Return to BigSpud Menu

Subject: In search of the best latke recipe/method
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Mon, 03 Dec 2007 20:28:39 -0700
--------
Heya folks,

I am thinking of fixing a pot roast of some sort this weekend, and I
want to have latkes along side of it.  

I have never made them before...but somehow they seem like they would
be a natural with the pot roast.  And it is the season....

So, I am searching for the best way to make them...recipe, method,
etc......  I know there have been discussions here before about making
them...and I probably should just google for them...but I am feeling
lazy today....

So...what do you folks think is the best way to make them?

============================

From: Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpulliam[at]meatloaf.net>
Date: Mon, 03 Dec 2007 19:47:19 -0800
--------
Christine, my ol' pal, you have indeed come to the right place. I
found the *perfect* potato latkes recipe about 8 years ago and it is a
never-fail crowd pleaser. Don't let the length of the recipe throw you
(as I know it won't), as it's a lot easier than the length telegraphs.
It's also always delicious, crisp and gorgeous:

@@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

Potato Latkes

vegetables

4 medium potatoes; peeled
2 large yellow onions
4 large eggs; lightly beaten
1/3 cup matzo meal
2 teaspoons salt
  pepper; to taste
3/4 cup peanut oil

Using medium shredding blade of food processor, grate the potatoes,
laying them horizontally in the feed tube to maximize the strand
length. Grate the onions on top of the potatoes. The onions will turn
to mush and their juices will help keep the potatoes from turning
brown.

Lay a clean dishtowel inside a large bowl and transfer the grated
mixture into the towel. Roll the towel lengthwise and wring out as
much liquid as possible (you can do this over the bowl, discarding the
liquid, or right over the sink). Depending on the size of the towel,
you may have to do this in batches.

Transfer the grated mixture to a mixing bowl. Add the eggs, matzo
meal, salt and pepper; mix well.

In a large cast-iron or nonstick skillet, pour about 1/8" of oil and
heat on medium high. The oil is hot enough when a piece of potato
sizzles when added. Form a trial latke with a tablespoon of the
mixture. Fry until golden brown on both sides. Taste and, if needed,
add salt and pepper to the potato mixture.

To form the latkes, scoop up about 1/2 C. of the mixture with your
hands and loosely pat it into a pancake about 1/2" thick, leaving a
few straggly strands along the edge. (As you work, liquid will
accumulate in the bowl. Squeeze out the excess. The last couple of
latkes may need a really firm squeeze.) after shaping each latke, slip
it into the hot oil and flatten it gently with the back of a spatula.
Fry until deep golden brown, at least 5 mins. on each side to be sure
the center is fully cooked. If the edges darken very quickly, lower
the heat. To prevent excess oil absorption, flip each latke only once.
Add oil between batches as needed, making sure the oil heats up again
before frying more latkes. Drain on paper towels or a clean brown
paper bag. Serve immediately.

May be rejeated in a 300 F oven. Set the latkes directly on the oven
rack and back 8 - 10 mins.

Contributor:  Fine Cooking Magazine

Yield: 8 servings

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Mon, 03 Dec 2007 20:54:17 -0700
--------
Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
>Christine, my ol' pal, you have indeed come to the right place. I
>found the *perfect* potato latkes recipe about 8 years ago and it is a
>never-fail crowd pleaser.
>
>Potato Latkes

>4 medium potatoes; peeled

Thanks Terry!!  

Now..which kind of potatoes do you use?  Russett types? Or another
kind?

============================

From: Pennyaline <candyapple[at]caramel.corn>
Date: Mon, 03 Dec 2007 21:43:21 -0700
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Now..which kind of potatoes do you use?  Russett types? Or another
> kind?

Chiming in...

I use yukon gold potatoes for this. They seem to hold up better and give 
the dish a nice feel. They also have a great flavor that works well with 
onion without disappearing into it. Last time I made it, the water 
content from the grated potatoes and onions was minimal. There was 
hardly anything to drain off. Combined with an egg and matzo binder they 
fried up crisp and tasty. They were a great and unfussy success!

============================

From: hahabogus <invalid[at]null.null>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 06:34:06 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Now..which kind of potatoes do you use?  Russett types? Or another
> kind?

I use red waxy tatters, but I ain't jewish and I dislike the way those 
white tatters taste.

============================

From: hahabogus <invalid[at]null.null>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 06:32:09 GMT
--------
Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
> Christine, my ol' pal, you have indeed come to the right place. I
> found the *perfect* potato latkes recipe about 8 years ago and it is a
> never-fail crowd pleaser.

I would soak in salted cold water for an hour then dry the shredded tatter 
to remove excess starch instead of using the towel method, but that's just 
me.

============================

From: Sheldon <PENMART01[at]aol.com>
Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2007 18:29:23 -0800 (PST)
--------
Terry Pulliam Bur wrote:

> Potato Latkes
>
> 4 medium potatoes; peeled
> 2 large yellow onions

Not gonna peel the onions...?

