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Subject: a hash brown learning experience
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: hahabogus <not[at]applicable.com.invalid>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2003 22:19:37 GMT
--------
For my whole life hash brown potatoes were made from pre-boiled 
potatoes...usually leftover from a day or so ago. Perhaps some chopped 
onion and diced red or green bell pepper. 

Tonight I tried a hash brown recipe from the barefoot contessa. I figured 
"what the hell I like her recipes so I'll try it".

She wants you to cube a pound of raw potatoes, add a diced yellow onion 
some green onion (both white and green parts) and flat leaf parsely, all 
fried in 5 tbsps of unsalted butter at a med low temp.

Well I stuck to the recipe except I used canola oil instead of butter and 
opted out on the flat leaf parsley.

Like she said I fried this undisturbeded for 5 minutes and then stired it 
up and then allowed time to pass between stirring it up again to allow the 
potatoes to brown.

It turned out very nicely...I think I'll ty other recipes for stuff I take 
making for granted. But next time I'll add some garlic.

You can learn new tricks even if you're an old dawg. 

============================

From: Z GIRL <nospamDeleteThis_z28_girl[at]comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2003 18:47:17 -0400
--------
Always be open to try new things, you never know what you may miss out on!!!
;-)

Barbarita

============================

From: Steve Wertz <swertz[at]fastmail.micronesia>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2003 19:35:16 -0500
--------
hahabogus wrote:

>For my whole life hash brown potatoes were made from pre-boiled 
>potatoes...usually leftover from a day or so ago. 

Those would be potatoe pancakes.

>Tonight I tried a hash brown recipe from the barefoot contessa. I figured 
>"what the hell I like her recipes so I'll try it".
>
>She wants you to cube a pound of raw potatoes, add a diced yellow onion 
>some green onion (both white and green parts) and flat leaf parsely, all 
>fried in 5 tbsps of unsalted butter at a med low temp.

Those would be home fries.

Hasj brows can only be made with *shredded* potato (onion, and egg of
you want).

============================

From: Jack Schidt® <jack.schidt[at]snet.net>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 01:58:53 GMT
--------
Steve Wertz wrote:

> Those would be home fries.

Potatoes O'Brien.  Home fries are fried sliced potatoes (the usual "around
here" caveat applies).

> Hasj brows can only be made with *shredded* potato (onion, and egg of
> you want).

Those things McD sells, are those considered "hash brownS" or "A hash
brown"??

Jack Grimace

============================

From: BOB <spam[at]kills.all>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2003 22:23:27 -0400
--------
Jack Schidt® typed:
> Potatoes O'Brien.  Home fries are fried sliced potatoes (the usual "around
> here" caveat applies).
>
> Those things McD sells, are those considered "hash brownS" or "A hash
> brown"??

Neither?

============================

From: Steve Wertz <swertz[at]fastmail.micronesia>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2003 22:22:43 -0500
--------
Jack Schidt® wrote:

>Potatoes O'Brien.  Home fries are fried sliced potatoes (the usual "around
>here" caveat applies).

Round slices?  Those ain't hash browws.  Those are simply round sliced
potatoes fried in oil (we call them buffalo chips, if anything).

I'll budge a little on the O'Brien thing.  If you add green pepper and
onion, then those are O'Brien Home Fries :-)  The only differece
between those and home fries is the green pepper and/or pimiento.
I've seen O'brien potatoes made with french fries plenty of times. 

Others would argue that potatoes O'Brien are the origoinal "hash
browns" because 'hash' traditionally refers to the diced potatoes and
the colors (like flannel hash).  They would be wrong, though.

>> Hash brows can only be made with *shredded* potato (onion, and egg of
>> you want).

>Those things McD sells, are those considered "hash brownS" or "A hash
>brown"??

Those aren't shredded - they're finely diced.  They have no official
definition, but are *close* to 'a hash browned potato patty.

I relize these are, of course, regional variations and have probably
been argued here before.  But I am right, and everyone, everywhere
else is just plain wrong.

============================

From: Jack Schidt® <jack.schidt[at]snet.net>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 07:52:37 GMT
--------
Steve Wertz wrote:

> Round slices?  Those ain't hash browws.  Those are simply round sliced
> potatoes fried in oil (we call them buffalo chips, if anything).

