[Previous Thread] [Return to BigSpud: The Potato Recipe Collection Menu][Next Thread]

Subject:   leftover mashed potatoes
Newsgroup: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: mjfst19[at]vms.cis.pitt.edu (Marni)
Date: 20 Sep 1995
--------
Leftover mashed potatoes taste surprisingly good reheated with some 
bottled spaghetti sauce poured over the top. No, really, it's good.

============================

From: jueytoo[at]aol.com (JueyToo)
Date: 21 Sep 1995
--------
i took some leftover mashed potatoes, mixed in julienned carrots, thinly
sliced onions, a T of curry powder, 2 T of sugar, 2 T flour, 2 T
cornstarch.... and pan fried it in patties -- it was scrumptious! next
time, i think i'm going to add some minced green onions... 

btw, don't try to deep fry this -- it just falls apart... and use very
little oil and a nonstick pan or it will soak up oil like you wouldn't
believe... 

and it looked like there were more carrots and onions than potatoes.. but
i think they were in about equal proportions...

it was quite tasty!

relaine
:)

============================

From: JENKINSGM%DFEM[at]dfmail.usafa.af.mil (Gail J)
Date: 1995/09/22
--------
relaine writes:
>i took some leftover mashed potatoes, mixed in julienned carrots, thinly
>sliced onions, a T of curry powder, 2 T of sugar, 2 T flour, 2 T
>cornstarch.... and pan fried it in patties -- it was scrumptious! next
>time, i think i'm going to add some minced green onions... 

We mix in seasonings and 1-2 eggs, depending on how much potato we
have. The egg helps hold patties together. We like to make the patties
thin so there's a higher proportion of crispy parts. Top with butter
when ready to eat.

============================

From: weiler[at]netaxs.com (Kristina)
Date: 1995/09/22
--------
Try putting them in a squarish container (like Tupperware) and put in
the fridge. Later, slice them about 1/2 inch thick and fry. Much like
hash browns; really good.

============================

Subject: leftover mashed potatoes
Newsgroups: misc.consumers.frugal-living,rec.food.cooking

============================

From: The Vietz's (mish[at]btigate.com)
--------
My husband when he cooks always makes an overabundance of mashed 
potatoes and I cringe when I have to toss them out a few days later.
Does anyone have any ideas for what to do with leftover mashed potatoes?
Any recipes?

============================

From: akerson[at]clark.net (Pete Akerson)
Date: 7 Nov 1996 00:42:22 GMT
--------
The following passed for Shepard's Pie at a certain fine British 
Boarding School...you'all might want to worry over that.

1. Cook up ground beef and toss in any available leftovers,
	say turnip bits, liver, kidney, and swede/rhutebegas.
1.1 Get a good thick sauce going with the meat if you can.
2. Pour the meat/mystery mix into a pan an inch or two thick,
	and cover with an inch or two of mashed potatoes.
3. Make a swirlly design on top of the potato mash with a fork.
4. Bake the heck out of it, say 400F for an hour.

Actually, I miss the stuff ...

============================

From: Maureen Jett 
Date: Thu, 07 Nov 1996 12:48:35 +0100
--------
Sorry, I didn't see the original post, but another idea is Gnocci. 
Here's a recipe Phyllis Harbst posted to this ng back in June.  I have
used it successfully.  You might have to use more flour so that the
dough isn't so sticky.  Another thing I do different is to press the
gnocci on a fork to give them a seashell shape before dropping them in
the water.

Basic Gnocci

1 cup flour (regular white)
1 cup left over refrigerated mashed potatoes
1 egg
salt

Mix all together to form dough, roll out into a rope about 3/4 inch
diameter. Cut off in 1" segments (look like little pillows). Drop into
BOILING water and when they float to the top they're done (2-4 minutes)
top with marinara sauce, or butter, salt, pepper and parmesan cheese.

If you want to make several batches at once you can freeze them. After
cutting into sections place individual gnocci on a cookie sheet and
freeze until firm, then place them in plastic bags. If they are frozen
individually first in this method, they won't stick together in the
bag.

I prefer to use mashed potatoes from real potatoes, but my relatives
have made them from instant mashed potatoes as well and they turn out
fine.

============================

From: fch2[at]cornell.edu (Fiona Hyland)
Date: Thu, 07 Nov 1996 17:53:55 -0400
--------
The traditional way to use mashed potatoes in Ireland is to make potato
pancakes.  There are a number of ways; here is one.

Mix the mashed potatoes with salt, pepper, a little milk, some butter and
a bit of flour (you can add onions if you like, or other seasonings). 
Shape into 'pancakes with your hands, say 4-5 inches diameter and about
.5-1 inch thick. Fry gently in butter until they are lightly browned and
warmed through.  True soul food!

============================

From: julieag945[at]aol.com (Julie)
Date: 7 Nov 1996 14:24:51 GMT
--------
You can also use leftover mashed potatoes as kind of a "frosting" for
meatloaf.  It tastes great and really uses up the leftovers!

