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Subject: Mashed Potato "Additive"
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: jessie 
Date: 6 Nov 1997 01:58:52 GMT
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Long ago a friend told me of making mashed potatoes ahead of time and 
heating them up when needed. They added something which insured the 
potatoes would still be smooth and creamy when heated and not lumpy. 
Anyone know what that "something" is?? Or have a recipe for a mashed 
potatoe that has been successfully reheated? Thanks, jessie

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From: robert parker 
Date: Wed, 05 Nov 1997 23:23:10 -0500
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I always make my mashed potatoes ahead of time.  Cook and Mash as
normal(whatever favorite method you have), then add a good dollop of
sour cream(depending on how many taters you have) and enought milk to
make them creamy but not gooey.  I make these early on Thanksgiving Day
and re-heat them in the Micro or oven when it has room..works great!
cheers!

LAngel

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From: abraham.23[at]osu.edu (Mad  Madam  Mim)
Date: Fri, 07 Nov 1997 01:19:26 GMT
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On the Subject of Mashed Potatoes:

I don't think there is anything more delicious than fried potato
pancakes for breakfast that have been patted out of last night's
mashed potatoes.   *swoon*

Lorraine

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From: jwalkerh[at]mindspring.com (EEOPro)
Date: Fri, 07 Nov 1997 14:14:40 GMT
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Hi everybody,
I need some ideas for mashed potatoes... my daughter cannot eat any
dairy.  I've tried mashing potatoes with soy margerine only but they
don't have quite the same creaminess.  Any ideas?
Thanx,
Jeny

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From: Cyndi Peters 
Date: Fri, 07 Nov 1997 09:39:52 -0500
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Have you used chicken broth instead of milk?  I hear it great tasting.
I personally use the boiling water mixed with fat free powdered milk.

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From: Doris Dunn 
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 16:52:54 -0800
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For mashed potatoes without dairy rather than mashing them - I whip them
with an electric mixer.  First with a pad of margarine then put in a raw
egg (minus shell) and whip again.  Smooth fantastic whipped potatoes.

I have put fried crisp onion and parmesan cheese into my mash when serving
a meal that does not have gravy.  Fantastic.

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From: penmart10[at]aol.com (Sheldon)
Date: 12 Nov 1997 16:35:04 GMT
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Doris Dunn  writes:

>For mashed potatoes without dairy rather than mashing them - I whip them
>with an electric mixer.  First with a pad of margarine then put in a raw
>egg (minus shell) and whip again.  Smooth fantastic whipped potatoes.
>
>I have put fried crisp onion and parmesan cheese into my mash when serving
>a meal that does not have gravy.  Fantastic.

What point are you making by stating "without dairy"?  You then go on to
describe the parmesan 'cheese' variation, and then add further confusion
with, as being dependant upon the inclusion or ommision of 'gravy'.   Am I
missing something here, or is that why the reference to "Fantastic"?

"For mashed potatoes [without dairy] rather than mashing them-"  Fantastic!

What is the 'dairy/gravy' link, or is there one?

Sheldon ( Who somehow comprehends"mashed rather then mashing". )

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From: Kristin Satterlee 
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 13:27:41 -0600
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It's also a bit confusing why you would go out of your way to make
non-dairy mashed potatoes and then put in egg.  Is the non-dairiness
just a side effect of a wonderful dish we should try on its own merits?

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From: jwalkerh[at]mindspring.com (EEOPro)
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 14:45:49 GMT
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I started this posting because I was having trouble adapting mashed
potatoes to a non-dairy recipe.  My daughter is on an elimination diet
and cannot have dairy or eggs or, or, or...
Thanx for all of the responses!
Jeny

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From: jrg14[at]cornell.edu (Jan)
Date: Fri, 07 Nov 1997 10:51:36 -0400
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I actually have come to enjoy them just mashed thoroughly with the
addition of some of the cooking water. But if you prefer, use soy milk or
rice milk. I think you will find them satisfactory.  Or, you can even use
a tablepoon or two of extra virgin olive oil, a different flavor but nice,
especially with roasted garlic added in. 

Another mashed spud favorite is to cook cubes of rutabaga  with the
potatoes and mash together, just note that rutabaga takes a bit longer to
cook.  We also like cauliflower cooked and mashed with the potatoes.  And
we really like a generous dollop of horseradish mixed in.

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From: janet[at]cogsci.ed.ac.uk (Janet H.)
Date: Mon, 10 Nov 1997 09:54:29 GMT
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What about egg yolks?  Or mayonaise?

I made an egg salad sandwich yesterday, and, for a change, decided to
medium-boil the eggs instead of hard-boiling them.  I found that they
were so creamy that I hardly needed to add mayo.  Nice change.

Or, hey, what about coconut milk/cream?