Right, they're home fries, not hash browns.  We have to import hash browns
here.

> I'll budge a little on the O'Brien thing.  If you add green pepper and
> onion, then those are O'Brien Home Fries :-)  The only differece
> between those and home fries is the green pepper and/or pimiento.
> I've seen O'brien potatoes made with french fries plenty of times.

And lotsa places cook up home fries with onions and green peppers.  They're
not cubed though.  And they're not Potatoes O'Brien.

> Others would argue that potatoes O'Brien are the origoinal "hash
> browns" because 'hash' traditionally refers to the diced potatoes and
> the colors (like flannel hash).  They would be wrong, though.

     Title: RED FLANNEL HASH (HOMEMADE CORNED BEEF HASH)
  Categories: Beef
       Yield: 4 servings

       1 lb Potatoes (about 2 medium
            Sized)
       3 tb Water
     1/2 c  Chopped onion
       2 tb Bacon drippings
       1 cn (12 oz) corned beef OR
            2 - cups cooked corned beef
       1 cn (8 oz) diced beets, drained
            OR 1 cup cooked diced beets
     1/4 c  Milk
       2 tb Chopped fresh parsley
            Salt and pepper to taste

   Peel and dice potatoes into 1/2" cubes.Place in a 4 cup glass
   measure;add water.Cover with plastic wrap,venting spout area.
   Microwave on high 6 to 7 minutes.Set aside. Place onion and bacon
   drippings in a 2 qt. casserole.Cover with lid or plastic wrap and
   microwave on high 2 to 3 minutes or until onion is tender.Stir in
   potatoes,corned beef,beets,milk and parsley.Add salt and pepper to
   taste.Microwave on high 3 minutes or to desired temperature.If
   desired,mixture may be browned in a skillet on conventional range top
   in lieu of final reheating in microwave.Makes 4 servings.

<snip the McD's aside>

> I relize these are, of course, regional variations and have probably
> been argued here before.  But I am right, and everyone, everywhere
> else is just plain wrong.

You have that in common with others around here. ;-P

Jack BlairPastorio

============================

From: Bob Pastorio <pastorio[at]rica.net>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 10:26:08 -0400
--------
Jack Schidt® wrote:
> You have that in common with others around here. ;-P

We *saw* that.

For an interesting variation on shredded potatoes cooked in oil (like 
I'm gonna give them a name and get smacked by somebody in, oh, I dunno, 
North Dakota or someplace for using the wrong name), add some shredded 
turnip up to maybe 30% and cook as usual. The turnip flavor diminishes 
and it adds a nice edge to the final taste.

Good with strongly-flavored gravies and meats.

============================

From: Jack Schidt® <jack.schidt[at]snet.net>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 15:15:15 GMT
--------
Bob Pastorio wrote:
> For an interesting variation on shredded potatoes cooked in oil (like
> I'm gonna give them a name and get smacked by somebody in, oh, I dunno,
> North Dakota or someplace for using the wrong name), add some shredded
> turnip up to maybe 30% and cook as usual. The turnip flavor diminishes
> and it adds a nice edge to the final taste.

Good to see the turnip being featured in something non-abusive, unlike the
mention of beets around here.

Jack Root

============================

From: swl_yb400pe[at]yahoo.com (yachtboy!)
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 22:19:39 GMT
--------
Bob Pastorio wrote:
>For an interesting variation on shredded potatoes cooked in oil (like=20
>I'm gonna give them a name and get smacked by somebody in, oh, I dunno,=20
>North Dakota or someplace for using the wrong name), add some shredded=20
>turnip up to maybe 30% and cook as usual. The turnip flavor diminishes=20
>and it adds a nice edge to the final taste.

Wellllll,
We tried the potato/turnip hash browns today. I, for one, have never had
turnips before. Interesting experience, to say the least. Wife and kids are
sure they'll never try that again, I'm undecided, as I feel this may be one
of those things you just have to get used to. 
Tonight it's red beans and rice, with cornbread.

============================

From: Kate Connally <connally[at]pitt.edu>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2003 10:25:20 -0400
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> We try and try and try to warn people, but some people just have to
> touch the flame to see if it's hot.  Ixnay on the urniptays!

Down with turnips!  Down with beets!

