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Subject: Mash potatoes
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: James 
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2009 17:44:21 -0800 (PST)
--------
I've been boiling potatoes and then pelling off the skins.  They come
off easily but are a bit hot for my fingers.  Still I rather do that
than pelling before cooking.

So far I just mash and add butter.

Any suggestions?

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2009 19:45:33 -0600
--------
> Any suggestions?

There are a million and one recipes for spuds.
Have you googled for that yet?

============================

From: "modom (palindrome guy)" 
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2009 22:20:45 -0600
--------
Roasted garlic mashed with the taters can be good, especially if you
cream them up with -- erm -- cream.

I like my mashed spuds with a little horseradish sometimes, but you
don't want to add horseradish if they're too hot because the allyl
isothoicyanate (the hot stuff in horseradish) is so volatile it'll
oxidize and/or dissipate before it has a chance to make the spuds glow
in that yummy horseradish manner if they're too hot when you mix them
in.

The same goes for wasabi, which has spiked mashers in my house on
occasion.  The kick comes from the same volatile chemical.

Bacon crumbled on top of regular mashers or horseradish spuds would
please me, at least.

Getting them creamy and adding minced green onion and butter and
baking it all in a casserole with some good cheese on top would be
good, too.  As would mashing gorgonzola and green onions into the
taters.

Once, when I had some leftover mashers, I made patties out of them,
put a dollop of sauteed minced mushrooms on the patties, formed the
patties into little mushroom-filled balls, rolled tater balls in panko
crumbs and fried them golden brown.  I thought I'd made it up, but was
told here on rfc that I'd approximated some sort of Russian potato
fried ball thingy I'd never heard of.

The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is
done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the
sun.

Except when there is.

Strong aromatics do nice things with mashed potatoes since the spuds
offer a mostly bland palette upon which you can compose a flavor
profile.  The softness of the mashed potato texture invites
contrasting textures (crunchy, for example, as with fried bacon and/or
raw green onion -- two different ways of being crunchy).  So I'd
hazard that mashed potatoes with butter and cream dolloped Belgian
endive leaves would taste right fine and offer a pleasing contrast of
textures.  Add some bacon crumbles or blue cheese, and you further
develop the interaction of textures and flavors.

Or do the above (sans bacon and blue cheese) and sprinkle with
parmisano-reggiano and broil for a few moments till the cheese browns
and the leaves begin to heat through.

Now I'm wondering about frying up some minced andouille and mixing it
with mashed spuds in a bitter herb wrapper like radicchio.  And what
about lemon juice and herbs de Provence with butter?

Don't forget salt and pepper.

============================

From: "..PL.." 
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2009 04:29:42 +0000 (UTC)
--------
modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
> Roasted garlic mashed with the taters can be good, especially if you
> cream them up with -- erm -- cream.

My favourite!!

> The same goes for wasabi, which has spiked mashers in my house on
> occasion.  The kick comes from the same volatile chemical.

Hmmmmmmmmmm, I have powdered wasabi in the fridge, might try that next 
time.

Peter Lucas

============================

From: Joseph Littleshoes 
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2009 22:09:35 -0800
--------
modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
> Roasted garlic mashed with the taters can be good, especially if you
> cream them up with -- erm -- cream.

Or just toss the peeled cloves in with the potatoes to boil, mash with 
the potatoes & add the butter & i like buttermilk rather than cream.

Of course, IMO, one has to have a good beef gravy with mashed potatoes.
for which i will pan fry some English de-boned rib meat, just for the 
pan juices it produces with which to make the gravy.

As the rib meat has to be braised for a couple of hours to be fork 
tender i will set them aside after sautŽing them and braise them the 
next day.
--
JL

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2009 20:23:41 -0600
--------
James wrote:
>Any suggestions?

I made some last night with milk, sour cream, butter, salt, and white
pepper.  They were fabulous!  I'm currently re-heating the leftovers
in the oven, with cheddar cheese on top.

Carol

============================

From: Hugh 
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2009 11:44:09 -0700
--------
Carol wrote:
> I made some last night with milk, sour cream, butter, salt, and white
> pepper.  They were fabulous!  I'm currently re-heating the leftovers
> in the oven, with cheddar cheese on top.

We do this type of thing routinely, most often just what you're doing. We 
occasionally add small amounts of goat cheese or blue cheese, leaving out 
the sour cream. We very often do this with "twice baked potatoes" . Scoop 
out potatoes, mash, add additions, put back in and heat in the oven. If it's 
rich one potato is plenty for two. Cut it in two before you start.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 13:57:46 -0500
--------
Hugh wrote:
>We do this type of thing routinely, most often just what you're doing. We 
>occasionally add small amounts of goat cheese or blue cheese, leaving out 
>the sour cream. We very often do this with "twice baked potatoes" . Scoop 
>out potatoes, mash, add additions, put back in and heat in the oven. If it's 
>rich one potato is plenty for two. Cut it in two before you start.

Thanks!  I'll make them for the family soon.  We still have a partial
bag of russets.

