[Previous Thread] [Return to BigSpud: The Potato Recipe Collection Menu][Next Thread]

Subject: Indian hash browns
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Jke 
Date: Sun, 14 May 2006 22:22:27 +0200
--------
I had left over boiled potatoes and a new cookbook with quick Indian 
recipes. I rad a recipe and then altered it almost beyond recognition, but 
the basic flavors I kept.

So...
1. I sauteed an onion in oil
2. then added some cumin to sort of toast it
before..
3. adding the chopped, cooked potatoes (about 250 grams, I suspect)
4. after they had warmed through I added a paste of:
5. equal amounts of tamarind paste and brown sugar plus some water (they 
added up to 5-6tablespoons)
6. let that cook down until t got sticky, while stirring
7. then I seasoned it with salt and chili powder

I considered adding an egg, but wasn't hungry enough for that.

It was very good. It was the first time I used tamarind. I expected to like 
it, because I like tangy. I wasn't disappointed - at all. I am grateful for 
having the rest of that jar to enjoy later.

============================

From: Dee Randall 
Date: Sun, 14 May 2006 16:33:18 -0400
--------
Tell me/us more about that jar of tamarind paste. Can you provide a link to 
show the brand or jar?
I usually buy a block of tamarind with the seeds in it, that has to be 
soaked in water, then strained; a PITA. I never know how much strength of 
tamarind I actually have using it this way.
Thanks,
Dee Dee 

============================

From: Jke 
Date: Sun, 14 May 2006 22:56:11 +0200
--------
Dee Randall schreef:

> Tell me/us more about that jar of tamarind paste. Can you provide a link 
> to show the brand or jar?

I've seen at least 3 or 4 brands around in ethnic stores, this jar says 
"Flower Brand". It's been packaged in The Hague, The Netherlands.

Tamarind (paste) is also sold as assem here (sometimes spelled assam), which 
I believe is the Indonesian name for it. Indonesia used to be a Dutch 
colony, so Indonesian products are relatively easily availbale here. Indian 
stores also carry it.

> I usually buy a block of tamarind with the seeds in it, that has to be 
> soaked in water, then strained; a PITA.

I bet. I wouldn't be as tempted to use it myself.

============================

From: Dee Randall 
Date: Sun, 14 May 2006 17:13:31 -0400
--------
Jke wrote:
> I've seen at least 3 or 4 brands around in ethnic stores, this jar says 
> "Flower Brand". It's been packaged in The Hague, The Netherlands.
>
> Tamarind (paste) is also sold as assem here (sometimes spelled assam), 
> which I believe is the Indonesian name for it. Indonesia used to be a 
> Dutch colony, so Indonesian products are relatively easily availbale here. 
> Indian stores also carry it.

I found a link.  http://www.thecmccompany.com/thai.htm#Item%20#1207
Hopefully, it's in the U.S. I see a few other things I can order that I 
need.
Thanks, I didn't know about the 'paste'. I'll look for it as well in the 
markets, now that I know.

============================

From: Jke 
Date: Sun, 14 May 2006 23:30:35 +0200
--------
Dee wrote:
> I found a link.  http://www.thecmccompany.com/thai.htm#Item%20#1207
> Hopefully, it's in the U.S. I see a few other things I can order that I 
> need.
> Thanks, I didn't know about the 'paste'. I'll look for it as well in the 
> markets, now that I know.

I was jsut thinking, there are 2 things that you could use as a substitute: 
pomegranate molasses (yum) and apple butter. Neither is quite the same, but 
I think both are pretty darn close. So if finding tamarind paste remains a 
problem, you could experiment with those. Assuming they are available where 
you are :)

If worst come to worst, there's always vinegar and brown sugar. And ketchup 
could be added to that, too.
Definitely not the same as tamarind, but still sweet and sour.

============================

From: Yogi Gupta 
Date: 15 May 2006 11:17:47 -0700
--------
I suspected it was Aloo Chaat at best. You are right, its basically
Russet type boiled poatoes served with Tamarind Chutney and splash of
yogurt. The basic flavor is drived from Tamarind Chutney. Tamarind
Chutney has Dates and raisins. The two spices which really add flavor
are 1. Dry roasted and crushed cumin seeds, and 2. Kala Namak.
If you have a chance, browse through my website and under Snacks, you
will see a list of different Chaat.
Yogi
www.IndiaCurry.com

============================

From: Jke 
Date: Mon, 15 May 2006 23:32:49 +0200
--------
Yogi Gupta schreef:
>I suspected it was Aloo Chaat at best. You are right, its basically
> Russet type boiled poatoes served with Tamarind Chutney and splash of
> yogurt. The basic flavor is drived from Tamarind Chutney. Tamarind
> Chutney has Dates and raisins. The two spices which really add flavor

I didn't use chutney, but if I ever come across tamarind chutney, I'll buy 
it,. I'm sure I'll love it.