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From: despina3[at]aol.com (Despina3)
Date: 11 Nov 1997 17:17:06 GMT
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I always add either sour cream or a little cream cheese to my mashed
taters...however, I had a bad experience when I was making them last night. 
When living in Paris, my host-mom made INCREDIBLE mashed potatoes that tasted
really different.  I think I understood her properly when she explained how to
make them...she said (I think!)  that she cooked celery and then mashed em in
with the potatoes.  I steamed the crap out of my celery last night...like for
20 minutes, and it was soft but still a little firm.  I even used a hand-mixer
to try to get it to incorporate into the mashed potatoes.  There were still
little threads everywhere.  Has anyone heard of this recipe, or do you know of
a solution?   Maybe I just mis-translated!

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From: Mary Elizabeth 
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 12:38:30 -0500
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Despina3 wrote:
>  I always add either sour cream or a little cream cheese to my mashed
>  taters...however, I had a bad experience when I was making them last night.
>  When living in Paris, my host-mom made INCREDIBLE mashed potatoes that tasted
>  really different.  I think I understood her properly when she explained how to
>  make them...she said (I think!)  that she cooked celery and then mashed em in
>  with the potatoes.  I steamed the crap out of my celery last night...like for
>  20 minutes, and it was soft but still a little firm.  I even used a hand-mixer
>  to try to get it to incorporate into the mashed potatoes.  There were still
>  little threads everywhere.  Has anyone heard of this recipe, or do you know of
>  a solution?   Maybe I just mis-translated!

Maybe your mom strained the celery first, or used a food mill?

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From: Steve 
Date: 11 Nov 1997 13:11:32 -0500
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Despina3 wrote:
> When living in Paris, my host-mom made INCREDIBLE mashed potatoes that tasted
> really different.  I think I understood her properly when she explained how to
> make them...she said (I think!)  that she cooked celery and then mashed em in
> with the potatoes.

The dish you are thinking of is mashed potatoes and celery root (celeriac).

Celeriac has a flavor very much like celery stalks but a texture more like  
that of potatoes. It is from a plant related to the common US celery, but 
the plant is grown for the roots and not the stalks.

The root is round, a little bigger than a baseball. It is light brown
and covered with little rootlets. A very bizare looking vegetable. The 
inside is a creamy white color. Peel with a paring knife and cut into
chunks the same size as your potato pieces. Cook for about as long as you 
cook your potato (until fork tender). Try using half potatoes, half
celeriac and follow your standard mashed potato recipe. Adjust to your
taste.

Once peeled, celeriac should be used fairly soon. The exposed white edges 
oxidize and turn black (like a cut potato).

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From: kate[at]wwa.com (Kate)
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 18:33:26 GMT
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Despina3 wrote:
> I always add either sour cream or a little cream cheese to my mashed
> taters...however, I had a bad experience when I was making them last night. 
> When living in Paris, my host-mom made INCREDIBLE mashed potatoes that tasted
> really different.  I think I understood her properly when she explained how to
> make them...she said (I think!)  that she cooked celery and then mashed em in
> with the potatoes. 

I haven't tried this myself but it sounds like a decent idea. I think steamed 
celery is totally tasteless.  You need to braise celery in some liquid, a good 
broth with possibly some chopped onions or what ever you have on hand for 20 
to 30 minutes.  Use the inner stalks (celery hearts) or, if you *have* to use 
the outer stalks, remove the fiberous strings before cooking.  The strings are 
easily removed but this is unnecessary if you use the inner part which is more 
tender.  You might want to run the celery through a food mill or partially 
puree before adding to the mashed potatoes.

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From: Kris Johansson 
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 12:03:16 -0800
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Perhaps it was celery root (also known as celeriac, I think) instead of
celery.

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From: Noa M. Rensing 
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 1997 09:40:25 -0500
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The celery in question is almost certainly celery root, used widely in
Europe in combination with other root vegetables (potatoes, turnips,
parsnips, etc.). Most Europeans mean the root when they just say celery,
and specify the green kind if they want that. While the plants are
related, I believe different varieties are grown for the two uses.
Celery root is becoming available in the states. Here (Boston) most
supermarkets carry it at least some of the time. In some places you may
need to go to a gourmet grocery to find it.

Another common recipe for celery root is grated in remoulade sauce (cole
slaw dressing will do).

