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Subject: Mashed potatoe ideas, comments please
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Adam Schwartz 
Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 18:46:18 GMT
--------
    In a previous post I stated that my soon-to-be father in law wanted
plain mashed potatoes for thanksgiving.  My faince has sinced talked with
her father, and she told me he was actually looking forward to trying more
exciting foods at thanksgiving this year, but he still wanted some sort of
mashed potato.  Cosequently I'm brainstorming ideas for an intrestig mashed
potato recipe.  What I need is for someone to tell me which ideas sound good
and which they probably wouldn't eat.  Hopefully I'll have the time and
money to make a test recipe or two before Thanksgiving but forst I'd like to
narrow down my ideas and discard the bad ones.  I haven't yet contemplated
to actual recipes, I'm just imagining flavor combinations.  Here are the
basic concepts I'm considering:

-truffle gravy
-mushroom gravy
-potatoes mashed with extra creamy butter and safron
-including a grated aged cheese
-using various varieties of potato
-using butttermilk instead of milk
-replacing milk with a soft cheese thats been thinned in cream/milk
-herbs including chervil, taragon, parley, thyme, etc.
-serving with various butters on the side, containing herb, cheese or a
combination
-whipping the potatoes

I also would like to know which combinations of ideas sound good, i.e.
truffle gravy with saffron potatoes, herbed potatoes made with butermilk,
cheese potatoes with herb buter etc.

Any other ideas are more than extremely very welcome.  Criticism is also
very welcome, because I'd rather get boos from the newsgroup than my future
father-in-law.

Thanks everyone,
Adan

============================

From: Jack Schidt 
Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 18:51:34 GMT
--------
I dunno, Adam, for me, mashed potatoes are at their best when mashed with a
hand masher, mixed with cream, butter, salt, pepper, and a little roasted
garlic.  Call me square, but I don't think they're any more exciting than
this.  Topped with an artery-scratching turkey gravy and they could be a
meal by themselves.

Jack Spuddo

============================

From: The Ranger 
Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 12:18:12 -0800
--------
Jack Square (you requested it!) answered Adam Schwartz's request:
> I dunno, Adam, for me, mashed potatoes are at their best
> when mashed with a hand masher, mixed with cream, butter,
> salt, pepper, and a little roasted garlic.  Call me square, but
> I don't think they're any more exciting than this.  Topped
> with an artery-scratching turkey gravy and they could be a
> meal by themselves.

We use sautéed onions instead of roasted garlic but I actually like the idea
of aged cheese as a side topping...

One other thought; try Yukons in place of the standard Idahoes.

============================

From: Rhonda Anderson 
Date: Fri, 15 Nov 2002 09:46:37 GMT
--------
The Ranger wrote:
> We use sautéed onions instead of roasted garlic but I actually like
> the idea of aged cheese as a side topping...

My mother used to add a little grated cheddar and nutmeg to mashed potatoes 
Very nice.

============================

From: The Ranger 
Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2002 19:45:51 -0800
--------
Rhonda Anderson wrote:
> My mother used to add a little grated cheddar and nutmeg to
> mashed potatoes. Very nice.

My Father-unit made twice-baked potatoes regularly and would substitute
different cheeses and vegetables, herbs and spices as he liked. One night he
added a stilton and cracked pepper, trying to keep it simple but different.
Somehow nutmeg got dusted across the tops. It was a grand success. Ah... The
comfort foods of Youth.

============================

From: niteowllie[at]webtv.net
Date: Sat, 16 Nov 2002 15:15:54 -0700 (MST)
--------
Boil potatoes with some grated carrots & chopped onion.  When mashing,
use sour cream instead of milk.  This is really good. Ollie

============================

From: jarkat2002[at]aol.come.on (Jarkat2002)
Date: 14 Nov 2002 19:04:50 GMT
--------
Adam Schwartz wrote:
>Any other ideas are more than extremely very welcome.  Criticism is also
>very welcome, because I'd rather get boos from the newsgroup than my future
>father-in-law.

I'm a mashed potato purest lol 
Potatoes, milk, butter and salt & pepper for me.
But ... when I do want to be a bit more adventurous ... I like some fresh
thyme.  It doesn't add an overpowering flavor ... but has a nice flavor.  
I'll also boil my potatoes w/ an onion or 2 but toss the onion before the
mashing when I'm in the mood.
~Kat

============================

From: spacytracy07[at]webtv.net (spacytracy)
Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 13:09:51 -0600 (CST)
--------
Adam Schwartz wrote:
>Criticism is also very welcome

I would never, ever criticize the former vice president Dan Quayle, he
got enough of it when he was in office.

