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Subject: Garlic Mashed Potatoes - SC [and sub thread]
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Ronda L. Carnicelli 
Date: Thu, 30 Aug 2001 19:02:43 GMT
--------
The September issue of Seasoned Cooking is now online. Below is just one of
the great garlic recipes that are being offered in the new issue. For more
kitchen ideas and recipes, visit this month's free online issue at
http://seasoned.com/.

*Garlic Mashed Potatoes*

2 lbs potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
1 clove elephant garlic
2 tbsp. butter
Cream or milk

Place the potato chunks in a large pot and cover with enough water to cook.
Add the clove of garlic. Bring to a boil over medium heat and cook until the
potatoes are easily pierced with a fork, about 30 minutes.  Drain the water
from the pot, reserving a little for mashing.  Add the butter and mash with
a potato masher, adding cream or milk until the desired consistency is
obtained.  Serve hot as an accompaniment with roast beef, turkey or chicken.

Yields: 4 servings
Preparation Time: 35 minutes


*Also in this month's issue:

- Simple crab quiche for your breakfast table
- Delicious chocolate recipes that are sure to please
- A review and recommendation of Quackwatch.com
- A treat of grilled grayling over an open flame
- AND MUCH MORE!

----------------------------------------
Ronda L. Carnicelli (ronda@seasoned.com)
Editor-in-Chief, Seasoned Cooking
http://www.seasoned.com/

============================

From: Paul M. Cookę« 
Date: Thu, 30 Aug 2001 19:06:40 GMT
--------
Pardon me for saying this but this recipe sounds absolutely dreadful as far
as garlic is concerned.  Good smashed potatoes but not garlic smashed
potatoes.  Elephant garlic is so delicate it would easily be hidden in this
dish.  I use about 20-30 cloves of garlic which I simmer slowly in milk
until very soft and then add to the potatoes and either mash or whip.

============================

From: siena 
Date: Thu, 30 Aug 2001 21:43:43 +0200
--------
Has anyone tested the written recipe?  1 clove of garlic for 2#
of potatoes?  Maybe 1 head of garlic but not a clove.  Next is
just ease of reading, why phrase the first 2 sentences the way
you did?  Couldn't you just say Place the potatoes and garlic in
a large pot with enough water to cover.

Just my 2 lire worth.

Cristina

============================

From: Trinker 
Date: Thu, 30 Aug 2001 15:30:06 -0700
--------
siena wrote:
> Has anyone tested the written recipe?  1 clove of garlic for 2#
> of potatoes?  Maybe 1 head of garlic but not a clove.

Well...the recipe *does* say "elephant garlic", which is that
allium variety (not strictly garlic, as I understand it) where
the head is the size of a softball (a bocce ball?), and the clove
would be the size of a pingpong ball or thereabouts.  But 
elephant garlic is very mild compared to the usual "garlic" that
everyone knows, so it seems like a strange recipe to me, too.

Maybe it's for those people for whom even a tiny amount of
garlic seems like a lot?

============================

From: Kat Frass 
Date: Thu, 30 Aug 2001 20:00:59 GMT
--------
DH and I actually prefer to roast a head of garlic in the oven with some
olive oil, and then smoosh the soft cloves into standard mashed potatoes
(made with milk and butter of course!).  Wonderful flavor.

============================

From: Dimitri 
Date: Thu, 30 Aug 2001 22:36:48 GMT
--------
Ronda L. Carnicelli wrote:
> The September issue of Seasoned Cooking is now online. Below is just one of
> the great garlic recipes that are being offered in the new issue. For more
> kitchen ideas and recipes, visit this month's free online issue at
> http://seasoned.com/.



> ----------------------------------------
> Ronda L. Carnicelli (ronda@seasoned.com)
> Editor-in-Chief, Seasoned Cooking
> http://www.seasoned.com/

Good lord madam - I might suggest you  do some cooking before touting "great
garlic recipes".  I would be embarrassed to even suggest such bland stuff.
Is this really supposed to get people excited about *seasoned.com*?   No
wonder the bubble burst

============================

From: Ronda L. Carnicelli 
Date: Thu, 30 Aug 2001 22:55:23 GMT
--------
I'm sorry that the recipe I posted doesn't appeal to you. I've made it
before and served it with roasted pork and other meats. It doesn't have a
very strong garlic flavor, but it works for me and my family. If you prefer
something with a stronger garlic flavor, let me recommend the following
garlic mayonnaise recipe that we use with everything from sandwiches to
baked fish. Roasted garlic can also add a special touch to potatoes, spreads
and dressings.