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' <barbschaller[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 09:02:32 -0500
--------
Steve Wertz wrote:
> Round slices?  Those ain't hash browws.  Those are simply round sliced
> potatoes fried in oil (we call them buffalo chips, if anything).

Ohmygosh!  The truth comes out!   At last!  :-)
From Epicurious food dictionary for home-fries:
"Potatoes that are sliced and fried, often with finely chopped onions or 
green peppers. The potatoes can either be raw or boiled before slicing. 
Also called cottage-fried potatoes."

No dice mentioned.

============================

From: Digger <dewar_sHATESPAM[at]mpx.com.au>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 18:17:26 +1000
--------
Jack Schidt® wrote:
> Those things McD sells, are those considered "hash brownS" or "A hash
> brown"??

They're called "Yesterdays unused fries squished into a shape and deepfried
again"

============================

From: hahabogus <not[at]applicable.com.invalid>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 11:12:40 GMT
--------
Jack Schidt® wrote:
> Those things McD sells, are those considered "hash brownS" or "A hash
> brown"??

Perhaps I mis-spoke I used 2 medium potatoes and cut them into about 1/2 
inch cubes. Frankly I agree with the contessa and call these hash browns. 
The larger cubed potatoes are what I call homefries. If you use a grater on 
the potatoes whether they are cooked or not, that's got to be a potato 
pancake kinda thing. 

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' <barbschaller[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 08:44:11 -0500
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> Perhaps I mis-spoke I used 2 medium potatoes and cut them into about 1/2 
> inch cubes. Frankly I agree with the contessa and call these hash browns. 
> The larger cubed potatoes are what I call homefries. If you use a grater on 
> the potatoes whether they are cooked or not, that's got to be a potato 
> pancake kinda thing.

Home fries to me are *sliced* raw potatoes, fried.  When I make 
hashbrowns from scratch (I'm using Simply Potatoes hashbrowns mostly 
now), I peel the raw spuds then use the julienne cutter with the 
Cuisinart.  I've used the coarse grater, too, but prefer the former.  
Anyway, before I shred or grate, I have a large pot of boiling water, 
lightly salted, ready.  On shredding the spuds, I dump them into the 
boiling water for maybe 30 seconds.  Then drain and rinse with cold 
water and drain again.  They'll keep in the fridge for 3 days.  I fry as 
needed.  I don't get potato pancakes from this -- that involves flour 
and egg and a different frying technique.  (I move my hashbrowns around 
when they're frying.)    My fitty cents worth.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakem[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 20:14:50 GMT
--------
Jack Schidt® wrote:
>Those things McD sells, are those considered "hash brownS" or "A hash
>brown"??

i hesitate to say that i kinda like them.  possibly only when it's six
a.m. and you have somehow neglested to go to bed.

============================

From: Steve Wertz <swertz[at]fastmail.micronesia>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 16:42:54 -0500
--------
blake murphy wrote:
>i hesitate to say that i kinda like them.  possibly only when it's six
>a.m. and you have somehow neglested to go to bed.

Thgere's something in those McD's hash brows that leave this bitter
taste lingering in my mouth.  I don't get em anymore (mainly because I
usually go to sleep just before they open).

============================

From: Kate Connally <connally[at]pitt.edu>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2003 11:33:50 -0400
--------
Steve Wertz wrote:

> Those would be potatoe pancakes.

Uh, how is that?  Potato pancakes are made from
grated or shredded raw potatoes, not leftover
boiled potatoes.
 
> Those would be home fries.

This is true, more or less.  Generally fried potatoes
consisting of largish cubes or slices are referred to
as home fries.
 
> Hasj brows can only be made with *shredded* potato (onion, and egg of
> you want).

This is not totally true.  Hash(ed) browns can be made
with finely diced potatoes as well as shredded.  The
word "hash" means "to chop or mince".

============================

From: Steve Wertz <swertz[at]fastmail.micronesia>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2003 16:25:50 -0500
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
>Uh, how is that?  Potato pancakes are made from
>grated or shredded raw potatoes, not leftover
>boiled potatoes.

Potatoe Pancakes are made with leftover mashed potatoes.  And you're
from Pittsburgh - Pennsylvania-Dutch territory? Hrmph.