Carol

============================

From: Joseph Littleshoes 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 13:43:18 -0700
--------
Hugh wrote:
> We do this type of thing routinely, most often just what you're doing. We 
> occasionally add small amounts of goat cheese or blue cheese, 

Ever make colcannon (sp?) potatoes & cabbage? i love it with a nice goat 
cheese.
--
JL

============================

From: Janet Wilder 
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2009 22:22:16 -0600
--------
James wrote:
> I've been boiling potatoes and then pelling off the skins.  They come
> off easily but are a bit hot for my fingers.  Still I rather do that
> than pelling before cooking.
> 
> So far I just mash and add butter.

Have you tried using a ricer? The skins stay in the ricer and the mashed 
potatoes have a very nice consistency. No burned fingers.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2009 22:27:27 -0600
--------
Janet Wilder wrote:
>Have you tried using a ricer? The skins stay in the ricer and the mashed 
>potatoes have a very nice consistency. No burned fingers.

Do they make those in an electric version yet?  They must!  I have too
many things ending in -itis in my arms to use a regular ricer.

Carol

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 04:38:50 GMT
--------
Damsel in dis Dress told us...
> Do they make those in an electric version yet?  They must!  I have too
> many things ending in -itis in my arms to use a regular ricer.

My aunt used to use a china cap (peformated, not mesh)with a fitted conical 
wooden pusher.  Far less strength and energy required.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2009 22:50:18 -0600
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>My aunt used to use a china cap (peformated, not mesh)with a fitted conical 
>wooden pusher.  Far less strength and energy required.

Oh, those jellty-making cones?  I used to have one.  Got lost in one
of our moves.

Carol

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 05:08:42 GMT
--------
Damsel in dis Dress told us...
> Oh, those jellty-making cones?  I used to have one.  Got lost in one
> of our moves.

Yep, that's pretty much the kind. It sat in a 3-legged stand.

============================

From: hahabogus 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 05:34:44 GMT
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> Oh, those jellty-making cones?  I used to have one.  Got lost in one
> of our moves.

There is always the manual food mill...you turns the crank and stuff is 
forced thru a mesh/screen and into a bowl (you supply the bowl). Better 
ones come with several mesh/screen sizes. It purees berries leaving the 
seeds behind, does mash spuds leaving the skins behind...makes baby food. 
It has a mess of aplications.

Mostly I use mine when making ice cream and frozen yogurt to puree the 
berries and remove the seeds for a smoother base; that is seedless.

It was rated as second choice for mashing spuds...first choice was a ricer. 
Rating was on texture..the lowly potato masher came in last.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 00:42:35 -0600
--------
Crash prefers whipped potatoes, so that's how I usually do them.  Last
night, I mashed them, though.  Yeah, the texture left something to be
desired.

Carol

============================

From: Lin 
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2009 22:51:38 -0800
--------
Carol wrote:
> Crash prefers whipped potatoes, so that's how I usually do them.  Last
> night, I mashed them, though.  Yeah, the texture left something to be
> desired.

It's a shame your sound card isn't working ...

Addicted to Spuds

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uXv9mhFLeQ&feature=related

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 04:36:13 -0600
--------
Lin wrote:
> Addicted to Spuds
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uXv9mhFLeQ&feature=related



That is one thing I have promised myself when I hit my goal weight...

A baked potato from "Outback"!!!

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 05:58:46 -0500
--------
Lin wrote:
> Addicted to Spuds
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uXv9mhFLeQ&feature=related

LOLOL!!!

I hadn't seen that one.

Musicians: BE AFRAID! Be very afraid!

Actually it's probably more of a compliment to be panned by Weird Al!

Thanks!

Andy

============================

From: sf  
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 11:03:40 -0700
--------
Andy  wrote:
>Actually it's probably more of a compliment to be panned by Weird Al!

If I remember correctly, he gets permission first.  

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 13:07:21 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
>If I remember correctly, he gets permission first.

Yeah, he does.  He has a page on MySpace, and discusses that there.

Carol

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Mon, 09 Mar 2009 21:59:58 GMT
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> sf wrote:
>>If I remember correctly, he gets permission first.
> 
> Yeah, he does.  He has a page on MySpace, and discusses that there.

that's my understanding as well, and that few artists refuse.  after all,
if al want to parody you, you have hit the Big Time.

(though i hear  a lot of yankovic's stuff on dr. demento, and most of the
time haven't the slightest idea what song he's parodying.)

your pal,
blake

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Mon, 09 Mar 2009 17:31:29 -0500
--------
blake murphy said...
> that's my understanding as well, and that few artists refuse.  after all,
> if al want to parody you, you have hit the Big Time.
> 
> (though i hear  a lot of yankovic's stuff on dr. demento, and most of the
> time haven't the slightest idea what song he's parodying.)

So with Damsel's permission you could "Shwack!"?



Andy

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Mon, 09 Mar 2009 18:44:00 -0500
--------
blake murphy wrote:
>(though i hear  a lot of yankovic's stuff on dr. demento, and most of the
>time haven't the slightest idea what song he's parodying.)

