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Subject: Harvested from another ng
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Ruddell 
Date: Tue, 08 May 2001 18:07:17 GMT
--------
Not sure if this is proper to do, but I wanted to know if any of you have 
done this?   It's such a simple way to use left-over mashed potatoes and 
sound good.  We're going to give it a go next time round as it does sound 
good and, well I can't see kids resisting it?

With all the other details cut, but remember it's not mine...here it 
is...


"If we're talking about baking mashed potato in the oven, then I 
recommend taking big dollops of your favourite mashed potato combination, 
making a mound with a hollow in the top, like a volcano, then carefully 
breaking an egg into it before baking until the egg is set and the potato 
is browned.
It's an old student veggie, cheap, easy, and nutritious standby. I 
never understood the students who lived on beans on toast when they could 
live on baked egg in potato (actually quite nice served on a bed of baked 
beans), or poached eggs indienne, or carrot and lentil soup, or peanut 
pilaf. I never sat next to them in lectures if I could help it, either. 
Mind you, I never went to lectures at all if I could help it."

Dennis

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From: Ay 
Date: Wed, 09 May 2001 13:50:20 +1000
--------
My mum used to make this for us all the time, with a few changes.  She
called it potato ramekins.  She'd use mashed potato with cooked bacon
mixed thru, and sometimes cooked onion too, fill the ramekin with it,
then make a hollow in the top and crack an egg into it, and top it with
grated cheese.  It was one of may favourites growing up, and now that
you've reminded me of it, I'll have to make it again.  But I think I'll
do it your way - I don't have any ramekins ;)
 
============================

From: forcooksonly[at]aol.com (ForCooksOnly)
Date: 09 May 2001 11:58:09 GMT
--------
>left-over mashed potatoes

I like to add left-over carrots and mash a little--then shape into individual
patties and fry in butter until a nice crust forms.   

============================

From: Ruddell 
Date: Wed, 09 May 2001 17:24:54 GMT
--------
In article <3AF8BE7C.66012076@ozemail.com.au>, alexine@ozemail.com.au 
says...

> My mum used to make this for us all the time, with a few changes.  She
> called it potato ramekins.  She'd use mashed potato with cooked bacon
> mixed thru, and sometimes cooked onion too, fill the ramekin with it,
> then make a hollow in the top and crack an egg into it, and top it with
> grated cheese.  It was one of may favourites growing up, and now that
> you've reminded me of it, I'll have to make it again.  But I think I'll
> do it your way - I don't have any ramekins ;)

We have some indiviual meat pie pots that I'm sure would work fine.  Now 
that it's Spring here in Canada,  we bbq every day meaning mashed 
potatoes are few and far between.  But maybe this Sunday I'll cook a 
turkey dinner with all the fixings, then next week try this with the 
leftover potatoes.  I'm sure no one round here would complain ;-)

Dennis

============================

From: Kate L Pugh 
Date: Wed, 09 May 2001 20:53:16 GMT
--------
Ruddell wrote:
> Not sure if this is proper to do, but I wanted to know if any of you
> have done this? [...]  With all the other details cut, but remember
> it's not mine...here it is...

Hi Ruddell,

I would say that if you're reposting something from another newsgroup,
then unless it is a newsgroup in a hierarchy with limited distribution,
you should probably leave in the attributions. The From: and Newsgroups:
lines should probably be sufficient. I would also leave in the Date:
line. This allows others to contact the original poster if necessary,
as well as giving credit to the original poster.

If the post originated in a private hierarchy, then I would contact
the original poster and ask which if any of their details they would
like to be excised from the post when reposting to a wider audience.

Kake

============================

From: Ruddell 
Date: Wed, 09 May 2001 22:11:34 GMT
--------
kake says...

> I would say that if you're reposting something from another newsgroup,
> then unless it is a newsgroup in a hierarchy with limited distribution,
> you should probably leave in the attributions. The From: and Newsgroups:
> lines should probably be sufficient. I would also leave in the Date:
> line. This allows others to contact the original poster if necessary,
> as well as giving credit to the original poster.

Yeah, I thought about that but it was such an off-topic post in a ng that 
well, is a rather odd place which I lurk, but wouldn't dare post to...

> If the post originated in a private hierarchy, then I would contact
> the original poster and ask which if any of their details they would
> like to be excised from the post when reposting to a wider audience.

It was in one of the big six...although I knew better, I didn't want to 
lie and say it was mine or anything like that.  I'll be more careful in 
the future while staying completely honest.  

Fair enough?

Dennis

============================

From: Kate L Pugh 
Date: Thu, 10 May 2001 18:13:36 GMT
--------
I wrote:

>> I would say that if you're reposting something from another newsgroup,
>> then unless it is a newsgroup in a hierarchy with limited distribution,
>> you should probably leave in the attributions.

and Ruddell wrote:

> Yeah, I thought about that but it was such an off-topic post in a ng that 
> well, is a rather odd place which I lurk, but wouldn't dare post to...

Well, I'm sure that if I tried, I could use the Google newsgroup
archive to figure out which group it was... (I haven't actually done
this; a token gesture towards respecting your privacy.)

> It was in one of the big six...although I knew better, I didn't want to 
> lie and say it was mine or anything like that.  I'll be more careful in 
> the future while staying completely honest.  

Oh, I'm not saying you were being dishonest at all! You said quite
clearly that it was a repost. It's just that people can find out where
it came from anyway, as I said above, so I would personally have left
in the attributions as a courtesy. Just my opinion :)

ObFood: yesterday's supper:

Red Pepper and Puy Lentil Stew

A tested recipe from .
Adapted very slightly from a recipe posted to the FATFREE vegetarian
mailing list by Michelle Dick; itself an adaptation of a recipe from
"The Moosewood Cookbook", with a similar recipe in a Pritikin book for
inspiration too. Michelle says: "I was somewhat leary of the prune
juice, so I added it last and tasted before and after. It definately
improved the soup, don't skip it.". I agree with her :-)

Serves 7 (freezes well)

125ml (4 fl oz) red wine
2 large onions, chopped
6 red (bell) peppers, chopped
1 tsp chilli powder (or to taste)
1 1/2 tsp sweet hungarian paprika
450ml (16 fl oz, 2 cups) water
2 tsp light vegetable stock powder, or to taste
50g (2oz, 1/2 cup) Puy lentils (small grey whole lentils, or use others)
2 tsp dried basil
1 tsp dried marjoram
1/4 tsp dried thyme
2 x 425g (14oz) can flageoloet beans (or other small soft beans), rinsed
                                                             and drained
150ml (5 fl oz, 10 tbsp, 6oz) tomato puree (paste)
150ml (5 fl oz, 6oz) prune juice
salt and black pepper to taste

Heat the red wine in a large pan. Add the onions and saute until
beginning to soften, adding a little more hot water if necessary.

Add the spices, stir well and simmer for 5 minutes. Add red peppers,
water, stock powder and lentils; simmer uncovered for 40 minutes,
adding the herbs 10 minutes before the end.

Add beans, tomato puree and prune juice. Mix well and heat through.
Add seasoning if necessary.

Kake


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