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Subject: Mashed potatoes ahead of time?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 18:34:39 -0500
--------
This year, I really want to avoid the last minute flusters.

However, I want everything to be really good.

On the good side, I am only cooking for 4--but of course we have to have 
enough leftovers for everyone to take home.

Is there a way to make homemade mashed potatoes ahead of time and have them 
be just as good? Or is that the one thing, along with the bread, that I need 
to do just before serving? I'm using russets if that matters. Thanks! 

============================

From: pfoley 
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 23:45:47 GMT
--------
I have made them a little ahead of time before large dinners a few times
now, and put them in a crock pot on warm.  I spray the crock pot with Pam
and then pile the mashed potatoes high in the center, so they don't touch
the sides and burn.  Sometimes I put a little milk in first, so they don't
dry out.  They have been fine.  Just make sure your crock pot is on warm;
not low or high or they will burn.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 13:49:14 -0500
--------
pfoley wrote:
> I have made them a little ahead of time before large dinners a few times
> now, and put them in a crock pot on warm.

Sounds reasonable! However, I took my crock pot to my sister-in-law's two
years ago and she never brought it back! 

============================

From: aem 
Date: 20 Dec 2006 15:47:28 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
> Is there a way to make homemade mashed potatoes ahead of time and have them
> be just as good? Or is that the one thing, along with the bread, that I need
> to do just before serving? I'm using russets if that matters. Thanks!

Make them as late as you can, stick them in the oven to warm when it's
available after taking out the turkey or ham or roast.  The most
important thing is that the Gravy must be piping hot.  That's much more
important than the spuds, at least at my house.  After the first
service, go reheat the gravy for those who want seconds.   -aem

============================

From: pfoley 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 11:27:22 GMT
--------
aem wrote:
>   The most
> important thing is that the Gravy must be piping hot.  That's much more
> important than the spuds, at least at my house.  After the first
> service, go reheat the gravy for those who want seconds.   -aem

I use a gravy thermos server for keeping my gravy hot on the table, and  I
have good luck with that.  I agree, the gravy must be hot.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 13:50:55 -0500
--------
aem wrote:
> Make them as late as you can, stick them in the oven to warm when it's
> available after taking out the turkey or ham or roast.  The most
> important thing is that the Gravy must be piping hot.  That's much more
> important than the spuds, at least at my house.  After the first
> service, go reheat the gravy for those who want seconds.   -aem

Sounds doable! And ... this year will be the unveiling of my Newly
Acquired Gravy-making Skill! Hahaha! I am going to wow them with
this gravy. 

============================

From: Stan Horwitz 
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 19:01:52 -0500
--------
cybercat wrote:
> Is there a way to make homemade mashed potatoes ahead of time and have them 
> be just as good? Or is that the one thing, along with the bread, that I need 
> to do just before serving? I'm using russets if that matters. Thanks! 

Sure. Just cook the mashed potatoes the day before. Make them a bit dry, 
then a few minutes before you're ready to server, add a bit of milk and 
butter, put them in a microwave safe serving bowl, nuke for a few 
minutes, stir thoroughly, then nuke a few more minutes

============================

From: projectilevomitchick[at]netzero.com
Date: 20 Dec 2006 18:45:13 -0800
--------
Stan Horwitz wrote:
> Sure. Just cook the mashed potatoes the day before. Make them a bit dry,
> then a few minutes before you're ready to server, add a bit of milk and
> butter, put them in a microwave safe serving bowl, nuke for a few
> minutes, stir thoroughly, then nuke a few more minutes

In what way is that more convenient than just making the mashed
potatoes at the dinner time?

============================

From: jennyskeptic[at]yahoo.com
Date: 20 Dec 2006 19:12:42 -0800
--------
projectilevomitchick wrote:
> In what way is that more convenient than just making the mashed
> potatoes at the dinner time?

