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Subject: potato latkes
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: jbcookie[at]webtv.net (Jeannie)
Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001 07:01:17 -0500 (EST)
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I have a function coming up and they want potato latkes, does anyone
have any short cuts or tips for making say 8-9 hundred of them? Any
suggestions appreciated.

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From: arlene 
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2001 09:26:05 +0000
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The suggestions call for frying them and not draining.  Lay them on a
sheet pan and freeze.  When frozen put them in plastic bags.

On reheating:  lay them on trays and put them in the oven to heat
through, then drain on paper towels.

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From: maxine in ri 
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2001 11:56:59 -0500
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Jeannie wrote:
> I have a function coming up and they want potato latkes, does anyone
> have any short cuts or tips for making say 8-9 hundred of them? Any
> suggestions appreciated.

We've usually made them for only 100 or so, but the methods should
be the same:
fry them, drain them (yes, do drain them, there's plenty of oil left
after you let them sit a while), and then freeze.  I usually do
this with a layer of plastic wrap or waxed paper in between, and
well-wrapped outside with foil.

Reheating: 350 oven for 7-10 minutes, or until crispy again.
Drain again and watch them disappear.

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From: Michael Edelman 
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2001 08:49:51 -0500
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Jeannie wrote:
> I have a function coming up and they want potato latkes, does anyone
> have any short cuts or tips for making say 8-9 hundred of them? Any
> suggestions appreciated.

Multiple burners, multiple pans and multiple helpers! Grate the potatoes
and onions with a Kitchen Aid mixer with the grater/grinder attachment.

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From: Alan Zelt 
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2001 00:57:30 GMT
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Michael Edelman wrote:
> Grate the potatoes
> and onions with a Kitchen Aid mixer with the grater/grinder attachment.

And one item that will keep the spuds from turning color is to
alternately grate onions and spuds together.

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 05 Dec 2001 03:53:40 GMT
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Michael Edelman wrote:
> Grate the potatoes
> and onions with a Kitchen Aid mixer with the grater/grinder attachment.

No Kitchen Aid mixer attachment will handle the quantity of spuds needed for
"8-9 HUNDRED" latkes, not in a reasonable amount of time nor with a resonable
amount of labor force... yer talking near-a-bouts ONE THOUSAND (1000) POUNDS of
taters... that's a friggin' *HALF A TON* (okay, yoose can get by with about 500
pounds, but somehow I think even a thousand pounds won't be enough - there are
never enough latkes!) . Yer gonna need at least ten KA mixers, with
attachments, with ten people operating... and which monkeys will you train to
peel a half ton of spuds, eh... ten edleweenies, maybe, but I think they're way
too dumb, and are physically incapable or holding a veggie peeler.... I
seriously doubt the edlweenies have evolved to the point of having opposing
thumbs.

And then where/how will someone cook so many latkes, on one stove is not
possible... not to feed so many within the same time period, you'd need at
least 1/2 dozen greezy spoon style griddles, BIG ones.... a swift short order
cook should be able to handle two griddles, so you'll need three of those...
no, not him, the edleweenie can't grasp a spatula (doncha remember that lack of
opposing thumbs).

I'm surprised at you, Alan, for not catching on, but I'm not surprised at all
at the fucking dumb ass megalomaniac edleweenie imbecile.

Now iffn' someone talks to to me real, real nice, with honey on top, I may
decide to let yoose in on how to fix a thousand latkes at home, EASILY... and
ya had better be someone of the female persuasion, and with very large
bosoms... 'cause we're gonna be working together, for the better part of a day,
in intimate proximity.

Obviously the edlweenie has never cooked for more than one, Kraft Mac n'
Cheese, for himself.

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From: Alan Zelt 
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2001 06:05:48 GMT
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Sheldon wrote:
> No Kitchen Aid mixer attachment will handle the quantity of spuds needed for
> "8-9 HUNDRED" latkes, not in a reasonable amount of time nor with a resonable

Not mixer. I use my Cuisinart when making latkes.

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 05 Dec 2001 10:55:57 GMT
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Alan "Mr. Potatohead" Zelt writes:
>Not mixer. I use my Cuisinart when making latkes.

That's more ridiculous.

Now you're being dumber than the edleweenie (is that even possible).  
Hasn't it sunk into your potato head yet that the original poster is 
tawking *8-9 HUNDRED*.... not a couple-three dozen.  No single 
Coozinart food processor can handle near to HALF TON of spuds 
in a reasonable time frame... with that toy you'd be at it for days.

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From: Michael Edelman 
Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2001 08:36:46 -0500
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The idiot child speaks:
> No Kitchen Aid mixer attachment will handle the quantity of spuds needed for
> "8-9 HUNDRED" latkes, not in a reasonable amount of time nor with a resonable
> amount of labor force... yer talking near-a-bouts ONE THOUSAND (1000) POUNDS of
> taters... that's a friggin' *HALF A TON*...

Since when do latkes weigh a pound and a half each? What an idiot!

And yet he's so gleeful when he expounds these ignorant, ill-informed  opinions.
As always, unless he's cutting and pasting he's just showing off his lack of
actual knowledge of cooking. They really should monitor his computer use more at
whatever institution they keep him in.

A latke should have perhaps 2-4 ounces of potatoes, depending on whether you like
them  thin or a little meatier. Ignoring the other ingredients that translates
into between 100 and 200 pounds of potatoes- simple enough for a good heavy-duty
Kitchen Aide grater and an afternoon of work. Depends on how much time you have,
and how many helpers.