We're getting old.

Granny Dams

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Tue, 10 Mar 2009 19:24:29 GMT
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> We're getting old.

i prefer the term 'experienced.'

your pal,
blake

============================

From: Becca 
Date: Tue, 10 Mar 2009 19:47:23 -0500
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> We're getting old.

When my Mom was doing the Stanky Leg, it made me feel younger.

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 15:12:05 -0500
--------
sf said...
> If I remember correctly, he gets permission first.  

WHAT??? Nobody OK'd that with me!!!



Andy

============================

From: sf  
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 20:49:20 -0700
--------
Andy wrote:
>WHAT??? Nobody OK'd that with me!!!

:)  Consider yourself out of the Weird Al loop.  LOL

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 23:04:15 -0500
--------
sf said...
>:)  Consider yourself out of the Weird Al loop.  LOL

Thank God!

Andy
"And I'm buying the stairway... to leaven!"

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 06:45:30 -0500
--------
Lin wrote:
>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3uXv9mhFLeQ&feature=related

I'll Yahoo the link to Crash, and we can watch it together later.  

Carol

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 06:57:55 GMT
--------
Damsel in dis Dress told us...
> Crash prefers whipped potatoes, so that's how I usually do them.  Last
> night, I mashed them, though.  Yeah, the texture left something to be
> desired.

I haven't used a potato masher in years, since my favorite one broke.  I 
peel and cube potatoes before cooking, drain and shake dry the potatoes 
cubes over heat.  I use an old hand mixer on low speed to whip them, whilst 
adding either cream or buttermilk and butter.  I call them "mashed". :-)  
Neither David nor I like lumpy potatotes.  Occasionally I use a ricer.

============================

From: Lin 
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2009 23:01:56 -0800
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>  I use an old hand mixer on low speed to whip them, whilst 

I uses a hand mixer as well. They are creamy, smooth, fluffy goodness! 
Bob certainly doesn't complain.

--Lin (Bob does like using the ricer and I don't)

============================

From: Bob Terwilliger 
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2009 23:08:36 -0800
--------
Lin wrote:
> (Bob does like using the ricer and I don't)

Using a ricer means not having to peel potatoes.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 04:44:48 -0600
--------
Bob Terwilliger wrote:
> Using a ricer means not having to peel potatoes.

Peeling cooked ones just takes seconds, but I prefer to make mashed 
spuds with the peels on.  I like the peels. ;-d

If I want unpeeled ones, I'll just use Idahoan boxed.  I actually _like_ 
powdered potatoes. They taste real to me.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 07:08:12 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
>If I want unpeeled ones, I'll just use Idahoan boxed.  I actually _like_ 
>powdered potatoes. They taste real to me.

I started thinking (I know, what a concept!), after inquiring about
ricers and such ... I'm potato intolerant.  Just in denial about it
sometimes.  Until after I eat them.  Boxed potatoes, for some reason,
don't have the same unwanted effects.

Is there anything special you do with the boxed potatoes so they taste
better or have better texture?  That's what we usually eat because of
the above, but for me, they leave something to be desired.

Will be grateful for any and all suggestions.

Carol

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 08:53:43 -0600
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> I started thinking (I know, what a concept!), after inquiring about
> ricers and such ... I'm potato intolerant.  Just in denial about it
> sometimes.  Until after I eat them.  Boxed potatoes, for some reason,
> don't have the same unwanted effects.

You too?  Real spuds give me terrible heartburn. So do tomatoes.
They are both in the nightshade family...  Bell peppers make me deathly 
ill.

> Is there anything special you do with the boxed potatoes so they taste
> better or have better texture?  That's what we usually eat because of
> the above, but for me, they leave something to be desired.

Mm, where to start. 

First of all, I make them with 1/2 and 1/2 and am generous with the 
butter.  I rarely eat potatoes so if I'm going to eat them, I go all the 
way. :-)

I also add shredded monterey jack cheese.

It's hardly a low calorie dish...

============================

From: Dave Smith 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 11:33:06 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> You too?  Real spuds give me terrible heartburn. So do tomatoes.
> They are both in the nightshade family...  Bell peppers make me deathly 
> ill.

I have a hard time with potatoes and tomatoes too. Bell peppers don't 
seem to bother me.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 11:18:38 -0600
--------
Dave Smith wrote:
> Omelet wrote:
> > You too?  Real spuds give me terrible heartburn. So do tomatoes.
> > They are both in the nightshade family...  Bell peppers make me deathly 
> > ill.
> 
> I have a hard time with potatoes and tomatoes too. Bell peppers don't 
> seem to bother me.

Nightshade allergies seem to vary.

I love tomatoes too much to give them up.  I just keep Rolaids on hand!

============================

From: Dave Smith 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 19:03:04 -0400
--------
Omelet wrote:
> I love tomatoes too much to give them up.  I just keep Rolaids on hand!

