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Subject: Hash Browns
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Steve Walker 
Date: Sun, 9 Jul 2006 18:51:05 +0100
--------
I've tried a variety of hash browns, all being slightly different from the 
east coast to the west coast of the US. The hash browns you buy already made 
here in the UK are very poor in comparison and contain mainly potato, and 
perhaps a little onion if lucky!
Are there any spices used in the US style hash browns, perhaps paprika or 
cumin??
Any recipes and tips for creating authentic style hash browns will be very 
much appreciated.

Kind Regards
Steve Walker
Hull, East Yorkshire
UK 

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From: Ophelia 
Date: Sun, 09 Jul 2006 18:00:02 GMT
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Steve Walker wrote:
> I've tried a variety of hash browns, all being slightly different from the
> east coast to the west coast of the US. The hash browns you buy already
> made here in the UK are very poor in comparison and contain mainly potato,
> and perhaps a little onion if lucky!
> Are there any spices used in the US style hash browns, perhaps paprika or
> cumin??
> Any recipes and tips for creating authentic style hash browns will be very
> much appreciated.
>
> Kind Regards
> Steve Walker
> Hull, East Yorkshire

Hi Steve:))  I grew up in Newland Avenue:)) But.. it was a longgggggg time
ago when it was a nice place to be:)

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From: Jill 
Date: Sun, 9 Jul 2006 13:55:36 -0500
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Steve Walker wrote:
> I've tried a variety of hash browns, all being slightly different
> from the east coast to the west coast of the US. The hash browns you
> buy already made here in the UK are very poor in comparison and

Hi Steve,

There are hash browns (grated potatoes grilled like a German potato pancake)
and then there are home fries (diced potatoes pan-fried in oil with diced
onions).  I'm not sure what you're looking for but I can guarantee there is
no cumin or paprika in either one.  Lots of salt & pepper, it's the key to
both.

Having said that, you can pretty much do anything you want to with your
potatoes.  I like to dice them, sprinkle with salt & pepper, toss them in a
frying pan with oil along with some onion, garlic, and sprinkle with some
(yes) hot Hungarian paprika.  It's not typical but there you have it.  The
typical ones are just browned in oil potatoes with diced onion.  There's
nothing really special about hash browns except they taste good :)

Jill
USA

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From: Mordechai Housman 
Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2006 04:02:59 GMT
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jmcquown wrote:
> There are hash browns (grated potatoes grilled like a German potato pancake)
> and then there are home fries (diced potatoes pan-fried in oil with diced
> onions).  I'm not sure what you're looking for but I can guarantee there is
> no cumin or paprika in either one.  Lots of salt & pepper, it's the key to
> both.

You lost me with the "German potato pancake." Can you describe this and 
the process of making hash browns, please?

Thanks! 

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From: Jill 
Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2006 01:19:09 -0500
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Mordechai Housman wrote:
> You lost me with the "German potato pancake." Can you describe this
> and the process of making hash browns, please?

German potato pancakes are shredded potatoes with onion, packed tightly into
pancakes and quickly fried until golden brown in hot oil in little pancakes.
Got it?

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From: Mordechai Housman 
Date: Tue, 11 Jul 2006 03:53:38 GMT
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jmcquown wrote:
> German potato pancakes are shredded potatoes with onion, packed tightly into
> pancakes and quickly fried until golden brown in hot oil in little pancakes.

Shredded raw onion? That sounds like potato latkes, which are fairly 
tradition among Ashkenazi Jews during Chanukah, basically because 
wintertime that was probably all we had to eat: potatoes and onions. 

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From: Jill 
Date: Tue, 11 Jul 2006 01:10:42 -0500
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Mordechai Housman wrote:
> Shredded raw onion? That sounds like potato latkes, which are fairly
> tradition among Ashkenazi Jews during Chanukah, basically because
> wintertime that was probably all we had to eat: potatoes and onions.

Exactly the same concept.  I shouldn't have to explain this to you ;)

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From: Steve Wertz 
Date: Sun, 09 Jul 2006 19:08:50 GMT
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Steve Walker wrote:
> Are there any spices used in the US style hash browns, perhaps paprika or 
> cumin??

Hash browns are just potato, onion, and salt (pepper), fried in
oil.  Sometimes a little egg can be used as a binder in the
"patty" type of hash browns (using shredded potatoes), but it's
not recommended - at least by me.  Not if you like em crispy.

There are of course variations to this, but this is how most
individuals and restaurants cook them.

You could be talking about home fries, or hashbrows, so I made
the first paragraph dual-purpose.  Hash browns are shredded
potatoes.  Home fries are (at least) 1/3" diced potatoes and
chopped onion.

If you're really making home fries, then you need to try hash
browns.

