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Subject: Perfect Mashed Potatoes
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 11:39:24 -0500
--------
I got roped into doing Thanksgiving dinner.

I don't do mashed potatoes! I never have. I recall trying years ago, and 
they were lumpy.

Got five pounds of big, fresh Idaho potatoes at Aldi, and a pound of butter. 
I guess I need milk, right?

How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 16:51:17 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, cybercat meant to say...

> Got five pounds of big, fresh Idaho potatoes at Aldi, and a pound of
> butter. I guess I need milk, right?

Use cream.
 
> How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

I don't use a recipe, however, I do "rice" the potatoes instead of mashing.  
(I'm not a fan of lumpy mashed potatoes.)  Then add desired butter, and add 
cream until the right consistency.  I often boil the potatoes with a fresh 
clove of garlic, and sometimes add a bay leaf to the pot.  I'm also not 
much of a fan of roasted garlic mashed potatoes.  Depends on the meal.

============================

From: Michael Kuettner 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 18:16:12 +0100
--------
Well, here's the Austrian version :

1 kilo potatos
100 grams butter
1/4 litre milk
salt, nutmeg

Peel potatos, cook them in saltwater (with cumin seeds, optional), until
very soft.
Drain the water, leave potatos in the pot (without lid) for some minutes.
Heat milk (do not bring to boil).
Puree them with a kitchen mixer, stir in the butter, season with salt and
nutmeg. Stir in milk until you have the consistency you like.
I never had lumps in my Erdäpfelpüree.

============================

From: Myrl Jeffcoat 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 19:50:56 -0000
--------
I must admit that I always seemed to over mash the potatoes until they
were more like paste. Then, a good friend of mine, who emanates from
"poor white trash" (sorry Nancy), who taught me "properly".

Her potatoes were, and still are the very best I've eaten.  I've stood
by her side a couple of times, while trying to copy her method, but I
still can't do it as well as she does.

She simply boils the potatoes until tender, drains ALL the water off
of them in the pot, leaves the lid ajar for about 15 minutes, adds
condensed milk, a bit of butter, and a tad of salt, then mashes - but
doesn't over mash, with the electric beater.  She never has lumps.

When I was in high school, the cooking teacher taught us to use a
ricer to mash potatoes, and that worked well too.

============================

From: Bobo Bonobo® 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 14:52:52 -0800
--------
Myrl Jeffcoat wrote:
> She simply boils the potatoes until tender, drains ALL the water off
> of them in the pot, leaves the lid ajar for about 15 minutes, adds
> condensed milk, a bit of butter, and a tad of salt, then mashes - but
> doesn't over mash, with the electric beater.  She never has lumps.

The idea that mashed potatoes are better made with canned milk than
cream--or even fresh milk--is laughable.

============================

From: Sarah Gray 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 23:57:28 GMT
--------
Bobo Bonobo® wrote:
> The idea that mashed potatoes are better made with canned milk than
> cream--or even fresh milk--is laughable.

"better" is a matter of taste. However, I still agree with your sentiment :)

============================

From: Myrl Jeffcoat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 03:29:14 -0000
--------
Bobo Bonobo® wrote:
> The idea that mashed potatoes are better made with canned milk than
> cream--or even fresh milk--is laughable.

I must agree with you.  It seems ludicrous to me too, but it works.
As my friend, Nancy said, when you're doin' poor white trash cooking,
most of the ingredients come from food commodities that the welfare
department gave us. . .LOL

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 19:19:47 -0800
--------
Myrl Jeffcoat wrote:

> She simply boils the potatoes until tender, drains ALL the water off
> of them in the pot, leaves the lid ajar for about 15 minutes, adds
> condensed milk, a bit of butter, and a tad of salt, then mashes - but
> doesn't over mash, with the electric beater.  She never has lumps.

Those are whipped potatoes, not mashed potatoes.  Mashed potatoes are
supposed to have lumps.

> When I was in high school, the cooking teacher taught us to use a
> ricer to mash potatoes, and that worked well too.

Yes, riced potatoes are good but they're still not mashed potatoes,
that's why they're called riced potatoes.

Mashed potatoes need the lumps, especially with all the overpowering
crap folks toss in... the lumps are what retain the potato taste, but
then I suppose many don't like the flavor of the potatoes they buy.
The spuds from the stupidmarket are storage potatoes, been out of the
ground for months, they don't taste much like potatoes.  Unless you've
eaten freshly dug potatoes you have no idea how a potato is supposed
taste.... eating storage potatoes is like eating storage corn.

I like smashed potatoes (lottsa lumps, and with skins on), a big
plateful steaming hot with plenty of real sour cream spooned on top,
and with big blobs of caviar (don't need any other salt).  Only thing
else I need to complete the meal is my bottle of vodka from the
freezer.

============================

From: Myrl Jeffcoat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 03:31:27 -0000
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> I like smashed potatoes (lottsa lumps, and with skins on), a big
> plateful steaming hot with plenty of real sour cream spooned on top,
> and with big blobs of caviar (don't need any other salt).  Only thing
> else I need to complete the meal is my bottle of vodka from the
> freezer.

Oh YUM!

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 03:54:15 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Myrl Jeffcoat meant to say...
> Oh YUM!

Oh, YUK!

============================

From: Sarah Gray 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 23:17:14 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Oh, YUK!

another "oh yum" for this informal poll :)

============================

From: ravenlynne 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 08:30:40 +0200
--------
Sarah Gray wrote:
> another "oh yum" for this informal poll :)

Oh yum here too.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 13:05:09 -0000
--------
ravenlynne wrote:
> Oh yum here too.

Yum here too:)

============================

From: Nancy2 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 08:43:45 -0800
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Oh, YUK!

(Me, too, Wayne - can't stand mashed potatoes - or any potato dish for
that matter - with skins on, unless it's a "potato skin" appetizer.

Don't like lumps, either.  And the definition of mashed is in the eye
of the masher.  I use my hand mixer for about 20-30 seconds after I've
mashed them thoroughly - I make great mashed potatoes.)

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 11:44:12 -0500
--------
Nancy2 wrote
> Don't like lumps, either.  And the definition of mashed is in the eye
> of the masher.  I use my hand mixer for about 20-30 seconds after I've
> mashed them thoroughly - I make great mashed potatoes.)

This sounds like a good technique, too. 

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 10:23:47 -0800
--------
Nancy2 wrote:
> the definition of mashed is in the eye of the masher.  
> I use my hand mixer for about 20-30 seconds after I've
> mashed them thoroughly - I make great mashed potatoes.)

That's NOT mashed, that's *whipped* potatoes.  I guess that's what
comes from spending Saturday night with your vibrator and thinking you
got laid.

============================

From: Nancy2 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 09:17:45 -0800
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> That's NOT mashed, that's *whipped* potatoes.  I guess that's what
> comes from spending Saturday night with your vibrator and thinking you
> got laid.

You would know.

============================

From: Nancy2 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 09:21:02 -0800
--------
Sheldon wrote:
[[Ugly smart-ass remark deleted (the only kind Shel ever makes).]]

I mash them first, whip them for 20-30 seconds.  That's mashed.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 19:34:23 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Nancy2 meant to say...
> Don't like lumps, either.  And the definition of mashed is in the eye
> of the masher.  I use my hand mixer for about 20-30 seconds after I've
> mashed them thoroughly - I make great mashed potatoes.)

Then I'm sure I'd love them!

============================

From: Blinky the Shark 
Date: 11 Nov 2007 21:39:33 GMT
--------
> I don't use a recipe, however, I do "rice" the potatoes instead of mashing.  
> (I'm not a fan of lumpy mashed potatoes.)  Then add desired butter, and add 
> cream until the right consistency.  I often boil the potatoes with a fresh 
> clove of garlic, and sometimes add a bay leaf to the pot.  I'm also not 
> much of a fan of roasted garlic mashed potatoes.  Depends on the meal.

Sometimes I saute some chopped onion and add that when I mix the
potatoes.  That'll probably set off the purists.  :)

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 21:54:37 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Blinky the Shark meant to say...
> Sometimes I saute some chopped onion and add that when I mix the
> potatoes.  That'll probably set off the purists.  :)

I would like it.  I'm not fond of the huge amounts of roasted garlic that 
seems to still be a trend these days.  I like roasted garlic, just not in 
the amounts that some people use in mashed potatotes.

============================

From: sf
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 14:39:18 -0800
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>I would like it.  I'm not fond of the huge amounts of roasted garlic that 
>seems to still be a trend these days.  I like roasted garlic, just not in 
>the amounts that some people use in mashed potatotes.

I love roasted garlic and I love garlic fries, but I still don't
understand the allure of garlic mashed potatoes.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 22:42:39 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, sf meant to say...
> I love roasted garlic and I love garlic fries, but I still don't
> understand the allure of garlic mashed potatoes.

I like just a hint.  I often spear a whole clove of garlic and throw it in 
the pot with the potatoes.  It doesn't give a lot of flavor, but it's a 
nice soft addition.

============================

From: Blinky the Shark 
Date: 11 Nov 2007 22:40:56 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Oh pshaw, Blinky the Shark meant to say...
> I would like it.  I'm not fond of the huge amounts of roasted garlic that 
> seems to still be a trend these days.  I like roasted garlic, just not in 
> the amounts that some people use in mashed potatotes.

I routinely use garlic, too.  Probably more than you'd like.

I don't peel the taters.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 22:45:09 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Blinky the Shark meant to say...
> I routinely use garlic, too.  Probably more than you'd like.
> 
> I don't peel the taters.

No, I would like a lot, nor would I like the unpeeled potatoes. :-)

I like my mashed potatoes creamy, but firm, with no "foreign" pieces of 
things in them.  Yeah, I know the peel is part of the potato, but I still 
don't like it mixed in.  I'm not overly fond of unpeeled french fries, 
either.

OTOH, one of my favorite parts of a baked potato is the skin. :-)

============================

From: hahabogus 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 00:17:43 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> I like my mashed potatoes creamy, but firm, with no "foreign" pieces
> of things in them.  Yeah, I know the peel is part of the potato, but I
> still don't like it mixed in.  I'm not overly fond of unpeeled french
> fries, either.
> 
> OTOH, one of my favorite parts of a baked potato is the skin. :-)

I like peel on my fries...but not on my boild potatoes whether they be 
mashed or not. I like my baked spuds with a crispy baked skin...but don't 
like skin on my roasted spuds.

On roasted spuds I like lemmon zest and garlic powder or the blend by 
penzeys called trinadad ?something? but no skin.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 11:27:33 -0000
--------
I love all potatoes except those with hair  

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 07:21:11 -0600
--------
I use this recipe

http://www.reluctantgourmet.com/mashed.htm

Additionally: from the last comment add cream cheese (3 tablespoons).

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 11:36:31 -0500
--------
Andy wrote:
> I use this recipe
>
> http://www.reluctantgourmet.com/mashed.htm

Andy, that is a really nice web site. 

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 10:43:20 -0600
--------
cybercat said...
> Andy, that is a really nice web site. 

Agreed. Enjoy!

============================

From: Blinky the Shark 
Date: 12 Nov 2007 19:00:07 GMT
--------
Andy wrote:
> I use this recipe
>
> http://www.reluctantgourmet.com/mashed.htm

Some nice ideas there.  Thanks!

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 11:41:43 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> I love all potatoes except those with hair 

lol 

============================

From: Blinky the Shark 
Date: 12 Nov 2007 19:01:43 GMT
--------
cybercat wrote:
>> I love all potatoes except those with hair 
> lol 

In my book, spoiled potatoes are the worst thing I've ever smelled in
the kitchen.  Ugh!  I'd sooner have some meat go bad.