She wouldn't have to peel, boil and whip them when company is there (no
pan for boiling, no mixer to clean up).  It would make things
significantly more convenient.  Nuking them would only keep her away
from her guests for a few moments.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 13:58:10 -0500
--------
projectilevomitchick wrote:
> In what way is that more convenient than just making the mashed
> potatoes at the dinner time?

You could not get four people together who would eat what you cook IF you 
cooked, scrofulous one.

And this post demonstrates it. 

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 20:49:07 -0600
--------
Stan Horwitz wrote:
>Sure. Just cook the mashed potatoes the day before. Make them a bit dry, 
>then a few minutes before you're ready to server, add a bit of milk and 
>butter, put them in a microwave safe serving bowl, nuke for a few 
>minutes, stir thoroughly, then nuke a few more minutes

Oh, I don't know about that.

Twice cooked potatoes always taste very different from
freshly cooked ones!

I think the other suggestions about how to keep them warm
for a while might be a better way to go.  However, I don't
think there is anything that will make them taste like they
were just mashed. . . .

============================

From: notbob 
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 21:03:42 -0600
--------
Alan Moorman wrote:
> for a while might be a better way to go.  However, I don't
> think there is anything that will make them taste like they
> were just mashed. . . .

Where's those latino high school students when you need 'em?

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 14:00:28 -0500
--------
Alan Moorman wrote
> I think the other suggestions about how to keep them warm
> for a while might be a better way to go.  However, I don't
> think there is anything that will make them taste like they
> were just mashed. . . .

That was really my question. I think I can make everything else
ahead of time, and do the potatoes the minute before we eat. 

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 21:24:21 -0600
--------
Stan Horwitz wrote:
> Sure. Just cook the mashed potatoes the day before. Make them a bit dry, 
> then a few minutes before you're ready to server, add a bit of milk and 
> butter, put them in a microwave safe serving bowl, nuke for a few 
> minutes, stir thoroughly, then nuke a few more minutes

I agree...

I've personally never had an issue eating leftover refrigerated mashed 
potatoes that way. Reheated with the "extras" and mixed well, they are 
just as good.

Personally, I'm doing whipped butternut squash instead and I have every 
intention of doing those the day ahead. 

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 10:31:26 -0600
--------
Omelet wrote:
>I've personally never had an issue eating leftover refrigerated mashed 
>potatoes that way. Reheated with the "extras" and mixed well, they are 
>just as good.

I like them reheated, the next day, too.

However, I think the OP wanted them to appear as fresh and
'just made' so there IS a limit to what you can do to them
and still keep that freshness. . .

>Personally, I'm doing whipped butternut squash instead and I have every 
>intention of doing those the day ahead. 

That sounds good!

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 13:57:06 -0600
--------
Alan Moorman wrote:
> However, I think the OP wanted them to appear as fresh and
> 'just made' so there IS a limit to what you can do to them
> and still keep that freshness. . .

"Freshness"?

Ok.

> >Personally, I'm doing whipped butternut squash instead and I have every 
> >intention of doing those the day ahead. 

I plan to keep it simple. IMHO butternut does not need much help.
Just a little butter and a smidgin of 4 color fresh ground pepper.

============================

From: notbob 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 14:16:50 -0600
--------
Omelet wrote:

> "Freshness"?

Yep.  

Day old mashed potatoes suck.  Do you ever hear, "Anyone for day
old mashed potatoes"?  Hell, no.  What you get are potato pancakes and
gnocchi and other lame derivitives.  Other than peeling the potatoes,
how much time does it take?  It's not like you have to stand there and
watch them boil.  Mashing?  Three whole minutes at the most.  If you
don't have time to make fresh mashed potatoes, your meal can't be much.

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 14:27:39 -0600
--------
notbob wrote:
> Day old mashed potatoes suck. 

Hm, sounds like someone did not make them right...

Mom's refrigerated, re-heated, mashed potatoes were always good.
She made large batches so that there _would_ be leftovers to eat plain 
with butter, or with gravy, and added to eggs to make potato pancakes.

They've always tasted fine to me.....