> are 1. Dry roasted and crushed cumin seeds, and 2. Kala Namak.
> If you have a chance, browse through my website and under Snacks, you
> will see a list of different Chaat.

I did and I really enjoyed your site. Lots of things there to try! And I 
like it that the ingredients list aren't as daunting as in some of the 
cookbooks I've come across. Although I am finally, after years, discovering 
places where  I can actually *buy* the ingreidients requerid. idian cooking 
has yet to take off in Holland, other minorites are more prominent here. But 
I've seen things liek betelnuts and asafoetida in stores, which seems to be 
a new development.

============================

From: George 
Date: Sun, 14 May 2006 18:33:52 -0400
--------
Dee Randall wrote:
> Tell me/us more about that jar of tamarind paste. Can you provide a link to 
> show the brand or jar?
> I usually buy a block of tamarind with the seeds in it, that has to be 
> soaked in water, then strained; a PITA. I never know how much strength of 
> tamarind I actually have using it this way.

I discovered tamarind paste earlier this year in a Vietnamese market. It 
comes in a white plastic jar with a blue screw top and a blue label that 
simply says "PURE FRESH TAMARIND (concentrated)". It is from Thailand 
and the exporter is listed as "Combine Thai Foods Co, LTD" and  actually 
has a yahoo email address listed "cfoods@yahoo.com"

============================

From: Dee Randall 
Date: Sun, 14 May 2006 19:19:13 -0400
--------
George wrote:
> I discovered tamarind paste earlier this year in a Vietnamese market. It 
> comes in a white plastic jar with a blue screw top and a blue label that 
> simply says "PURE FRESH TAMARIND (concentrated)". It is from Thailand and 
> the exporter is listed as "Combine Thai Foods Co, LTD" and  actually has a 
> yahoo email address listed "cfoods@yahoo.com"

Thanks, George.  I sent off an email to them to see if they furnish this 
product near to me.

============================

From: Bronwyn 
Date: 14 May 2006 16:47:54 -0700
--------
In Oz, I've used a tamarind concentrate paste branded TAMICON, product
of India. Its says 1 teaspoon for a dish sized for 6 persons
(subjective hey). I usually soften it in a 1/4c hot water and add that
to the recipe.
I see it's like Tabasco sauce - the jar is dated 1998! Just about
finished now, think I'll chuck it out and splurge on a new jar LOL

Cheers
-- Bronnie

============================

From: Yogi Gupta 
Date: 14 May 2006 20:42:03 -0700
--------
The best tamarind concentrates are from Puerto Rico and sold in almost
all Indian Stores in United States. The price is about $3.00 for about
2 Cup size.
Those blocks are really cumbersome to use.
JKe! I dont know what you made, sounds South Indian.

Two suggestions: Throw in a few golden raisins (about half a
Tablespoon) along with Tamarind and brown sugar, Use Sea salt.
Indian Stores have a rock salt called 'Kala Namak', that migh go
better.

============================

From: Jke 
Date: Mon, 15 May 2006 10:45:23 +0200
--------
Yogi Gupta schreef:

> The best tamarind concentrates are from Puerto Rico and sold in almost
> all Indian Stores in United States. The price is about $3.00 for about
> 2 Cup size.
> Those blocks are really cumbersome to use.
> JKe! I dont know what you made, sounds South Indian.

I don't know what I made, either. It's a variation on that recipe fromo the 
book. The book calls it Aloo Chaat. It doesn't use any onions, the other 
ingredients I did take from the recipe. The book doesn't talk about regions 
and such.
It's called Stylish Indian in Minutes, BTW. By Monisha Bhardawaj.

> Two suggestions: Throw in a few golden raisins (about half a
> Tablespoon) along with Tamarind and brown sugar,

That sounds delicious. Will definitely give that a try because I will 
defintiely have this dish again. It was so good.

>  Use Sea salt.
> Indian Stores have a rock salt called 'Kala Namak', that migh go
> better.

I'll look out for that.

============================

From: "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan" 
Date: Mon, 15 May 2006 18:06:43 GMT
--------
Jke wrote:
> It was very good. It was the first time I used tamarind. I expected to
> like it, because I like tangy. I wasn't disappointed - at all. I am
> grateful for having the rest of that jar to enjoy later.

That sounds really good.  I love a tamarind flavor. I use it to taste, my 
taste of course.  I saved the recipe.  

============================

From: Jke 
Date: Mon, 15 May 2006 23:26:35 +0200
--------
Michael wrote:
> That sounds really good.  I love a tamarind flavor. I use it to taste, my
> taste of course.  I saved the recipe.

I can't tell you how excited I am about finally tasting tamarind and 
realizig just how much happiness that jar of  paste is going to provide.

I hope you'll enjoy your potatoes as much as I did. 


[Previous Thread] [Return to BigSpud: The Potato Recipe Collection Menu][Next Thread]