============================

From: Sarah Gray 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 00:55:10 -0500
--------
Blinky the Shark wrote:
> In my book, spoiled potatoes are the worst thing I've ever smelled in
> the kitchen.  Ugh!  I'd sooner have some meat go bad.

ROtten potatoes smell pretty bad. It's hard to get the smell gone from 
whatever surface they were on. Once I was defrosting a chicken in the 
microwave and somehow forgot about it. It was so, so gross the next day. 
  It's the only time I can remember something worse smelling than really 
rotten potatoes.

============================

From: Michael Kuettner 
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2007 02:04:41 +0100
--------
Sarah Gray schrieb:
> ROtten potatoes smell pretty bad. It's hard to get the smell gone from 
> whatever surface they were on. Once I was defrosting a chicken in the 
> microwave and somehow forgot about it. It was so, so gross the next day. It's 
> the only time I can remember something worse smelling than really rotten 
> potatoes.

Have you smelled "really" rotten potatoes ?
Those left in a plastic bag, which then develop their own "brown sauce" ?

Sickly yours,

Michael Kuettner

============================

From: Lou Decruss 
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2007 20:17:59 -0600
--------
Michael Kuettner wrote:
>Have you smelled "really" rotten potatoes ?
>Those left in a plastic bag, which then develop their own "brown sauce" ?

I returned from a 2 week holiday to a stench that took my breath away.
A bag of spuds got pushed to the back of the pantry and forgotten.
The special brown sauce leaked out of the bag.  It was probably well
on it's way before we even went away.  It took a long time for the
smell to go away.

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2007 06:58:31 -0700
--------
Michael Kuettner wrote"
> Have you smelled "really" rotten potatoes ?
> Those left in a plastic bag, which then develop their own "brown sauce" ?

The smell is exactly like that of a poorly maintained outhouse (outdoor 
privy).

============================

From: Sarah Gray 
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2007 14:08:38 GMT
--------
Janet B. wrote:
> The smell is exactly like that of a poorly maintained outhouse (outdoor 
> privy).

No, it's worse, at least imo!

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2007 09:45:57 -0500
--------
Sarah Gray wrote:
> No, it's worse, at least imo!

Girls, I gotta tell you, I am glad I don't have a point of reference for 
this comparison. 

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2007 08:30:14 -0700
--------
cybercat wrote:
> Girls, I gotta tell you, I am glad I don't have a point of reference for 
> this comparison.

Ah, kiddo, you gotta broaden your horizons!!!  You must live 'back East.' 
;o}

============================

From: Sarah Gray 
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2007 03:27:14 GMT
--------
Janet B. wrote:
> Ah, kiddo, you gotta broaden your horizons!!!  You must live 'back East.' 

I took Ellie camping this summer, and she was amazed at how stinky the 
outhouses were... and for outhouses, they were pretty well maintained, 
heh. I then told her about the "trench toilets" at rainbow gatherings... 
I think she'll have to be a little older before we try that one :)

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 18:52:45 -0800
--------
Blinky wrote:
> Sometimes I saute some chopped onion and add that when I mix the
> potatoes.  That'll probably set off the purists.  :)

It's purist only when the onions are sauted in chicken schmaltz.

============================

From: Julie Bove 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 04:33:11 GMT
--------
Blinky the Shark wrote:
> Sometimes I saute some chopped onion and add that when I mix the
> potatoes.  That'll probably set off the purists.  :)

Mmmmmmmmmmm!!! 

============================

From: Blinky the Shark 
Date: 12 Nov 2007 06:25:17 GMT
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
>> Sometimes I saute some chopped onion and add that when I mix the
>> potatoes.  That'll probably set off the purists.  :)
>
> Mmmmmmmmmmm!!! 

Is that indicative of you doing the same, or that you're gonna do the
same next time?  :)

============================

From: Julie Bove 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 07:07:07 GMT
--------
Blinky the Shark wrote:
> Is that indicative of you doing the same, or that you're gonna do the
> same next time?  :)

I often do!  :) 

============================

From: ravenlynne 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 08:32:57 +0200
--------
Blinky the Shark wrote:
> Sometimes I saute some chopped onion and add that when I mix the
> potatoes.  That'll probably set off the purists.  :)

Onions sound good to me!  I don't think anyone would call me a "purist" 
in any category, ever, though...lol.

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 15:58:00 -0700
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>I don't use a recipe, however, I do "rice" the potatoes instead of mashing.  
>(I'm not a fan of lumpy mashed potatoes.)  Then add desired butter, and add 
>cream until the right consistency.  I often boil the potatoes with a fresh 
>clove of garlic, and sometimes add a bay leaf to the pot.  I'm also not 
>much of a fan of roasted garlic mashed potatoes.  Depends on the meal.

That looks good. ;)

Don't forget to salt them. ;)

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 23:02:15 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Christine Dabney meant to say...
> That looks good. ;)
> 
> Don't forget to salt them. ;)

Thanks! I rather heavily salt the cooking water, so rarely have to add salt 
while mashing, although I do often add some white pepper at that point.

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 16:15:35 -0700
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>Thanks! I rather heavily salt the cooking water, so rarely have to add salt 
>while mashing, although I do often add some white pepper at that point.

Oh, you must be a Julia Child aficionado....LOL.  She always liked to
use white pepper...   It was funny to watch her and Jacques Pepin go
back and forth on that, cause he liked black pepper, and she used
white pepper.  LOL.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 23:18:21 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Christine Dabney meant to say...
> Oh, you must be a Julia Child aficionado....LOL.  She always liked to
> use white pepper...   It was funny to watch her and Jacques Pepin go
> back and forth on that, cause he liked black pepper, and she used
> white pepper.  LOL.

Indeed...  I like adding a bit of white pepper while mashing the potatoes.  
I also like adding freshly ground black pepper to my serving at the table.

============================

From: hahabogus 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 00:18:43 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Don't forget to salt them. ;)

Potatoes are one of those foods that if you don't salt the water no amount 
of salt later will help.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 00:24:02 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, hahabogus meant to say...
> Potatoes are one of those foods that if you don't salt the water no amount 
> of salt later will help.

Exactly so, as well as pasta.

============================

From: Dee.Dee 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 19:49:35 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Exactly so, as well as pasta.

Thanks, guys, for the tips.  I hope I can remember it.  Will try.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 11:38:13 -0000
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Exactly so, as well as pasta.

I agree about the pasta, but I steam many vegges including potatoes.  I
don't have a problem with the salting. Perhaps it is something to do with
boiling them?

After steaming I put them in a pan with warm butter, milk and salt and 
mash:)

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 14:28:18 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Ophelia meant to say...
> I agree about the pasta, but I steam many vegges including potatoes.  I
> don't have a problem with the salting. Perhaps it is something to do with
> boiling them?
> 
> After steaming I put them in a pan with warm butter, milk and salt and 
> mash:)

Dunno, but I know that if I don't boil potatoes with salt, it seems I can 
never get the final product salty enough.  The exception, of course, is 
roasted, baked, and fried potatoes.  Seems only to be a problem with 
boiling.

============================

From: sf
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 14:31:06 -0800
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>Dunno, but I know that if I don't boil potatoes with salt, it seems I can 
>never get the final product salty enough.  The exception, of course, is 
>roasted, baked, and fried potatoes.  Seems only to be a problem with 
>boiling.

Huh!  I never salt the water for potatoes, but I feel the same way
about pasta.  If I don't boil it in salted water, it tastes flat to
me.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 08:15:36 -0000
--------
sf wrote:
> Huh!  I never salt the water for potatoes, but I feel the same way
> about pasta.  If I don't boil it in salted water, it tastes flat to
> me.

I rarely more than a little salt in my cooking.  I have the salt cellar on 
the table. 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 02:22:30 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Janet meant to say...
> I agree, use cream. Also, save your Idahos for something else and get a
> bag of Yukon Golds.

Actually, I like Idahos for mashed potatotes.  The real trick is drying 
them out adequately over the burner after draining.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 01:28:18 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Actually, I like Idahos for mashed potatotes.  The real trick is drying
> them out adequately over the burner after draining.

I will do this. 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 06:32:40 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, cybercat meant to say...
> I will do this. 

Toss them about in the pot as they're drying, until they look a little 
powdery on the surface.  As you're mashing, add the butter first, then the 
cream, all this done while still over lowest heat on the stove.  
Perfection!

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 19:48:59 -0700
--------
Janet wrote:
> I agree, use cream. Also, save your Idahos for something else and get a 
> bag of Yukon Golds.

Yukon Golds are too low starch to make decent mashed potatoes.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 03:05:06 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Janet B. meant to say...
> Yukon Golds are too low starch to make decent mashed potatoes.

Agreed...

============================

From: George 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 08:34:30 -0500
--------
Janet B. wrote:
> Yukon Golds are too low starch to make decent mashed potatoes.

I don't care for starchy sticky whipped potatoes so I use yukon golds or 
red potatoes (sometimes both) to make really really good smashed 
potatoes. Whipped potatoes always remind me of the instant potatoes you 
getin school cafeterias and industrial restaurants.

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 08:50:53 -0500
--------
George wrote:
> Whipped potatoes always remind me of the instant potatoes you getin school 
> cafeterias and industrial restaurants.

Ditto.  I wouldn't consider using a mixer of any kind on
mashed potatoes.  A ricer would be nice but my masher
does a fine job.  Start to work off those potatoes before you
even eat them.

============================

From: ppnerkDELETETHIS[at]yahoo.com (Phred)
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 14:22:32 GMT
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
>Ditto.  I wouldn't consider using a mixer of any kind on
>mashed potatoes.  A ricer would be nice but my masher
>does a fine job.  Start to work off those potatoes before you
>even eat them.

I just smash 'em up with a fork in the saucepan.  But then, I do all 
these other horrible things too:

1. Smash up the cooked spuds (skin and all) with the fork.

2. Make a small well in the centre, through to the metal bottom of the 
pot; add a bit of milk; return to the heat until the milk starts to 
simmer.

3. Add enough butter, a generous helping of finely diced *raw* onions; 
and a goodly amount of finely chopped parsley (sometimes garlic too).  
Then mix the whole brew vigorously with the fork until the consistency 
meets your whim and the components are fairly uniformly distributed.

4. Turn out onto the plate beside a rare to medium rare rump steak 
topped with cooked onions or mushrooms and accompanied by selected 
vegetables of your choice -- I like to add just a generous helping of 
barely cooked green beans seasoned with a little butter and nutmeg.

Have a couple of pieces of fresh fruit in season for dessert then wash 
the dishes and finally relax with a brewed coffee and a side of a good 
port or muscat or liqueur and a couple of pieces of fine chocolate.

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 07:19:45 -0700
--------
George wrote:
> I don't care for starchy sticky whipped potatoes so I use yukon golds or 
> red potatoes (sometimes both) to make really really good smashed potatoes. 
> Whipped potatoes always remind me of the instant potatoes you getin school 
> cafeterias and industrial restaurants.