But if the OP is not sure, they should experiment ahead of time. They 
still have 4 days.

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 16:43:31 -0600
--------
notbob wrote:
>Day old mashed potatoes suck.

Day old mashed potatoes can be delicious.   

Usually are, in fact!

(Not that we ever have left-overs!)

However, my mom used to fry mashed potato patties the next
day.  They were fine!

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 13:51:55 -0500
--------
Stan Horwitz wrote :
> Sure. Just cook the mashed potatoes the day before. Make them a bit dry,
> then a few minutes before you're ready to server, add a bit of milk and
> butter, put them in a microwave safe serving bowl, nuke for a few
> minutes, stir thoroughly, then nuke a few more minutes

I guess you have done this. But would you say they are as good as
they are when first made? Probably not. 

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: 20 Dec 2006 16:08:53 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
> Is there a way to make homemade mashed potatoes ahead of time and have them
> be just as good? Or is that the one thing, along with the bread, that I need
> to do just before serving? I'm using russets if that matters.

Gently blend your mashed potatoes with well caramelized onions.  With
wet hands form into patties (about 3" diam x 3/4" thk), coat with egg
wash and fine cracker crumbs or matzo meal.  Gently fry potato patties
in vegetable oil until golden brown on both sides.  Place patties in
fridge until time to reheat... reheat on a sheet pan in med oven.
Caramelized onions may be omited, but why...

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 13:47:43 -0500
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Gently blend your mashed potatoes with well caramelized onions.  With
> wet hands form into patties (about 3" diam x 3/4" thk), coat with egg
> wash and fine cracker crumbs or matzo meal.  Gently fry potato patties
> in vegetable oil until golden brown on both sides.  Place patties in
> fridge until time to reheat... reheat on a sheet pan in med oven.
> Caramelized onions may be omited, but why...

This sounds awesome, Sheldon! Thanks. 

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: 21 Dec 2006 11:30:44 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
> This sounds awesome, Sheldon! Thanks.

You can even make a bunch extra and freeze them.  Just don't whip the
potatoes, mash them, minimally... real mashed potatoes still have a few
lumps... if it's prfectly smooth you're after than may as well use
dehys, and even dehys when prepared correctly are better than
whipped... whipped is like eating library paste.

Those potato cakes are great as is, or blend with half flaked cod fish
to make wonderful fish cakes... or fold mashed potatoes with flaked
canned salmon and make fried patties or bake in a greased loaf pan.

If you feel artistic:

timbale  [TIHM-buhl, tihm-BAHL]
1. A mold, generally high-sided, drum-shaped and slightly tapered at
the bottom and closed end, used to bake various dishes. 2. A dish -
usually based on custard, FORCEMEAT or RISOTTO combined with meat,
fish, vegetables, cheese, etc. - baked in such a mold. The dish is
unmolded and often served as an entrée (and sometimes as a first
course) with a sauce such as BÉCHAMEL. 3. A pastry shell made by
dipping a timbale iron first into a batter, then into deep, hot fat.
When the crisp pastry is pushed off the iron and cooled, it can be
filled with a sweet or savory mixture. Timbale irons come in various
sizes and shapes such as hearts, stars and butterflies. They're
available in specialty cookware stores.

© Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.
---

http://www.amazon.com/Nordic-Ware-Swedish-Rosette-Timbale/dp/B00004RFPJ/

http://www.jbprince.com/professional-culinary-molds/molds.asp

============================

From: Ward Abbott 
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 20:44:09 -0500
--------
cybercat wrote:
>Is there a way to make homemade mashed potatoes ahead of time and have them 
>be just as good?

Dear....this is mashed potatoes....not landing a lunar orbiter. What
is the difficulty in making a common side dish?    

============================

From: jennyskeptic[at]yahoo.com
Date: 20 Dec 2006 18:08:17 -0800
--------
When entertaining, I peel and quarter my potatoes the day/night before
and keep them covered in a large pot of water.  You still have to boil
them and whip the potatoes, but it's not very much last minute work.