-sw (Ex-North Hills Resident)

============================

From: Jack Schidt® <jack.schidt[at]snet.net>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2003 21:59:07 GMT
--------
Steve Wertz wrote:
> Potatoe Pancakes are made with leftover mashed potatoes.  And you're
> from Pittsburgh - Pennsylvania-Dutch territory? Hrmph.

Hmm.....there's a variant on this one.

Lefse, or Norwegian style potato pancakes are made from mashed potatoes.  I
think Irish potato pancakes are and not sure but I think Ukranian Deruny are
grated and then pureed..

Kartoffelpuffer, or German Style, Yiddish Latkes, and Swedish Potato
pancakes all use grated raw potatoes.

Jack Kartoffelfresser

============================

From: Steve Wertz <swertz[at]fastmail.micronesia>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2003 17:43:40 -0500
--------
Jack Schidt® wrote:
>Kartoffelpuffer, or German Style, Yiddish Latkes, and Swedish Potato
>pancakes all use grated raw potatoes.

I have a couple german cookbooks (not to mention grandparents and
parents) and the recipes are equally divided: Mashed and Shredded.

Schidt?  It almost sounds German?  ;-)

============================

From: Jack Schidt® <jack.schidt[at]snet.net>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2003 23:43:41 GMT
--------
Steve Wertz wrote:
> Schidt?  It almost sounds German?  ;-)

Ja, dude, foist cheneration Deutsch-Ami.  Pops escaped from DDR, Mom came
here from Austria.  Ich bin kein Berliner, though.  ;-P

Jack Kraut

============================

From: Steve Wertz <swertz[at]fastmail.micronesia>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2003 19:06:14 -0500
--------
Jack Schidt® wrote:
>Ja, dude, foist cheneration Deutsch-Ami.  Pops escaped from DDR, Mom came
>here from Austria.  Ich bin kein Berliner, though.  ;-P

No Habla Deutsch.

But I am making hash browns tonight (which are really german potato
pancakes).  I start the atkins next week....

============================

From: Jack Schidt® <jack.schidt[at]snet.net>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 00:08:54 GMT
--------
Steve Wertz wrote:
> But I am making hash browns tonight (which are really german potato
> pancakes).  I start the atkins next week....

I don't know diet atkins from chet atkins, but I hear tell you oughta savor
every potato bite now before ya go on it.

Good luck with it.

Jack DietSmith

============================

From: blake murphy <blakem[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2003 20:22:39 GMT
--------
Jack Schidt® wrote:
>I don't know diet atkins from chet atkins, but I hear tell you oughta savor
>every potato bite now before ya go on it.

i would recommend chet over diet.  the two 'chester and lester'
records (with les paul) are a treat.

============================

From: Kate Connally <connally[at]pitt.edu>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2003 10:24:08 -0400
--------
Steve Wertz wrote:
> But I am making hash browns tonight (which are really german potato
> pancakes).  I start the atkins next week....

Well, not really, as there are no eggs in them.
German-style potato pancakes have eggs and a
small amount of flour.  Shreddes hash browns don't.
Not to mention that they are generally not made 
into the shape of a pancake.

============================

From: Kate Connally <connally[at]pitt.edu>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2003 10:20:13 -0400
--------
Steve Wertz wrote:
> Potatoe Pancakes are made with leftover mashed potatoes.  And you're
> from Pittsburgh - Pennsylvania-Dutch territory? Hrmph.

No they're not, no matter where you're from.
I'm have German and the Germans invented
potato(no e) pancakes.  We used to form
leftover mashed potatoes into patties and
fry them but we never called them potato
pancakes.  You could stretch a point and
call them that but real potato pancakes are
made with shredded raw potatoes, egg, a little
flour and salt and pepper.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 20 Aug 2003 17:22:19 GMT
--------
Kate Connally writes:
>No they're not, no matter where you're from.
>I'm have German and the Germans invented
>potato(no e) pancakes.

Nonsense.  The Germans may have invented lots of things but potato pancakes is
definitely not one.   Obviously the 'invention' of the potato pancake is
credited to the Peruvians... who were producing various potato pancakes for
thousands of years before any Kraut~ ever knew potato.

============================

From: Dog3 <dog30[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 20 Aug 2003 17:36:59 GMT
--------
Sheldon poured a cocktail and penned:
> Nonsense.  The Germans may have invented lots of things but potato
> pancakes is definitely not one.   Obviously the 'invention' of the
> potato pancake is credited to the Peruvians... who were producing
> various potato pancakes for thousands of years before any Kraut~ ever
> knew potato. 