============================

From: Tracy R. 
Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 13:14:47 -0600
--------
Adam Schwartz wrote:
>    In a previous post I stated that my soon-to-be father in law wanted
>plain mashed potatoes for thanksgiving.  My faince has sinced talked with
>her father, and she told me he was actually looking forward to trying more
>exciting foods at thanksgiving this year, but he still wanted some sort of
>mashed potato.  Cosequently I'm brainstorming ideas for an intrestig mashed
>potato recipe.  

Our family really enjoys basic mashed potatoes (made with s&p, butter
and either cream/milk/buttermilk/sour cream, depending on what I have
handy) with a sprinkle or two or three of granulated garlic added.
It's a little different from the usual, without being overly
threatening to someone who likes "familiar" foods. They're *very*
good, and go nicely with gravy.

============================

From: Dawn 
Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 17:01:14 -0600
--------
Adam Schwartz wrote:
>    In a previous post I stated that my soon-to-be father in law wanted
>plain mashed potatoes for thanksgiving.  My faince has sinced talked with
>her father, and she told me he was actually looking forward to trying more
>exciting foods at thanksgiving this year, but he still wanted some sort of
>mashed potato.  Cosequently I'm brainstorming ideas for an intrestig mashed
>potato recipe.  

Try a pot full of small red Maine potatoes or baby Yukon golds with the
skin on. Quarter them if you need them to cook faster. These small
potatoes have tender, tasty nutritious skins that will add flavor, color
and texture to the dish. 

I mash mine lightly, so there are still lumps, with some butter and sour
cream. How much? For two cups of smashed potatoes I use about 2 tb of
butter and 1/3 cup sour cream. Add 1/2 tsp thyme and 1/2 tsp of parsley.
The mix should be soft but not liquidy, and look like mashed potato and
not cream gravy. 

I let individual diners add their own salt and pepper at the table. 

============================

From: bigricky60[at]hotmail.com (Ricky)
Date: 15 Nov 2002 20:11:08 -0800
--------
Dawn wrote:
>These small
> potatoes have tender, tasty nutritious skins that will add flavor, color
> and texture to the dish. 

Bleh.  I hate skins in my mashed potatoes.  It's like eating garbage.

> I let individual diners add their own salt and pepper at the table. 

Not seasoning your food, even lightly, before service is a travesty!

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Sat, 16 Nov 2002 08:38:09 -0700
--------
Ricky wrote:
> Not seasoning your food, even lightly, before service is a travesty!

Why? If I have guests who I know will thickly salt and
pepper food without tasting first, why fuss more in the
kitchen? They cannot taste anything other than the
salt/pepper anyway.

============================

From: Peter Aitken 
Date: Sat, 16 Nov 2002 20:53:35 GMT
--------
Arri London wrote:
> Why? If I have guests who I know will thickly salt and
> pepper food without tasting first, why fuss more in the
> kitchen? They cannot taste anything other than the
> salt/pepper anyway.

Some foods can be seasoned at the table just fine, but others are better
when the seasonings are mixed in during cooking - meatloaf and mashed
potatoes are two such items. That's why. My goal is to season so that no one
finds the food over-seasoned, and most people find it OK. THose who want
more can add it at the table.

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Sat, 16 Nov 2002 17:25:10 -0700
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
> Some foods can be seasoned at the table just fine, but others are better
> when the seasonings are mixed in during cooking - meatloaf and mashed
> potatoes are two such items. That's why. My goal is to season so that no one
> finds the food over-seasoned, and most people find it OK. THose who want
> more can add it at the table.

But that is my point... people who coat their food at table
in salt or other seasonings without tasting are hardly going
to notice any seasoning I put in before or during cooking.
That's why I don't bother when those people are coming to
eat.

============================

From: Judith Umbria 
Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2002 06:52:28 GMT
--------
Arri London wrote:
> But that is my point... people who coat their food at table
> in salt or other seasonings without tasting are hardly going
> to notice any seasoning I put in before or during cooking.
> That's why I don't bother when those people are coming to
> eat.

We do not feed those people, Arri.  Also don't feed people who put ketchup
pn everything.  It is like casting pearls before swine.

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2002 08:49:03 -0700
--------
Judith Umbria wrote:
> We do not feed those people, Arri.  Also don't feed people who put ketchup
> pn everything.  It is like casting pearls before swine.

LOL! True enough!! But they have their other redeeming
qualities, so I don't mind from time to time.  When I eat at
their places, I just have a substantial snack before I leave
my home.

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2002 11:13:01 -0500
--------
Judith Umbria wrote:
> We do not feed those people, Arri.  Also don't feed people who put ketchup
> pn everything.  It is like casting pearls before swine.

Yesterday I saw some show on FoodTV, the guy filled up his plate
with the usual Thanksgiving dinner and instead of reaching for
the gravy, grabbed a bottle of ketchup.  I just can't see how
ketchup would enhance turkey and stuffing.