Also, I always warm up my milk/cream before mixing.  It seems to make
them fluffier.

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: 20 Dec 2006 18:45:18 -0800
--------
jennyskeptic wrote:
> When entertaining, I peel and quarter my potatoes the day/night before
> and keep them covered in a large pot of water.  You still have to boil
> them and whip the potatoes, but it's not very much last minute work.

Yeah, but, whipped potatoes are not mashed potatoes... very different.

If I was concerned about made in advance that just needed reheating,
and there was leeway on whether mashed or whipped or whatever, then I
may as well do something really good... I'd prepare potato k'nish, or
potato blintz, or better yet potatonik.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 13:54:39 -0500
--------
Ward Abbott wrote:
> Dear....this is mashed potatoes....not landing a lunar orbiter. What
> is the difficulty in making a common side dish?

Sugartits ... I was asking if there is a trick to making them ahead AND 
having them be just as good as when they are newly made. Here's hoping you 
got your icky rocks off on this little masturbatory condescension exercise. 
Happily, you didn't get any on me. So I can let you live. This time.

ASSHOLE.

And Merry Christmas to All!

============================

From: King's Crown 
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 18:39:30 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
> Is there a way to make homemade mashed potatoes ahead of time and have 
> them be just as good? Or is that the one thing, along with the bread, that 
> I need to do just before serving? I'm using russets if that matters. 

I know what you mean.... this year at Thanksgiving I wanted to avoid the 
cold semi reheated mashed potato problem and tried something new.  Afterthe 
usual preparation and mashing I put them in my crockpot on low.  They were 
there probably only an hour, but they were hot and OH so good with each 
refill of the mashed potato bowl.

Lynne 

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 13:56:14 -0500
--------
King's Crown wrote:
> I know what you mean.... this year at Thanksgiving I wanted to avoid the 
> cold semi reheated mashed potato problem and tried something new. 
> Afterthe usual preparation and mashing I put them in my crockpot on low. 
> They were there probably only an hour, but they were hot and OH so good 
> with each refill of the mashed potato bowl.

Oh, mann! I NEED to get my crockpot back! 

============================

From: projectilevomitchick[at]netzero.com
Date: 20 Dec 2006 18:43:34 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
> Is there a way to make homemade mashed potatoes ahead of time and have them
> be just as good? Or is that the one thing, along with the bread, that I need
> to do just before serving? I'm using russets if that matters. Thanks!

Yet another example of how you are dumb as a fucking post.  You can't
manage to fix dinner for 4-6 people without getting all flustered about
the goddamned mashed potatoes?  Do everyone a favor and just stick your
head in the fucking oven, cunt.

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: 20 Dec 2006 18:47:06 -0800
--------
projectilevomitch...@netzero.com wrote:
> Yet another example of how you are dumb as a fucking post.  You can't
> manage to fix dinner for 4-6 people without getting all flustered about
> the goddamned mashed potatoes?  Do everyone a favor and just stick your
> head in the fucking oven, cunt.

Um, that's cybercunt. hehe

============================

From: Omelet 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 12:53:18 -0600
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> Um, that's cybercunt. hehe

Gee, and I thought you did not like CC. ;-)

============================

From: projectilevomitchick[at]netzero.com
Date: 21 Dec 2006 21:02:30 -0800
--------
Sheldon wrote:
 
> Um, that's cybercunt. hehe

Right-O....lol

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Fri, 22 Dec 2006 13:32:01 -0500
--------
projectilevomitchick wrote:
> Right-O....lol

Any port in a storm, eh, witless?

hahahahaha!

You'll be sitting in your roachy flat with pee stains
in your underwear, heating up a Swanson's and
remembering bitter childhood memories.

From when you were in the decaying bosom of the Vomit family.

You don't cook.

You don't COOK!