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From: Virginia Tadrzynski 
Date: Sun, 9 Jul 2006 16:04:21 -1200
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> I've tried a variety of hash browns, all being slightly different from the

we use cubed potatoes, chopped onions, diced bell pepper and Old Bay
seasoning.
-ginny

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From: Jimbo1 
Date: Sun, 09 Jul 2006 21:24:19 GMT
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> we use cubed potatoes, chopped onions, diced bell pepper and Old Bay
> seasoning.
> -ginny

That is "potatoes o'brian".

Jim 

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From: "Virginia Tadrzynski" 
Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2006 10:36:25 -1200
--------
> > we use cubed potatoes, chopped onions, diced bell pepper and Old Bay
> > seasoning.
> > -ginny
> >
> That is "potatoes o'brian".
> Jim

Nah, not with the Old Bay.  Besides, I'm Scotch, we don't do "O" anything.
-ginny

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From: Jill 
Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2006 12:11:06 -0500
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Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:
> Nah, not with the Old Bay.  Besides, I'm Scotch, we don't do "O"
> anything. -ginny

Laughing muchly!  Tadrynski is Scottish?

Jill McQuown (grinning)

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From: "~xy~" 
Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2006 18:42:17 GMT
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> Laughing muchly!  Tadrynski is Scottish?

It was originally MacTadrynski ....

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From: Virginia Tadrzynski 
Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2006 19:16:48 -1200
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> Laughing muchly!  Tadrynski is Scottish?
> Jill McQuown (grinning)

Born and bred a Nawth Caroliner MacDonald (or McDonald dependent upon which
side of the family you were on at any particular time).  Only started the
Polish injections at the ripe old age of 22.
-ginny

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From: myrl_jeffcoat[at]yahoo.com
Date: 9 Jul 2006 14:33:04 -0700
--------
I'm really fond of Carolina Low Country cooking, and also Greek
cooking.  One day, I came up with the following funky bunch of
hashbrowns, and I've been doing it often since.


* Cubed potatoes of three kinds (Yams, Sweet potatoes, Irish) in equal parts.
* Butter
* Brown Sugar
* Red and Green Bell Peppers chopped
* Onion Chopped (I like yellow ones for this recipe)
* Garlic grated
* Some Caraway seeds
* Some Fennel seeds
* A little Beer

In a rather large skillet, I melt the butter over medium/high heat, add
the brown sugar until it makes a little sauce.

Throw in the chopped onion, garlic, cubed potatoes, and bell peppers.

Stir a bit while they are frying.  After a few minutes, turn the
temperature down a bit, put in as much beer as you like, add the
caraway and fennel, cover with a lid, and cook until tender.

There not only good at breakfast or lunch. . .They're good anytime of
the day.  I like them with those BBQ tenderloins I put Marv Woods rub
on, which we were talking about last night.

Myrl Jeffcoat
http://www.myrljeffcoat.com

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From: Jimmy 
Date: 9 Jul 2006 15:33:17 -0700
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Grate cooked Potatoes.  Add whole egg and mix well.  Saute' in pan in
duck or goose fat.  Note onions are sauted first to soften and then
potatoes are added along with salt pepper and Hungarian Paprika.  We do
not crisp these but you can if you want.  They are served as an
accompianment to a main course and not a breakfast thing but of course
you can have them for breakfast as well.

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From: Mordechai Housman 
Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2006 04:09:15 GMT
--------
>Grate cooked Potatoes.  Add whole egg and mix well.  Saute' in pan in
>duck or goose fat.  Note onions are sauted first to soften and then

That sounds like Jewish chremselach (the "ch" is a velar fricative -- it 
sounds like you're clearing your throat).

Cook potatoes, mash them, add whole raw egg, add grated or 
finely-chopped onion (though I think some people consider the opinion 
optional -- but heathens will say anything), salt, pepper (no paprika). 
Fry in pan. Most people fry this in oil. Many fry this in chicken fat 
(shmaltz), but then it will taste very much like chicken, I am told. 
This is almost traditional for a side dish on Passover. 

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From: Jimmy 
Date: 10 Jul 2006 08:35:30 -0700
--------
Mordechai Housman wrote:
> Cook potatoes, mash them, add whole raw egg, add grated or
> finely-chopped onion (though I think some people consider the opinion
> optional -- but heathens will say anything), salt, pepper (no paprika).
> Fry in pan. Most people fry this in oil. Many fry this in chicken fat
> (shmaltz), but then it will taste very much like chicken, I am told.
> This is almost traditional for a side dish on Passover.

This is a dish from the Schwabische Turkei region in Hungary; down
Kaposvar way.
We call them 'geraeste kartoffel.'; I think a variation of Swiss style
Rosti potatoes.

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From: Dave Smith 
Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2006 14:18:05 -0400
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Steve Walker wrote:
> I've tried a variety of hash browns, all being slightly different from the

Start off with boiled potatoes. Fry them in butter or oil. Add some onion of you
want, or bits of ham or bacon.


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