*Garlic Mayonnaise*

2 cloves garlic finely chopped
1 egg yolk
1 tsp Dijon mustard
3/4 cup vegetable oil
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Put the garlic in a small bowl and mash to a paste. Beat in the egg yolk and
mustard. Add the oil in a thin stream while beating vigourously with a small
wire whisk. When the mixture is thick and smooth, season with salt and
pepper. Cover the bowl and refrigerate until serving. To avoid any risk of
salmonella, use pasterized eggs.

============================

From: Dimitri 
Date: Thu, 30 Aug 2001 23:01:13 GMT
--------
Ronda L. Carnicelli wrote:
> *Garlic Mayonnaise*
> 2 cloves garlic finely chopped
> 1 egg yolk
> 1 tsp Dijon mustard
> 3/4 cup vegetable oil
> salt and freshly ground black pepper

Next time try Aioli and use a good extra virgin olive oil and lose the
vegetable oil crap. and you really don't need the mustard that is a cheat
for people who don't know how to make mayonnaise.

============================

From: Ronda L. Carnicelli 
Date: Thu, 30 Aug 2001 23:08:02 GMT
--------
> Next time try Aioli and use a good extra virgin olive oil and lose the
> vegetable oil crap. and you really don't need the mustard that is a cheat
> for people who don't know how to make mayonnaise.

I just don't seem to be able to please you today. I'm sorry. Perhaps you'd
like to share a recipe or two? I'm personally interested in hearing more
about how other people use garlic in their cooking.

----------------------------------------
Ronda L. Carnicelli (ronda@seasoned.com)
Editor-in-Chief, Seasoned Cooking
http://www.seasoned.com/

============================

From: Kat Frass 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 00:35:15 GMT
--------
Ronda,

I have to commend you.. you have remained pleasant and civil even though
someone attacked you and your ideas.  I don't think I could have been so
nice.  :-)  Good for you!!

I have no idea if Dimitri really meant to come off as nasty as he did.  It
can be hard to decipher the emotional intent in a newsgroup post sometimes.
:-)

============================

From: Ronda L. Carnicelli 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 01:00:25 GMT
--------
> I have to commend you.. you have remained pleasant and civil even though
> someone attacked you and your ideas.  I don't think I could have been so
> nice.  :-)  Good for you!!

Thank you for your kind words. I try to take comments in stride and learn
what I can from the bright people who frequent rfc. I find that it's best to
keep a calm head when interacting in the newsgroups. It's too easy to
misunderstand intentions. What can I say? I try to be optimistic and
cheerful -- life's too short to spend any signifigant amount of time
grumbling :)

============================

From: Tony Roder 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 05:34:19 GMT
--------
Ronda L. Carnicelli wrote:
> I find that it's best to
>keep a calm head when interacting in the newsgroups. It's too easy to
>misunderstand intentions. 

Maybe that should be engraved on any number of monitor screens ... 

============================

From: Peter Aitken 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 13:43:30 GMT
--------
Ronda L. Carnicelli wrote:
>  life's too short to spend any signifigant amount of time grumbling :)

Now that's an attitude more people should adopt - myself included once in a
while!

============================

From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 05:01:03 GMT
--------
Ronda L. Carnicelli graciously offered...
> I just don't seem to be able to please you today. I'm sorry. Perhaps you'd
> like to share a recipe or two? I'm personally interested in hearing more
> about how other people use garlic in their cooking.

Why does everyone have to be so damned critical of this contributor.  If 
you don't like her recipes, then don't make them.  No need for slamming!

============================

From: garyokada[at]yahoo.com (GaryO)
Date: 31 Aug 2001 12:11:05 -0700
--------
Thierry Gerbault wrote:
> Ronda L. Carnicelli graciously offered...
> > Ronda L. Carnicelli
> > Editor-in-Chief, Seasoned Cooking
> > http://seasoned.com
> 
> Why does everyone have to be so damned critical of this contributor.  If 
> you don't like her recipes, then don't make them.  No need for slamming!

I believe that the signature provokes intense critiquing by implying
expertise.  And the original post could easily be viewed off hand as
SPAM.  While not as blatant as some, the poster did not exactly follow
the most subtle path for promoting a web site or online magazine in a
NG that frowns upon commercial posts.  Additionally, "Seasoned
Cooking" and seasoned.com imply bold taste.