> 4 large eggs; lightly beaten

*Large* onions with *medium* potatoes, must be onion latkes... but
with four eggs it's onion omelets... this is beyond sad, it's pathetic

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 19:52:21 -0700
--------
Sheldon wrote:
>*Large* onions with *medium* potatoes, must be onion latkes... but
>with four eggs it's onion omelets... this is beyond sad, it's pathetic

So....what's your recipe/method?  

============================

From: Sheldon <PENMART01[at]aol.com>
Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2007 10:38:00 -0800 (PST)
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> So....what's your recipe/method? ?

I've posted a few diferent recipes/methods over the years... just
seach <penmart01 and latkes>

<a href="http://groups.google.com/group/rec.food.cooking/search?group=rec.food.cooking&q=penmart01+and+latkes&qt_g=Search+this+group">http://groups.google.com/group/rec.food.cooking/search?group=rec.food.cooking&q=penmart01+and+latkes&qt_g=Search+this+group</a>

============================

From: cathy <cwells21[at]NOSPAMhotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 05:24:51 GMT
--------
Sheldon wrote:
>*Large* onions with *medium* potatoes, must be onion latkes... but
>with four eggs it's onion omelets... this is beyond sad, it's pathetic

I'm with Sheldon - thats WAY too much onion.

For three pounds of potatoes I'll use one medium-large onion, of which
only about 2/3 gets used because of the grater - it's impossible to
grate the entire onion, it falls apart.

one to two eggs, and several tablespoons of flour. I don't know
proportions, I learned by feel. I know by looking and stirring how
many eggs are needed and how much flour. And lots of salt and pepper.

The most crucial thing is what you grate the potatoes and onions with.
It MUST be the sort of mesh grater that has been referred to ^^ in
this thread. I've always heard it referred to as a safety grater - it
looks like a rectangular tennis racquet. It creates exactly the right
sort of shred you need for latkes. A box grater makes the shred too
thick and a food processor (the horror!!) makes mush, 

And never use a non-stick pan. The latkes won't brown right. Cast iron
is best, followed by any heavy aluminum/stainless steel pan. 

Latkes isn't about the recipe, it's all about the technique. Practice,
practice, practice.

============================

From: Sheldon <PENMART01[at]aol.com>
Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2007 11:03:14 -0800 (PST)
--------
cathy wrote:
> The most crucial thing is what you grate the potatoes and onions with.
> It MUST be the sort of mesh grater that has been referred to ^^ in
> this thread. I've always heard it referred to as a safety grater - it
> looks like a rectangular tennis racquet. It creates exactly the right
> sort of shred you need for latkes. A box grater makes the shred too
> thick and a food processor (the horror!!) makes mush,

The safety grater works, um, great.  But when I need more than a few
potatoes (like 3-5 pounds) I send them through my meat grinder and
into a fine mesh sieve...  press a bit and let drain a minute, then
dump into a bowl.  Then grind the onion into the potatoes (one medium-
small onion is plenty for 3-5 lbs spuds - supposed to taste potato,
onion is only a flavoring), then grind in a couple three sheets of
matzo, add a couple eggs, salt, pepper, and stir... spoon into hot
oil... for latkes I like corn oil.  Have the pint of sour cream out at
room temperature... that's the entire menu for two, nothing else
needed.

The only real labor is peeling the potatoes, fressing, and pushing Oy
away from the table.

The correct beverage is a kosher concord grape spritzer.

============================

From: Janet Wilder <kelliepoodle[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 03 Dec 2007 23:06:10 -0600
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> So...what do you folks think is the best way to make them?

I've been doing them this way for over 20 years. Saves knuckles. I use 
an electric skillet for frying as it is easier to keep the temperature 
even. It is critical to only use peanut oil. Anything else doesn't taste 
right.

* Exported from MasterCook *

                               Potato Latkes

Recipe By     :Janet Wilder
Serving Size  : 10    Preparation Time :0:30
Categories    : Vegetables

   Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
   3                 lb  baking potatoes
   1              large  yellow onion
   2                     eggs
   1                  c  matzo meal
                         salt and pepper
                         peanut oil

Peel potatoes, placing each one into a large bowl of cold water.  Slice 
each potato in half, length-wise.  In a food processor with shredder 
disk inserted, shred potatoes in batches until all are finished.  As 
each batch is complete, place in a bowl of cold water to prevent 
discoloration.

Cut onion into eight pieces.  Place metal blade in processor.  Put a 
piece of onion in and pulse until chopped.  Squeeze two  handfuls  of 
potato shreds dry and place in processor bowl.  Pulse three or four 
times until it looks like fine shreds.  Empty into a bowl and repeat 
until all shreds are chopped.  Stir in eggs and matzo meal.  Season with 
salt and pepper to taste.  Let mixture sit for at least 30 minutes. 
Stir and add more matzo meal if necessary.  Mixture should be a little 
stiff.