I don't know what you are objecting too.. .starchy, or sticky or whipped. 
All separate issues.  Smashed potatoes are another completely different 
issue.  Smashed potatoes is a good way to go if you can't make mashed 
potatoes. What I object to about smashed potatoes is that the cook often 
doesn't see a need to scrub the potatoes beforehand or cut out hard scar 
bits and you get all the grit and stuff in the mix.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 14:40:17 -0000
--------
Janet B. wrote:
> I don't know what you are objecting too.. .starchy, or sticky or
> whipped. All separate issues.  Smashed potatoes are another
> completely different issue.  Smashed potatoes is a good way to go if
> you can't make mashed potatoes. What I object to about smashed
> potatoes is that the cook often doesn't see a need to scrub the
> potatoes beforehand or cut out hard scar bits and you get all the
> grit and stuff in the mix. Janet

ewwwwwwwwww I have never seen that:( 

============================

From: Dee.Dee 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 11:12:26 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> ewwwwwwwwww I have never seen that:(

I always notice how they prep on the food shows.
I wonder when they have cleaned those celery stalks.
I wonder if and how they've cleaned the herbs -- they don't look wetted and 
dried, too darned fresh-of-the-vine looking.

I even notice (I won't mention the famous cook's name) dirty fingernails 
that don't look as if they have been recently dipped in chocolate.

But I do notice that sometimes they will roast vegetables that I would prep 
a little better.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 16:16:54 -0000
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
> I always notice how they prep on the food shows.
> I wonder when they have cleaned those celery stalks.
> I wonder if and how they've cleaned the herbs -- they don't look
> wetted and dried, too darned fresh-of-the-vine looking.

Hmmm a good  scrub is mandatory and even a good wash if that is not 
possible.

> I even notice (I won't mention the famous cook's name) dirty
> fingernails that don't look as if they have been recently dipped in
> chocolate.

ewwwwwwwwwwww on the tv??? Oh do tell.  He ought to be named and shamed!!!!!

> But I do notice that sometimes they will roast vegetables that I
> would prep a little better.

Oh dear.  Sounds scary:( 

============================

From: Lou Decruss 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 17:32:42 GMT
--------
Ophelia wrote:
>ewwwwwwwwwwww on the tv??? Oh do tell.  He ought to be named and shamed!!!!!

Probably Mario.  He's a good cook, but pretty greasy looking.

============================

From: Dee.Dee 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 12:39:09 -0500
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> Probably Mario.  He's a good cook, but pretty greasy looking.

Not at 'he.'

Poooooor Mario -- did anyone see him with Bittman in one of Bittman's shows, 
of them enjoying an Italian hillside meal together.  Honest to goodness --  
he is soooo fat!  I'm wondering how long he's going to be around.

============================

From: Serene 
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2007 15:08:28 -0800
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
> Poooooor Mario -- did anyone see him with Bittman in one of Bittman's shows, 
> of them enjoying an Italian hillside meal together.  Honest to goodness --  
> he is soooo fat!  I'm wondering how long he's going to be around.

Fat does not equal unhealthy.  I had lots more to say about your 
comments, but I'm saving my emotional energy these days, so let's 
just say my doctor *wishes* he had my cholesterol, blood pressure, 
and blood sugar numbers.

============================

From: Lou Decruss 
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2007 17:17:09 -0600
--------
Serene wrote:

>Fat does not equal unhealthy.  

What freekin planet are you from? 

>I had lots more to say about your 
>comments, but I'm saving my emotional energy these days, so let's 
>just say my doctor *wishes* he had my cholesterol, blood pressure, 
>and blood sugar numbers.

Did her tell you to put another 100 pounds on?

Lou <----wondering why diabetics are told to loose weight.

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2007 18:24:52 -0500
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> Did her tell you to put another 100 pounds on?
> 
> Lou <----wondering why diabetics are told to loose weight.

A lot of diabetics weight is already "loose"....not always mind you but 
frequently enough!

Regarding Mario though- he's got that terribly unhealthy male abdominal 
weight going on. Men put fat down differently than women and the risks 
aren't the same. His gut has become quite burdensome to him, I imagine?

============================

From: Lou Decruss 
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2007 19:22:16 -0600
--------
Goomba38 wrote:

>A lot of diabetics weight is already "loose"....not always mind you but 
>frequently enough!

LOL.
 
>Regarding Mario though- he's got that terribly unhealthy male abdominal 
>weight going on. Men put fat down differently than women and the risks 
>aren't the same. His gut has become quite burdensome to him, I imagine?  

I'm sure it's a burden.  But it can't be any more unhealthy than the
poster who claimed her doctor wanted her numbers even though she
weighs almost double what would be considered normal.  An average
woman in the US is 5'4" and 164 pounds.  (not that means healthy)  

For a short woman who weighs over 300 pounds to claim's fat is not
unhealthy because tests came back with nice numbers is denial.  You're
a nurse.  You know these things better than I do.

============================

From: Sarah Gray 
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2007 22:33:34 -0500
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> For a short woman who weighs over 300 pounds to claim's fat is not
> unhealthy because tests came back with nice numbers is denial.  You're
> a nurse.  You know these things better than I do.

I've seen pictures of Serene... she doesn't look *that* heavy to me...
Some people are genetically predispositioned to be heavier; If you are 
eating decent food, and getting exercise,  and the numbers are ok, who 
cares?

Sarah Gray (who knew I was so average? :>)

============================

From: Lou Decruss 
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2007 09:38:06 -0600
--------
Sarah Gray wrote:

>I've seen pictures of Serene... she doesn't look *that* heavy to me...

She did mention she was over 300 pounds.  Maybe "that heavy" means
different things to people.

>Some people are genetically predispositioned to be heavier; If you are 
>eating decent food, and getting exercise,  and the numbers are ok, who 
>cares?

I don't care how much anyone weighs except myself and Louise.  But if
someone does what you said they won't weigh 300 pounds.  They're
either lying about their lifestyle or have medical issues.  Neither of
which are healthy.  People that fat go to the grave early.  How often
do you see an obese 80 year old?    

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2007 18:18:04 -0500
--------
Serene wrote:
> Fat does not equal unhealthy.  I had lots more to say about your 
> comments, but I'm saving my emotional energy these days, so let's just 
> say my doctor *wishes* he had my cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood 
> sugar numbers.

Have you seen Mario, though? His kinda fat is definitely the unhealthy 
kind.

============================

From: Lou Decruss 
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2007 19:42:36 -0600
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
>Have you seen Mario, though? His kinda fat is definitely the unhealthy 
>kind.

What's healthy fat? 

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2007 20:50:47 -0500
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> What's healthy fat? 

Well, the layer of fat women put down during pregnancy to later nourish 
the baby off of is an obvious example...

============================

From: Lou Decruss 
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2007 08:37:13 -0600
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
>Well, the layer of fat women put down during pregnancy to later nourish 
>the baby off of is an obvious example...

My ex put on 90 pounds of that healthy fat. A year after she gave
birth she still had all 90 on.  I wonder if it was still healthy fat?

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2007 12:41:36 -0500
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> My ex put on 90 pounds of that healthy fat. A year after she gave
> birth she still had all 90 on.  I wonder if it was still healthy fat?

Ok, ok... so *she* went a bit overboard! LOL. You got the point though, 
right?

============================

From: Lou Decruss 
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2007 12:34:23 -0600
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
>Ok, ok... so *she* went a bit overboard! LOL. You got the point though, 
>right?

I'm not sure what you're saying.  Point to her?

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2007 13:53:57 -0500
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> I'm not sure what you're saying.  Point to her?

Your ex who was still wearing 90 pounds of fat a year after the birth.
Not all fat is bad (think breasts!) but the belly fat as Mario wears is 
way bad. That's all. Where is the confusion here?

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2007 17:44:07 GMT
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
>What's healthy fat? 

fat in the head.

============================

From: Dee.Dee 
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2007 18:44:18 -0500
--------
Serene wrote:
> Fat does not equal unhealthy.  I had lots more to say about your comments, 
> but I'm saving my emotional energy these days, so let's just say my doctor 
> *wishes* he had my cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood sugar numbers.

Yes, I do agree with you in a sense, Serene.  I get the lesson from my 
doctor at my yearly physical (yesterday was the day).  I am perhaps a tad 
overweight (on the borderline, shall we say).

DH is overweight and I wish I had his cholesterol, blood pressure and blood 
sugar numbers, too.  My comment about Mario was one of concern, not one of 
derision.  I adore Mario.

I understand about saving emotional energy.  I will try to send some good 
thoughts your way to accept and hope that you will not expend any energy at 
all on my commnts.  They do not warrant any.  Keep well.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2007 13:34:05 -0000
--------
Serene wrote:
> Fat does not equal unhealthy.  I had lots more to say about your
> comments, but I'm saving my emotional energy these days, so let's
> just say my doctor *wishes* he had my cholesterol, blood pressure,
> and blood sugar numbers.

I hope your health is improving Serene!

best

O 

============================

From: Dee.Dee 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 12:40:40 -0500
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> Probably Mario.  He's a good cook, but pretty greasy looking.

No.

Poem:
If I would mention the name,
I'd be getting a flame.

Dee Dee
In no mood for a flame today.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 17:47:33 -0000
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> Probably Mario.  He's a good cook, but pretty greasy looking.

ahh i don't know him:) 

============================

From: Sharon 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 16:27:39 -0500
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
> I even notice (I won't mention the famous cook's name) dirty fingernails
> that don't look as if they have been recently dipped in chocolate.

Jamie Oliver in particular.  I like him, but I notice on his Jamie At Home
show, cleanliness isn't always there, and the bowls he uses are often
cracked or checked.  I noticed several chefs cutting potatoes with the skins
on and not cutting out the blemishes and eyes.....yuk.....Sharon

============================

From: Dee.Dee 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 17:42:11 -0500
--------
Sharon wrote:
> Jamie Oliver in particular.  I like him, but I notice on his Jamie At Home
> show, cleanliness isn't always there, and the bowls he uses are often
> cracked or checked.  I noticed several chefs cutting potatoes with the skins
> on and not cutting out the blemishes and eyes.....yuk.....Sharon

Jamie Oliver never struck me as being concerned about that sort of thing. 
He's so darned nervous, I could crawl out of my skin after watching 5 
minutes.

I have a thing about cracked cups.   Instead of being washed in santized 
dishwashers, I think about the greasy water perhaps being used by a 
dishwasher.

DH knows I feel this way and so he caught onto it, too.  He tells me (over 
and over and over) about one time he and a couple of friends were going to 
pick up a boat and stopped at a local diner.  He told the woman who brought 
his coffee that the cup was cracked.  She said, It's allright; it won't 
leak.

Tee Hee
Dee Dee

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 08:14:20 -0000
--------
Sharon wrote:
> Jamie Oliver in particular.  I like him, but I notice on his Jamie At
> Home show, cleanliness isn't always there, and the bowls he uses are
> often cracked or checked.  I noticed several chefs cutting potatoes
> with the skins on and not cutting out the blemishes and
> eyes.....yuk.....Sharon

Double yuk! 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 14:29:19 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, George meant to say...
> I don't care for starchy sticky whipped potatoes so I use yukon golds or
> red potatoes (sometimes both) to make really really good smashed 
> potatoes. Whipped potatoes always remind me of the instant potatoes you 
> getin school cafeterias and industrial restaurants.

The stickiness comes from over beating.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 11:33:24 -0500
--------
George wrote:
> I don't care for starchy sticky whipped potatoes so I use yukon golds or 
> red potatoes (sometimes both) to make really really good smashed potatoes. 
> Whipped potatoes always remind me of the instant potatoes you getin school 
> cafeterias and industrial restaurants.

Not good ones. You must have had someone like me making your
whipped potatoes! 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 17:48:51 -0000
--------
cybercat wrote:
> Not good ones. You must have had someone like me making your
> whipped potatoes!