============================

From: gloria p 
Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2002 17:55:48 GMT
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Yesterday I saw some show on FoodTV, the guy filled up his plate
> with the usual Thanksgiving dinner and instead of reaching for
> the gravy, grabbed a bottle of ketchup.  I just can't see how
> ketchup would enhance turkey and stuffing.

Ooooohh, you are in trouble when Stan gets online!

============================

From: Faux_Pseudo 
Date: Tue, 26 Nov 2002 20:33:40 GMT
--------
Judith Umbria spoke:
> We do not feed those people, Arri.  Also don't feed people who put ketchup
> pn everything.  It is like casting pearls before swine.

Thank you for saying that so that I did not have to.

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Tue, 26 Nov 2002 17:00:58 -0700
--------
Faux_Pseudo wrote:
> Thank you for saying that so that I did not have to.

LOL! Yes, but even swine need to be fed!

============================

From: bigricky60[at]hotmail.com (Ricky)
Date: 16 Nov 2002 18:41:34 -0800
--------
Arri London wrote:
> Why? If I have guests who I know will thickly salt and
> pepper food without tasting first, why fuss more in the
> kitchen? They cannot taste anything other than the
> salt/pepper anyway.

Obviously you need different friends-- with taste!

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2002 08:58:10 -0700
--------
Ricky wrote:
> Obviously you need different friends-- with taste!

ROTFL!  Did anyone say those were the only friends I have? I
cook for **all** my friends, no matter what trash they like
to eat at home.

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 12:34:15 -0500
--------
Ricky wrote:
>Obviously you need different friends-- with taste!

on the other hand, you might view it as giving them an opportunity to
have some food that actually tastes good on it own - but if they still
want to over-salt it, well, you tried.

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 10:51:41 -0700
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> on the other hand, you might view it as giving them an opportunity to
> have some food that actually tastes good on it own - but if they still
> want to over-salt it, well, you tried.

LOL! The dining relationships always start out that way
obviously. However, it soon becomes apparent who has a
working palate and who does not.

============================

From: Tracy R. 
Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 13:28:10 -0600
--------
Adam Schwartz wrote:
>     Cosequently I'm brainstorming ideas for an intrestig mashed
>potato recipe.

Here are a couple of specific recipes that I started thinking about
after I made the first post suggesting garlic. BTW, roasted garlic is
a really nice addition to mashed potatoes too, if a bit more time
consuming than the granulated ~ but hey, it's thanksgiving, it's a
special meal. =)


@@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

Buttermilk Mashed Potatoes With Caramelized Shallots

vegetables, gourmet magazine

12 ounces Yukon Gold potatoes; peeled and quartered
2 medium shallots; thinly sliced
1/2 tablespoon unsalted butter
1/2 cup well-shaken low-fat buttermilk

Cover potatoes with salted cold water by 1 inch in a saucepan and
simmer until tender, about 20 minutes.

While potatoes are simmering, cook shallots in butter in a small
nonstick skillet over moderately high heat, stirring frequently, until
softened and deep golden, about 8 minutes.

Drain potatoes, return to pot, and coarsely mash with a potato masher.
Stir shallots into potatoes with buttermilk and salt and pepper to
taste.

Each serving about 193 calories and 2 grams fat 

Contributor:  Gourmet, January 2001

Yield: 4 servings

Preparation Time:  00:35


** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.57 **

@@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

Creamy Chive Mashed Potatoes

vegetables

5 medium potatoes; peeled
1 1/2 teaspoons salt; divided
4 ounces cream cheese; softened
2 tablespoons butter or margarine; softened
2 tablespoons chives; snipped
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/4 cup buttermilk; to 1/2 cup

Place potatoes in a large saucepan and cover with water; add 1
teaspoon salt. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and cook for 25-30
minutes or until tender. Drain.

In a large mixing bowl, mash the potatoes until smooth. Add cream
cheese, butter, chives, pepper and remaining salt; gradually beat in
the buttermilk.

Contributor:  Bonnie Thompson, Rathdrum, ID ~ Taste of Home

Yield: 4 servings


** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.57 **

@@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

Garlic-Gruyere Mashed Potatoes

vegetables

6 medium russet potatoes
3/5 cup hot whole milk
1/2 cup sour cream
1/4 cup chives; chopped
1/4 cup butter; softened
1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
1 clove garlic; minced
1/4 cup gruyere cheese; grated
2 medium scallions; chopped
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper

Peel the potatoes and cut up. Cook in boiling water til tender. Drain.
Mash the potatoes and stir in the milk, butter, sour cream and the
rest of the ingredients. Serve at once.

** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.57 **

============================

From: Heidi Pilewski 
Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 15:35:42 -0500
--------
Adam Schwartz wrote:
>     Cosequently I'm brainstorming ideas for an intrestig mashed
>potato recipe.

