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Subject: Various Mashed Potato Recipes 1997-1999

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: need recipe for garlic mashed potatoes!
From: Barb McGivern 
Date: 3 Jan 1997 16:39:35 GMT
--------
Hello - 
I'm sure that by adding garlic to mashed potatoes, I'll get the desired
result. But
does anyone have a real recipe for a wonderful garlicky comfort creation?
Thanks in advance - 

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: need recipe for garlic mashed potatoes!
From: Jacob Shaurette 
Date: Fri, 03 Jan 1997 22:37:53 -0800
--------
Garlic Mashed Potatoes

2.5 lbs. red potatoes
1 1/4 stick butter
3 oz. grated romano cheese
1.5 tbs plus 1/2 tsp. oregano
3/4 tbs. salt
2 tbs. plus 1 tsp. finely chopped garlic

1 tbs. butter

Partially peel potatoes (leave about half the skin on).  Cook potatoes until
fork tender.  Mash with potato masher or metal paddle of mixer.  Add butter,
cheese, and spices and mix well.  PLace mashed potatoes in serving bowl; place
remaining tb. butter in the center of the potatoes and serve.


Recipes from Buca Little Italy
***************************************

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Compliments for garlic mashed potatos
From: hpplweb[at]nslsilus.org
Date: Wed, 12 Feb 1997 20:22:56 -0800
--------
Hi--

This is my first time posting to a newsgroup so please excuse any breach
of ettiquette.

First I'm looking for a good garlic mashed potatos recipie.

Second, can anyone recommend a main dish and vegetable that would
compliment these mashed potatos.

Thanks for your help.

Jenny
jbauman@nslsilus.org

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Compliments for garlic mashed potatos
From: Don Kleist 
Date: Thu, 13 Feb 1997 06:01:09 -0600
--------
> First I'm looking for a good garlic mashed potatos recipie.
>
> Second, can anyone recommend a main dish and vegetable that would
> compliment these mashed potatos.

Try breath mints.  ;-)

In a more serious vein, try this.

Much of the garlic we get comes from Gilroy, CA, which is just about a
driver and 7-iron away from Castroville, CA, where most of the artichokes
are grown. The old saying is that things that grow together go together.

My way of cooking artichokes is to trim the stickers, then steam them for
about 1 hour.  Into the steaming liquid I put a few pieces from the top
of a bunch of celery, a couple of garlic cloves, a splash of lemon juice,
and a splash of olive oil.  Don't ask for proportions, because this is
just a "throw it in the pot and cook it" kind of thing.  I then chill the
artichokes and serve them with mayonaise.  Simple, but very good.

As for some meat, try some skinned chicken, breasts, or, more to my
taste, thighs, slathered with almost any mustard but plain American
yellow.  Then, just bake the chicken till done.  Cooking the mustard this
way mellows the bite and gives the chicken a great taste.  My favorite
mustard for this is my homemade lemon dill mustard.  I will post that
recipe when I get a chance.

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Compliments for garlic mashed potatos
From: Neil Friedman 
Date: Thu, 13 Feb 1997 07:01:09 -0500
--------
> First I'm looking for a good garlic mashed potatos recipie.

Garlic Mashed Potatoes ...Bon Appetit May 1996
1 1/4 pounds russets potatoes, peeled, cut into 1/2" pieces.
1/4 cup milk
6 large garlic cloves, peeled, crushed

1/4 cup whipping cream
1/4 cup ( 1/2 stick) butter, room temperature

Place potatoes in medium saucepan. Add enough cold water to cover
potatoes. Add milk and garlic. Bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer
until potatoes are very tender, about 25 minutes.

Drain potatoes and garlic, reserving 1/4 cup cooking liquid. Return
potatoes and garlic to same saucepan. Add cream and butter and mash
until smooth. Thin with reserved liquid, if desired. Season to taste
with salt & pepper.

I have modified this recipe to reduce the calories...I used chicken
stock to replace the whipping cream...added 1 tablespoon of chopped sage
& 1/2 cup parmasean cheese. The chicken stock was heated & added to
potatoes in mixer until consistency was satisfactory.

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Compliments for garlic mashed potatos
From: sconsult[at]tricon.net (Paul McMichael)
Date: 14 Feb 1997 00:39:50 GMT
--------
Welcome to the group Jenny

I just got up from the table after a meal of steamed artichokes for a starter. 
followed by bacon wrapped venison (slow smoked outside) potatoes mashed with 
baked garlic and sauteed brussles sprouts. A mix of flavors that seem to go 
well together. nothing subtle about this meal.

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Compliments for garlic mashed potatos
From: mmp77[at]aol.com (MMP77)
Date: 14 Feb 1997 02:18:49 GMT
--------
Jenny writes in part:

>First I'm looking for a good garlic mashed potatos recipie.
>
>Second, can anyone recommend a main dish and vegetable that would
>compliment these mashed potatos.