LOL awwwwwwwwwwwwww!  But all that will change now:)) 

============================

From: Jon v Leipzig 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 11:28:55 -0500
--------
Janet wrote:
> I agree, use cream. Also, save your Idahos for something else and get a bag 
> of Yukon Golds.

That's what my homie, Wolfgang Puck,  prefers...the Yukon Gold for mashed.


(just takin' notes, here)

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 19:32:44 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Jon v Leipzig meant to say...
> That's what my homie, Wolfgang Puck,  prefers...the Yukon Gold for
> mashed. 

What did one do before the Yukon Gold made it's appearance in today's 
kitchens?  They haven't been around all that long. :-)

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 13:55:30 -0700
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> What did one do before the Yukon Gold made it's appearance in today's
> kitchens?  They haven't been around all that long. :-)

IMO, Yukon Golds don't do a good job on either end of the spectrum.  I don't 
dislike them, but they are not good mashers because of a slightly waxy 
texture and they don't do good for potato salad because of a slightly 
starchy, crumbly texture.  If you're just going to boil and eat, they are 
wonderful.  Good for frying.  It's probably just me.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 20:59:41 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Janet B. meant to say...
> IMO, Yukon Golds don't do a good job on either end of the spectrum.  I
> don't dislike them, but they are not good mashers because of a slightly
> waxy texture and they don't do good for potato salad because of a
> slightly starchy, crumbly texture.  If you're just going to boil and
> eat, they are wonderful.  Good for frying.  It's probably just me.

No, Janet, I persnally feel the same way, and think they are overrated.

============================

From: hahabogus 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 21:19:01 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> No, Janet, I persnally feel the same way, and think they are overrated.

My preference is a red waxy potato for all things...I just prefer them. 
Also they were the potato I ate as a youth...Mom only used red potatoes. 
And I'm guessing that plays a major role in my preference.

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 16:23:31 -0700
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> My preference is a red waxy potato for all things...I just prefer them.
> Also they were the potato I ate as a youth...Mom only used red potatoes.
> And I'm guessing that plays a major role in my preference.

I love boiled red potatoes -- parsley buttered potatoes, German potato 
salad, boiled potatoes and herring, just plain boiled potatoes with cold 
butter, in  potato salad, in soups, in scalloped potatoes, hummmmm, there 
must be more.  Yum, Yum.

============================

From: hahabogus 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 00:55:26 GMT
--------
Janet B. wrote:
> I love boiled red potatoes -- parsley buttered potatoes, German potato
> salad, boiled potatoes and herring, just plain boiled potatoes with
> cold butter, in  potato salad, in soups, in scalloped potatoes,
> hummmmm, there must be more.  Yum, Yum.

If you like potatoes you like this... the broth is mashed potatoes 
mostly...thinned with a little chicken broth.

@@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

Vadalia Onion Chowder

Soups/Chowders/Stews

4 slices bacon -chopped bite sized; -not crumbled
2 tbsp olive oil; or use bacon fat
4  vadialia onions; sliced
2-3 cups mashed potatoes (leftovers); I used 3
4 cloves garlic; minced
2 boxes chicken stock (approx 30 oz)
2 cups corn kernels (I used 2 cans)
2  bay leaf; (optional)
1/4 tsp dried thyme
  fresh ground black pepper; LOTS
  salt to taste
  sour cream; see note*

Fry the bacon crisp. drain well the bacon and reserve. (Used later.)
Heat oil in large pot. low medium  to med heat.
Make the onions bite sized, add to pot, cook till tender, about 10 min.
Mince the garlic, add to pot, cook 1 minute or so more.
Add broth, potatoes, corn, bay leaves, thyme.  Bring the soup to a boil.
Remove the pot from the heat.  Remove the bay leaves.  Season with 
pepper. Add sour cream.

*Notes:

 Add the sour cream just before serving by the tablespoon per bowl.
This freezes better without the sour cream.(Frozen sour cream seperates)

Serve in soup bowls, and sprinkle crumbled bacon on top.
this recipe needs  more garlic than called for IMO.
Note: I just stirred the crumbled bacon in with the whole batch.
Don't be shy with the garlic.
I used some turkey Stock in with this  (excellent.)
Used 5 or 6 sweet onions
6-7 potatoes served as mashed.
I Didn't have vidalia onions so i used locally grown sweet onions 
instead.
I added a grated carrot just for colour.
I think some brocolli florets might be nice as well

** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.83 **

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 23:50:09 -0700
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> If you like potatoes you like this... the broth is mashed potatoes
> mostly...thinned with a little chicken broth.
>
> @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format
>
> Vadalia Onion Chowder

lovely recipe snipped

> The house of the burning beet-Alan

Well of course -- chowder.  I've saved your recipe.  I haven't made chowder 
since early last spring.  It's cold and nasty wet here now, I'm going to try 
your recipe tomorrow.  Thanks

============================

From: Dee.Dee 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 17:45:26 -0500
--------
Janet B. wrote:
> IMO, Yukon Golds don't do a good job on either end of the spectrum.  I 
> don't dislike them, but they are not good mashers because of a slightly 
> waxy texture and they don't do good for potato salad because of a slightly 
> starchy, crumbly texture.  If you're just going to boil and eat, they are 
> wonderful.  Good for frying.  It's probably just me.

Someone mentioned potato smell when they are bad.  Tell me about it!  Costco 
doesn't always keep the freshest potaotes; and sometimes they are fabulous. 
One particular day, the Yukons looked fresh, but oh, the smell -- I've been 
turned off ever since and that's been a few months.  I did buy a few reds at 
another store, but I didn't have a hankering for them - I still have that 
bad potato smell in my nose!

============================

From: sf
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 15:36:21 -0800
--------
Janet B. wrote:
>IMO, Yukon Golds don't do a good job on either end of the spectrum.  I don't 
>dislike them, but they are not good mashers because of a slightly waxy 
>texture and they don't do good for potato salad because of a slightly 
>starchy, crumbly texture.  If you're just going to boil and eat, they are 
>wonderful.  Good for frying.  It's probably just me.

I don't use them either.  I rarely use waxy potatoes for that matter.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 08:05:42 -0000
--------
Janet B. wrote:
> IMO, Yukon Golds don't do a good job on either end of the spectrum. I 
> don't dislike them, but they are not good mashers because of a
> slightly waxy texture and they don't do good for potato salad because
> of a slightly starchy, crumbly texture.  If you're just going to boil
> and eat, they are wonderful.  Good for frying.  It's probably just me.

No sweetie:)   You are too precious to fry  

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 05:35:02 -0700
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> No sweetie:)   You are too precious to fry 

Oh, thank you!!! o}

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 14:50:32 -0000
--------
Janet B. wrote:
> Oh, thank you!!! o}

 

============================

From: sf
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 07:02:35 -0800
--------
Ophelia wrote:
>No sweetie:)   You are too precious to fry  

Can I poach her instead?  I'll be gentle, no boiling involved.
Honest!  Can I, huh?  Pleeeeze!  Can I?  Can I?  

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 15:49:43 -0000
--------
sf wrote:
> Can I poach her instead?  I'll be gentle, no boiling involved.
> Honest!  Can I, huh?  Pleeeeze!  Can I?  Can I?  

Oh go one then!!  But gently mind!!! 

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 13:04:34 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> Oh go one then!!  But gently mind!!!

Gentle poaching: a long, hot bath with coco butter bath oil. :) 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 18:10:44 -0000
--------
cybercat wrote:
> Gentle poaching: a long, hot bath with coco butter bath oil. :)

Ooh can I get in too???? 

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 08:59:26 -0700
--------
sf wrote:
> Can I poach her instead?  I'll be gentle, no boiling involved.
> Honest!  Can I, huh?  Pleeeeze!  Can I?  Can I?  

I don't think we're talking hot tub here, are we?  ;o} How about we all go 
out for a drink and some nibbles and discuss this?

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 18:09:09 -0000
--------
Janet B. wrote:
> I don't think we're talking hot tub here, are we?  ;o} How about we
> all go out for a drink and some nibbles and discuss this?
> Janet

Hehe I am on my way:) 

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 16:15:38 -0700
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> Hehe I am on my way:)

Oh, good!  My treat,

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2007 14:24:34 -0000
--------
Janet B. wrote:
> Oh, good!  My treat,

O revs up her broomstick:))))))))))) 

============================

From: sf
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 21:49:01 -0800
--------
Janet B. wrote:
>I don't think we're talking hot tub here, are we?  ;o} How about we all go 
>out for a drink and some nibbles and discuss this?

LOL!  You *are* a clever one, diverting my attention like that with
food and drink.  

OK, let's do it!  Eating is so much more fun.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2007 14:28:04 -0000
--------
sf wrote:
> LOL!  You *are* a clever one, diverting my attention like that with
> food and drink.
>
> OK, let's do it!  Eating is so much more fun.

^5 :)) 

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2007 08:34:46 -0700
--------
sf wrote:
> LOL!  You *are* a clever one, diverting my attention like that with
> food and drink.
>
> OK, let's do it!  Eating is so much more fun.

Whew!  Saved from poaching!

============================

From: Blinky the Shark 
Date: 12 Nov 2007 21:22:35 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> What did one do before the Yukon Gold made it's appearance in today's
> kitchens?  They haven't been around all that long. :-)

This sent me off to Google, because you got me curious as to how long
they *have* been available.  I remembered my mom discovering them back
in the 1980s or early 1990s -- yeah, that's pretty recent in terms of
The History Of Cooking.  :)

I found this:



Yellow-fleshed potatoes are common in Europe and South America. In fact,
yellow flesh potatoes are actually considered the norm in most countries
outside North America, so naturally, immigrants to North America were
accustomed to and preferred potatoes with yellow flesh.

...

We have the potato-breeding program of the University of Guelph in
Canada to thank for the Yukon Gold. Led by potato breeder Dr. Gary
Johnston and sponsored by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, a research
team spent years experimenting, finally achieving success by
cross-breeding a North American white potato (Norgleam) with a wild
South American yellow-fleshed variety (W5279-4). The result was the
Yukon Gold, the first Canadian-bred potato to be marketed and promoted
by name. It received a Canadian license in 1980 and soon began
exportation to the United States.



Full article, which discusses some other yellow potates as well:

http://homecooking.about.com/od/foodhistory/a/yukongoldhistry.htm

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 16:26:19 -0700
--------
Blinky the Shark wrote:
>   It received a Canadian license in 1980 and soon began
> exportation to the United States.

I grew them back then when they were brand new.  They were touted as having 
a naturally buttery taste.  I found them a little harder to grow than 
Russets or any of the Red potatoes.  I have a hankering to try some 
different varieties, but I simply don't have enough sun in my garden any 
more.

============================

From: George 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 17:40:24 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> What did one do before the Yukon Gold made it's appearance in today's 
> kitchens?  They haven't been around all that long. :-)
 
I used red potatoes. Now I often make smashed potatoes or potato salad 
with a mix of skin on red and yukon gold potatoes.

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 17:16:07 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>What did one do before the Yukon Gold made it's appearance in today's 
>kitchens?  They haven't been around all that long. :-)

i guess he made cruddy mashed potatoes.