Hmmm...  according to my aunt, I am from Peruvian ancestory.  Supposedly we 
were cannibalistic in nature.  I still don't know how we got to Ireland.

Michael <- loves potato

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 20 Aug 2003 18:09:29 GMT
--------
Dog3 writes:
>Hmmm...  according to my aunt, I am from Peruvian ancestory.  Supposedly we 
>were cannibalistic in nature.  I still don't know how we got to Ireland.

http://www.popmatters.com/film/reviews/k/keep-the-river-on-your-right.html

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2003 08:20:46 -0500
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
> No they're not, no matter where you're from.
> I'm have German and the Germans invented
> potato(no e) pancakes.  We used to form
> leftover mashed potatoes into patties and
> fry them but we never called them potato
> pancakes.  You could stretch a point and
> call them that but real potato pancakes are
> made with shredded raw potatoes, egg, a little
> flour and salt and pepper.

My mom and her mother (Scottish) called leftover mashed potatoes mixed with
an egg, dusted with flour and patted into patties "potato pancakes".
Pancakes are, after all, thinly fried something or other.  BUT, my other
grandmother was German.  And she did the grated potatoes with onion thing.
I'm not sure which I like best.  I suppose it depends on my mood :)  But I'd
call both potato pancakes.

============================

From: Elaine Parrish <esp[at]ebicom.net>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2003 23:50:40 -0500
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
> Uh, how is that?  Potato pancakes are made from
> grated or shredded raw potatoes, not leftover
> boiled potatoes.

Around here (thank you to whomever stated that this is the standard
caveat. tee hee hee, it is perfect. It eliminates hurt feelings and keeps
the peace.), we make potato cakes (no "pan" in front of cake) out of
leftover creamed potatoes (we haven't had "mashed potatoes" since the
electric mixer came along and "whipped potatoes" seem to be something from
north of the Mason/Dixon line.) Stir the cold potatoes with enough milk to
make them "workable", add a beaten egg or two, and form into little
patties, dust with a little flour, and fry in a skillet with just a little
oil until hot through and through and browned and crispy on the outside.

We also make "hot potato salad" out of left over creamed potatoes by
adding some basic potato salad stuff that is well sauteed (onions, bell
pepper, celery, etc), crumbled crispy fried bacon, and hard boiled eggs.
No mayo, but sometimes a bit of mustard. We used to turn this mixture into
a buttered loaf pan or baking dish to warm, but now I put it in the
microwave.

============================

From: Elaine Parrish <esp[at]ebicom.net>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 03:46:03 -0500
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> For my whole life hash brown potatoes were made from pre-boiled
> potatoes...usually leftover from a day or so ago. Perhaps some chopped
> onion and diced red or green bell pepper.

We have several dishes along this line. Cubed potatoes fried in a small
amount of oil are called home fries or pan fries. They are served for
breakfast or as a quick side dish at dinner.

One variation is to add chopped onions and bell peppers (I think the folks
on this ng call it Potatoes O'brien) and I do add the parsley (dried
flakes) for color. Depending on what else I am cooking, I have also fried
bacon crispy - remove from skillet - cook potatoes and stuff in bacon
drippings and add crumbled bacon in last minutes of cooking. I've also
added garlic, chives, red pepper, etc. The combination of seasonings
depends on the rest of the meal.

This can be cooked in a covered or uncovered skillet. The results are very
different. Usually, a little more oil is needed for an uncovered skillet
and you have more of a "fried" texture. A covered skillet uses the steam
and gives a softer texture and all the added "stuff" adheres to the
potatoes better.

Also, depending on the temperature used, the potatoes can be soft or
crisp.

Re: hashbrowns: I use a standard grater and grate raw, peeled potatoes.
From here, I have 3 basic cooking methods.

1) using a small amount of oil, spread potatoes in a thin layer covering
bottom of skillet. Brown until crisp, turn and brown other side.

2) squeezing excess water from potatoes, shape into little patties and fry
in small amount of oil.

3) squeezing excess water, drop handfuls of potatoes in about a half inch
of hot oil and fry fast. This results in a crispier potato.