I have no tried and true recipe, but I often have garlic mashed potatoes
at my favorite restaurant.  The entrees I prefer them with are prime rib,
tuna steak (broiled/grilled) and salmon steak.  They add a little extra
flavor to these basic meats/fish.  Also, they serve them with the potatoes
on the bottom of the plate and the meat directly  on top.  You cut a piece
of meat and have the potatoes in every bite!  Yum!  There are usually a
few token juliennes sliced carrots on top, too to make a nice appearance.
I cannot wait to benefit from all the replies you will get for a recipe!

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Compliments for garlic mashed potatos
From: beaner[at]postoffice.ptd.net (Jeanine)
Date: Fri, 14 Feb 1997 21:31:03 GMT
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MMP77 wrote:

> Also, they serve them with the potatoes
>on the bottom of the plate and the meat directly  on top.  

I tried that at home once, and hubby set me straight! He MUST be able
to eat each dish seperatly (unless its served in a casserole, of
course)  Casserole dishes are allowed to take most of the plate,
but meals with individually prepared main part and sides, he eats in
parts..therefore they shouldn't co-habitate!  (he only does that at
home though..Strange guy )

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Garlic mashed potatoes
From: Kate 
Date: 14 Feb 1997 02:43:15 GMT
--------
Fine Cooking Magazine did a very fine article a while back ::shuffles
through old magazines::  Eureka! Issue Number 6 Dec 1994/ Jan 1995
featuring the best ways to make mashed potatoes.  It included discussions
about why one method seemed to be superior to the other depending on the
effect one wanted to create.  Examples were peeling vs not peeling the
potato before cooking, types of potatoes for the best mash and using a food
mill or another method for mashing.  They had a very nice recipe for
roasted-garlic mashed potatoes.  This has a much milder taste than potatoes
mashed with fresh or even sauteed garlic.  If anyone wants the recipe
please E-Mail me and I will send it and/or post.

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Garlic Mashed Potatoes (recipe long)
From: "kate" 
Date: 15 Feb 1997 00:10:22 GMT
--------
Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes from Fine Cooking Magazine Vol 6.  The
author of the article is David Everett.

The article summarizes why you should use one potato over another (he
recommends a russet, specifically Yukon Gold, the blue potato or Idaho) not
peeling the potato before boiling, and using a food mill.  He also
recommends using chilled butter cut into 1/2 inch slices.  Since all of
these ideas either seemed sound to me or comport with my own experience I
follow the suggestions and always have great mashed potatoes.  The problem
with this method is that it requires using a food mill and a double boiler
to warm the ground potatoes.  There is more to clean up but the potatoes
are perfect.  Use your own method if this seems like too much and just add
the roasted garlic before putting in the first bit of butter.

Here is his recipe for roasted garlic mashed potatoes

3 tbs sea salt
1 whole head garlic
2 sprigs fresh thyme [optional IMO] 
Approx. 2 1/2 quarts cold water
2 lb Yukon Gold potatoes, scrubbed, unpeeled
2 tbs unsalted butter, chilled cut into 1/2 tbs slices
1/2 cup buttermilk.  
[regular fat version would use 4 tbs unsalted butter and 1/2 cup hot milk.
The richness of the garlic seems to compensate for some of the fat.  Both
are tasty but the higher fat version wins in my home ;-)]
sea salt and fresh pepper to taste

Heat the oven to 350 degrees F. Sprinkle 1 tbs sea salt on a small
oven-proof dish.  Put the garlic head  and the thyme on the salt and cover
with foil.  Bake until the garlic is soft, about 45 minutes.  Allow the
garlic to cool slightly, then break the head into cloves and peel.

Bring the water to a boil and add the remaining sea salt.  Add the potatoes
and reduce the heat to medium, and cook the potatoes until they are tender,
about 35 min.  Drain immediately.

If you are using a food mill most of the peel will be removed in grinding
[I prefer to pull the peel off the potato when they are just cooled enough
to handle].  Grind the potatoes and half the garlic through the food mill.

Keep the potatoes warm in a double boiler as you add the butter in thin
slices; stir the potatoes constantly.  Wait till each slice of butter has
been incorporated before adding more.

Warm the buttermilk (it may curdle slightly, this is not a problem). 
Slowly add the warm buttermilk to the potatoes, stirring constantly.  Mix
well.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  If you want to add the rest
of the garlic do so now by mashing the cloves with a fork and add.  [If you
already have enough garlic to your liking use the roasted garlic spread on
bread or toast.  At this point I am done and I serve the potatoes.  The
author recommends a final grinding through the food mill using the finest
mesh disc.  Again, IMO, extra work with little pay off]  Keep the potatoes
warm in the double boiler, uncovered, until serving.

Kate

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re:Lumpy mashed potatoes
From: R&S Partrick 
Date: Sun, 23 Mar 1997 21:30:45 -0800
--------
My MIL always used to use her blender to get perfectly smooth potatoes. 
The type of potatoe didn't matter one iota.