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From: mcc6050[at]aol.com (Mac)
Date: 05 Dec 2001 15:21:07 GMT
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Michael Edelman wrote:
>A latke should have perhaps 2-4 ounces of potatoes, depending on whether you like
>them  thin or a little meatier. Ignoring the other ingredients that translates
>into between 100 and 200 pounds of potatoes- simple enough for a good heavy-duty
>Kitchen Aide grater and an afternoon of work. Depends on how much time you have,
>and how many helpers.

Those estimates, both of quantity of spuds and time involved, sounds about
right...nearer to 150 lbs of potatoes tho.  Last year spouse and I made several
hundred latkes and the whole process, including preparing the cooked latkes for
freezing, took the better part of the day.  We discovered that grating the
potatoes in  small batches (using both a food processor and a hand grater),
frying the batch, and then preparing a fresh batch worked best, esp in avoiding
discolored potatoes.  

Freezing wasn't a problem, other than to make room in the freezer. The latkes,
after reheating in a low oven, were delicious and  tasted freshly made.  For
once, there were enough latkes to satisfy everyone.

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 05 Dec 2001 17:04:37 GMT
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Mac writes:
> Last year spouse and I made several hundred latkes and the whole 
>process, including preparing the cooked latkes for freezing, took the 
>better part of the day. 

How many hundred is "several"... that took two of you all day.  Can I assume by
several hundred you mean 3 hundred, perhaps 4 hundred tops.

several
pronoun, plural in construction

: an indefinite number more than two and fewer than many 

>nearer to 150 lbs of potatoes tho. 

By the time you pare, eye, grate, and squeeeze out the water from 150 pounds of
potatoes you'd be lucky to have 100 pounds (probably somewhat less).  The
typical medium Idaho Russet weighs 8 ounces, which after processing will yield
no more than 5 ounces, which will yield 2 very skimpy latkes (and during frying
latkes shrink quite a bit). One pound of raw potato will yield three medium
sized latkes (or one half serving for a not so hungry person).  For serving a
large crowd it would be wise to make large latkes, requires far less cooking
time and labor.

I can imagine your recipe... I bet you're one of those who adds flour rather
than matzo meal, and lots of it because you don't squeeze out the water, and
those btw, ain't potato latkes, they're crepes, um, crapettes.

And again, food processors are incapable of grating... those so-called grating
blades do not grate, they produce a fine shred... which will prepare potatoes
for fercocktah hash browns, not latkes.  And hash brown patties is what you
produced, not latkes... you wouldn't know a latke if smacked you in your mouth.

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From: mje[at]spamcop.net (Michael Edelman)
Date: 8 Dec 2001 20:50:03 -0800
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Sheldon wrote:
> By the time you pare, eye, grate, and squeeeze out the water from 150 pounds of
> potatoes you'd be lucky to have 100 pounds (probably somewhat less).  The
> typical medium Idaho Russet weighs 8 ounces, which after processing will yield
> no more than 5 ounces

Shelly, just learn to say "Sorry, I was wrong" instead of *endlessly*
blathering on and on and making an even bigger ass of yourself.

Do this, and who knows? The other children might just let you play
with them one day.

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From: Alan Zelt 
Date: Thu, 06 Dec 2001 01:10:03 GMT
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Sheldon wrote:
> Now you're being dumber than the edleweenie (is that even possible).
> Hasn't it sunk into your potato head yet that the original poster is
> tawking *8-9 HUNDRED*.... not a couple-three dozen.  No single
> Coozinart food processor can handle near to HALF TON of spuds
> in a reasonable time frame... with that toy you'd be at it for days.

No, I just said that I use the cuisinart. The process of interleaving
onions and spuds works for ten latkes or any large number. While I
missed his quantity, the truth is still that the process ensures spuds
not turning color so quickly.

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From: stan[at]temple.edu
Date: 4 Dec 2001 13:58:14 GMT
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Jeannie wrote:
> I have a function coming up and they want potato latkes, does anyone
> have any short cuts or tips for making say 8-9 hundred of them? Any
> suggestions appreciated.

That many? Sure, call a cater and let them handle it!

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From: DIMITRI 
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2001 17:59:46 GMT
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Jeannie wrote:
> I have a function coming up and they want potato latkes, does anyone
> have any short cuts or tips for making say 8-9 hundred of them? Any
> suggestions appreciated.

Take a look here:  http://www.angelfire.com/bc/incredible/indexhundred.html

A good source for information on mega recipes for  100 or more.

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From: Bev Russell 
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2001 21:54:17 GMT
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I just finished making 100 of the darlings!  I grated and mixed and set my
husband at the kitchen with an electric frying and a brandy and egg nog.  He
was content and as he does not cook at all, was very patient and they were
lovely and golden brown.  Now, I just have to get the smell of them out of
my house!  As for 800 of them, very time consuming so probably would get
more frying pans and help from my friends!  Have fun!

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From: ginnysher[at]mediaone.net (Ginny Sher)
Date: Fri, 07 Dec 2001 13:54:35 GMT
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Jeannie wrote:
>I have a function coming up and they want potato latkes, does anyone
>have any short cuts or tips for making say 8-9 hundred of them? Any
>suggestions appreciated.

One time saving tip I've used is to partially "pre-bake" the potatoes
about half way through before grating them.  This removes the moisture
so that squeezing the grated potatoes becomes unnecessary.  Removing
the water is a step I happen to dislike doing. It seems I can never
remove *enough* water for my liking. Wtih this method, turning an off
color is also eliminated so no special steps are needed to insure they
are soaking. Secondly, because they are pre-baked, they don't require
quite as much time on the stove.  You can bake them in advance, let
them cool, then grate.  When I've made them with this method, everyone
loved their texture, which is less like hash browns and more like a
"deli" style latke IMO.

When's the party?


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