Heat one inch of peanut oil in a large skillet.  Drop large spoons full 
of potato mixture into hot oil.  Fry until golden brown, turning once 
after four minutes.  Makes a lot.

Cuisine:
   "Jewish"
                                   -

NOTES : Serve with applesauce and sour cream.

============================

From: sf
Date: Mon, 03 Dec 2007 23:58:11 -0800
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
>So...what do you folks think is the best way to make them?

I've made them and they are delicious... but I don't think they are
something that would go with pot roast.  Be prepared for a real stinky
oil smell too.  Not sure why they produce more odor than hash browns,
but they do.

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 01:20:26 -0700
--------
sf wrote:
>I've made them and they are delicious... but I don't think they are
>something that would go with pot roast. 

Why don't you think they would go with pot roast? I would think they
would be a marvelous accompaniment...  At least in my mind, I think I
would love the contrasts....

And looking through books, etc...they do seem to be a traditional
partner to things like brisket, especially those that are pot roasted.

============================

From: Mitch Scherer <mitch[at]dont.reply>
Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2007 01:56:19 -0800
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> And looking through books, etc...they do seem to be a traditional
> partner to things like brisket, especially those that are pot roasted.

I like them best with Polish Sausage but they would probably go with 
anything that any other potato dish would go with.  I first had these when 
my great grandmother made them for us almost 50 years ago with the manual 
crank grinder.  I like them with ketchup or sour cream.  Terry's recipe 
sounds standard.  It's a simple and tasty dish.

============================

From: Arri London <biotech[at]ic.ac.uk>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 07:59:39 -0700
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> And looking through books, etc...they do seem to be a traditional
> partner to things like brisket, especially those that are pot roasted.

You eat what you want. With the egg content and the oil from frying,
have never considered latkes an accompaniment to anything. We eat them
on their own, with choice of applesauce or sour cream.

My method is to take whatever potatoes we have in the house, which are
usually any all-purpose potato. They are shredded by hand (we have a
special shredder for that) or cut up in the food processor, but not too
finely. Rinsed off, mixed with beaten egg, grated onion (to taste) and a
little salt. Then flour (usually) or finely-ground matzo meal added
until the mix holds together when fried. Let it rest a bit before adding
more flour. In our dry climate, probably a little less than most recipes
state. Should be thicker than the average American pancake batter, but
still flows somewhat. Spoon it into shallow oil (flatten slightly if
needed) and fry on both sides until brown and crisp. Stir the batter
between frying sessions. Drain and eat while very hot. No other
adjustments needed for the altitude.

============================

From: sf
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 07:13:04 -0800
--------
Arri London wrote:
>They are shredded by hand (we have a special shredder for that) 

By "special", do you mean it's a dedicated shredder or is there
something different about it?  TIA

============================

From: Arri London <biotech[at]ic.ac.uk>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 17:17:02 -0700
--------
sf wrote:
> By "special", do you mean it's a dedicated shredder or is there
> something different about it?  TIA

Apparently it was designed to shred potatoes 'correctly' for latkes and
dumplings. It's more like a wire mesh than the sharp pointy bits a
grater typically has. We brought it with us from Holland and it was
quite old back then :) My mother said it would work for apples too but I
haven't tried it for that. We don't have any dedicated shredders/graters
for anything except maybe the Japanese ginger grater a neighbour gave
me.

(I'm not a 'dedicated' cook LOL)

============================

From: Arri London <biotech[at]ic.ac.uk>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 17:55:33 -0700
--------
Arri London wrote:
> Apparently it was designed to shred potatoes 'correctly' for latkes and
> dumplings. It's more like a wire mesh than the sharp pointy bits a
> grater typically has. We brought it with us from Holland and it was
> quite old back then :) My mother said it would work for apples too but I
> haven't tried it for that. We don't have any dedicated shredders/graters
> for anything except maybe the Japanese ginger grater a neighbour gave
> me.

Here is a picture of one:
<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000GSIUL2/?tag=bigspud-20">http://www.amazon.com/Kuchenprofi-10-2008-28-Potato-Grater-Shredder/dp/B000GSIUL2</a>

============================

From: sf
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 19:15:09 -0800
--------
Arri London wrote:
>Here is a picture of one:
><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000GSIUL2/?tag=bigspud-20">http://www.amazon.com/Kuchenprofi-10-2008-28-Potato-Grater-Shredder/dp/B000GSIUL2</a>

AHA!  I should have read this post before I posted.  Looks exactly
like what I found too.  I think I'll buy one when I see it.

TY  :)

============================

From: sf
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 19:13:36 -0800
--------
Arri London wrote:
>Apparently it was designed to shred potatoes 'correctly' for latkes and
>dumplings. It's more like a wire mesh than the sharp pointy bits a
>grater typically has. We brought it with us from Holland and it was
>quite old back then :) My mother said it would work for apples too but I
>haven't tried it for that. 