I can get away with small amounts of it. I have to weigh the delicious 
taste against the side effects. I sure miss those lettuce and tomato or 
toasted tomato sandwiches with tomatoes straight from the garden.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 21:27:00 -0600
--------
Dave Smith wrote:
> Omelet wrote:
> > I love tomatoes too much to give them up.  I just keep Rolaids on hand!
> 
> I can get away with small amounts of it. I have to weigh the delicious 
> taste against the side effects. I sure miss those lettuce and tomato or 
> toasted tomato sandwiches with tomatoes straight from the garden.

Tomato sauce can also be a problem. No way in hell I'm giving that up. 


Tomato sandwiches from garden tomatoes? Ditto!

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 11:49:24 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
>You too?  Real spuds give me terrible heartburn. So do tomatoes.
>They are both in the nightshade family...  Bell peppers make me deathly 
>ill.

I bloat.  'Nuff said.

>First of all, I make them with 1/2 and 1/2 and am generous with the 
>butter.  I rarely eat potatoes so if I'm going to eat them, I go all the 
>way. :-)
>
>I also add shredded monterey jack cheese.

Those all sound good.  I put cheese on top of Crash's, when he ate the
leftovers last night.

>It's hardly a low calorie dish...

Well, I look at it this way.  When I try to lose weight, it never
becomes a lifestyle change, no matter how hyped I get at some points.
I lose weight, then gain it back *with interest*.  So I don't try to
lose anymore, and I don't gain.

Serene and Crash have helped me to begin accepting myself for who I am
inside, as well as the package I happen to be wrapped in.  There's
more to it than that, but I don't want to open yet another can of
worms.

Carol

============================

From: "Jean B." 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 12:54:26 -0400
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> Serene and Crash have helped me to begin accepting myself for who I am
> inside, as well as the package I happen to be wrapped in.  There's
> more to it than that, but I don't want to open yet another can of
> worms.

Maybe not but...  (shouting)  GOOD FOR YOU!!!!!!!

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 12:12:55 -0500
--------
Jean B. wrote:
I heard you!  It was a little muffled, but it was there.  LOL!

Thanks,
Carol

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 17:37:50 GMT
--------
Damsel in dis Dress told us...
> Serene and Crash have helped me to begin accepting myself for who I am
> inside, as well as the package I happen to be wrapped in.  There's
> more to it than that, but I don't want to open yet another can of
> worms.

Carol, I agree with Serene and Crash.  I have no problem with large people 
or extra weight.  In my case I chose to lose weight because it was 
seriously affecting my health; e.g., blood pressure, blood glucose, 
breathing problems, weakness, etc.  I don't ever expect to be "slim", but 
reducing enough to improve those conditions.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 12:49:40 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>Carol, I agree with Serene and Crash.  I have no problem with large people 
>or extra weight.  In my case I chose to lose weight because it was 
>seriously affecting my health; 

Thanks, Wayne.  My blood pressure medication had to be quartered about
a year ago.  Not sure why it's improving, but I'm not complaining.  My
lipids and blood glucose are well within goal ranges.  My doctor's
happy.

Last year, I dropped 20 pounds for no apparent reason, and none of it
has come back.  I'm still not complaining.

Carol

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 19:42:14 GMT
--------
Damsel in dis Dress told us...
> Last year, I dropped 20 pounds for no apparent reason, and none of it
> has come back.  I'm still not complaining.

You'rer OKAY, Carol!

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 14:53:11 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>You'rer OKAY, Carol!

Oops!  Am I sounding a tiny bit insecure?  LOL!

Carol

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 19:54:34 GMT
--------
Damsel in dis Dress told us...
> Oops!  Am I sounding a tiny bit insecure?  LOL!

Not at all. :-)  I meant that in the most highly complimentary way.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 12:04:22 -0600
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> Well, I look at it this way.  When I try to lose weight, it never
> becomes a lifestyle change, no matter how hyped I get at some points.
> I lose weight, then gain it back *with interest*.  So I don't try to
> lose anymore, and I don't gain.

Been there, done that. ;-)
We'll see if I can keep off what I've lost this time.  I'd blown it off 
for awhile for the same reason, but the joint and back problems finally 
caught up with me. Pain was my incentive to try to lose it this time!

I totally understand where you are coming from. 

> Serene and Crash have helped me to begin accepting myself for who I am
> inside, as well as the package I happen to be wrapped in.  There's
> more to it than that, but I don't want to open yet another can of
> worms.

It's all good!  I'm not a weight loss nazi. Everyone needs to do what is 
best for them!  And if being overweight is not hurting you (I'm not an 
advocate that a little over "ideal" weight is a big deal) then more 
power to ya. ;-)  

I was (and still am) morbidly obese and it was/is causing me a great 
deal of pain. 

#105 over ideal weight was a bit much for my body to deal with...

It is possible to be big and beautiful.  I've never met you in person 
but to me, what I've "seen" of you here is beautiful indeed, and so is 
Crash!

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 12:31:05 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
>We'll see if I can keep off what I've lost this time.  I'd blown it off 
>for awhile for the same reason, but the joint and back problems finally 
>caught up with me. Pain was my incentive to try to lose it this time!