============================

From: Ms P 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 11:23:16 -0600
--------
cybercat wrote:
> How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

Get a decent masher.  Those old wire things always leave lumps.  I have a 
nylon one I got at Target that has holes and it really mashes them.  Butter 
and cream make the best mashed potatoes.  Another thing I do is let them 
drain in the colander until they look dry.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 12:55:18 -0500
--------
Ms P wrote:
> Get a decent masher.  Those old wire things always leave lumps.  I have a 
> nylon one I got at Target that has holes and it really mashes them. 
> Butter and cream make the best mashed potatoes.  Another thing I do is let 
> them drain in the colander until they look dry.

My mother always used an electric mixer. Trying that is how I wound up
overbeating them and they turned gray.

Also, the milk or cream (maybe half and half?) should be warm, right? 

============================

From: Ms P 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 12:29:19 -0600
--------
cybercat wrote:
> My mother always used an electric mixer. Trying that is how I wound up
> overbeating them and they turned gray.
>
> Also, the milk or cream (maybe half and half?) should be warm, right?

I don't warm the milk or cream.  I tried it a few times and couldn't tell 
any difference so I don't bother.  I've used a mixer a few times to make 
mashed when I had a lot to make.  Most of the time on holidays I have either 
my husband or one of my sons mash for awhile and then I finish them.

============================

From: aem 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 10:42:35 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
> My mother always used an electric mixer. Trying that is how I wound up
> overbeating them and they turned gray.

Stand and hand mixers are convenient for large quantities but they run
a severe risk of creating a gummy, pasty mess.  For light, airy
potatoes without lumps the ricer is the way to go.  It's more trouble
but definitely worth the effort.  Put the well-drained/dried potatoes
through the ricer, add butter and cream/milk, and finish with just a
few strokes of the wooden spoon.  The potatoes will float off the
spoon like a cloud.

> Also, the milk or cream (maybe half and half?) should be warm, right?

You can easily warm them in the microwave, if it's convenient.  By the
time the whole T-Day meal gets to the table, though, it's a lost cause
trying to keep the potatoes hot.  Way more important, and easier to
accomplish, is to make sure the gravy is really hot.  That's what
matters.....     -aem

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 16:03:22 -0700
--------
cybercat wrote:
>My mother always used an electric mixer. Trying that is how I wound up
>overbeating them and they turned gray.

Yes, exactly..  Don't use a stand mixer, or a food processor.  A hand
mixer on very low speed is okay, but it is too easy to turn them into
glue with a stand mixer. Plus, you really need to mash them in the
pot, where they can dry out from the heat.  

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 18:38:54 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Yes, exactly..  Don't use a stand mixer, or a food processor.  A hand
> mixer on very low speed is okay, but it is too easy to turn them into
> glue with a stand mixer. Plus, you really need to mash them in the
> pot, where they can dry out from the heat.

I think sf is right, I need to practice! Once with the ricer, once with the 
mixer. And yes, I did turn my potatoes to glue as a kid, and never tried to 
make mashed again. lol 

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 15:59:58 -0700
--------
Ms P wrote:
>   Another thing I do is let them 
>drain in the colander until they look dry.

Julia Child goes a step further.. After they drain, she puts them back
in the pot, over low heat, then starts mashing them there.  The heat
dries out the residual moisture left in the potatoes, so you don't
have watery mashed potatoes.  This step is really important.

Then, you can start adding butter and cream.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 23:09:32 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Christine Dabney meant to say...
> Julia Child goes a step further.. After they drain, she puts them back
> in the pot, over low heat, then starts mashing them there.  The heat
> dries out the residual moisture left in the potatoes, so you don't
> have watery mashed potatoes.  This step is really important.
> 
> Then, you can start adding butter and cream.

That's something I always do.  Makes a world of difference.

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 18:26:02 -0700
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> That's something I always do.  Makes a world of difference.

I've always mashed them over low heat, added the butter (mash, mash) and 
then when smooth, stir in the cream/milk.  I was just reading today in Fine 
Cooking that you want to mash over low heat, add the butter first so that it 
coats the starch granules and does something important and then add the 
cream.  Who knew?

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 01:27:51 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Janet B. meant to say...
> I've always mashed them over low heat, added the butter (mash, mash) and
> then when smooth, stir in the cream/milk.  I was just reading today in
> Fine Cooking that you want to mash over low heat, add the butter first
> so that it coats the starch granules and does something important and
> then add the cream.  Who knew?

Me!  Learned that a long time ago. 

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 18:37:33 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Julia Child goes a step further.. After they drain, she puts them back
> in the pot, over low heat, then starts mashing them there.  The heat
> dries out the residual moisture left in the potatoes, so you don't
> have watery mashed potatoes.  This step is really important.
>
> Then, you can start adding butter and cream.

This sounds like a plan. I am going to get a ricer like the one sf uses. 

============================

From: Ms P 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 18:16:28 -0600
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Julia Child goes a step further.. After they drain, she puts them back
> in the pot, over low heat, then starts mashing them there.  The heat
> dries out the residual moisture left in the potatoes, so you don't
> have watery mashed potatoes.  This step is really important.
>
> Then, you can start adding butter and cream.

I used to do them over low heat too but I discovered if I left them to drain 
in the colander long enough they steamed themselves pretty dry.  Then son 2 
or hubby can mash them over on another counter out of the way.

============================

From: ravenlynne 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 19:37:29 +0200
--------
cybercat wrote:
> I got roped into doing Thanksgiving dinner.
> 
> I don't do mashed potatoes! I never have. I recall trying years ago, and 
> they were lumpy.

You can make them for me then.  I like them lumpy.

My MIL puts them in her kitchenaid mixer for 10 minutes (it seems like). 
They're all pasty and stuff.
 
> Got five pounds of big, fresh Idaho potatoes at Aldi, and a pound of butter. 
> I guess I need milk, right?
> 
> How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

Butter, half and half, a pinch of S&P...then I roughly mash.

============================

From: koko
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 09:48:50 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
>How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

Sometimes I add a little orange juice. 

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 12:53:30 -0500
--------
koko wrote:
> Sometimes I add a little orange juice.

hmmm ... how does it turn out? 

============================

From: koko
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 16:54:09 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
>hmmm ... how does it turn out? 

Really delicious. They have a nice fresh taste with a hint of citrus. 
Here's the recipe. 

@@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

Orange Mashed Potatoes

vegetables

3 pounds potatoes
2 cups yellow onions; finely chopped
4 tablespoons sweet butter
1/2 cup crème fraîche; (see note)
3/4 cup orange juice
  grated fresh orange zest; for garnish

Peel and quarter the potatoes and drop them into a large pot of cold
salted water. Bring to a moderate boil and cook until potatoes are
very tender,30 minutes or so.
Meanwhile, in another pan, cook the onions in the butter, covered,
until very tender and lightly colored, about 25 minutes.
Drain and mash the potatoes and stir in the onions and their cooking
butter. Stir in the crème fraîche and orange juice and beat potatoes
with a wire whisk until fluffy. Turn into a heated serving dish and
garnish with fresh orange zest to taste. Serve immediately.

Note: To make crème fraîche

1 cup heavy cream (not ultrapasteurized)
1 cup dairy sour cream.

Whisk heavy cream and sour cream together in a bowl. Cover loosely
with plastic wrap and let stand in the kitchen or other reasonably
warm spot overnight, or until thickened. In cold weather this may take
as long as 24 hours.
Cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours, after which the crème
fraîche will be quite thick. The tart flavor will continue to develop
as the crème fraîche sits in the refrigerator.

Yield: 2 cups.

Contributor:  The Silver Palate cookbook

Yield: 6 servings

** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.77 **

============================

From: ravenlynne 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 07:45:10 +0200
--------
koko wrote:
> Really delicious. They have a nice fresh taste with a hint of citrus. 
> Here's the recipe. 
> 
> @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format
> 
> Orange Mashed Potatoes

It would never have occured to me to mix potatoes and oranges. 
Interesting..

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 06:51:00 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, ravenlynne meant to say...
> It would never have occured to me to mix potatoes and oranges. 
> Interesting..

Nor I, but I have had mashed potatoes combined with mashed rutbagas, and 
with mashed parsnips, and with mashed carrots.

============================

From: ravenlynne 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 09:29:17 +0200
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Nor I, but I have had mashed potatoes combined with mashed rutbagas, and 
> with mashed parsnips, and with mashed carrots.

Well, those I can imagine...it's the acidic oranges that I'm not sure 
I'd like...

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 13:01:28 -0000
--------
ravenlynne wrote:
> Well, those I can imagine...it's the acidic oranges that I'm not sure
> I'd like...

During WWII here in UK, potato was used for many things other than savoury 
dishes.  With a little flour it could be used for pastry and cakes.  Very 
versatile. 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 14:26:25 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Ophelia meant to say...
> During WWII here in UK, potato was used for many things other than savoury 
> dishes.  With a little flour it could be used for pastry and cakes.  Very 
> versatile. 

As it was in the States, Ophelia.  Flour was rationed here as well as most 
foods.  If you didn't live on a farm and grew most of your own food, 
cooking had to be particularly creative.  I've seen recipes for cakes and 
candies that used potatoes.

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 09:34:54 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote
> As it was in the States, Ophelia.  Flour was rationed here as well as most
> foods.  If you didn't live on a farm and grew most of your own food,
> cooking had to be particularly creative.  I've seen recipes for cakes and
> candies that used potatoes.

Potato fudge!

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 14:42:22 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Nancy Young meant to say...
> Potato fudge!

Indeed.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 15:02:38 -0000
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> Potato fudge!

Do you still have a recipe for that  Nancy? 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 19:31:46 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Ophelia meant to say...
> Do you still have a recipe for that  Nancy? 

Here's one from the same 1930s cookbook as the cake recipe I posted a bit 
earlier.

Potato Fudge
2 medium potatoes (about 10 ounce
    total), peeled and cut up
1 to 2 tablespoons milk
1 (6 ounce) package (1 cup) semisweet chocolate chips
1 cup peanut butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 cups confectioners' sugar (about 12 ounces)
1 cup finely chopped peanuts

In a large saucepan, cook potatoes until very tender. Drain and mash with 
enough milk to make fluffy; you should have 2/3 cup mashed potatoes.

In a heavy 3 quart saucepan, heat chocolate chips over low heat until 
melted, stirring constantly. Remove from heat, stir in mashed potatoes, 
peanut butter and vanilla extract. Stir in confectioners' sugar. (If 
necessary, work in last 1/2 cup of confectioners' sugar with your hands.) 
Stir in 1/2 the peanuts. Turn the mixture into a 9-inch square baking pan. 
Press down evenly. Sprinkle with remaining peanuts and press down into 
candy. Cover, chill firm. Cut into pieces. 

Makes about 2 1/4 pounds creamy fudge. 

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 15:09:22 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote
> Do you still have a recipe for that  Nancy?

I don't, Ophelia, though people did post some for me at one
time.  It's something I remember from when I was a kid ... my
best friend's grandmother would come visit from West Virginia
or Pennsylvania and bring it.  It was like white fudge.  Blew my
mind ... candy made from Potatoes???

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 08:09:40 -0000
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> I don't, Ophelia, though people did post some for me at one
> time.  It's something I remember from when I was a kid ... my
> best friend's grandmother would come visit from West Virginia
> or Pennsylvania and bring it.  It was like white fudge.  Blew my
> mind ... candy made from Potatoes???

LOL although when you think about it, potato is quite bland. Wayne posted 
the recipe so perhaps you might like to make more?

Thanks nancy:) 

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 08:23:50 -0700
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> As it was in the States, Ophelia.  Flour was rationed here as well as most
> foods.  If you didn't live on a farm and grew most of your own food,
> cooking had to be particularly creative.  I've seen recipes for cakes and
> candies that used potatoes.