Like this?  http://fantes.com/images/98102graters.jpg  I'm still
unclear how it could shred a potato, but dough is a different matter.

Thanks!

============================

From: Arri London <biotech[at]ic.ac.uk>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 20:05:43 -0700
--------
sf wrote:
> Like this?  http://fantes.com/images/98102graters.jpg  I'm still
> unclear how it could shred a potato, but dough is a different matter.
 
That's the sort. There is a German company that makes them too:
Kuchenprofi. The one pictured in your link comes from China.

============================

From: sf
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 07:14:13 -0800
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
>And looking through books, etc...they do seem to be a traditional
>partner to things like brisket, especially those that are pot roasted.

Ask yourself if you'd like hash browns with that?  Same difference.  I
wouldn't want hash browns with brisket.

Ari's post was right on.  They are delicious all on their own, served
with some applesauce or sour cream. 

============================

From: Arri London <biotech[at]ic.ac.uk>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 17:19:13 -0700
--------
Just checked the latke-making supplies: got potatoes, onions, eggs,
flour, oil and applesauce. Need to get sour cream. 

We do have a tiny menorah (the 8-candle candlestick) someone gave us.
Some years I do light it some years not.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]cox.net>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 15:09:09 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, sf meant to say...
> I've made them and they are delicious... but I don't think they are
> something that would go with pot roast.  Be prepared for a real stinky
> oil smell too.  Not sure why they produce more odor than hash browns,
> but they do.

Lots of pople serve latkes with pot roast.  I like them together.

As to the "real stinky oil smell", I never fry anything indoors, but always 
outdoors in an electric skillet or the side burner of my gas grill.  I 
don't like the accumulation of grease vapor being deposited on everything 
in the kitchen.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2007 11:01:15 -0600
--------
sf wrote:
> I've made them and they are delicious... but I don't think they are
> something that would go with pot roast.

I wouldn't think of them with pot roast, either.  Brisket is a different
story.  Or with some sort of sausage.

============================

From: Janet Wilder <kelliepoodle[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 16:38:12 -0600
--------
Jill wrote:
> I wouldn't think of them with pot roast, either.  Brisket is a different
> story.  Or with some sort of sausage.

Brisket and potato latkes are a long-standing deli menu item. There was 
a famous diner in Montclair, NJ called the Clairmont Diner. They made a 
sandwich of brisket between two large potato pancakes.

Brisket and latkes will be tomorrow night's dinner here. Will be trying 
out the new slow-cooker with the brisket. Threw the Rival in the garbage 
along with the baked beans it burnt up. This one's a Hamilton Beach. It 
has 3 temp methods including a probe.

============================

From: maxine in ri <weedfam[at]gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2007 09:23:18 -0800 (PST)
--------
sf wrote:
> I've made them and they are delicious... but I don't think they are
> something that would go with pot roast.  Be prepared for a real stinky
> oil smell too.  Not sure why they produce more odor than hash browns,
> but they do.

One of the traditional Hanukkah meals is brisket and latkes, but then
you need to serve them with applesauce.

The other traditional Hanukkah menu is latkes with applesauce or sour
cream.

maxine, making veggie soup and no latkes tonight

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 15:42:29 -0500
--------
maxine in ri wrote:
> One of the traditional Hanukkah meals is brisket and latkes, but then
> you need to serve them with applesauce.
> 
> The other traditional Hanukkah menu is latkes with applesauce or sour
> cream.

LOL... one of my early cooking faux pas (well, not cooking per se since 
it was a salad, but I digress...) was when I was invited to friends to 
share their Rosh Hashanah meal and I offered to bring the salad for 
dinner. She made a brisket I seem to recall? Well, not knowing a lot 
about Jewish dietary customs (even if only observed casually on holidays 
as my friends did) I made that "make ahead" 7 layered salad with the 
mayonnaise layer topped by the... parmesan cheese!!  Gawd do I now feel 
like an idiot! I didn't realize my mistake for a long while.

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 16:02:08 -0500
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> LOL... one of my early cooking faux pas (well, not cooking per se since 
> it was a salad, but I digress...) was when I was invited to friends to 
> share their Rosh Hashanah meal and I offered to bring the salad for 
> dinner. She made a brisket I seem to recall? Well, not knowing a lot 
> about Jewish dietary customs (even if only observed casually on holidays 
> as my friends did) I made that "make ahead" 7 layered salad with the 
> mayonnaise layer topped by the... parmesan cheese!!  Gawd do I now feel 
> like an idiot! I didn't realize my mistake for a long while.

Oops..following up my own post. It wasn't for Rosh Hashanah, it was 
Passover! How did I forget that?? (slaps own head)
I recall now she taught me about cleaning out all the leavened products 
from her kitchen, even to cleaning out the crumb tray on the toaster! 
She mentioned that some folks "sell" or give the bread and other 
leavened products away to neighbors and then later "buy" them back again 
(is that correct?)