My knees are bad, so I'm likely to join you at some point.  You have
to be ready, and have the right reasons.  Just like for quitting
smoking.

>#105 over ideal weight was a bit much for my body to deal with...

I'm about 70 pounds over what would be considered healthy for me.

>It is possible to be big and beautiful.  I've never met you in person 
>but to me, what I've "seen" of you here is beautiful indeed, and so is 
>Crash!

Aw, thanks, Om!  You have a beautiful light inside of you that glows
out into the world.

Carol

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 13:58:22 -0600
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> My knees are bad, so I'm likely to join you at some point.  You have
> to be ready, and have the right reasons.  Just like for quitting
> smoking.

 Exactly! :-)

> I'm about 70 pounds over what would be considered healthy for me.

Rough, but food just tastes so damned good. 

> Aw, thanks, Om!  You have a beautiful light inside of you that glows
> out into the world.



============================

From: sf  
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 11:07:02 -0700
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

>Serene and Crash have helped me to begin accepting myself for who I am
>inside, as well as the package I happen to be wrapped in. 

That's a huge step, Carol.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 13:08:02 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
>That's a huge step, Carol.

Thanks.  Most of the time, I don't hate myself anymore.  :)

Carol

============================

From: sf  
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 11:45:01 -0700
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
>Thanks.  Most of the time, I don't hate myself anymore.  :)

There's no point, since you have to live with yourself no matter what.
I know self loathing is hard to overcome, but you can do it.
:)

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 13:59:10 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
>There's no point, since you have to live with yourself no matter what.
>I know self loathing is hard to overcome, but you can do it.

Thank you, sf.  Most other people like me, I don't know why I'm so
hard on myself.  Parental conditioning?  Hard to say for sure.

Carol

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 15:25:01 -0600
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> Thank you, sf.  Most other people like me, I don't know why I'm so
> hard on myself.  Parental conditioning?  Hard to say for sure.

I'm the same way babe. :-)
I think it's a social thing.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 15:41:52 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
>I'm the same way babe. :-)
>I think it's a social thing.

GROUP HUG!
Carol

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 16:00:32 -0600
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> GROUP HUG!
> Carol

I'm game!



============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 14:04:27 -0600
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> Thanks.  Most of the time, I don't hate myself anymore.  :)

Self-loathing...  I know that one all too well! Unfortunately. 

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 14:20:44 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
>Self-loathing...  I know that one all too well! Unfortunately. 

That made me cry.  You're such a beautiful person, Om.  Sometimes,
we're our own worst enemies.

Carol, back to rec.food.counseling

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 15:35:08 -0600
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> That made me cry.  You're such a beautiful person, Om.  

Why thank you!  Self loathing caused me to have a really bad eating 
disorder when I was 31. What knocked me out of it was my Dr. looking at 
my labwork. Numbers don't lie. When you are starving yourself, there are 
tell tales.  He looked me straight in the eye and told me I was going to 
be the thinnest corpse in the city if I kept it up. 

> Sometimes,
> we're our own worst enemies.

 Ain't that the truth.

> Carol, back to rec.food.counseling

Hah! That'd make a great group. :-) Some of the diet support lists are 
pretty good for that...  I've not been on one for awhile.  It's why I 
was so pleased to see Susan posting here. She's really good.

============================

From: Gloria P 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 13:09:27 -0600
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> Is there anything special you do with the boxed potatoes so they taste
> better or have better texture?  That's what we usually eat because of
> the above, but for me, they leave something to be desired.

I always have real potatoes at home, but if I had to use dehydrated 
ones, I would think anything you add would help, like:

salt & pepper
cream, half&half
sour cream
shredded cheese
chopped chives or lightly sauteed onions
crumbled bacon
blue cheese
roasted garlic
finely chopped red, yellow or green pepper
your favorite spice blend
fresh herbs

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 14:18:32 -0500
--------
Gloria P wrote:
>I always have real potatoes at home, but if I had to use dehydrated 
>ones, I would think anything you add would help, like:

ROFL!  You are SO tactful, Gloria!  

>salt & pepper
>cream, half&half
>sour cream
>shredded cheese
>chopped chives or lightly sauteed onions
>crumbled bacon

>roasted garlic
>finely chopped red, yellow or green pepper
>your favorite spice blend
>fresh herbs

These all sound awesome!  I've never thought to do much with mashed
potatoes.  We're gonna have fun experimenting.

Thanks,
Carol

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 15:26:53 -0600
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> These all sound awesome!  I've never thought to do much with mashed
> potatoes.  We're gonna have fun experimenting.

There is nothing you cannot do to powdered potatoes that you would not 
do to "real" ones imho.  I hope I stated that right. 

They are just dried "real" ones after all!

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 15:42:59 -0500
--------
Omelet wrote:
>There is nothing you cannot do to powdered potatoes that you would not 
>do to "real" ones imho.  I hope I stated that right. 
>
>They are just dried "real" ones after all!

Hmmmm ....