Shelly

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Irish Mashed Potatoes (Colcannon)
From: David J Stevens 
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 1997 21:35:31 -0800
--------
This is really a great recipe; but I'm a little confused about
something. I was taught that Colcannon was a Scots dish and made with
kale instead of cabbage; the onions chopped or sliced and browned in
butter and used as a topper. Enlighten me.

David Stevens

The Weekly Spud wrote:
 
> Irish Mashed Potatoes (Colcannon)
> 
> 2 cups - Green cabbage, shredded
> 2 cups - Mashed potatoes
> 1/4 cup - Green onions, sliced
> 1/8 tsp - Pepper
> Butter or margarine
> Parsley
> 
> Heat 1/2-inch water to boiling.
> Stir in cabbage, cover and heat to boiling.
> Cook 5 minutes, drain.
> Prepare mashed potatoes, fold in cabbage, onions and pepper.
> Dot with butter, sprinkle with parsley.
> Serves 4.
> 
> ~~~
> Rec.food.recipes is moderated; only recipes and recipe requests are accepted
> for posting.  Please read the "Posting Guidelines" article.  Recipes/requests
> go to recipes@rt66.com; questions/comments to tfdpress@acpub.duke.edu.
> Please allow several days for your submission to appear.

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Irish Mashed Potatoes (Colcannon)
From: owlsprng[at]iol.ie (P. Morwood & D. Duane)
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 1997 09:49:00 GMT
--------
David J Stevens wrote:
>This is really a great recipe; but I'm a little confused about
>something. I was taught that Colcannon was a Scots dish and made with
>kale instead of cabbage; the onions chopped or sliced and browned in
>butter and used as a topper. Enlighten me.

Here's what I know about it. 

MMMMM----- Recipe via UNREGISTERED Meal-Master (tm) v8.04
 
      Title: Colcannon Lore
 Categories: Irish, Vegetables, Information
      Yield: 1 servings
 

  (from IRISH TRADITIONAL FOOD, Theodora Fitzgibbon:)
  
  "This is traditionally eaten in Ireland at Hallowe'en.  Until quite
  recently this was a fast day, when no meat was eaten.  The name is
  from *cal ceann fhionn* -- white-headed cabbage.  Colcannon should
  correctly be made with chopped kale (a member of the cabbage family)
  but it is also made with white cabbage;  an interesting version is
  the Irish Folklore Commission's, which gives it as mashed potatoes
  mixed with onions, butter, and a boiled white cabbage in the center.
  Colcannon at Hallowe'en used to contain a plain gold ring, a
  sixpence, a thimble or button:  finding the ring meant marriage
  within the year for the person who found it, the sixpence meant
  wealth, the thimble spinsterhood and the button bachelorhood."
  
  (from THE POOLBEG BOOK OF IRISH TRADITIONAL FOOD:)
  
  "For a dish that is not widely eaten or served today, colcannon
  remains remarkably widely known.  Maybe the song about    colcannon is
  better known than the dish.  If you say "colcannon" in a crowded
  room, the chances are that half the room will break into one version
  of the song and the other into a completely different version.  Like
  the recipe itself, there are two versions commonly known.
  
  Did you ever eat colcannon            Did you ever eat colcannon
  when 'twas made with yellow cream     when 'twas made with thickened cream 
  And the kale and praties blended      And the greens and scallions blended
  Like the picture in a dream?          Like the picture in a dream?
  
  
  Did you ever take a forkful           Did you ever scoop a hole on top
  And dip it in the lake                To hold the melting cake
  Of heather-flavored butter            Of clover-flavored butter
  That your mother used to make?        Which your mother used to make?
  
  Oh, you did, yes you did!             Did you ever eat and eat, afraid
  So did he and so did I,               You'd let the ring go past,
  And the more I think about it         And some old married sprissman
  Sure, the more I want to cry.         Would get it at the last?
  
                         God be with the happy times
                         When trouble we had not,
                         And our mothers made colcannon
                         In the little three-legged pot.
  
  
  " -- Colcannon is so like champ, cally, stampy and poundies that it's
  difficult to understand how it ever came to have a different name.
  Yet, all over the country, colcannon is colcannon and known as
  nothing else. As in the two versions of the song, it can be made with
  kale or with greens, meaning cabbage.  Those reared on the version
  made with kale can never understand how the cabbage version can be
  considered colcannon, and vice versa...."
 