============================

From: Janet Wilder <kelliepoodle[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 16:40:47 -0600
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> She mentioned that some folks "sell" or give the bread and other 
> leavened products away to neighbors and then later "buy" them back again 
> (is that correct?)

Correct. The products could thereby remain in your house but were not in 
your possession. Of course they had to be stored away from the passover 
goods.

Brings back memories.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]cox.net>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 00:36:59 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, sf meant to say...
> I've made them and they are delicious... but I don't think they are
> something that would go with pot roast.  Be prepared for a real stinky
> oil smell too.  Not sure why they produce more odor than hash browns,
> but they do.

Lots of pople serve latkes with pot roast.  I like them together.

As to the "real stinky oil smell", I never fry anything indoors, but always 
outdoors in an electric skillet or the side burner of my gas grill.  I 
don't like the accumulation of grease vapor being deposited on everything 
in the kitchen.

============================

From: Boron Elgar <boron_elgar[at]hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 19:46:46 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

>Lots of pople serve latkes with pot roast.  I like them together.

I love them (but don't eat them anymore, sigh) with home made pear
sauce and sour cream.

>As to the "real stinky oil smell", I never fry anything indoors, but always 
>outdoors in an electric skillet or the side burner of my gas grill.  I 
>don't like the accumulation of grease vapor being deposited on everything 
>in the kitchen.

You have the advantage of Arizona in the winter. I will only make
latkes at Chanukah because I think it is a mess, too. I cover the
kitchen table and have an electric skillet going.

I couldn't use my grill, because it is on a deck. I can just imagine
what the deck would look like after a session of latkes. Freckle-deck.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]cox.net>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 00:59:46 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Boron Elgar meant to say...

> I love them (but don't eat them anymore, sigh) with home made pear
> sauce and sour cream.

I've never had pear sauce.  It sounds good!  I'm assuming, but do you make 
it the same way one would make applesauce?
 
> You have the advantage of Arizona in the winter. I will only make
> latkes at Chanukah because I think it is a mess, too. I cover the
> kitchen table and have an electric skillet going.

Only one of the many reasons we moved to Arizona. :-)
 
> I couldn't use my grill, because it is on a deck. I can just imagine
> what the deck would look like after a session of latkes. Freckle-deck.

Oh, yes, the spatters.  That would really mess up a deck.  Our grill sits 
out in a bed of granite.  We just re-rake it and you can't see anything.
 
============================

From: Boron Elgar <boron_elgar[at]hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 20:27:59 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

>I've never had pear sauce.  It sounds good!  I'm assuming, but do you make 
>it the same way one would make applesauce?

Yes. In fact, I wing it based on watching someone make it at a cooking
demo 20 or so years ago. Wash the pears well, cut in quarters, add
some water and sugar - this depends on the type and ripeness of the
pears - and cook until they fall apart. Put through a food mill to
remove the skin and seeds.

>Only one of the many reasons we moved to Arizona. :-)

How I went from Michigan to NY to NJ, I'll never know. I do love it
here in NJ, though. I am in the foothills of the Ramapos and it is
quite lovely.

>Oh, yes, the spatters.  That would really mess up a deck.  Our grill sits 
>out in a bed of granite.  We just re-rake it and you can't see anything.
 
Xericulture!

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]cox.net>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 01:41:17 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Boron Elgar meant to say...

> Yes. In fact, I wing it based on watching someone make it at a cooking
> demo 20 or so years ago. Wash the pears well, cut in quarters, add
> some water and sugar - this depends on the type and ripeness of the
> pears - and cook until they fall apart. Put through a food mill to
> remove the skin and seeds.

I must try this!  Thanks!
 
> How I went from Michigan to NY to NJ, I'll never know. I do love it
> here in NJ, though. I am in the foothills of the Ramapos and it is
> quite lovely.

I used to travel in NJ years ago.  That is a lovely area.  Lucky you!

> Xericulture!

Yes, we have nothing but cactus, succulents, and desert trees.  Very 
natural looking and very low maintenance.
 
============================

From: Lou Decruss <Me[at]notvalid.com>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 01:48:07 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>Oh, yes, the spatters.  That would really mess up a deck.  Our grill sits 
>out in a bed of granite.  We just re-rake it and you can't see anything.

I've seen that setup in gardening and decorating magazines.  I like
it.  We have concrete here.  <sigh>

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]cox.net>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 02:04:26 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Lou Decruss meant to say...
> I've seen that setup in gardening and decorating magazines.  I like
> it.  We have concrete here.  <sigh>

Crushed granite is very common here, and it does note have nice look.  When 
we lived in Ohio, concrete was the norm.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 17:44:18 GMT
--------
Boron Elgar wrote:
>You have the advantage of Arizona in the winter. I will only make
>latkes at Chanukah because I think it is a mess, too. I cover the
>kitchen table and have an electric skillet going.

what temperature do you set your skillet at?