============================

From: HacJec[at]webtv.net (Helen C.)
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2003 22:20:53 -0700 (PDT)
--------
Elaine wrote Re hashbrowns: 
> I use a standard grater and grate raw, peeled
> potatoes. From here, I have 3 basic cooking methods.

Grated potatoes cooked in oil have always been a "comfort" food for me.
I use raw potatoes, also, and form into a patty with a little thickness
to it just after they are put in pan. I always use one of my cast irons.
They come out fairly crispy on the outside and nicely cooked on the
inside.

When I fix shredded fried potato patties, I just have to fix eggs, bacon
or sausage and toast to go with the potatoes. Then, I usually figure
that a little french toast or pancakes would be nice also. It ends up
being a huge breakfast so only do it now and then.... sure is good!

If you want comfort, grab a raw potato and a grater....

============================

From: Elaine Parrish <esp[at]ebicom.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2003 01:52:04 -0500
--------
Helen C. wrote:
> When I fix shredded fried potato patties, I just have to fix eggs, bacon
> or sausage and toast to go with the potatoes. Then, I usually figure
> that a little french toast or pancakes would be nice also. It ends up
> being a huge breakfast so only do it now and then.... sure is good!

I totally agree! I don't cook breakfast for breakfast unless it is a
special occassion, but I do cook breakfast for dinner several times a
month. All the things you mentioned are a must! I have to be careful or
the menu gets way too large.

============================

From: AM Pittman <amy[at]nas.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 11:04:06 -0700
--------
Isn't amazing what can be made from the lowly potato?

Seriously though I love potatoes and make hash browns (the boiled,
cooled and grated variety) several times a month. I also make a
variation called Spicy D&D Potatoes, which is made by cubing a
precooked boiled spud, liberally coating pieces with spices and pan
fry.

One question how exactly do I get from shredded spuds to potato
pancakes? I have only had the mashed variety.

Amy

============================

From: Kate Connally <connally[at]pitt.edu>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2003 11:29:24 -0400
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> Like she said I fried this undisturbeded for 5 minutes and then stired it
> up and then allowed time to pass between stirring it up again to allow the
> potatoes to brown.

I find it hard to believe that the potatoes
got done in fine minutes - even if you diced them
quite small.  I've tried making home fries or hash
browns from raw potatoes and they take forever to
cook and the texture is never right.  I then started
using baked potatoes.  I would use leftover boiled
or baked potatoes if I had them, but I usually don't,
so I just bake the potatoes in the microwave.  Since
I'm going to fry them, with the skins on, I don't 
worry about the fact that the skins don't come out
right on microwave baked potatoes.  When I make baked
potatoes to eat as such I always rub the skins with
butter before baking in the oven.  Then the skin is
the best part.

============================

From: hahabogus <not[at]applicable.com.invalid>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2003 21:40:11 GMT
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
> I find it hard to believe that the potatoes
> got done in fine minutes - even if you diced them
> quite small. 

Actually I wrote that  the 1/2 inch cubed potatoes were to sit cooking in 
the butter for 5 minutes (low medium heat) before you disturb them to get 
them nicely browned on one side. I didn't mean that 5 minutes was the total 
cooking time ...just the time to get a good start on the browning. The hash 
browns took closer to 20 minutes to get a nicely crisped batched that 
browned up nicely. But I didn't stir/flip them a lot.

============================

From: Steve Wertz <swertz[at]fastmail.micronesia>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2003 17:01:19 -0500
--------
hahabogus wrote:
>Actually I wrote that  the 1/2 inch cubed potatoes were to sit cooking in 
>the butter for 5 minutes (low medium heat) before you disturb them to get 
>them nicely browned on one side. I didn't mean that 5 minutes was the total 
>cooking time ...just the time to get a good start on the browning. The hash 
>browns took closer to 20 minutes to get a nicely crisped batched that 
>browned up nicely. But I didn't stir/flip them a lot.

With a half-inch dice, it usually takes 12-15 minutes for me to get
brown/crisp on a *one* side of a raw potato.  And butter?  That would
burn pretty easily when doing home fries.

Just my $.02.  Not sure how you accomplished this according to my many
experiences.

============================

From: Becca <becca[at]hal-pc.org>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2003 17:35:33 -0500
--------
Kate, I also used baked potatoes.  Since the potatoes are done, I use
a higher heat and they brown well.  They taste great. 


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