MMMMM
MMMMM----- Recipe via UNREGISTERED Meal-Master (tm) v8.04
 
      Title: Colcannon #3
 Categories: Irish, Vegetables
      Yield: 4 servings
 
  2 1/2 lb Potatoes (cooked, mashed)
      1 c  Cooked kale (finely chopped)
      1 c  Hot milk
      4    Chopped scallions (optional)
           Butter
 
  Strip the heads of kale away from the stems and shred them finely.
  Kale is a tough vegetable which needs to cook for 10-20 minutes
  depending on its age.  Cook as you would for any green vegetable in
  furiously boiling salted water until it is just tender.  (Some people
  add 1/2 tsp baking soda to the water to help keep the kale at its
  brightest green.)  Strain it and refresh it with cold water. Drain it
  thoroughly and squeeze out any excess water.  Nowadays I put the kale
  into a food processor with the hot milk and blend them into a green
  soup which I then mix through the mashed potatoes.  I then reheat it
  in the oven until it is very hot.  This produces a dish fit for St.
  Patrick's Day in greenness.  It is perfectly acceptable just to mix
  the kale and milk into the potatoes without recourse to the food
  processor, but the resulting dish is just speckled green.  Do not use
  the processor if you are making colcannon with cabbage instead of
  kale.  Don't forget the coin and the ring to amuse the children.
  
  (from THE POOLBEG BOOK OF TRADITIONAL IRISH COOKING, Biddy White
  Lennon)
 
MMMMM
 
MMMMM----- Recipe via UNREGISTERED Meal-Master (tm) v8.04
 
      Title: Colcannon #2
 Categories: Irish, Vegetables
      Yield: 4 servings
 
    450 g  Kale or cabbage
    450 g  Potatoes
      2    Small leeks or green onion
           -tops
    150 ml Milk or cream
           Pinch of mace
           Salt and pepper
    100 g  Butter
 
  
  ~- If using the kale, strip from the stalks or likewise remove the
  stump of cabbage before cooking in boiling salted water until tender
  but not overcooked.  Drain very well and chop finely.  Meanwhile,
  cook the potatoes, and while they are cooking chop the leeks or onion
  tops and simmer them in milk or cream for about 7 minutes.  Drain the
  potatoes, season and mash them well, then stir in the cooked leeks
  and milk, adding a little more milk if needed.
  
  Finally blend in the finely chopped kale or cabbage (modern cooks will
  find a blender or food processor ideal for this).  Add the mace and
  taste for seasoning.  Heat the entire mixture gently, then pile in a
  warmed dish.  Make a small well in the center and pour in the melted
  butter.
  
  (from IRISH TRADITIONAL FOOD, Theodora Fitzgibbon)
 
MMMMM
 
MMMMM----- Recipe via UNREGISTERED Meal-Master (tm) v8.04
 
      Title: Colcannon #1
 Categories: Irish, Vegetables
      Yield: 4 servings
 
      1 lb Curly kale or cabbage,
           -cooked
      1 lb Potatoes, cooked
      1    Onion, chopped
      1 oz Dripping per lb. vegetables
           Salt and pepper
           Milk if necessary
      1    Ring, wrapped in greaseproof
           -paper
 
  Mash the potatoes or pass them through a food mill.  Chop the cabbage
  or kale and add it to the potatoes.  Mix well.  Peel and chop the
  onion. Melt a little of the dripping in a large, heavy frying pan and
  cook the onion in it.  Remove and mix with the potato and cabbage.
  Season to taste, and stir in a little milk if the mixture is too
  stiff.  Add the rest of the dripping to the hot pan and, when very
  hot, turn the potato and cabbage mixture into the pan and spread it
  out.  Fry until brown, then cut it roughly and continue frying until
  there are lots of crisp brown pieces.  Just before serving, slip in
  the wrapped ring -- the trick, as you can see from the rhyme, is to
  make sure the ring doesn't turn up too soon -- then the children will
  eat it all willingly!
  
  (from GOOD FOOD FROM IRELAND, Georgina Campbell)
 
MMMMM

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Irish Mashed Potatoes (Colcannon)
From: Lyndon Watson  (Lyndon Watson)
Date: 27 Mar 97 08:41:16 +1200
--------
(P. Morwood & D. Duane) writes:

>   Nowadays I put the kale
>   into a food processor with the hot milk and blend them into a green

Is there no recipe for fine food that someone won't put through a food
processor and reduce to a mush fit only for the toothless?

>  It is perfectly acceptable just to mix
>   the kale and milk into the potatoes without recourse to the food
>   processor, but the resulting dish is just speckled green.

It's acceptable?  What a relief!  Here was I thinking that the point of
making colcannon was to make something that is good to eat....

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Irish Mashed Potatoes (Colcannon)
From: owlsprng.NOSPAM[at]iol.ie (P. Morwood & D. Duane)
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 1997 07:40:12 GMT
--------
Lyndon Watson wrote:
>Is there no recipe for fine food that someone won't put through a food
>processor and reduce to a mush fit only for the toothless?

(chuckle)  You'll have noticed that there's some variation among the recipes.
Not everybody puts the stuff in the food processor.  I wouldn't, myself. 

Best!  D.

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Irish Mashed Potatoes (Colcannon)
From: this[at]reader.makes.me.doThis (BlackBeard)
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 1997 15:05:59 -0800
--------
Praline@erols wrote:
>  I was taught that Colcannon was a Scots dish and made with
> kale instead of cabbage; the onions chopped or sliced and browned in
> butter and used as a topper.