                      * Exported from MasterCook *

                   Parmesan-Prosciutto Mashed Potatoes

Recipe By     :Carol Peterson
Serving Size  : 8     Preparation Time :0:45
Categories    : Potatoes                        Side Dishes
                Signature Dishes

  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
  1 1/2         pounds  russet potatoes -- peeled and cubed
  3             cloves  garlic -- peeled
  2        tablespoons  unsalted butter
  2             ounces  prosciutto -- thinly sliced, finely chopped
     1/4      teaspoon  dried thyme
     1/2           cup  milk -- or more if needed
     1/2           cup  parmesan cheese -- freshly grated
                        freshly ground black pepper -- to taste
  2        tablespoons  parmesan cheese

1.  Cook potatoes and garlic in large pot of boiling water until
potatoes are very tender, about 15 minutes. Drain; return potatoes and
garlic to same pot.

2.  Meanwhile, melt  butter in heavy small saucepan over medium heat.
Add chopped prosciutto and thyme and sauté until fragrant, about 2
minutes.

3.  Add prosciutto mixture and 3/4 cup milk to potatoes and garlic.
Mash well, adding more milk by tablespoonfuls if potatoes are dry. Mix
in 1/2 cup cheese. Season with pepper. (Can be prepared 6 hours ahead.
Cover and chill. Stir over low heat to rewarm, adding more milk by
tablespoonfuls, if desired.) Transfer potatoes to bowl. Sprinkle
lightly with  2 tablespoons cheese; serve. 

Cuisine:
  "Italian"
Source:
  "http://www.epicurious.com/"
Copyright:
  "Adapted from Bon Appétit, November 1998"
Yield:
  "4 cups"

            - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 146 Calories; 6g Fat (36.1%
calories from fat); 7g Protein; 17g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber;
20mg Cholesterol; 321mg Sodium.  Exchanges: 1 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Lean
Meat; 0 Vegetable; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 1 Fat.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 16:03:28 -0600
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
>                       * Exported from MasterCook *
>                    Parmesan-Prosciutto Mashed Potatoes

Oh yum!

I'm overhauling my herb garden at the moment and need to put in a new 
Thyme plant. Fresh (imho) is better than dried.

============================

From: biig 
Date: Mon, 9 Mar 2009 11:12:12 -0400
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> Is there anything special you do with the boxed potatoes so they taste
> better or have better texture?  That's what we usually eat because of
> the above, but for me, they leave something to be desired.

   Carol, I use them sometimes and add herbed cream cheese and fresh chopped 
chives.  Makes them more flavourful.  I've also used the roasted garlic 
flavour or the butter and herb.  Either way, I still add herbs, sometimes 
crushed tarragon.  They're fairly cheap at Dollarama.....Sharon 

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Mon, 09 Mar 2009 13:03:45 -0500
--------
biig wrote:
>     Either way, I still add herbs, sometimes 
>crushed tarragon.  They're fairly cheap at Dollarama.....Sharon 

Tarrragon!  Now we're talkin'!  Can't go wrong with cream cheese,
either.

Thank you,
Carol

============================

From: biig 
Date: Mon, 9 Mar 2009 15:36:15 -0400
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> biig wrote:
>>   Carol, I use them sometimes and add herbed cream cheese and fresh chopped
>>chives.  Makes them more flavourful.

> Thank you,
> Carol

   You're welcome... I made potato salad and tuna macaroni salad the other 
day and didn't have any green onion, so used chopped chives.  I had just 
bought two starter plants from the nursery since mine won't sprout til the 
weather warms up.  I put in some chopped basil too.  I have a grow light in 
the low-hanging fixture over my kitchen table.  It's beside a sunny window 
and the chives (and the basil plant I bought at the grocery) are doing 
pretty well with the increased daylight hours.  I crave a greenhouse window, 
but they're too expensive to install.  My lemon thyme plant, that I brought 
in last fall is not doing well.  the sprouts are micro to say the 
least..lol......Sharon 

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 04:29:51 -0600
--------
I just us a wand blender.

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 05:47:14 -0500
--------
Omelet said...
> I just us a wand blender.

I use the food (foley) mill to do mashed potatoes. It doesn't require so 
much hand strength but certainly requires elbow grease!!!

I use the ricer contraption with the widest (I forget the measure) holes 
plate to make spaetzle.

Ahhh... the fat old days!!!

Andy

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 04:59:08 -0600
--------
Andy wrote:

> > I just use a wand blender.
> 
> I use the food (foley) mill to do mashed potatoes. It doesn't require so 
> much hand strength but certainly requires elbow grease!!!

A wand blender does not require any strength at all.
I could see that point if you were talking about a ricer.

> I use the ricer contraption with the widest (I forget the measure) holes 
> plate to make spaetzle.
> 
> Ahhh... the fat old days!!!

 I know what you mean.  I have mom's ricer and it works well too, 
but I've not used it in years.

============================

From: Janet Wilder 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 13:30:16 -0500
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> There is always the manual food mill...you turns the crank and stuff is 
> forced thru a mesh/screen and into a bowl (you supply the bowl). Better 
> ones come with several mesh/screen sizes. It purees berries leaving the 

> It was rated as second choice for mashing spuds...first choice was a ricer. 
> Rating was on texture..the lowly potato masher came in last.