============================

From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 05:04:45 GMT
--------
FWIW, almost everytime I make mashed potatoes I include 1 or 2 garlic 
cloves, a bay leaf, and a couple of allspice berries while boiling the 
potatoes.  It's a very pleasant seasoning for less strongly flavored 
meals.  Other times, I roast a head of garlic, mash, then add to my 
potatoes before serving.  Not every bowl of potatoes has to have 20-30 
cloves of garlic.

============================

From: combatlit[at]aol.com (Robert)
Date: 31 Aug 2001 15:56:57 GMT
--------
Thierry Gerbault wrote: 
> Other times, I roast a head of garlic, mash, then add to my
> potatoes before serving.

FWIW, I always dry the potatoes in the pot before adding the milk, cream,
butter and/or roasted garlic.  I timed this last night.  After draining the
water, I put the uncovered pot back on low heat.  It took about 10 minutes for
the potatoes to dry.

============================

From: Peter Aitken 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 18:58:03 GMT
--------
I like Julia's method. You cook about 20 whole peeled cloves in butter in a
small covered pan for at least half an hour, slowly so they don't brown,
then run them thru a sieve and add to the potatoes.

============================

From: sharkman 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 22:44:46 GMT
--------
Robert wrote:
> FWIW, I always dry the potatoes in the pot before adding the milk, cream,
> butter and/or roasted garlic.  I timed this last night.  After draining the
> water, I put the uncovered pot back on low heat.  It took about 10 minutes for
> the potatoes to dry.

Another way to dry them out is to put some paper towels in the pot cover and
put over low heat... Drys the potato's a bit quicker.

============================

From: Elizabeth Ling 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 19:08:08 +0100
--------
Ronda L. Carnicelli wrote:
> I just don't seem to be able to please you today. I'm sorry. Perhaps you'd
> like to share a recipe or two? I'm personally interested in hearing more
> about how other people use garlic in their cooking.

Good for you managing to stay polite.  Mayonnaise is enormously subjective;
some people prefer it without a very strong olive oil taste (me for one; I
think a very heavy olive oil taste spoils it.  I use half sunflower oil and
half olive oil; usually a fairly pale extra virgin).  And mustard works from
a flavour point of view as well as from the not-curdling point of view.

Chin up.  I liked your recipe.

============================

From: Don Wiss 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 13:51:55 -0400
--------
On Thu, 30 Aug 2001, Ronda L. Carnicelli  wrote:

>The September issue of Seasoned Cooking is now online. Below is just one of
>the great garlic recipes that are being offered in the new issue. For more
>kitchen ideas and recipes, visit this month's free online issue at
>http://seasoned.com/.

[wimpy recipe snipped]

I agree with Dimitri. Your post is nothing but an underhanded way of
spamming this newsgroup. And everything you sell can be purchased elsewhere
for a better price than what Amazon.com charges when you place an order
through your site.

============================

From: MH 
Date: Sat, 01 Sep 2001 00:15:08 GMT
--------
Don Wiss wrote:
> I agree with Dimitri. Your post is nothing but an underhanded way of
> spamming this newsgroup. And everything you sell can be purchased elsewhere
> for a better price than what Amazon.com charges when you place an order
> through your site.

Besides, if she would have bothered to read this NG, she would have found
out that there as just recently a thread all about mashed potatoes with
garlic, and most people agreed that garlic has no place in mashed potatoes.

============================

From: Ranee Mueller 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 17:31:22 -0700
--------
MH wrote:
> Besides, if she would have bothered to read this NG, she would have found
> out that there as just recently a thread all about mashed potatoes with
> garlic, and most people agreed that garlic has no place in mashed 
> potatoes.

   I must have missed that thread.  I love garlic in mashed potatoes.  
Fortunately, my family agrees.
   
============================

From: MH 
Date: Sat, 01 Sep 2001 03:40:49 GMT
--------
Ranee Mueller wrote:
>    I must have missed that thread.  I love garlic in mashed potatoes.
> Fortunately, my family agrees.

As I said above, most people, Ranee. The original poster was a spammer,
perhaps you didn't catch that.

============================

From: Mickey Zalusky 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 20:35:03 GMT
--------
One tip when making mashed potatoes:
If you add cold butter and milk/cream it tends to cool down the potatoes.