  I've had it with both.  Last time I was in Ireland My mother made it
slightly different.  She chopped bacon and rendered it in a big skillet. 
Then after mixing the cabbage, onions and mashed spuds etc, she placed the
mixture into the pan with the bacon and grease (some of it was drained
off).  She let it cook for a few more minutes as she packed it all down. 
Then she took the serving dish, inverted the colcannon onto it and served
it like a pie with the tasty bits of bacon on the top and a hint of
browning.  I don't know if this was a regional thing (Kerry) or what, but
it was definately the best I've ever had.

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Meatloaf w/ mashed potatoes and cheese.
From: pthorn[at]ihug.co.nz (Pam Thornbury)
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 1997 10:37:31 GMT
--------
Craig H. Hamre wrote:
>I am looking for a recipe that I found on a catsup bottle about 8 years
>ago. I lost the recipe and would really like to make it again. It was a
>meatloaf (ground beef) with mashed potatoes and cheese on it.

This sounds like 	SHEPHERDS PIE	

Brown 500gms minced or ground beef, brown large onion, put in
casserole.  Add 2 cups beef stock, 2 Tbspns tomato sauce (or catsup),
salt & pepper.  Cook in oven for approx 1hr on 180C.

Thicken with flour.  Allow to cool.

While this is cooking, make mashed potatoes (easy on the milk or cream
- you don't want it to be "sloppy").  Put meat into 2pt oven proof
serving dish or casserole,  spread potato over top, rough up the top
with a fork, sprinkle with cheddar cheese.  Put under grill to heat
through and brown.

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Peruvian mashed potatoes
From: jdeangeo[at]aol.com (JDeanGEO)
Date: 29 Sep 1997 17:30:27 GMT
--------
In a Peruvian restaurant in Denver (now defunct), we had a wonderful
appetizer. It was cold mashed potatoes (yep) with a spicy bright green
sauce on top. The more we ate, the more we liked it. I have searched the
net, but Peruvian recipes are pretty scarce. If you know what this is,
could you post a recipe? Thanks, Jan

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Peruvian mashed potatoes
From: Karen Selwyn 
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 1997 13:54:19 -0700
--------
JDeanGEO wrote:
> In a Peruvian restaurant in Denver (now defunct), we had a wonderful
> appetizer. It was cold mashed potatoes (yep) with a spicy bright green
> sauce on top. 

The spicy, bright green sauce is most likely Chimichurri Sauce.  I have
a bottle of this wonderful condiment in my refrigerator right now.  I
know you're asking for a recipe, but I can only supply a vendor and a
source for the product.

The product I have is called Marilyn G's Chimichurri Table Sauce.  The
product is distributed by Spice Styles, P.O. Box 1134, Pine Grove, CA
95665.  I bought this at The Chile Shop in Santa Fe, NM.  

The Chile Shop has an 800 phone number and does a wonderful job packing
things for shipping.  I have had two orders of assorted food mailed
since my original purchase at the store and everything arrives intact
because of the excellent double-boxed packing job.  

I have no connection with either Spice Styles or with The Chile Shop.

In case you want to experiment on your own, the ingredient list on the
bottle is as follows: wine vinegar, lemon juice, balsamic vinegar, olive
oil, garlic, capers, parsley, red chiles, anchovies, herbs and spices.

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Mashed Potatoe Make-over
From: ggaldia[at]utdallas.edu
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 1997 19:41:00 GMT
--------
I tried this with slight variations. In addition to the ingredients
below, I added 1 can of spinach (no water), 1 package of onion soup
mix and some parmasean cheese. The results were tasty, but I couldn't
quite get them to stay in patty form.

On 21 Oct 1997 05:18:48 -0600, Walter Kasbey wrote:

This was submitted to the Taste of Home magazine by Rosemary Burr of 
Carlsbad California. It is so good I just had to let others have the
recipe.

1 beaten egg
1 tablespoon of flour
2 cups of leftover mashed potatoes
butter
chopped onion 
cheddar cheese