I never read the ratings, but they reflect my personal preferences. I 
really hate it when people mash potatoes with an electric mixer. Turns 
them to glue!

============================

From: "Hugh" 
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2009 11:47:19 -0700
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> There is always the manual food mill...you turns the crank and stuff is
> forced thru a mesh/screen and into a bowl (you supply the bowl). Better
> ones come with several mesh/screen sizes. It purees berries leaving the

The French food mill works fine. It's just a lot to rinse and put into the 
dishwasher.

============================

From: Janet Wilder 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 13:27:20 -0500
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> Janet Wilder wrote:
>> Have you tried using a ricer? The skins stay in the ricer and the mashed 
>> potatoes have a very nice consistency. No burned fingers.
> 
> Do they make those in an electric version yet?  They must!  I have too
> many things ending in -itis in my arms to use a regular ricer.

I Googled "electric potato ricer" and didn't come up with anything other 
than people-powered ones. Sorry.

============================

From: Joseph Littleshoes 
Date: Sat, 07 Mar 2009 22:12:41 -0800
--------
Or wash well and mash after boiling with skin on, while its not 
noticeable with the new white potatoes, and i think is good even with 
the new red potatoes, i find even russets or Idaho's ok with their skins 
left on.
--
JL

============================

From: Janet Wilder 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 13:31:51 -0500
--------
Joseph Littleshoes wrote:
> Or wash well and mash after boiling with skin on, while its not 
> noticeable with the new white potatoes, and i think is good even with 
> the new red potatoes, i find even russets or Idaho's ok with their skins 
> left on.

red potatoes mashed with the skins on has become a favorite around here. 
The skins add fiber so less potatoes are more filling (and lower in carbs)

============================

From: Joseph Littleshoes 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 13:41:53 -0700
--------
Janet Wilder wrote:
> red potatoes mashed with the skins on has become a favorite around here. 
> The skins add fiber so less potatoes are more filling (and lower in carbs)

Plus, i think the red and white potatoes just taste better than the 
idaho's or russets.

I sometimes pressure cook a few and then just add a few grains of salt 
and eat them.

I would forego making a potato salad these days if all i had were 
russets or idaho's, the red & whites ae so much tastier imo.

A nice steak with a pan gravy and a couple of pressure cooked reds and 
im in heaven.
--
JL

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 16:02:22 -0600
--------
> Plus, i think the red and white potatoes just taste better than the 
> idaho's or russets.
> JL

JL, have you tried yukon golds?  I like them even better than the reds.

============================

From: azazello[at]koroviev.de (Victor Sack)
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2009 12:57:48 +0100
--------
> So far I just mash and add butter.
> Any suggestions?

If you do not mind some serious work...

Here is a recipe for the famous mashed potatoes by Joël Robuchon.  It is
from _Simply French_ by Patricia Wells, complete with her comments.
I've made it once and it was probably the best mashed potatoes I've ever
had, not excluding those I got served at Robuchon's restaurant in Paris.
I won't make them again, though - no matter the result - as the effort
is really disproportionate.... YMMV.

Victor

                        Potato Purée 
                  Purée de Pommes de Terre 

Ever homey, ever elegant, ever irresistible, this is the dish that
helped make chef Robuchon's reputation.  Clever man that he is, he
realized early on that if you give people potatoes, potatoes, and more
potatoes, they'll be eternally grateful, forever fulfilled.  These are,
of course, no ordinary mashed potatoes, but a purée that is softened
with an avalanche of butter and mellowed with bubbly boiling milk.  The
quantity of butter and milk needed for a successfully silken and satiny
purée will vary according to the potatoes and the season.  Early-season
potatoes will be firmer, demanding more butter and milk for a perfectly
soft, almost fluffy purée.

The keys here are potatoes of uniform size (so they are uniformly
cooked), and a strong arm for drying the potatoes with a flat wooden
spatula.  Be sure that the butter is well chilled, for it will help make
a finer, smoother purée.  Also follow the proportions of salt to water
when cooking the potatoes:  You won't be able to make up for it with
additional salt at the end.  I agree, this is a lot of work for a simple
potato purée.  But once you taste the results, you'll agree that your
labor has been pleasantly rewarded.  For exceptionally rich potatoes,
the quantity of butter may be doubled.

EQUIPMENT:  A food mill; a flat fine-mesh (drum) sieve 

2 pounds potatoes, such as Idaho Russets 
3/4 to 1 1/4 cups whole milk 
About 16 tablespoons (1 cup) unsalted butter, chilled, cut into pieces 
Sea salt to taste 

1.  Scrub the potatoes, but do not peel them.  Place the potatoes in a
large pot, add salted water (1 tablespoon salt per quart of water) to
cover by at least 1 inch.  Simmer, uncovered, over moderate heat until a
knife inserted into a potato comes away easily, 20 to 30 minutes. Drain
the potatoes as soon as they are cooked.  (If they are allow to cool in
the water, the potatoes will end up tasting reheated.)