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Subject: Mashed Potatoes & Celery Root Recipe
From: Allison Wise 
Date: 20 Nov 1997 08:00:49 GMT
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I'm pretty sure this is from Anthony Diaz Blue's Thanksgiving Cookbook and it makes 
enough for a crowd!
Mashed Potatoes and Celery Root
2 lbs celery root
4 lbs potatoes
1/2 lb (2 sticks) unsalted butter
1 cup half-and-half
2 teaspoons salt
Freshly ground white pepper
Peel the celery root and cut into 3/4-inch cubes.  Place in a bowl with cold water to 
cover and reserve.  Put about 2 quarts water into a medium-size pot.  Peel the potatoes 
and cut them into 3/4-inch cubes.  As you finish each potato, drop the cubes into the pot.  
When you have finished, adjust the amount of water so that the potatoes are covered by 2 
inches of water.  Add 1 teaspoon of salt and bring to a boil.  Boil the potatoes for 5 
minutes, then add the drained celery root.  Reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 12 
minutes, or till tender.  Drain.  Place the vegetables in a food porcessor fitted with the 
metal blade and puree for a few seconds, or use a potato ricer.  Add the butter, 
half-and-half, the 2 teaspoons salt, and pepper to taste, then process for a few more 
seconds.  Return the potatoes and celery root to the pot and stir over medium heat.  Serve 
immediately.  Makes 12 cups (16 3/4-cup servings)

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From: P h i l 
Date: Sun, 09 Nov 1997 11:25:32 -0700
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chicken broth and herbs?

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From: lwcollier[at]aol.com (Lisa)
Date: 10 Nov 1997 23:00:54 GMT
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I make mashed potatoes by mixing the potatoes with warm milk.  To make them
more special, I sometimes add crispy fried pieces of chopped onion, and
chopped parsley.

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From: decaro[at]ohsu.edu (Marcia DeCaro)
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 20:31:44 GMT
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The swanson chicken broth cans suggest that you can cut your fat intake by 
using chicken broth instead of butter/milk etc.  I haven't tried it, but plan 
to.  Maybe that would work for you.

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From: Antidisestablishmentarianism 
Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 16:03:45 -0600
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Try getting a pound of TOFU and whirring it up with a blender then a
hand mixer combined with the potatoes, should be creamy and 
nutritionally loaded with protein.

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From: jwalkerh[at]mindspring.com (EEOPro)
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 1997 03:24:54 GMT
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Anti,
I tried it tonite.  The mashed potatoes were mahhhhhhvelous!  Thanx
for the advice!
Jeny

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From: Sharon 
Date: Thu, 06 Nov 1997 15:20:31 GMT
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jessie wrote:
>Long ago a friend told me of making mashed potatoes ahead of time and 
>heating them up when needed. They added something which insured the 
>potatoes would still be smooth and creamy when heated and not lumpy. 
>Anyone know what that "something" is?? Or have a recipe for a mashed 
>potatoe that has been successfully reheated? Thanks, jessie

You could try putting a light layer of milk or cream on top of the
mashed potatoes to avoid forming a skin. Before you re-heat them,just
stir in the milk.

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From: jutzee[at]aol.com (JUTZEE)
Date: 7 Nov 1997 13:43:29 GMT
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At Christmas I always make my mashed potatoes hours before we actually eat.  I
don't want the mess and lack the last minute time when feeding 18 people.  I
put the prepared potatoes in a microwave safe covered container and just heat
them while getting the dinner set out.  They seem to get even lighter in
consistency.  Stir them before serving.  I do not refrigerate them but keep
them at room temperature until reheating.  I add nothing special, just the
milk, S&P, etc.  I wouldn't suggest leaving them out overnight though.  

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From: Chloie Parsons 
Date: Thu, 6 Nov 1997 10:56:24 -0800
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Hmmm. I made some m.p.s that turned out really good the other night.
Totaly light and fluffy. The only thing out of the norm that I did was
poured the boiled-till-soft potato cubes on top of some cold leftover
m.p.s from the night before. Then I mashed the dickens out of 'em,
stirred in some milk and a dab of butter, then topped with paprika.
Normally, I don't have any leftovers, but in this case I didn't have
enough to feed the gang so I add more to the cold leftovers. Maybe it was 
the two day old m.p added to the new m.p. that made them so fluffy.
Totally happy. =)  

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From: Cyndi Peters 
Date: Fri, 07 Nov 1997 09:05:23 -0500
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I make mine up as usual then put in my slow cooker (West Bend) on 1 they
stay great and warm until dinner time.  Great for a big crowd.  I've also
heard to make them in the top of a double boiler and the water in the
bottom keeps them in great shape!  ;^)  Cyndi

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From: brawny[at]nononsense.com (Bill)
Date: Sat, 08 Nov 1997 00:05:54 GMT
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Cyndi Peters wrote:
>I make mine up as usual then put in my slow cooker (West Bend) on 1 they
>stay great and warm until dinner time. 

Same here...I use my crockpot  on low and it is perfect every time.  

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From: whimsey[at]mindspring.com (Whimsey)
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 1997 07:26:32 GMT
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My "secret" additive is a dollop of mayonnaise or salad dressing. Yup!
That's right! Makes perfect mashed potatoes everytime!


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