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 13:57:22 -0500
--------
projectilevomitchick wrote:
> Yet another example of how you are dumb as a fucking post.  You can't
> manage to fix dinner for 4-6 people without getting all flustered about
> the goddamned mashed potatoes?  Do everyone a favor and just stick your
> head in the fucking oven, cunt.

Your mother must be so proud. :D 

============================

From: yetanotherBob 
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 22:17:25 -0500
--------
cybercat says...
> Is there a way to make homemade mashed potatoes ahead of time and have them 
> be just as good? Or is that the one thing, along with the bread, that I need 
> to do just before serving? I'm using russets if that matters. Thanks! 
 
I regularly make "smashed potatoes" in large quantities and have them as 
leftovers one or two days (or more) after the fact.  IMO they're as good 
or better in their latter incarnations than the first time around.  I 
use a double boiler to reheat, very gently, allowing enough time for 
simmering water to reheat the potatoes.

First, I would ditch the russets.  They're OK if you're making 
"whipped" potatoes, but they don't seem to work for "smashed" potatoes, 
and don't seem to reheat nearly as well.  Get some small, thin-skinned 
white or red "new" potatoes and use them instead.  Cut the bigger ones 
up as needed to make them all fairly uniform in size.  Do not peel the 
potatoes.  

Drop the potatoes into a pot of boiling water, and cook for around 20 
minutes after boiling resumes.  Test for done-ness with a fork.  When 
the potatoes yield to the fork, drain the water off, add your seasonings 
and smash them with a masher, stout whisk, large fork, or whatever.  
You're not aiming for whipped smoothness, but literally "smashing" them.  
Lumps are just fine.

I'll add a bit of salt, a good-sized lump of butter, some sour cream, 
roasted garlic or garlic powder, some horseradish and a bit of dill weed 
prior to smashing, and add liquid from the sour cream and/or whey from 
yogurt as needed to adjust the consistency while smashing.

These are quick, not finicky to make, and delicious.  I'm not sure you'd 
really even have to make them very far ahead of time.  If you do them an 
hour or two ahead and keep them warm in a covered container, they should 
be just fine.  You could add a dab of butter and a sprinkling of dill 
weed to them when you put them in the bowl for the table to "refresh" 
them.

============================

From: Terry Pulliam Burd 
Date: Wed, 20 Dec 2006 19:29:45 -0800
--------
cybercat rummaged among random neurons and opined:
>Is there a way to make homemade mashed potatoes ahead of time and have them 
>be just as good? Or is that the one thing, along with the bread, that I need 
>to do just before serving? I'm using russets if that matters. Thanks! 

I make a dish called "Chantilly Potatoes" that I make a day or two
ahead and the potatoes are just fine. I'd modify it for your use by
leaving out the cheese (the "trick," IMHO, is the cream, which both
enriches the potatoes and seals them):

@@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

Chantilly Potatoes

vegetables

4 whole potatoes; quartered
3 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  salt
  pepper

Boil potatoes until tender. Mash with butter and 1/4 cup cream. Season
with salt and pepper. Whip the remaining 1/4 cup cream until stiff.
Spread mashed potatoes in a greased 1-1/2 quart baking dish. Spread
whipped cream over the mashed potatoes; sprinkle with grated Parmesan
cheese. Bake at 475 degrees until the cheese melts and the top is
golden brown, about 20 minutes.

Contributor:  Elizabeth Powell

Yield: 8 servings

============================

From: kilikini 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 07:23:50 -0500
--------
Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
> I make a dish called "Chantilly Potatoes" that I make a day or two
> ahead and the potatoes are just fine.

This sounds really good, Terry!  Thanks for posting it.  The recipe is
saved.

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2006 06:31:24 -0600
--------
cybercat wrote:
>Is there a way to make homemade mashed potatoes ahead of time and have
>them be just as good? Or is that the one thing, along with the bread,
>that I need to do just before serving? I'm using russets if that
>matters. Thanks! 

There's no free lunch!

There's no crying in baseball!