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]cox.net>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 18:34:38 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, blake murphy meant to say...
> what temperature do you set your skillet at?

375F.

============================

From: Janet Wilder <kelliepoodle[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 14:38:27 -0600
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> 375F.

Same here

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 06 Dec 2007 16:52:25 GMT
--------
Janet Wilder wrote:
>Same here

thank you, wayne, boron and janet.  my previous attempt was only
semi-successful using a conventional skillet.  i think i'll try again
using the electric.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]cox.net>
Date: Thu, 06 Dec 2007 17:23:03 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, blake murphy meant to say...
> thank you, wayne, boron and janet.  my previous attempt was only
> semi-successful using a conventional skillet.  i think i'll try again
> using the electric.

You're certainly welcome from all of us, I'm sure.  I've been a devotee of 
electric skillets for many years,if only for the fact that they are 
temperature controlled.

Best of luck with your next batch!

============================

From: sf
Date: Thu, 06 Dec 2007 23:11:11 -0800
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>You're certainly welcome from all of us, I'm sure.  I've been a devotee of 
>electric skillets for many years,if only for the fact that they are 
>temperature controlled.

You're so old fashioned, Wayne.  LOL!
I haven't used one in decades.

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Fri, 7 Dec 2007 09:07:24 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
> You're so old fashioned, Wayne.  LOL!
> I haven't used one in decades.

How did this happen, your entry into modernity?
Wanting to get into the groove, baby.  ;-))

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]cox.net>
Date: Sat, 08 Dec 2007 02:12:28 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Dee.Dee meant to say...
> How did this happen, your entry into modernity?
> Wanting to get into the groove, baby.  ;-))

Remember "Thoroughly Modern Millie"?

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]cox.net>
Date: Sat, 08 Dec 2007 02:11:52 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, sf meant to say...
> You're so old fashioned, Wayne.  LOL!
> I haven't used one in decades.

The primary reason I use it is that I will not fry anything on the range 
top, or in the kitchen for that matter.  I take it outside for frying.  I 
just don't want to deal with grease vapor pervading the area.  

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 08 Dec 2007 23:19:04 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>The primary reason I use it is that I will not fry anything on the range 
>top, or in the kitchen for that matter.  I take it outside for frying.  I 
>just don't want to deal with grease vapor pervading the area.  

grease vapor is good.  it coats your lungs to protect them from
cigarette smoke.

your pal,
philip

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]cox.net>
Date: Sun, 09 Dec 2007 02:53:39 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, blake murphy meant to say...
> grease vapor is good.  it coats your lungs to protect them from
> cigarette smoke.

In the lungs is one thing.  Having to scrub it off of cabinets, walls, and 
appliances is another thing altogether.  I prefer not to.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 07 Dec 2007 18:50:18 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>You're certainly welcome from all of us, I'm sure.  I've been a devotee of 
>electric skillets for many years,if only for the fact that they are 
>temperature controlled.

i bought the damn thing thinking it would make frying chicken easier,
but still didn't end up using it much.

============================

From: Boron Elgar <boron_elgar[at]hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 13:47:48 -0500
--------
blake murphy wrote:
>what temperature do you set your skillet at?

Between 350 and 400.

The skillet heats unevenly and has one short "foot," too. PITA to use.
I have to move things around to get them all to cook evenly. 

Now...you may ask why I don't just junk it and get another one...I use
it only once or twice a year and it is the devil I know.

============================

From: Ophelia <O[at]nix.co.uk>
Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2007 18:55:31 -0000
--------
Boron Elgar wrote:
> The skillet heats unevenly and has one short "foot," too. PITA to use.
> I have to move things around to get them all to cook evenly.
>
> Now...you may ask why I don't just junk it and get another one...I use
> it only once or twice a year and it is the devil I know.

LOL I love the bit about one short foot:)  If you did treat yourself to a 
new one, you might  use it more> 

============================

From: Boron Elgar <boron_elgar[at]hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 14:00:34 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote:
>LOL I love the bit about one short foot:)  If you did treat yourself to a 
>new one, you might  use it more> 

This is the second one I have had in a decade, as the previous one had
its flaws, too (it wasn't non-stick and it surely lived up to that).

I don't really fry enough to bother with it. I have an electric
griddle for pancakes and we do use that a lot, though.

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2007 14:11:19 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> LOL I love the bit about one short foot:)  If you did treat yourself to a 
> new one, you might  use it more>

I treated myself to a new one -- I was worried about tipping.

This new (semi-new, now) one holds more and allows me to fry in larger 
batches for freezing.  It is heavier and sturdy.

But, I think it is the nature of the beasts to have uneven heating on the 
sides (which, of course, can be used to advantage, as you know.)

(I like it for pancakes, too).

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]cox.net>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 20:14:23 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Dee.Dee meant to say...

> I treated myself to a new one -- I was worried about tipping.