Here's where I get upset when folks ridicule foods of yore that (as you 
exampled, used potatoes in inventive ways) use ingredients that are old 
fashioned now or the food item itself is not in style.  Many casseroles and 
sweets were born out of inventiveness, are part of our heritage and deserve 
our respect.  To my mind, these food items have more to recommend them than 
the current crop that have been created simply to appeal to jaded tastes.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 16:14:39 -0000
--------
Janet B. wrote:

> Here's where I get upset when folks ridicule foods of yore that (as
> you exampled, used potatoes in inventive ways) use ingredients that
> are old fashioned now or the food item itself is not in style.  Many
> casseroles and sweets were born out of inventiveness, are part of our
> heritage and deserve our respect.

They most certainly do!

>   To my mind, these food items have
> more to recommend them than the current crop that have been created
> simply to appeal to jaded tastes. Janet

I don't think I have ever heard anyone ridicule wartime food Janet!

Mind you, I work in social history so maybe it is more accepted. 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 19:27:11 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Janet B. meant to say...
> Here's where I get upset when folks ridicule foods of yore that (as you 
> exampled, used potatoes in inventive ways) use ingredients that are old 
> fashioned now or the food item itself is not in style.  Many casseroles
> and sweets were born out of inventiveness, are part of our heritage and
> deserve our respect.  To my mind, these food items have more to
> recommend them than the current crop that have been created simply to
> appeal to jaded tastes. Janet

Agreed.  I recall one such recipe in a 1930s cookbook that was for 
"Butterless, Eggless, Milkless Cake".  I have made it and still do 
occasionally.  It is a rather dense cake laden with spices and raisins and 
currants, and lard used in place of butter.  Given the cost of dried fruits 
and spices today, it would not be a cheap cake to make.  It's quite tasty.

============================

From: Larry LaMere 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 12:18:05 -0500
--------
Janet B. wrote:
>Here's where I get upset when folks ridicule foods of yore that (as you 
>exampled, used potatoes in inventive ways) use ingredients that are old 
>fashioned now or the food item itself is not in style.  Many casseroles and 
>sweets were born out of inventiveness, are part of our heritage and deserve 
>our respect.  To my mind, these food items have more to recommend them than 
>the current crop that have been created simply to appeal to jaded tastes.
>Janet

If you can get hold of one, check out the 1943 edition of The Joy of Cooking. Lots of
recipe's  for using substitutes for rationed items. 

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 09:26:18 -0700
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> As it was in the States, Ophelia.  Flour was rationed here as well as most
> foods.  If you didn't live on a farm and grew most of your own food,
> cooking had to be particularly creative.  I've seen recipes for cakes and
> candies that used potatoes.

Irish potato candy (From 'Favorite Recipes from Southern Kitchens')

2 potatoes size of an egg [what size egg one might ask]
2 boxes powdered sugar [no idea how much that is]
1 pt peanut butter

Cook potatoes with jackets on; peel and mash smooth.
Add sifted powdered sugar to make a dough.
Roll on a biscuit board to 1/2 inch thick;spread with peanut butter.
Roll up, let set about 30 minutes and slice.

Chocolate roll (same book)

1/2 cup unseasoned mashed Irish potatoes, cooled
1 3/4 cup powdered sugar
2 2/3 cup dry coconut
1/2 tsp vanilla
pinch of salt
3 oz semisweet chocolate, melted

Place mashed potatoes in a bowl; mix in powdered sugar and coconut to
form a stiff mixture. Mix in vanila and salt. Shape into two long rolls.
Spread melted chocolate over rolls and cool.

============================

From: Mitch Scherer 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 18:42:17 -0800
--------
Arri London wrote:
>Irish potato candy (From 'Favorite Recipes from Southern Kitchens')
>
> 2 potatoes size of an egg [what size egg one might ask]
> 2 boxes powdered sugar [no idea how much that is]
> 1 pt peanut butter
>
> Cook potatoes with jackets on; peel and mash smooth.
> Add sifted powdered sugar to make a dough.
> Roll on a biscuit board to 1/2 inch thick;spread with peanut butter.
> Roll up, let set about 30 minutes and slice.

My relatives in Kentucky made this awful potato candy and claimed it was a 
secret family recipe.  Maybe it was from the Irish part of the family.

============================

From: Julie Bove 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 00:02:13 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> As it was in the States, Ophelia.  Flour was rationed here as well as most
> foods.  If you didn't live on a farm and grew most of your own food,
> cooking had to be particularly creative.  I've seen recipes for cakes and
> candies that used potatoes.

I remember using mashed potatos mixed with coconut and then rolled in balls 
and dipped in chocolate.  I've also seen a Mexican sweet potato candy 
recipe. 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 11:32:52 -0000
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> I remember using mashed potatos mixed with coconut and then rolled in
> balls and dipped in chocolate.  I've also seen a Mexican sweet potato
> candy recipe.

It just shows how clever the housewives were at feeding their families in 
hard times:)

============================

From: Julie Bove 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 00:01:08 GMT
--------
ravenlynne wrote:
> Well, those I can imagine...it's the acidic oranges that I'm not sure I'd 
> like...

I've made lemon potatoes and they were good.  I can't remember the exact 
recipe now.  They were boiled potatoes and then they had a lemon butter on 
them. 

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 18:42:42 -0700
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> I've made lemon potatoes and they were good.  I can't remember the exact
> recipe now.  They were boiled potatoes and then they had a lemon butter on
> them.

Try boiled new potatoes dressed with butter and minced fresh mint. The
new potatoes are often boiled with mint in the UK, but the 'external'
mint dressing seems tastier.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 08:16:09 -0000
--------
Arri London wrote:
> Try boiled new potatoes dressed with butter and minced fresh mint. The
> new potatoes are often boiled with mint in the UK, but the 'external'
> mint dressing seems tastier.

I do both, but you are right.. they are heavenly:)) 

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 08:56:46 -0700
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> I do both, but you are right.. they are heavenly:))

When I mention that concept around here (US) usually get a negative
reaction. Don't have any fresh mint sob sob.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 18:08:46 -0000
--------
Arri London wrote:
> When I mention that concept around here (US) usually get a negative
> reaction. Don't have any fresh mint sob sob.

Once you get mint in your garden, your problem is more about keeping it 
under control than having to take care to grow it:) 

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 16:18:33 -0700
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> Once you get mint in your garden, your problem is more about keeping it 
> under control than having to take care to grow it:)

I use mint and spearmint as erosion control for the creek bank.  One year 
the wild ducks that were passing through ate the mints down below the soil 
level -- pecked at all visible roots and I thought for sure that the mint 
was a goner.  Not so . . .it came back stronger than ever. :o}

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2007 14:25:15 -0000
--------
Janet B. wrote:
> I use mint and spearmint as erosion control for the creek bank.  One
> year the wild ducks that were passing through ate the mints down
> below the soil level -- pecked at all visible roots and I thought for
> sure that the mint was a goner.  Not so . . .it came back stronger
> than ever. :o}

Yep, it is quite hard to kill mint:) 

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 17:39:24 -0700
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> Once you get mint in your garden, your problem is more about keeping it
> under control than having to take care to grow it:)

Should be! Unfortunately didn't do any gardening last year and thinking
my mum pulled up the mint along with some weeds. Didn't have one plant
this year. Will try again when spring comes round.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2007 14:26:22 -0000
--------
Arri London wrote:
> Should be! Unfortunately didn't do any gardening last year and
> thinking my mum pulled up the mint along with some weeds. Didn't have
> one plant this year. Will try again when spring comes round.

Gosh, she must be a very thorough weeder!!!!!!!!!! 

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2007 17:54:49 -0700
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> Gosh, she must be a very thorough weeder!!!!!!!!!!

No kidding. Don't forget that I currently live in a desert area. Plants
that take over in wetter climes often just die off here without a lot of
extra help.

She also dug up all the tiger lily bulbs and threw them out without
realising what was what...

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2007 13:38:35 -0000
--------
Arri London wrote:
> No kidding. Don't forget that I currently live in a desert area.
> Plants that take over in wetter climes often just die off here
> without a lot of extra help.

I didn't know that:(

> She also dug up all the tiger lily bulbs and threw them out without
> realising what was what...

oh:((((((((  Just a question?  Why do you let her loose in your garden?? :)) 

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2007 08:58:53 -0700
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> I didn't know that:(

LOL now you do!

> oh:((((((((  Just a question?  Why do you let her loose in your garden?? :))

Because it's *her* garden and I was getting sicker and sicker at the
time and just didn't care. Had been trying to grow some herbs for
culinary and medical purposes; the Mediterranean ones survive here just
fine but the moister herbs need some care. Will try again next season.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2007 16:27:08 -0000
--------
Arri London wrote:
> Because it's *her* garden and I was getting sicker and sicker at the
> time and just didn't care. Had been trying to grow some herbs for
> culinary and medical purposes; the Mediterranean ones survive here
> just fine but the moister herbs need some care. Will try again next
> season.

OK:)  Good luck with it:) 

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2007 17:43:34 -0700
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> OK:)  Good luck with it:)

TY! The rosemary is doing just fine but that stuff is indestructible
anyway LOL.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2007 08:50:18 -0000
--------
Arri London wrote:
> TY! The rosemary is doing just fine but that stuff is indestructible
> anyway LOL.

Oddly that is the one thing I haven't been able to grow here in my bit of 
Scotland!  It is also my favourite herb wouldn't you know:) 

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2007 10:45:05 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote
> Oddly that is the one thing I haven't been able to grow here in my bit of 
> Scotland!  It is also my favourite herb wouldn't you know:)

Same here in North Carolina. Mine died. 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2007 16:09:34 -0000
--------
cybercat wrote:
> Same here in North Carolina. Mine died.

Well, we are on the same latitude as Moscow!  What is your excuse  

============================

From: Bobo Bonobo(R) 
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2007 09:06:45 -0800 (PST)
--------
cybercat wrote:
> Same here in North Carolina. Mine died.

Ours usually dies too, which sucks because rosemary is the one herb
that just doesn't dry well.

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2007 12:27:33 -0500
--------
Bobo Bonobo(R) wrote
> Ours usually dies too, which sucks because rosemary is the one herb
> that just doesn't dry well.

Where I live the plants usually last a few seasons outdoors until we
have a particularly rough winter.  Just a thought, I see those
rosemary Christmas 'trees' for sale and I think that would be a
pretty and useful houseplant that maybe you'd move outside for the
summer?

Well, since I started it, I decided to look it up.  These pretty little
topiaris must go on sale right after Christmas.

http://www.gardenguides.com/how-to/tipstechniques/herbs/rosemarychrostmastrees.asp

============================

From: Lou Decruss 
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2007 11:48:58 -0600
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
>Well, since I started it, I decided to look it up.  These pretty little
>topiaris must go on sale right after Christmas.

Costco (the dreaded C word) usually has them in December.  We got one
trimmed up like a pine tree.  They had tons of them.  It smelled so
good when we got home we went back the next day to get more for gifts.
Gone.  Getum when they gotum.  IIRC is was about 15 bucks.  About 2
ft. tall.  

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2007 12:56:27 -0500
--------
Lou Decruss wrote
> Costco (the dreaded C word) usually has them in December.  We got one
> trimmed up like a pine tree.  They had tons of them.  It smelled so
> good when we got home we went back the next day to get more for gifts.
> Gone.  Getum when they gotum.  IIRC is was about 15 bucks.  About 2
> ft. tall.

