publixdirect, and they'll deliver them, and
> carry them into your kitchen.  :-)

Well, there are services like that in Memphis if you are a senior citizen...
and delivery costs about 5% of the grocery bill.  Since I'm not a "senior",
think I'll just haul my groceries myself.

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From: ktsheehy3624[at]cs.com (Ktsheehy3624)
Date: 23 Mar 2003 22:19:59 GMT
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Jill McQuown wrote:
>Well, there are services like that in Memphis if you are a 
>senior citizen... and delivery costs about 5% of the grocery bill.  
>Since I'm not a "senior", think I'll just haul my groceries myself.

Safeway is taking a shot at home delivery here in Portland,
maybe in other locations too. Doesn't seem to have caught
hold. When I was a kid, I remember that the grocer, butcher
and seafood store delivered with no "extra" charge, but I'm
sure they tried to price the delivery cost into the product.

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From: Pat Meadows 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 22:48:21 GMT
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aintlifegrand wrote:
>If you move to Florida, you can have Publix supermarket deliver. Order
>your groceries online at publixdirect, and they'll deliver them, and
>carry them into your kitchen.  :-)

I have wanted this for ages, but it's not available in any
area where I have lived.  Rats. 

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From: connieg999[at]aol.com (ConnieG999)
Date: 24 Mar 2003 00:32:30 GMT
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aintlifegrand writes:
>If you move to Florida, you can have Publix supermarket deliver. 

Well, certain parts of Florida. They won't deliver to my area, near Orlando.

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From: ruby2sd[at]webtv.net (webbee)
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 03:25:36 -0500 (EST)
--------
Thanks for the info...the potatoes now have "eyes" that are blooming...
so maybe I'll try planting them...
I live in L.Island, NY... the grocery store that  delivers used to be a
Del i(they all deliver).. I'm really lucky that they deliver, as it's
nearly impossibl for me to get to a market..my friends and neighbors
would take me to just about anywhere BUT a supermarket...as they hate to
do food-shopping,, themselves..  even though I offerred to buy them
gasoline...                             .
We used to have a service called "Mobile Gourmet" that would deliver
food from any restaurant... unfortunately they went out of business 2
years ago..

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From: nobody[at]nevermind.com (Frogleg)
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 13:14:24 GMT
--------
webbee wrote:
>Thanks for the info...the potatoes now have "eyes" that are blooming...
>so maybe I'll try planting them...
>I live in L.Island, NY... the grocery store that  delivers used to be a
>Del i(they all deliver).. I'm really lucky that they deliver, as it's
>nearly impossibl for me to get to a market..my friends and neighbors
>would take me to just about anywhere BUT a supermarket...as they hate to
>do food-shopping,, themselves..  even though I offerred to buy them
>gasoline...                             .

Sorry you're not my neighbor. I'm a very bad planner, and go to the
grocery store often. Could you perhaps ask people to just pick up some
things for you when they did their own shopping? I didn't remember
often enough, but used to ask a neighbor if I could get anything for
her when I was shopping. It was hardly any trouble at all to bring
home the extras. 

Yes, cut up the potatoes a bit and plant them. I've had plants come up
from discards tossed on the compost pile, and even a few little
'volunteer' spuds are fun to have. If they take hold, they'll have a
somewhat tomato-looking foliage. They require little care, 'though you
can maximize yield by 'mounding up' dirt around the stems. When the
foliage withers, it's time to dig around for potatoes. 

============================

From: Tim 
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 14:35:12 +0100
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Frogleg wrote:
> Yes, cut up the potatoes a bit and plant them. I've had plants come up
> from discards tossed on the compost pile, and even a few little
> 'volunteer' spuds are fun to have. If they take hold, they'll have a
> somewhat tomato-looking foliage. They require little care, 'though you
> can maximize yield by 'mounding up' dirt around the stems. When the
> foliage withers, it's time to dig around for potatoes.

I wouldn't cut the potatoes up, it just increases the chance of infection
and reduces the store of food for the growing young plants. Uses whole
potatoes.
If the potaotes are sprouting then you can sow them straight away, if not,
put them in a flat box in the light for a week or two until the eyes sprout.
Plant the spuds about 9" to a foot apart, if possible in a forrow a few
inches deep and cover them over.
When the plants are about 18" high pile some earth around the stems until
just the leaves are showing (the new potatoes grow on roots, and you can
encourage these by burying the stems, and new roots will grow there).
Every time there's more than say 6" of stem, pile up the earth around them.