============================

From: rsvptown[at]aol.com (Steve)
Date: 8 Nov 1996 00:53:52 GMT
--------
Try adding some garlic powder, parsley, garted parmesan, and egg and shape
into patties and fry in olive oil.  All measurements are to taste.

============================

From: Cynthia 
Date: Thu, 07 Nov 1996 21:28:06 -0800
--------
That's the way Italians use mashed potatoes--to make potato
croquettes--and they are fabulous!

============================

From: nancy-dooley[at]uiowa.edu (Nancy Dooley)
Date: Thu, 7 Nov 1996 10:11:40
--------
I love having left-over mashed potatoes about.  Put them in "true" Czech 
kolache dough; make them into potato pancakes (add parsley, garlic, onion, egg 
and flour, and fry in butter); use them for hot meat sandwiches - turkey or 
beef are the best.

============================

From: cheshire[at]ridgecrest.ca.us (Dr Pepper)
Date: Fri, 08 Nov 1996 21:12:23 GMT
--------
My favorite is to add them to Navy soup, , , It makes it into
SENATE bean soup.  Also, Cold potato sandwiches,, yummy~!

============================

From: Brian Mailman 
Date: Thu, 07 Nov 1996 09:50:01 -0800
--------
1.  Potato pancakes.  Add egg, stir in well, and fry.  Serve with
applesauce and sour cream.

2.  Potato souffle.  A specialty of the Auvergne, I believe, but I
reserve the right to be wrong.  Add a egg or two or three and a goodly
amount of grated Parmesan cheese.  Spread mixture in tray and bake at
350| for about 40 minutes or until souffle is puffed and golden-brown on
top.  Even after it has cooled down and lost its puff, it is still very
good as a side dish.

3. Mashed potato soup.  Thin down leftovers with chicken/veggie stock to
consistency you want.  Fry some bacon; drain grease and crumble strips
into soup.  Add some sour cream.  NOTE:  DO NOT BOIL AFTER ADDING SOUR
CREAM.   Garnish each serving with finely chopped chives.

============================

From: Lin Nah 
Date: Fri, 08 Nov 1996 02:47:51 -0800
--------
1.  Fish cakes
Mix mashed potato with canned tuna or canned salmon or any cooked 
fish of choice.  If too wet, use add some breadcrumbs.  You can all 
add herbs and seasoning you fancy.  eg salt, pepper, chilli powder
or cayenne pepper, etc. Grab a small bit and roll into ball or pat 
into round disk.  Coat in breadcrumbs and fry.  You can also freeze
these and fry later.

2.  Potato top pie
Make a 2 crust pie with only the crust at the bottom.  Cover the top
with mashed potatoes.  I've not made these before but the ones sold
at the shops seem to have a light golden brown on the top.
The shepherd's pie recipe given by someone else is also a good idea.


Perhaps you should try to fine tune the amount of mashed potatoes
you make.  Slowly decrease the potatoes you cook till you get the
right amount.  OR see how much you eat in one seating and perhaps
use that proportion of potatoes.  e.g. if you only consume 25% of
the mashed potatoes you make, next time decrease your recipe's 
ingredients by dividing by 4 (or 3 for a third)

============================

From: Lesley Fitzpatrick 
Date: Fri, 08 Nov 1996 15:08:37 -0500
--------
Ian Diddams wrote:
> Is there any other kind of shepherd's pie??

My mom makes it with left over roast beef or ground beef. Then a layer
of corn (canned or frozen) and then mashed potatos on top. 
I think that originally it was made with lamb... hence the name.
I beleive that I had it in a pub in the UK this summer and it was
made with lamb.

============================

From: roglb[at]nrv.net (Diane)
Date: 9 Nov 1996 21:16:24 GMT
--------
Umm...  I always just heat them up in the oven slowly and eat them as......
Mashed Potatoes!  

My husband swore he couldn't eat reheated mashed potatoes.  Then after 
Thanksgiving one year, I warmed up a plate of leftovers and included the 
taters and he said they tasted just like they were just prepared.

I don't know, maybe it's the way I make mine, maybe it's my magic touch ;-), 
maybe it's because I do things differently than his mother (who can only 
make a certain amount of dishes and never can try anything new without 
turning it into  a clone of one of her old dishes!).

BTW, how dord anyone make mashed potatoes without making way too many?  I 
always make at least twice as much as is needed.  It is not physically 
possible for me to make "just enough" or even just a little extra.

============================

From: msoja[at]globalnet.co.uk (Onion Breath)
Date: Mon, 11 Nov 1996 12:10:05 GMT
--------
Diane wrote:
>BTW, how dord anyone make mashed potatoes without making way too many?
>I always make at least twice as much as is needed.

In all my years of cooking I only recently started making mashed
potatoes and like you I can't seem to make less than double what
I need.  And all these years, too, I've been telling myself that
they can't be reheated, in fact, I thought that if I didn't make
them within ten minutes of sit down time they would suffer.  But
I tried zapping them once the next day and they were beautiful.
I was amazed.  No really.

I put butter and sour cream in mine, and sometimes some of those
sliced jalepenos from the jar.