I think you should be more worried about tippling, Dee Dee! :-)

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2007 15:43:20 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> I think you should be more worried about tippling, Dee Dee! :-)

That could be so -- aren't I always 'in my cups'?
;-))

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]cox.net>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 20:58:16 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Dee.Dee meant to say...
> That could be so -- aren't I always 'in my cups'?
> ;-))

Always, Dee Dee, always...  :-)

============================

From: Ophelia <O[at]nix.co.uk>
Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2007 21:46:23 -0000
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
> That could be so -- aren't I always 'in my cups'?

woman after my own heart <G> 

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2007 19:28:45 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> woman after my own heart <G>

xxoo
:-))
DD 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]cox.net>
Date: Thu, 06 Dec 2007 01:43:18 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Ophelia meant to say...
> woman after my own heart <G> 

And both of you lovlies!!!

============================

From: Dave Bugg <davebugg2[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2007 11:22:41 -0800
--------
Boron Elgar wrote:
> Now...you may ask why I don't just junk it and get another one...I use
> it only once or twice a year and it is the devil I know.

Which will doom you to the perpetual hell it creates.  :-)

============================

From: Boron Elgar <boron_elgar[at]hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 14:37:29 -0500
--------
Dave Bugg wrote:
>Which will doom you to the perpetual hell it creates.  :-)

I have had maybe 4-5 electric skillets over the past 40 years and not
one has ever performed as well as a good skillet on a stove. The only
advantage they offer is portability.

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2007 14:41:01 -0500
--------
Boron Elgar wrote:
> I have had maybe 4-5 electric skillets over the past 40 years and not
> one has ever performed as well as a good skillet on a stove. The only
> advantage they offer is portability.

I totally agree, Boron.  I've had my share of electric skillets, too. 
Everytime I say that I'm not going to get another one ==

I do like the ability to get 'close to the temperature I'm aiming for,' 
without using a thermometer, particularly when you are wanting to get it 
up-to-temp again for the next batch of ...

I'm wondering, have you ever used an electric skillet to make donuts?  Or 
has anyone?  It seems like it might be an ideal thing to use as the oil 
isn't deep and one can do a number of them at a time.

============================

From: Boron Elgar <boron_elgar[at]hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 15:15:03 -0500
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
>I'm wondering, have you ever used an electric skillet to make donuts?  Or 
>has anyone?  It seems like it might be an ideal thing to use as the oil 
>isn't deep and one can do a number of them at a time.

I've only used a dutch oven or a deep fryer for donuts.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]cox.net>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 20:16:10 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Dee.Dee meant to say...
> I'm wondering, have you ever used an electric skillet to make donuts?  Or 
> has anyone?  It seems like it might be an ideal thing to use as the oil 
> isn't deep and one can do a number of them at a time.

It works well for doughnuts, and also for fritters if they're a bit on the 
flat side.

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2007 15:46:04 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> It works well for doughnuts, and also for fritters if they're a bit on the
> flat side.

Ah, thanks, so much.  I had to remind myself what signifies a 'fritter.'

<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fritter">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fritter</a>

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]cox.net>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 21:00:22 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Dee.Dee meant to say...
> Ah, thanks, so much.  I had to remind myself what signifies a 'fritter.'

I particularly like corn fritters.  When I was growing up we'd sometimes 
have them for breakfast with maple syrup.

============================

From: Janet Wilder <kelliepoodle[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 14:42:20 -0600
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
> I'm wondering, have you ever used an electric skillet to make donuts?  Or 
> has anyone?  It seems like it might be an ideal thing to use as the oil 
> isn't deep and one can do a number of them at a time.

We used electric skillets to make donuts with the nursery school kids. 
We used packaged biscuits, cut a hole in them with a small pill bottle 
and fried them. Topped with powdered sugar. I haven't thought of that 
for years.

The kids that were in nursery school then are parents now.

Janet, listening to XM "Radio Chanukah" on channel 108 as she types.

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 17:44:16 -0500
--------
Janet Wilder wrote:
> Correct. The products could thereby remain in your house but were not in 
> your possession. Of course they had to be stored away from the passover 
> goods.
> 
> Brings back memories.

I seem to have the memory of her saying they were physically out of the 
house. I don't recall if she herself subscribed to this little deception 
or just told me about others doing it?

============================

From: Arri London <biotech[at]ic.ac.uk>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 17:31:27 -0700
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> I seem to have the memory of her saying they were physically out of the
> house. I don't recall if she herself subscribed to this little deception
> or just told me about others doing it?

Lots of people do that at Passover. A friend of mine who keeps kosher
(sort of) used to do that with another friend. It really should be
removed from the house but that was too much trouble for her, so she put
all the chometz (fermented grain products) into one cupboard, sold it to
the mutual friend of ours and then taped the cupboard shut for the
duration. The friend who bought the chometz asked me what would happen
if he didn't sell it back to her after the holiday. Told him that
nothing would happen in the religious sense but she'd be awfully mad at
him for a long time. 