Add egg and flour to leftover mashed potatoes. Shape into thin patties and
place half in a skillet
over melted butter. Put some chopped onion and cheddar cheese on each.
Top with another patty and press to seal the edges. Brown on both
sides. Delicious
--
   Wally Kasbey   
   Orleans Ontario 

~~~
Rec.food.recipes is moderated; only recipes and recipe requests are accepted
for posting.  Please read the "Posting Guidelines" article.  Recipes/requests
go to recipes@rt66.com; questions/comments to tfdpress@acpub.duke.edu.  
Please allow several days for your submission to appear.

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: garlic mashed potatoes
From: csphof[at]yahoo.com
Date: Wed, 01 Apr 1998 14:35:55 -0600
--------
My family and I tried the garlic mashed potatoes the other night and they were
absolutely delicious.  Thanks for such a great idea.

Chris from California

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: garlic mashed potatoes
From: bbbearbb[at]aol.com (BBbearBB)
Date: 4 Apr 1998 18:39:10 GMT
--------
Sounds like your familiy likes garlic   :{D  If so please check out
http://angelfire.com/me/debear  for some Stinkin recipes
Da ßear 
Visit me for some Stinkin Recipes at http://www.angelfire.com/me/debear

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: "Charlie's Smashed Potatoes"
From: rodolan 
Date: 18 Sep 1998 18:56:22 PDT
--------
Does anyone know how to duplicate "Charlie's Smashed Potatoes" .  They are
served at Bugaboo Creek Steak House and are delicious.  Thanks in advance.

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: "Charlie's Smashed Potatoes"
From: seesa2[at]aol.com (Seesa 2)
Date: 21 Sep 1998 03:04:40 GMT
--------
Not sure how Charlie smashes his potatoes, but I make up some tasty taters.

1 Med Onion diced
1 Med Green pepper Diced small
2or 3 cloves garlic smashed
1 tablespoon olive oil
Cook all the above about 5-7 minutes until onion is brown and carmelized.
 You might wait to put in the garlic so it doesnt burn.
Add 1 Teaspoon worchestershire sauce and a splash of tabasco.

Nuke 4-6 Potatoes in the microwave for 12 minutes on High (My Micro is 1000
watt job, check your instructions)
I poke the taters with a fork and wrap em in Paper towels before nuking.
While the taters are piping hot, Half them and scoop out the tater into a bowl,
when all the tart stuff is in the bowl, add 3-5 tablespoons butter (I also
sometimes use leftover bacon drippings for a true cholesterol fest)
Add a good dose of cracked black pepper and about a tsp of salt. Mix with a
fork to break up the taters. Add to the pan with the peppers and onions and mix
throughly. Add more or less butter to taste  (The more the better)

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Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: "Charlie's Smashed Potatoes"
From: A Boles 
Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 20:09:27 GMT
--------
Seesa 2 wrote:
>Nuke 4-6 Potatoes in the microwave for 12 minutes on High (My Micro is 1000
>watt job, check your instructions)

I do about the samething except I bake potatoes in the oven till skin is
really crisp about 1 hour at 375. then after mixing in other ingregients.
Put them back in skins and cover with cheese and back to oven just long
enough to melt cheese.

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Christmas menu (Mashed potatoes and yams)
From: turner[at]reed.edu (Johanna C. Colgrove)
Date: 11 Jan 1999 11:07:24 -0800
--------
Starch basics taken to a new level. 

	Cheese and garlic mashed potatoes 
	(enough for 14 people plus leftovers)

20  Potatoes peeled and boiled until done, drained
1/2 cup Olive oil
Garlic 1 1/2 heads peeled 
3/4 lb fresh finely grated good Parmesan cheese  (don't use pregrated
cheese, it won't melt right on top)
1/2 cup sour cream
1/2 cup cream
salt and pepper

put garlic in olive oil in bakeable small dish. Bake in oven for about 25
minutes. Mash garlic in oil. Mash potatoes

Whip potatoes in stand mixer (sort of have to do two batches with this
many potatoes) adding everything else except reserve about a cup of grated
parmesan.

Butter a large flat casserole dish (ours was an oval about 8" wide at the
widest and 15" long, 3" deep), put potatoes in dish, sprinkle top with
cheese. 

Can be made ahead to this point and refridgerated overnight. Allow to come
to room temp for one hour before baking, then bake in a 375 oven until
everything is brown on top about 45 minutes.


	Sweet Potatoes and yams
2 orange fleshed sweet potatoes (yams)
2 white sweet potatoes
1 head garlic broken apart but not peeled (should have used more)
olive oil
salt and pepper

cut sweet potatoes and yams into 3/4" slices then cut in half if very big,
put in large flat baking dish with garlic, oil liberally, salt and pepper
generously and bake at 350 for about an hour or until done.

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Mashed Potatoes and Cabbage Casserole
From: amandamarx[at]aol.com (AmandaMarx)
Date: 12 Apr 1999 02:45:16 GMT
--------
Wouldn't it be better to add the cabbage to boiling water that doesn't contain
all the starch from the water used to boil potatoes?  Also, what would happen
if you peeled potatoes before placing in water and cutting them in pieces?  

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Cream Cheese & Chives Mashed Potatoes
From: garyl19379[at]aol.com (GaryL19379)
Date: 27 May 1999 02:58:14 GMT
--------
In keeping with your diabetic creamcheese and chives mashed potatoes, once I