To ensure everything is as hot as possible, I always heat the butter and
milk/cream (hot but not boiling) in a small sauce pan or the microwave oven
toward the end of the potato cooking time. Then mix everything together as
usual.

============================

From: Grandma 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 21:21:12 GMT
--------
>   Drain the water
> from the pot, reserving a little for mashing.  Add the butter and mash with
> a potato masher, adding cream or milk until the desired consistency is
> obtained.  Serve hot as an accompaniment with roast beef, turkey or

You'll get fluffier mashed potatoes if you use a bit of the water from
cooking the potatoes rather than milk to mash them.

============================

Subject: Re: Garlic Mashed Potatoes - SC  SPAM
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Dimitri 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 14:42:28 GMT
--------
Kat Frass wrote:
> Ronda,
>
> I have to commend you.. you have remained pleasant and civil even though
> someone attacked you and your ideas.  I don't think I could have been so
> nice.  :-)  Good for you!!
>
> I have no idea if Dimitri really meant to come off as nasty as he did.  It
> can be hard to decipher the emotional intent in a newsgroup post sometimes.
> :-)

Let me stop the speculation - yes it was meant to come off NASTY.  This
woman POSTED SPAM.

She is editor and chief of a COMMERCIAL WEBSITE.

I quote "The September issue of Seasoned Cooking is now online. Below is
just one of
the great garlic recipes that are being offered in the new issue. For more
kitchen ideas and recipes, visit this month's free online issue at
http://seasoned.com/."

Here are her credentials.  Again I quote:   Ronda L. Carnicelli
(ronda@seasoned.com)
Editor-in-Chief, Seasoned Cooking

http://www.seasoned.com/


Now you may want RFC filled with magazine quotes from editors - I don't
happen to think that is appropriate behavior as a matter of fact I believe
is contrary to many ISP guidelines if not rules.

And to top it off it isn't a very good site and the recipes are marginal at
best.

Are we clear as to my motives???????

============================

From: hall monitor 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 17:09:58 GMT
--------
Dimitri wrote:
> Let me stop the speculation - yes it was meant to come off NASTY.  This
> woman POSTED SPAM.

 You should read the NG guidelines before chipping your gums about
something you are uninformed about!!  You really sound like a first class
idiot!  What is a dimitri anyway?  You are most likely fed with a HOSE!

hehehehehehehe!

============================

From: Dimitri 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 18:08:31 GMT
--------
hall monitor wrote:
>  You should read the NG guidelines before chipping your gums about
> something you are uninformed about!!  You really sound like a first class
> idiot!  What is a dimitri anyway?  You are most likely fed with a HOSE!
>
> hehehehehehehe!

Hiding behind anonymity are we?

read on Mc Duff:

Netiquette
It's a combination of the words "network" and "etiquette," and is an
informal code of manners governing online conduct. Netiquette can be as
simple as not typing message in all upper-case letters (all caps words are
interpreted as SHOUTING), not "spamming" other Internet users, and not
posting commercial messages to newsgroups.

============================

From: Kat Frass 
Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2001 21:54:26 GMT
--------
> Are we clear as to my motives???????

I am crystal-clear on your motives now, Dimitri.  Why must you be so
hateful?  I understand that you feel this was spam, but at least she posted
a recipe.  At least she came back to the group to see what responses she got
to her recipe.  At least she didn't just pop on and say "check out my site"
and then leave.  She tried to post something that would be of interest to
our group.  A RECIPE.  Yes - she also touted her site, which you may not
like.. but is that really a reason to be nasty?  If you are so upset and
offended by spam.. why haven't you responded to any of the recent porn spams
that have plagued our newsgroup?

And there is ABSOLUTELY no reason to be rude, nasty or condescending to me.

============================

From: Danny C. 
Date: Sun, 02 Sep 2001 08:06:01 GMT
--------
Dimitri burped, and scrawled this:
> Now you may want RFC filled with magazine quotes from editors - I
> don't happen to think that is appropriate behavior as a matter of
> fact I believe is contrary to many ISP guidelines if not rules.
> 
> And to top it off it isn't a very good site and the recipes are
> marginal at best.
> 
> Are we clear as to my motives???????

Hm, she posted two recipes, with a link to her site in her sig. As 
far as I can tell, the site is free, and I spent a good deal of time 
browsing around there. It's a nice site, and well-designed at that.

Spam? Nah.


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