2.  Meanwhile, in a large saucepan, bring the milk just to a boil over
high heat.  Set aside.

3.  As soon as the potatoes are cool enough to handle, peel them.  Pass
the potatoes through the finest grid of a food mill into a large
heavy-bottomed saucepan set over low heat.  With a wooden spatula, stir
the potatoes vigorously to dry them, 4 to 5 minutes.  Now begin adding
about 12 tablespoons of the butter, little by little, stirring
vigorously after each batch of butter is thoroughly incorporated; the
mixture should be fluffy and light.  Then slowly add about three fourths
of the hot milk in a thin stream, stirring vigorously until the milk is
thoroughly incorporated.

4.  Pass the mixture through a flat fine-mesh (drum) sieve into another
heavy-bottomed saucepan.  Stir vigorously, and if the puree seems a bit
heavy and stiff, add additional butter and milk, stirring all the while.
Note: few of us have a real French flat bottomed screen for scraping
potato puree.  Simply use any mesh sieve you have in the kitchen and
press down on the potato puree as you push it through the sieve.  This
second step of puréeing is the true secret behind Chef Robuchon's
recipe.  Taste for seasoning.  (The purée may be made up to 1 hour in
advance.  Place in the top of a double boiler, uncovered over simmering
water.  Stir occasionally to keep smooth.)

Yield:  6 to 8 servings

============================

From: Hugh 
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2009 11:54:50 -0700
--------
Victor Sack wrote:
> Here is a recipe for the famous mashed potatoes by Joël Robuchon.  It is
> from _Simply French_ by Patricia Wells, complete with her comments.

Patricia Wells is one of our favorite cookbook authors, on a par with Julia 
Child, Marcella Hazan and Michael Field. I'll try to find "Simply French"
Thanks,

Hugh 

============================

From: Goomba 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 17:08:57 -0400
--------
> Any suggestions?

My mashed potatoes also contain milk or cream, salt and pepper. 
Sometimes I add a small bit of nutmeg, as I learned to do in Germany.
I always peel and cube the potatoes into uniform cubes before boiling. 
Why do you prefer to peel after cooking?

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Mon, 09 Mar 2009 22:05:52 GMT
--------
Goomba wrote:
> My mashed potatoes also contain milk or cream, salt and pepper. 
> Sometimes I add a small bit of nutmeg, as I learned to do in Germany.
> I always peel and cube the potatoes into uniform cubes before boiling. 
> Why do you prefer to peel after cooking?

it's said that the potatoes retain more of their vitamins and minerals if
you boil them with the skins on, which certainly sounds plausible.  

your pal,
blake

============================

From: Goomba 
Date: Mon, 09 Mar 2009 21:39:35 -0400
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> it's said that the potatoes retain more of their vitamins and minerals if
> you boil them with the skins on, which certainly sounds plausible.  

I know they say that assuming you're eating those skins along with the 
innerds, but what about that same cooked potato that has been peeled?

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Tue, 10 Mar 2009 19:22:49 GMT
--------
Goomba wrote:
> I know they say that assuming you're eating those skins along with the 
> innerds, but what about that same cooked potato that has been peeled?

even if you peel them after boiling, from what i've read.  i don't know if
one of the scientific johnnies has tackled the question, but as i say, it
sounds reasonable.

your pal,
blake

============================

From: zxcvbob 
Date: Sun, 08 Mar 2009 16:19:05 -0500
--------
> Any suggestions?

What kind of potatoes are you using?  Try using red potatoes (especially 
if you can find large ones,) trim any bad spots, and boil them whole. 
Drain, chop, and mash *without* peeling.  The peels are good, and less 
noticeable than brown potato peels (and I think red potatoes taste 
better than Russets for making mashed potatoes)

Bob

============================

From: "modom (palindrome guy)" 
Date: Mon, 09 Mar 2009 11:47:34 -0500
--------
>Any suggestions?

Another late suggestion: mashed potatoes with dandelion greens.

Bittman does them here:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/11/dining/11mini.html?ref=dining

============================

From: "phil..c" 
Date: Tue, 10 Mar 2009 08:07:22 +0900
--------
modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
> Another late suggestion: mashed potatoes with dandelion greens.

Here is another suggestion to go with mash
that i posted  earlier


2 kg of pork ribs
4 tspn butter  salt and freshly ground pepper
2 spring onions
750 g spuds  Potatoes peeled and sliced
100g cream

preheat the oven to 220c
rub the pork ribs with plenty of salt & pepper
place upon a rack in a baking dish  with one cup of water
cook for half an hour

cover the ribs with foil  turn down temp to 150 or 160 c
and cook another half an hour  basting occasionally with the pan 
collected liquids


Cook the spuds in slated water until soft  drain and steam in a dry pot
add butter and cream  then mash them

serve the meal on warmed plates  with the mashed spuds  and sauce with 
the liquids from the roasting dish
Garnish with strips of spring onions

Goes well with a Good Merlot.


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