They're very pretty, and if you want to grow rosemary inside, that
seems to be the way to go.  This is no little starter plant.  I was
ogling them at Wegman's yesterday.  If I didn't have rosemary
outside, I'd grab one in a heartbeat.

============================

From: Lou Decruss 
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2007 12:00:03 -0600
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
>They're very pretty, and if you want to grow rosemary inside, that
>seems to be the way to go.  This is no little starter plant.  I was
>ogling them at Wegman's yesterday.  If I didn't have rosemary
>outside, I'd grab one in a heartbeat.

How much were they?

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2007 13:14:43 -0500
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> How much were they?

You know, I didn't look because I didn't intend to buy one.

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2007 18:59:53 -0700
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> Oddly that is the one thing I haven't been able to grow here in my bit of
> Scotland!  It is also my favourite herb wouldn't you know:)

It really does need a fair bit of sun. Got a south-facing corner
somewhere?

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2007 19:46:42 -0700
--------
Arri London wrote:
> It really does need a fair bit of sun. Got a south-facing corner
> somewhere?

Good drainage wouldn't hurt either.  Rosemary doesn't like wet feet.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Sun, 18 Nov 2007 07:43:59 -0000
--------
Janet B. wrote:
> Good drainage wouldn't hurt either.  Rosemary doesn't like wet feet.
> Janet

Yes indeed.  I have grown it successfully in other places. But thanks for 
the advice anyway Janet:))
Any other advice happily received:)) 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Sun, 18 Nov 2007 07:42:48 -0000
--------
Arri London wrote:
> It really does need a fair bit of sun. Got a south-facing corner
> somewhere?

Too late now, we are in the throes of moving house:))  Fingers crossed for 
the next one:) 

============================

From: Giusi 
Date: Sun, 18 Nov 2007 10:46:39 +0100
--------
Ophelia ha scritto:
> Too late now, we are in the throes of moving house:))  Fingers crossed for 
> the next one:)

O, find a southfacing place with fantastic drainage, maybe even creating a 
French drain under it.  Rosemary can take cold, it can take wet periods, but 
cold and wet together are death.  In WV I lost mine to ice storms, or freeze 
thaw cycles that left choking crust for days or weeks.  When we had cold 
winters with dry snow, it would survive.

I dragged a pot in some years, but it always seemd to get infected with some 
kind of mite and would croak.  Here the problem is pruning enough.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Sun, 18 Nov 2007 10:17:30 -0000
--------
Giusi wrote:
> O, find a southfacing place with fantastic drainage, maybe even creating a 
> French drain under it.  Rosemary can take cold, it can take wet periods, but 
> cold and wet together are death.  In WV I lost mine to ice storms, or freeze 
> thaw cycles that left choking crust for days or weeks.  When we had cold 
> winters with dry snow, it would survive.
>
> I dragged a pot in some years, but it always seemd to get infected with some 
> kind of mite and would croak.  Here the problem is pruning enough.

many thanks Guisi and Arri:)))))))))))) 

============================

From: Sarah Gray 
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2007 00:07:37 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> Once you get mint in your garden, your problem is more about keeping it 
> under control than having to take care to grow it:) 

My mother once had an herb garden. I helped her plant it when I was 
about 4 or 5. Now it's a huge expanse of mint that has overtaken a chunk 
of the backyard. There used to be some sage, but the mint choked it out. 
At least it smells nice when we mow the lawn :)

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2007 14:27:41 -0000
--------
Sarah Gray wrote:
> My mother once had an herb garden. I helped her plant it when I was
> about 4 or 5. Now it's a huge expanse of mint that has overtaken a
> chunk of the backyard. There used to be some sage, but the mint
> choked it out. At least it smells nice when we mow the lawn :)

It does have a saving grace:))))  Don't you use it in your cooking? 

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 01:34:53 -0500
--------
koko wrote
> Really delicious. They have a nice fresh taste with a hint of citrus.
> Here's the recipe.
>
> Orange Mashed Potatoes

Thank you! I save it and will try it in my practice runs this week. 

============================

From: George 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 13:06:11 -0500
--------
cybercat wrote:
> I don't do mashed potatoes! I never have. I recall trying years ago, and 
> they were lumpy.

I like lumpy. Whipped potatoes are usually space food that you get at 
the big box restaurant.

I usually use yukon golds and cut them up with the skins on. Boil until 
tender, drain, add butter, milk and a little nutmeg and smash them with 
a masher.

============================

From: Lou Decruss 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 21:48:43 GMT
--------
readandpostrosie wrote:
>way to go george................leave those VITAMIN PACKED skins on! 

I prefer twice baked myself.  Best of both worlds.

============================

From: sf
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 14:46:09 -0800
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
>I prefer twice baked myself.  Best of both worlds.

I like them all, in fact I'm making twice baked today.

============================

From: Janet Baraclough 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 18:36:23 GMT
--------
The message from cybercat contains these words:

> I got roped into doing Thanksgiving dinner.

> I don't do mashed potatoes! I never have. I recall trying years ago, and 
> they were lumpy.

   Reminds me of  the 60's and a student friend (6 ft 6, bearded, built
like a barn, voice like a grater, mind of a child) saying "Should I mash
the potatoes raw, or cook them first? ".

> Got five pounds of big, fresh Idaho potatoes at Aldi, and a pound of
> butter. 
> I guess I need milk, right?

> How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

   Peel , cut the spuds into half (or egg-size lumps) and put them in
cold salted water to cover. bring to the boil and cook for about 10 mins
(test to see if a table knife slides in easily, test it on more than one
spud; you make need another 5 mins or more depending on breed of spud).
Stop before the surfaces start to break up Don't over cook to a mush. 

Drain the pan and return it with potatoes briefly to the stove top while
you slosh in some fullcream milk  and a big dod of good butter; (the
residual heat heats up the milk and melts the butter as you mash) a
pinch of salt, grind some black pepper. Mash with a hand-potato masher
till smooth and no lumps; do NOT be tempted to use any kind of electric
aid as they will go slimey. If you don't have a masher use a table fork;
good result just takes longer and more wrist action. You may want some
more milk or cream. Taste to check seasoning and adjust. You can make
them half an hour before serving and keep them hot in a covered dish.

============================

From: sf
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 12:21:59 -0800
--------
Janet Baraclough wrote:
>Drain the pan and return it with potatoes briefly to the stove top while
>you slosh in some fullcream milk  and a big dod of good butter; (the
>residual heat heats up the milk and melts the butter as you mash) a
>pinch of salt, grind some black pepper. 

nodnodnod  

============================

From: sf
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 10:37:21 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
>How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

Well, it's for a crowd so peel them *first*, then quarter.  Put the
potatoes in a large pot, cover with water and boil gently until fork
tender.  

I dump out the water (reserving a little for making gravy later), put
them back into the hot pot, back on the burner (which is now turned
off) and let them dry out a few minutes.  

I use an old fashioned potato ricer to mash
http://g-ec2.images-amazon.com/images/I/31HXA67NP6L._AA280_.jpg, but I
don't do 5 pounds at a time.  A potato masher
http://www.all-creatures.org/recipes/images/u-potmash-02.jpg will
probably be a better tool for your amount.  After that, throw in your
butter.  You can use up to the entire pound (start with 1/2 a pound) -
heck, it's only one day.  You can heat the milk or not too.  I don't.
Use a very small amount and whip by stirring the potatoes vigorously
with the tool you used to mash them with.  Dribble in a little more
liquid if you think they are too dry.  Be careful not to add too much
liquid or you'll end up with wallpaper paste.  Making fluffy mashed
potatoes is really a quick thing to do, so don't make it into a big
production.  That's a surefire recipe for disaster.

After typing all that, I discovered eHow has the method with pictures.
LOL  http://www.ehow.com/how_2645_mash-potatoes.html

Oh, since you've never done this before... I suggest that you practice
once or twice (on smaller amounts) before Thanksgiving.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 13:43:09 -0500
--------
sf wrote
> Well, it's for a crowd so peel them *first*, then quarter.  Put the
> potatoes in a large pot, cover with water and boil gently until fork
> tender.

I appreciate your taking the time to type all of that in! Thanks.
I will do exactly that.

Tell me this, do you use the potato water instead of flour or
in addition to it, for your gravy? 

============================

From: sf
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 12:13:54 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
>Tell me this, do you use the potato water instead of flour or
>in addition to it, for your gravy? 

In addition to.... I make the flour/water slurry with potato water and
if I need to thin the gravy later, I use the potato water.

:)

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 13:30:52 -0700
--------
sf wrote:
> In addition to.... I make the flour/water slurry with potato water and
> if I need to thin the gravy later, I use the potato water.

Yes, save the potato water for gravy making.

============================

From: MareCat 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 15:46:28 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
> In addition to.... I make the flour/water slurry with potato water and
> if I need to thin the gravy later, I use the potato water.

My brother and his wife visited us one Thanksgiving when we were living in 
Houston. He wanted to make the gravy for the meal and told me to save some 
of the potato water for him. Prior to then, I had never heard of using 
potato water for making gravy, but I've done it that way ever since.

============================

From: Steve Y 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 20:36:22 +0100
--------
cybercat wrote:
> I don't do mashed potatoes! I never have. I recall trying years ago, and 
> they were lumpy.

Thre is no substitute for elbow grease and finding the masher that suits 
you.

Make sure the spuds are cooked but not mushy. Use a hand masher and add 
milk, salted butter and/or virgin oil oil.

Use of a mixer/blender makes pureed spuds which is a totally different 
dish and is possibly OK under certain, limited circumstances

============================

From: Lou Decruss 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 21:50:40 GMT
--------
Steve Y wrote:
>Thre is no substitute for elbow grease and finding the masher that suits 
>you.

Yes there is.  It's called a ricer.  Wayne and aem have mentioned it
also.  

============================

From: sf
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 15:06:46 -0800
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
>Yes there is.  It's called a ricer.  Wayne and aem have mentioned it
>also.  

It's not easy to plop a lot of potatoes in a basket and squeeze
http://www.cookware-online.co.uk/ishop/images/930/Kcricerc.jpg.  I
have one of those, but I need big hands to span the handle gap and I
need well developed biceps to squeeze the handles together.  I prefer
using the "other" kind of ricer with the square grid and a single
handle.

============================

From: Dee.Dee 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 18:54:32 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
> It's not easy to plop a lot of potatoes in a basket and squeeze
> http://www.cookware-online.co.uk/ishop/images/930/Kcricerc.jpg.  I
> have one of those, but I need big hands to span the handle gap and I
> need well developed biceps to squeeze the handles together.  I prefer
> using the "other" kind of ricer with the square grid and a single
> handle.

I bought a new ricer about a month or so ago. The one in the picture is the 
one I like, but I couldn't find any like that ( in the U.S.) that was 
stainless steel.  Mine was tinned and had seen better days.

I like the side "vent" holes as in the picture, but all I could find were 
the ricers that just had the bottom strainer(s).
But as long as there is a DH in the home, he can rice them, but for some 
reason I like the kind with the extra holes in them which probably makes it 
harder to process; but it stands to reason that you can do the job faster.

============================

From: Janet Baraclough 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 01:55:01 GMT
--------
The message from sf contains these words:
> It's not easy to plop a lot of potatoes in a basket and squeeze
> http://www.cookware-online.co.uk/ishop/images/930/Kcricerc.jpg.  I
> have one of those, but I need big hands to span the handle gap and I
> need well developed biceps to squeeze the handles together.  I prefer
> using the "other" kind of ricer with the square grid and a single
> handle.