AND

There's no such thing as ahead of time mashed potatoes!
If they're mashed potatoes, it's time. DUH!!!

:)

============================

From: denise~* 
Date: 20 Dec 2006 22:37:03 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
> Is there a way to make homemade mashed potatoes ahead of time and have them
> be just as good? Or is that the one thing, along with the bread, that I need
> to do just before serving? I'm using russets if that matters. Thanks!

Make them just as you would normally, put them in a cassarole dish that
has a glass top. Refrigerate.  Put them in the oven with the
turkey/ham/whatever for an hour (or so) till warm.
I did this for thanksgiving & they turned out just fine, cept I used a
glazed ceramic apple baker.

============================

From: "-L." 
Date: 20 Dec 2006 23:38:48 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
> Is there a way to make homemade mashed potatoes ahead of time and have them
> be just as good? Or is that the one thing, along with the bread, that I need
> to do just before serving? I'm using russets if that matters. Thanks!

I make them the day before, than an hour to 90 minutes before serving,
nuke them a little bit and throw thwem into the crok on warm.  My
"warm" is pretty hot though, so you may want to give it a little more
time.  Good luck!

============================

From: myrl_jeffcoat[at]yahoo.com
Date: 21 Dec 2006 23:06:39 -0800
--------
I had a large bunch at my house for Thanksgiving.  I was like you, and
wanting to avoid the last minute jitters, where everything has to be
hot at the same time.

The secret is crockpots, and crockpot liners.

My house is small.  I only have 4 burners, and one oven.  But I have a
portable roaster oven which I use during holidays.

I managed to have the turkey in my regular oven.  And a ham in the
portable roaster oven, which was going out in my garage (next to the
kitchen).

I had three crockpots going out there on my counter as well.

After I mashed the potatoes, I put them in one crockpot (with the
disposable liner).  I had also made the Harvest Potatoes, which are the
blend of regular potatoes, yams, spices, cheese, etc.  They went into
the second crockpot.

In the third crock pot, I had the gravy which I had going.  This crock
pot didn't have a disposable liner.

When it came time to serve.  I set my daughter to carving the turkey,
while I went out to the garage grabbed the two disposable bags of
different potatoes, and turned them inside out into the serving bowls.

I was really glad to see how easily that worked out.  The only thing
that really took attention at the last moment, was my vegetable dish.
I had made a nice platter, which had a small hollowed out pumpkin,
which I had stuffed with steamed baby carrots, with italian seasoning,
butter, and grated parmesan.  I had placed the little pumpkin on a bed
of stir fried mushrooms, and then taken my green beans with bacon and
slivered almonds, and filled up the remainder of the platter.  It was
really quite pretty.  Even the kids ate vegetables that day;-)

It was so nice to not worry about the potatoes which had been prepared
and completed about an hour before hand, and kept warm in those
crockpots.

I think it is also very important to take the stress out of the day, by
chopping, dicing, and prepping as much as possible the day before.

I usually chop or dice any bell peppers, onions, celery, etc. the
previous day, while I'm baking pies, etc.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Fri, 22 Dec 2006 13:29:20 -0500
--------
myrl_jeffcoat wrote:
> I had a large bunch at my house for Thanksgiving.  I was like you, and
> wanting to avoid the last minute jitters, where everything has to be
> hot at the same time.
>
> The secret is crockpots, and crockpot liners.

Thanks, Myrl. You see what I was getting at! Since I am crockless
(so to speak) at the moment, and am cooking for so few, I am
going to make the mashed potatoes at the last minute. But next year
I will have the crockpot! This year I am making everything else ahead
of time except the rolls. And I do mean platters of sliced ham and
turkey that have been wrapped in foil and reheated! Candied yams
and stuffing made in corning ware and reheated slowly, too! As long
as the gravy is good and piping hot, and the collards are steaming,
and the butter is melting on the biscuits everyone will be happy!!

Merry Christmas!!

Happy Yule!

Joyous Scrooge Day!

Whatever's your pleasure .... ;) 


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