As Frogleg says, they look a bit like (tough) tomato plants (to which they
are closely related, along with paprka and deadly nightshade). But they
don't need any support to grow up like tomatoes often do.
You can dig up some potatoes before the leaves wither - just after
flowering, for small new potatoes, otherwise wait until the leaves wilt. The
keep well in the ground until winter if you don't have anywhere to store
them.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 24 Mar 2003 15:43:34 GMT
--------
Tim writes:
>I wouldn't cut the potatoes up, it just increases the chance of infection
>and reduces the store of food for the growing young plants. Uses whole
>potatoes.

I would divide the potatoes, leaving at least one eye but 2-3 is better,
leaving them whole does nothing to lessen the chance of disease and may even
have the opposite effect by bunching too many plants too closely.  Actually
it's best to use certified "seed" sets, they're properly hybrid selected and
they've already been treated for disease.  It's rare that ordinary stupidmarket
spuds will yield a viable crop.  If your spuds are sprouting and you must
exercise your green thumb then prop them in water and enjoy the foliage... but
do not eat the leaves and not if you have pets... nightshade leaves, stems and
especially blossoms are toxic.

http://www.extension.umn.edu/info-u/plants/BG476.html

Potato Growing
Potatoes are an important home garden vegetable in the Midwest. They require
many cultural practices in order to produce a good crop. For success, choose
the correct variety, till and fertilize the soil properly and use quality seed.
You may need to control severe fungal diseases and insect problems. For most
gardeners, it is beneficial to use scab-resistant varieties such as Norland or
Superior. It is also beneficial to purchase certified disease-free seed. 

Cut the seed tubers into pieces weighing about 2 ounces. Make sure there is at
least one "eye" or bud on each seed piece. Prepare a deep, loose seedbed. Apply
one pound of low-nitrogen fertilizer such as 5-10-10 per ten feet of row. Plant
seed pieces about 4 inches deep with the eyes facing up. Space them 12 inches
apart in rows 36 inches apart. 

To protect plants from severe blight diseases, use a fungicide containing
chlorothalonil such as "Daconil 2787". Remember to always read and follow label
directions. 

In late June, "hill" the rows by drawing soil up against the base of the
plants. This guards the developing new tubers against turning green from
exposure to sunlight. Water potato plants thoroughly once a week when rainfall
is inadequate. 

Begin harvesting when tubers reach the size you prefer. Larger, more mature
tubers have thicker skin and will store better than small, thin-skinned, "new
potatoes". 

Additional information on the control of insects affecting potatoes is also
available from INFO-U. Or contact your local Extension office. 

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 24 Mar 2003 14:00:17 GMT
--------
webbee wrote:
>I live in L.Island, NY... the grocery store that  delivers used to be a
>Del i(they all deliver).. I'm really lucky that they deliver, as it's

Many of the independant stupidmarkets on Lung Guyland will deliver, the
"Compare" markets offer free delivery on a minimum $50 order.  Compare markets
cater to the Latino community, offering wonderful produce and the best pork.

Here are the Compare store locations; click on individual stores to see weeky
circular... website is new and can use some work as it's difficult to navigate.

In fact if you look at the top of their circular it plainly indicates "Free
Delivery".

http://www.comparesupermarkets.com/sales.html

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From: blake murphy 
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 13:23:22 -0500
--------
aintlifegrand wrote:
>If you move to Florida, you can have Publix supermarket deliver. Order
>your groceries online at publixdirect, and they'll deliver them, and
>carry them into your kitchen.  :-)

or certain areas of manhattan.  but if you lived there, you might not
be able to afford to eat.

============================

From: Brian Rodenborn 
Date: Mon, 24 Mar 2003 20:34:09 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Agreed.  And, where can I find a grocer who will deliver?! 

In the greater St. Louis area, and a few other cities where they have
stores, Schnucks will deliver for a relatively nominal fee (12.50 for
next day delivery). It doesn't look like the Tennessee stores do though,
sorry.

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From: sue[at]addressin.sig (Curly Sue)
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 00:56:17 GMT
--------
Brian Rodenborn wrote:
>In the greater St. Louis area, and a few other cities where they have
>stores, Schnucks will deliver for a relatively nominal fee (12.50 for
>next day delivery). It doesn't look like the Tennessee stores do though,
>sorry.