became diabetic, I adapted my old, very similar favorite baked potato recipe to
the low fat, low etc. method.  The old way with a baked potato was to use, of
course, only Idaho bakers (russets), bake them in an extremely hot oven until,
when you slice their tops open, they fairly explode.  Then (remember, this is
the old way) gobs of real butter, salt and pepper, real, crisp crumbled bacon,
globs of sour cream, and finally, a garni of chives.  Now with some margarines
tasting almost as good as old time butter (really salty), low fat or no fat
sour cream, and keeping the bacon real since no bacobits yet come close ---
heaven!!!

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Mashed potato pizza crust?
From: Doug Hendry 
Date: Fri, 10 Sep 1999 08:24:41 +0200
--------
Enjoy..

Potato-based pizza.
Cooking temp. 220C

225g(8 oz) potatoes, peeled, cooked, and sieved
50g(2 oz) butter
125g (4oz) self-raising flour
¼ tsp. salt.

Rub the butter into flour and salt, then stir in the potatoes, knead lightly
then place on a well-oiled baking sheet and press into a 10" (25cm) round.
Add your choice of toppings and bake in the top of the oven 25-30 mins or
until the base is firm.

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: mashed potato balls
From: Kelly 
Date: Fri, 08 Oct 1999 20:15:05 GMT
--------
Does anyone know how to make those little seasoned bread crumb coated mashed
potato balls?  Are they deep fried or baked?

Thanks

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: mashed potato balls
From: jynxx6969[at]aol.com (Jynxx6969)
Date: 08 Oct 1999 23:41:05 GMT
--------
Kelly wrote:
>how to make those little seasoned bread crumb coated mashed
>potato balls?  Are they deep fried or baked?

I usually just dip them in egg and seasoned bread crumbs and fry in oil.  A
friend of mine puts a cube of mozzerella cheese in the middle of the potato
ball before she dips and fries :) 

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: mashed potato balls
From: Amalia Freedman 
Date: Mon, 11 Oct 1999 17:53:53 -0700
--------
Jynxx6969 wrote:
> I usually just dip them in egg and seasoned bread crumbs and fry in oil.  A
> friend of mine puts a cube of mozzerella cheese in the middle of the potato
> ball before she dips and fries :)

In some Andean countries, mashed potato balls are sold as street food
stuffed with a cooked and seasoned ground meat mixture, they are
delicious. I have not attempted them at home, but this might be a good
variation if you decide to make a batch. I'm sure you could season with
sautéed onion, garlic and Italian seasoning for starters, and experiment
from there. 

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: better mashed potatoes
From: af[at]homer.com (JF)
Date: Wed, 20 Oct 1999 19:19:02 GMT
--------
Cindy wrote:
>about making mashed potatoes in the microwave.  I guess I figured I'd have
>to boil them like on the stove.  They are really good and easy and I make
>them that way all the time now.
>Cindy

I think you missed the point on the reason why they were better--

They weren't boiled!  Just like any vegetable, boiling strips the
flavor and nutrients from potatoes. Forget the microwave though,
try baking them first. Roasting with a little olive oil on the skins
then mashing is good too. Anything but boiling!

Alex
( master of the mashed potato )

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: better mashed potatoes
From: Cindy 
Date: Thu, 21 Oct 1999 13:22:41 GMT
--------
Yeah, well, I've been married for 26 years and I've always boiled them.  I
learned from my scotch/German grandmother.  She boiled everything.  Where
were you 26 years ago when I was learning to cook.  Although I must admit,
a friend made me mashed potatoes by steaming them so I've been doing it
that way for a couple of years.  Anyway, I like the microwave idea because
it is so quick.  I may try the oven idea when I have lots of time.  I bet
you like mashed potatoes with the skins left on don't you?

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: better mashed potatoes
From: ndooley[at]blue.weeg.uiowa.edu (Nancy Dooley)
Date: Thu, 21 Oct 1999 16:17:59 GMT
--------
>that way for a couple of years.  Anyway, I like the microwave idea because
>it is so quick.  I may try the oven idea when I have lots of time.  I bet

15 minutes in a microwave is quick for mashed potatoes?  You can cook
them in simmering water on top the stove for 15 minutes and they'll be
ready to mash (if they're cut up first)....

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: marinara sauce?  mashed potatoes?
From: pbelci[at]mindspring.com (Jill)
Date: Tue, 26 Oct 1999 17:53:43 -0400
--------
Hi everybody - 

I just got my Foley food mill today!  I am just now cooking down something
like two billion pounds of tomatoes, which I will then put through my new
food mill and freeze.  This weekend I will make applesauce, which I will
serve with roast pork and mashed potatoes.

My questions are:  1) Does anyone have a good recipe for a basic marinara
sauce?  2) Has anyone ever made mashed potatoes using a food mill?  I
normally make my mashed potatoes with aan electric mixer - how do they
differ?

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: marinara sauce?  mashed potatoes?
From: Mary 
Date: Tue, 26 Oct 1999 19:44:56 -0400
--------
Jill...I use a ricer to make "mashed " potatoes....
works great!....I like it better than a masher or
egg beater...

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: marinara sauce?  mashed potatoes?
From: j6505[at]aol.com (J6505)