Had her over for lunch one Saturday and served her perfectly kosher
chicken soup (real meat) ...and toasted cheese sandwiches! Put the food
on the table, there was a pause, we looked at each other and burst out
laughing. I do know the rules quite well and just made a mistake. She
ate the cheese sandwiches and had the soup for tea later in the
afternoon.

============================

From: Sarah Gray <anisaerah[at]yahoonot.com>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 06:36:36 GMT
--------
Arri London wrote:
> Had her over for lunch one Saturday and served her perfectly kosher
> chicken soup (real meat) ...and toasted cheese sandwiches! Put the
> food on the table, there was a pause, we looked at each other and
> burst out laughing. I do know the rules quite well and just made a
> mistake. She ate the cheese sandwiches and had the soup for tea later
> in the afternoon.

Some people are even more strict than that. My mother won't eat food 
cooked in non-kosher kitchens, for example, even if all the ingredients 
are kosher,

============================

From: Arri London <biotech[at]ic.ac.uk>
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2007 20:08:23 -0700
--------
Sarah Gray wrote:
> Some people are even more strict than that. My mother won't eat food
> cooked in non-kosher kitchens, for example, even if all the ingredients
> are kosher,

Most Orthodox won't either. For my Jewish friends I used paper plates
and plastic cutlery. Pots and pans (that never had anything unkosher in
them) were either koshered by boiling or lined with foil. LOL or else we
ate fish and chips!

============================

From: Sarah Gray <anisaerah[at]yahoonot.com>
Date: Thu, 06 Dec 2007 03:29:35 GMT
--------
Arri London wrote:
> Most Orthodox won't either. For my Jewish friends I used paper plates
> and plastic cutlery. Pots and pans (that never had anything unkosher in
> them) were either koshered by boiling or lined with foil. LOL or else we
> ate fish and chips!

My mom is Orthodox, I guess I should have specified :)
She is a convert, and when we are at her parent's or sisters' houses, we 
eat off paper and plastic (or glass, at my grandmother's, who has a 
set...glass is not considered "permeable" by halacha, so you don't need 
to kasher it in between.). I remember sneaking non-kosher cookies at 
their houses more than once when I was younger. It seemed exotic or 
something...

============================

From: Arri London <biotech[at]ic.ac.uk>
Date: Thu, 06 Dec 2007 18:21:48 -0700
--------
Sarah Gray wrote:

> My mom is Orthodox, I guess I should have specified :)

LOL that was my assumption in any case. Although many people in all the
other branches of Judaism do keep fairly strict kashrut.

> She is a convert, and when we are at her parent's or sisters' houses, we
> eat off paper and plastic (or glass, at my grandmother's, who has a
> set...glass is not considered "permeable" by halacha, so you don't need
> to kasher it in between.). 

For some reason I didn't know that. I did have glass plates and bowls
etc but they always had had pork etc in/on them, so weren't considered
kosher by *me*.

>     I remember sneaking non-kosher cookies at
> their houses more than once when I was younger. It seemed exotic or
> something...

LOL but of course it would! And did you enjoy them?

============================

From: Sarah Gray <anisaerah[at]yahoonot.com>
Date: Fri, 07 Dec 2007 03:16:35 GMT
--------
Arri London wrote:
> LOL but of course it would! And did you enjoy them?

Yeah, but I felt guilty about it... at least at the time :)

============================

From: azazello[at]koroviev.de (Victor Sack)
Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2007 23:58:42 +0100
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> So...what do you folks think is the best way to make them?

What kind of latke?  Potato (with or without meat or griebenes)?  Some
other vegetable?  Cheese?  Matzo meal?  Apple?  Rice?

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2007 19:17:05 -0700
--------
Victor Sack wrote:
>What kind of latke?  Potato (with or without meat or griebenes)?  Some
>other vegetable?  Cheese?  Matzo meal?  Apple?  Rice?

Potato.

============================

From: azazello[at]koroviev.de (Victor Sack)
Date: Wed, 5 Dec 2007 23:57:24 +0100
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Potato.

1/2 kg (1.1 pounds) potatoes
1 egg
salt
1-2 tablespoons flour or matzo meal
1 small onion (optional)
100 g (3.5 ounces, about 1/2 cup) finely chopped griebenes (cracklings 
        made with goose, duck, or chicken skin (optional)
oil, butter, or poultry fat for frying (if it is a Hanukkah dish, it 
        should be oil)

Grate or grind potatoes not too finely and drain.  Optionally, grate or
grind the onion.  Combine potatoes, onion, egg, flour or matzo meal,
salt and, optionally, griebenes.  Mix well.  The mixture should have a
consistency of fairly thick sour cream.  Heat a generous amount of fat
in a pan and spoon in the latke "batter".  Size and thickness of each
latke is up to you.  Fry on both sides until golden brown.  Serve with
sour cream and, optionally, with freshly melted butter.


Return to BigSpud Menu