============================

From: David Willus 
Date: Mon, 11 Nov 1996 12:04:17 -0600
--------
They also freeze pretty well, if you don't mind the TV dinner texture.

============================

From: James R. and Kathleen A. Beilstein 
Date: Mon, 11 Nov 1996 18:39:30 -0500
--------
> I tried zapping them once the next day and they were beautiful.
> I was amazed. 

I swear that Thanksgiving Dinner leftovers are better than the original.
Put turkey, stuffing, and mashed potatoes in a broiler pan (or other
deep pan).  Pour gravy over all.  Cover potatoes & stuffing w/ foil. 
Put in oven for 30 - 45 min. (or until turkey is good and hot).

P.S. I made gnocci today for the first time with my leftovers.  I froze
them for future use, but they looked pretty good.

============================

From: John Hobson 
Date: Tue, 12 Nov 1996 14:08:35 GMT
--------
Diane wrote:
> BTW, how dord anyone make mashed potatoes without making way too many?
> I always make at least twice as much as is needed.

I always work from the number of potatoes per person.  I know that
the people in my house will typically eat two average-sized russet
potatoes each, so I start with that.  If the entree is not going
to be very plentiful, I will add more; contrariwise, if there is
plenty of other stuff, I will make fewer.

============================

From: awhite[at]indigo.ie (Anne White)
Date: 12 Nov 1996 22:39:43 GMT
--------
My son loves when I make a "Potato Pancake" where I mix an egg with the 
leftovers and fry it (about half an inch thick) on each side so it goes 
brown and crispy I just shake a little salt on it for him and he then 
covers it with ketchup.....(why do I bother, I ask myself....!!!)  For 
myself, I like to add either fish (tinned will do) or onions....or 
herbs....or garlic...  or diced ham.... or cheese.....

============================

From: Lorraine Terrier 
Date: Sat, 09 Nov 1996 21:31:44 -0800
--------
When I was working full time and going to school part time, I used to
deliberately make extra mashed potatoes.  I would add egg yolk and
chopped onions to the leftovers.  I would then form them into patties
and coat the patties with flour.  Next, I spread them out on a cookie
sheet to freeze individually, then stored them frozen in a plastic bag. 
I'd thaw them, then fry them in butter.

============================

From: robe[at]siu.edu
Date: 10 Nov 1996 22:12:59 GMT
--------
Potato pancakes are the best use of leftover pancakes.  My husband's 
grandmother gave me the secret to reheating mashed potatoes though.  She 
said to heat them slowly in a sauce pan and add extra milk to keep them 
creamy.  This is the only way my family will eat the leftovers.

============================

From: Tracy L. Carter 
Date: Mon, 11 Nov 1996 15:56:18 -0500
--------
Lorraine Terrier wrote:
>                                              I would add egg yolk and
> chopped onions to the leftovers.  I would then form them into patties
> and coat the patties with flour.  Next, I spread them out on a cookie
> sheet to freeze individually, then stored them frozen in a plastic bag.
> I'd thaw them, then fry them in butter.

This is similar to my use of leftover potatoes by reincarnating them as
"potato puffs".  Mix an egg, chopped onions, a little milk, and some
self-rising flour into a batter similar to cookie dough in thickness. 
DRop by the spoonful into hot oil and deep fry until golden brown.

I have also, on occassion, added some cheddar cheese to the mixture for
a different taste.

============================

From: Mike Thorp 
Date: Sun, 10 Nov 1996 00:43:02 -0800
--------
Another good use for leftover mashed potatoes is potatoe pancakes.  Thin 
the potatoes with a little milk, pat into cakes and cook in a skillet 
like pancakes.  Serve with butter, salt and pepper

============================

From: David Willus 
Date: Sun, 10 Nov 1996 14:00:54 -0600
--------
You can make a yummy potato soup.  Just heat the potatoes with lots of 
milk, add cheese, heat until the cheese is melted.  Garnish with parsley 
flakes. YUM!

============================

From: rbruman[at]netcom.com (Ray Bruman)
Date: Sun, 10 Nov 1996 11:38:45 GMT
--------
I try to keep tarama (carp roe) on hand so that mashed potatoes
can be quickly converted to taramasalata with:
olive oil
pressed garlic
lemon juice
yogurt

...whipped into a soft consistency and dipped on sesame crackers.... mmmm.

============================

From: chagelstein[at]jack.clarku.edu
Date: 11 NOV 96 04:31:07 GMT
--------
After you mash potatos, and whip them up, I always add
a generous helping of Hot Tabasco Sauce or Salsa in it,
and sprinkle Oregeno on it.  Delicious.

============================

From: sarah 
Date: 11 Nov 1996 17:27:01 GMT
--------
We used to make gnocci out of them.  Add an egg, a little salt, and
enough flour to make a soft dough.  Cut them into 1/2 tsp blips (flatten
and curl off the back of a fork if you want to get fancy), dry 'em for an
hour or so and cook like pasta.  Serve the way you like pasta.  Great in
lasagna-esque casseroles too.


[Previous Thread] [Return to BigSpud: The Potato Recipe Collection Menu][Next Thread]