I like the traditional mashed potatoes (milk/butter, salt & a little 
pepper)(especially with creamy chicken or pork gravy) but I also fixed 
lumpy mashed red potatoes mixed with sour cream and green onion a few 
years ago for Thanksgiving.  (My father prefers Potato Buds and I just 
couldn't face that again.) :-)

============================

From: Brian Connors 
Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 20:46:16 GMT
--------
Adam Schwartz wrote:
>     Cosequently I'm brainstorming ideas for an intrestig mashed
>potato recipe.

Sour cream, butter, a couple of cloves of crushed garlic, and milk as 
necessary to thin it out. And leave the skins on.

============================

From: pattee[at]spot.colorado.edu (Donna Pattee)
Date: 14 Nov 2002 21:19:19 GMT
--------
Adam Schwartz wrote:
>     Cosequently I'm brainstorming ideas for an intrestig mashed
>potato recipe.

A local Caribbean restaurant makes mashed potatoes with manchego cheese.
I have no idea what this has to do with the Caribbean, but the potatoes
are really good. I just saw a recipe for them, and it's basically plain
mashed potatoes with some extra milk or cream and then lots of manchego
cheese. I can't imagine that any but the very pickiest eaters would
objec to the flavor.

============================

From: robertpalmer[at]webtv.net
Date: Sat, 16 Nov 2002 15:57:44 -0600 (CST)
--------
Here's a couple.
Fried Mashed Potatoes

Make your standard mashed potatoes, milk, butter, salt, pepper. If you
are making a batch containing, say, five potatoes, cut one up and fry it
till it is nice and crisp. When mashing time comes, toss in the fried
potatoe and mash away. I've made these with garlic, as well. They are
really good.

The second is, instead of boiling onions with the potatoes, caremalize
as many as you think you need and mash them in with the potatoes. Both
of these techniques give an off color to the potatoes, but I'll
sacrifice beauty for flavor any day. Besides, you can hide them under
gravy.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 21:48:49 GMT
--------
Here's a recipe that's always a hit.  It includes a couple of the
suggestions that you made (added cheese, and thyme), but also includes
prosciutto and garlic.  Wonderful stuff!


                      * Exported from MasterCook *

                   Parmesan-Prosciutto Mashed Potatoes

Recipe By     :Damsel in dis Dress
Serving Size  : 8     Preparation Time :0:45
Categories    : potatoes                        side dishes


  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
  1 1/2         pounds  russet potatoes -- peeled and cubed
  3             cloves  garlic -- peeled
  2        tablespoons  unsalted butter
  2             ounces  prosciutto -- thinly sliced, finely chopped
     1/4      teaspoon  dried thyme
     1/2           cup  skim milk -- or more if needed
     1/2           cup  parmesan cheese -- freshly grated
                        freshly ground black pepper -- to taste
  2        tablespoons  parmesan cheese

1.  Cook potatoes and garlic in large pot of boiling water until
potatoes are very tender, about 15 minutes. Drain; return potatoes and
garlic to same pot.

2.  Meanwhile, melt  butter in heavy small saucepan over medium heat.
Add chopped prosciutto and thyme and sauté until fragrant, about 2
minutes.

3.  Add prosciutto mixture and 3/4 cup milk to potatoes and garlic.
Mash well, adding more milk by tablespoonfuls if potatoes are dry. Mix
in 1/2 cup cheese. Season with pepper. (Can be prepared 6 hours ahead.
Cover and chill. Stir over low heat to rewarm, adding more milk by
tablespoonfuls, if desired.) Transfer potatoes to bowl. Sprinkle
lightly with  2 tablespoons cheese; serve. 

Cuisine:
  "Italian"
Source:
  "Adapted from Bon Appétit"
Yield:
  "4 cups"

                                    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

============================

From: kswck 
Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 22:21:02 GMT
--------
Mashed potatoes by hand; add to: roasted garlic, butter, milk, salt & 
pepper and some chopped dill. Garnish w/same. Makes a good appearance as 
well. Finely diced red onion if desired, as well.

============================

From: Rodney Myrvaagnes 
Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 19:01:10 -0500
--------
I'll tell you one I did for a TG a few years ago. I used russets,
about half pound each. I scrubbed them and baked them. Since I was
using the oven anyway I roasted a head of garlic for each. That was 7
lbs of potatoes and 14 heads of garlic.

I scooped the flesh out of the cooked potatoes and squeezed the garlic
pulp. Mashed them together. Then I took a small amount of th emashed
potato, and chopped in a habanero with a blender.

I then mixed a tiny part of the "hot" potato into the rest. I overdid
it, as the heat built up as the potatoes went to the table.

I would do the same but with perhaps chopped chipotles, or a fresh
jalapeno now.

It might be good to put the pepper in only half the batch, so people
who don't want the heat have a choice.

The potato skins can be stuffed separately.


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