Some people around here go to the store, pick out and pay for their
groceries, and then have the store deliver.  There are often 3-4 full
carts in the front of the store waiting for delivery.

I suspect they don't buy ice cream that way though. :>

============================

From: Brian Rodenborn 
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2003 16:41:15 GMT
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Curly Sue wrote:
> Some people around here go to the store, pick out and pay for their
> groceries, and then have the store deliver.  There are often 3-4 full
> carts in the front of the store waiting for delivery.

That wouldn't seem to be all that convenient to me. It doesn't really
matter to me, I don't mind grocery shopping and I like to examine my
produce before buying it.

Grocery delivery would be a good thing if one were in a situation that
limited mobility, like recovering from a broken leg or something.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 25 Mar 2003 17:14:17 GMT
--------
Brian Rodenborn writes:
>Grocery delivery would be a good thing if one were in a situation that
>limited mobility, like recovering from a broken leg or something.

"something"... would a bust in the mouth qualify...

============================

From: sue[at]addressin.sig (Curly Sue)
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2003 01:47:13 GMT
--------
Brian Rodenborn wrote:
>That wouldn't seem to be all that convenient to me. It doesn't really
>matter to me, I don't mind grocery shopping and I like to examine my
>produce before buying it.

Actually, in my "around here" a lot of people don't have cars.  They
do get to the store to pick out their groceries.  They just can't
carry so many bags of groceries home (the carts waiting for delivery
are full), so the store does the actual delivery.  It's free (with a
purchase over $35-50) but I'm sure they give the delivery person a
tip.

I was without a car for several months and managed by making numerous
smaller trips carrying 3-4 bags, but I had to forego the 25 lb bags of
kitty litter :>

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 26 Mar 2003 04:27:04 GMT
--------
Curly Sue writes:
>I was without a car for several months and managed by making numerous
>smaller trips carrying 3-4 bags, but I had to forego the 25 lb bags of
>kitty litter :>

You went back to using TP, eh? 

As an aside... I did my grocery shopping this afternoon and each trip I
purchase two 25lb bags of kitty litter.  The STUPIDmarket where I shop recently
installed some fercocktah carousel thingies at the checkout that hold those
plastic bags... must be 8-10 batches of bags hanging onto the carousel by a set
of long pointy arms.  Usually I would leave the heavy sacks in the cart and I'd
read off the bar code numbers but today the moron checker insisted on my
handing her the sacks so she could scan them.  I handed her one and I reminded
her to scan it twice, but no, the imbecile insisted I heft up the other
absolutely identical sack and so I did.  As she handed it back I saw it coming,
she lost her grip and dropped the sack onto a set of those pointy arms holding
the plastic grocery bags... rrrrrrip... cat litter all over, 25lbs worth.  I
had to say it so everyone could hear, I TOLD YOU SO!  I told her to just deduct
that sack of litter from my tab, I didn't feel like going all the way to the
end of the store for another.  Whoever the so-called engineer is who designed
that idiotic carousel contraption needs to go back to flipping burgers. 
Anyway, I've been saying for YEARS, design a reasonably tough plastic kitty
litter sack that once emptied can be used for a cat box liner, maybe even two. 
I've written to all the major cat litter companies with the idea but so far no
responses.

============================

From: Sheryl Rosen 
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2003 02:29:45 GMT
--------
Brian Rodenborn wrote:
> Grocery delivery would be a good thing if one were in a situation that
> limited mobility, like recovering from a broken leg or something.

I think you missed the point Sue was making.
Where Sue lives, people GO TO THE STORE, SELECT THEIR GROCERIES, and then
HAVE THE STORE DELIVER THEM home.

This sort of thing is done quite often in urban areas, where people walk to
the market and need to purchase more than they can carry in one trip (or
have other stops to make on the way home). It is very helpful if you don't
use a car or have limited ability for lifting. Many times, the delivery
person will bring your bags or box full of groceries right into the
apartment. Not a bad deal and worth the tip.

This is quite different than making a phone order and having them select
your groceries and then deliver it. (or the modern day equivalent, ordering
from the internet and having them deliver it), which is what, I think, you
might have been thinking of.


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