Date: 27 Oct 1999 10:03:07 GMT
--------
Q # 2 - The best resulting mashed potatoes is achieved with a potato ricer. 
Worst mashed potatoes are done with an electric mixer.

Rick (Caterer)

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: marinara sauce?  mashed potatoes?
From: penmart10[at]aol.com (Sheldon)
Date: 27 Oct 1999 15:12:54 GMT
--------
J6505 writes:

>Q # 2 - The best resulting mashed potatoes is achieved with a potato ricer. 
>Worst mashed potatoes are done with an electric mixer.

That's correct, only a moron would try to mash potatoes with a mixer... I can
picture you pounding yer spud with a Kitchen-Aid stand mixer, betcha it's messy
and yer friggin' arms must get tired... hahahaha, you blithering idiot... and
riced potatoes ain't mashed potatoes!  Yoose better stick to driving yer
catering truck and leave the cooking to those who can. 

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: marinara sauce?  mashed potatoes?
From: pbelci[at]mindspring.com (Jill)
Date: Wed, 27 Oct 1999 18:24:51 -0400
--------
And I beg to differ on the potatoes.  My Mom makes the best mashed
potatoes in the world, and she has always used an electric mixer.  Come to
think of it, I make pretty good mashed myself, and I use a mixer.  I just
wanted to know if you could make decent mashed with ther food mill.

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: Garlic Mashed Potatoes
From: Tillman LJenkins 
Date: Sat, 27 Nov 1999 09:36:39 -0800
--------
I make instant mashed potatoes and then stir in ranch dressing they have it
in all flavors with onion garlic and such tastes pretty good and the kids
love it.

Robin Cowdrey wrote:

Request: Does anyone know a good recipe for garlic mashed potatoes?

The roasted garlic variation will work well.  Roasting really mellows the
garlic flavour so use more if you are a garlic lover.  For a really intense
garlic flavour use raw garlic pushed through a garlic press.  The flavour
will be very different; use only one or two fat cloves.  Unless you like
gluey potatoes, don't use a food processor or electric mixer.  I would leave
out the nutmeg and use the buttermilk with the garlic variation.

I particularly like the roasted garlic or celeriac variation as a topping
for Shepherd's or Cottage Pie.


Mashed Potatoes With Variations

6 medium baking potatoes
1 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoon butter
1/2 cup hot milk or hot buttermilk
  freshly grated nutmeg; optional

Peel and quarter potatoes and place in large pot with just enough cold
water to cover and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Over high heat, bring to a boil;
lower heat to medium low and cook, covered, until very tender, about 20 to
25 minutes. Drain. Mash potatoes, working out all the lumps. Add butter,
1/2 teaspoon salt and milk. Whip with a fork until smooth. Add nutmeg to
taste, if using, and a little more hot milk, if necessary. Serve
immediately or keep warm over a pan of hot water.

VARIATIONS
All quantities are for the basic Mashed Potatoes (recipe above):

HERBED: Add sprigs of fresh herbs, bay leaf or celery tops to the water
while boiling potatoes, if desired add 1 tablespoon finely chopped parsley,
thyme or oregano, or a combination of fresh herbs, while mashing.

ITALIAN: Substitute herbed olive oil for butter and use hot chicken broth
instead of milk.

PESTO: Omit butter; add 1/4 cup grated Parmesan and 1 to 2 tablespoon basil
pesto or sundried tomato pesto.

ROASTED GARLIC: Brush 6 to 10 unpeeled cloves garlic with olive oil and
roast at 3250F for 30 minutes. When cool enough to handle, squeeze garlic
out of skins and add to the potatoes while mashing. Add 1/4 cup grated
Parmesan, if desired.

ROOT VEGETABLE: Use only 4 potatoes and add one of the following: 4 medium
parsnips, peeled and diced; 2 white turnips, of equal size to the potatoes,
peeled and diced; or 1 medium celery root, peeled and diced. Cook with
potatoes. Add an extra pinch of nutmeg

Contributor:  President's Choice Magazine - October, 1998

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: leftover mashed potatoes
From: "Kerith A. Strano" 
Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 03:14:18 -0500
--------
How long do mashed potatoes made w/ butter and milk stay edible if
stored in the fridge?  I have a ton leftover from Thanksgiving and I'm
afraid I missed my freezer ready window.

Any help ia appreciated.

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: leftover mashed potatoes
From: Stan Horwitz 
Date: 30 Nov 1999 12:49:01 GMT
--------
Kerith Strano wrote:
> How long do mashed potatoes made w/ butter and milk stay edible if
> stored in the fridge?

This depends on how well sealed the storage bowl is, but just
use your nose. If the mashed potatoes look okay and smell okay,
then they're fine to eat.

============================

Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
Subject: Re: leftover mashed potatoes
From: gloria p 
Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 16:27:38 -0700
--------
Kerith A. Strano wrote:
> How long do mashed potatoes made w/ butter and milk stay edible if
> stored in the fridge? 

Can't tell you specifically, but as long as they don't have funny looking liquid
in the bottom or a strange odor, taste and see.
In order to microwave them, add a little extra milk and butter, heat and beat
with a fork and the texture improves a lot.  We had some left from Thanksgiving
last night and they were still fine!


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