   Here's my favourite masher

http://www.lakeland.co.uk/product.aspx/!10038?src=ga071

============================

From: hahabogus 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 13:00:37 GMT
--------
Janet Baraclough wrote:
>    Here's my favourite masher
> 
> http://www.lakeland.co.uk/product.aspx/!10038?src=ga071

Here's mu ricer   http://www.amazon.com/OXO-Grips-26981-Potato-Ricer/dp/B00004OCJQ

============================

From: Blinky the Shark 
Date: 12 Nov 2007 19:20:02 GMT
--------
Janet Baraclough wrote:
>    Here's my favourite masher
>
> http://www.lakeland.co.uk/product.aspx/!10038?src=ga071

I have the same type but in stainless.  I love the nice big
cross-handle; from an ergo standpoint of efficient application of force
through the mechanics of a human hand/arm/shoulder that makes so much
more sense than an upright handle.
http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/product.asp?SKU=11586082

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 15:09:04 -0500
--------
Blinky the Shark wrote:
> I have the same type but in stainless.  I love the nice big
> cross-handle; from an ergo standpoint of efficient application of force
> through the mechanics of a human hand/arm/shoulder that makes so much
> more sense than an upright handle.
> http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/product.asp?SKU=11586082

So this is the kind I need to get! 

============================

From: Blinky the Shark 
Date: 12 Nov 2007 21:15:11 GMT
--------
cybercat wrote:
> So this is the kind I need to get! 

Especially good if you have arthritis or something like that.  Because
you're pushing against the cross-handle with your palm (the way your
hand would be pushing on the floor if you were doing a push-up) you
don't need a death grip on the handle as you would if it were an upright
handle.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 15:11:59 -0500
--------
Blinky the Shark wrote
> I have the same type but in stainless.  I love the nice big
> cross-handle; from an ergo standpoint of efficient application of force
> through the mechanics of a human hand/arm/shoulder that makes so much
> more sense than an upright handle.  http://tinyurl.com/298dxp

I did not realize BB& Beyond had all of those kitchen gadgets on the web 
site!
That is cool. It is very disorienting trying to see them all up on that big 
wall. 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 21:04:31 -0000
--------
cybercat wrote:
> I did not realize BB& Beyond had all of those kitchen gadgets on the
> web site!
> That is cool. It is very disorienting trying to see them all up on
> that big wall.

Don't you worry wee cat, I will be here to help if you need it:) 

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 16:30:41 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> Don't you worry wee cat, I will be here to help if you need it:)

haha! Yes, I am a delicate flower, easily overwhelmed by a wide array of 
kitchen devices. :D 

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 14:53:48 -0700
--------
cybercat wrote:
>haha! Yes, I am a delicate flower, easily overwhelmed by a wide array of 
>kitchen devices. :D 

Not me!  I am never overwhelmed by kitchen gadgets/devices! I say the
more the merrier!

Christine, kitchenware slut.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 16:57:51 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Not me!  I am never overwhelmed by kitchen gadgets/devices! I say the
> more the merrier!
>
> Christine, kitchenware slut.

hahaha, I can see you now, with a potato peeler behind your ear and a ricer 
in your teeth, with just a big smile and an apron on! 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 08:11:35 -0000
--------
cybercat wrote:
> hahaha, I can see you now, with a potato peeler behind your ear and a
> ricer in your teeth, with just a big smile and an apron on!

*gasp* are you suggesting our Christine is bare round the back?????????? 

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 16:30:09 -0700
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Not me!  I am never overwhelmed by kitchen gadgets/devices! I say the
> more the merrier!

Was that you that was elbowing me out of the way at the store the other day? 
Piggy.  I think there was enough for both of us.  ;o}

============================

From: koko
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 19:09:27 -0800
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
>Not me!  I am never overwhelmed by kitchen gadgets/devices! I say the
>more the merrier!
>
>Christine, kitchenware slut.

And I have the photos to prove it. ;-)

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 03:15:52 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Christine Dabney meant to say...
> Not me!  I am never overwhelmed by kitchen gadgets/devices! I say the
> more the merrier!
> 
> Christine, kitchenware slut.

I don't know who is worse, you or Dee Dee! :-)

I used to be like that, but I think I reached the saturation point, as well 
as a lack of places to put the stuff.  God forbid I should have basement.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 08:13:03 -0000
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> I don't know who is worse, you or Dee Dee! :-)
>
> I used to be like that, but I think I reached the saturation point,
> as well as a lack of places to put the stuff.  God forbid I should
> have basement.

Our equivalent is the attic.  We have just cleared it out as we are 
preparing to move house.  When we get our new house, *nothing* will go into 
that attic without discussion!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 12:00:36 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Ophelia meant to say...
> Our equivalent is the attic.  We have just cleared it out as we are 
> preparing to move house.  When we get our new house, *nothing* will go
> into that attic without discussion!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

We have no attic here, either.  We'll have to find something else to 
"discuss"!

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 14:48:54 -0000
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> We have no attic here, either.  We'll have to find something else to
> "discuss"!

LOL!  You don't have a basement?? 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2007 00:18:45 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Ophelia meant to say...
> LOL!  You don't have a basement?? 

No, most homes in the desert do not have basements, though a few do.  
Houses are either built on a concrete slab, or are built a bit off the 
ground with a crawl space underneath.

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2007 14:25:51 -0000
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> No, most homes in the desert do not have basements, though a few do.
> Houses are either built on a concrete slab, or are built a bit off the
> ground with a crawl space underneath.

Well!  I learn something new every day!!!!! 

============================

From: Dee.Dee 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 07:03:09 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> Our equivalent is the attic.  We have just cleared it out as we are 
> preparing to move house.  When we get our new house, *nothing* will go 
> into that attic without discussion!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Nothing goes to the attic or basement anymore.  I have relegated a total 
room to my gadgets where I can get to anyone of them and see them all.  I do 
get rid of them as I go, too (to make room for more,)  just keep the 'good 
stuff.'  Ha ha ha!  Laughing hysterically!

Good luck on your move, O,
Dee Dee

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 12:08:44 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Dee.Dee meant to say...
> Nothing goes to the attic or basement anymore.  I have relegated a total
> room to my gadgets where I can get to anyone of them and see them all. 
> I do get rid of them as I go, too (to make room for more,)  just keep
> the 'good stuff.'  Ha ha ha!  Laughing hysterically!

You are  an insane gadget freak! :-)

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 14:50:00 -0000
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
> Nothing goes to the attic or basement anymore.  I have relegated a
> total room to my gadgets where I can get to anyone of them and see
> them all.  I do get rid of them as I go, too (to make room for more,)
> just keep the 'good stuff.'  Ha ha ha!  Laughing hysterically!

Just keep taking the tablets m'dear:)

> Good luck on your move, O,

Thanks Dee Dee:)) 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 08:11:01 -0000
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Not me!  I am never overwhelmed by kitchen gadgets/devices! I say the
> more the merrier!
>
> Christine, kitchenware slut.

LOL me too:)) 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 08:10:46 -0000
--------
cybercat wrote:
> haha! Yes, I am a delicate flower, easily overwhelmed by a wide array
> of kitchen devices. :D

Nodnodnod  

============================

From: Blinky the Shark 
Date: 12 Nov 2007 21:09:35 GMT
--------
cybercat wrote:
> I did not realize BB& Beyond had all of those kitchen gadgets on the web 
> site!
> That is cool. It is very disorienting trying to see them all up on that big 
> wall. 

At the ones I go to, the tall walls just contain overstock, above where
the customer-accessible ones are.  It's hooks all the way up, but for
the most part, each column contains the same item.  Or, at worst, if
they have a metric buttload of an item, that high stock might expand a
column or two to the side(s).

============================

From: Julie Bove 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 04:50:16 GMT
--------
Janet Baraclough wrote:
>   Here's my favourite masher
>
> http://www.lakeland.co.uk/product.aspx/!10038?src=ga071

Oh, that looks like a good one! 

============================

From: Julie Bove 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 20:14:03 GMT
--------
cybercat wrote:
> I don't do mashed potatoes! I never have. I recall trying years ago, and 
> they were lumpy.

You need a good masher.  If you don't have a good one, you'll have lumps.  I 
prefer the kind that looks sort of like a waffle as opposed to the kind that 
snakes back and forth like an "S".

Also make sure your potatoes are cooked enough.  If not, you'll have hard 
little lumps.  Cook until they are fork tender.

Mash them very well, then add the butter and milk that have been heated 
first.  Then salt and pepper to taste.  You may also want to add chopped 
parsley, chives or green onions. 

============================

From: Janet B. 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 13:35:55 -0700
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> You need a good masher.  If you don't have a good one, you'll have lumps. 
> I prefer the kind that looks sort of like a waffle as opposed to the kind 
> that snakes back and forth like an "S".
>
> Also make sure your potatoes are cooked enough.  If not, you'll have hard 
> little lumps.  Cook until they are fork tender.
>
> Mash them very well, then add the butter and milk that have been heated 
> first.  Then salt and pepper to taste.  You may also want to add chopped 
> parsley, chives or green onions.

I agree about the shape of the masher.  Then, it is important to work your 
way methodically around the pot/pan while mashing down and twisting slightly 
to make sure that you have reached all the potatoes.  Then give the pot a 
couple of stirs with the masher and work around with the masher again.  I 
never have lumps if I work this way.

============================

From: Gregory Morrow 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 14:55:24 -0600
--------
cyberSPUD mashed:
> How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

One word:  BUTTERMILK...

And I'd never use less than a full pound of butter, it's perfect for five
pounds of spuds...

============================

From: Cshenk 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 13:44:50 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote

> I don't do mashed potatoes! I never have. I recall trying years ago, and 
> they were lumpy.

Hey, I *like* them lumpy.  In fact, we like them with the peel still on.

> Got five pounds of big, fresh Idaho potatoes at Aldi, and a pound of 
> butter. I guess I need milk, right?

Not the optimal type of potato for this but they will work. Since you like 
them 'unlumpy' peel first.

> How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

Boil that 5 lbs chopped up after peeling.  How long depends on how much you 
cut them up.  You can leave them whole too (takes longer but works better 
with idahos).  Done when a fork slides in easy and they no longer taste 
'raw'.  If you wish a delightful but *small* flavor boost, add 1 cube 
chicken stock to the boiling water but be aware it will slightly color the 
potatoes.

Dump them in a collander and let drip til it stops then put them back in the 
pot. You dont want them to get too cold.  (If you are going to use a mixer, 
heat the bowl before adding the potatoes.  The rest of my instructions are 
without a mixer).

Add 1 stick softened butter and 1/2 cup sour cream (can use low or no fat 
sour cream if desired).  Do *not* use margarine or 'whipped butter' as both 
are filled with water (up to 50%) and you'll get weapy whimpy mashed 
potatoes.  Start stirring this with a large fork, mashing a bit as you go. 
As they start looking dry, you can add any of these to it then cointinue: 
heavy cream (no sugar added!  We arent talking coffeemate here!), more 
butter, whole milk (reduced fat will work but not as well).

I like mine thick and lumpy so I stop stirring earlier than you will and i 
use at most 1/2 cup cream (adding more sour cream or butter to smoothe).  Be 
careful to not overmix.  I almost never use milk but prefer the heavy cream.

Variations:  Garlic or chive types, melt 1/2 that first stick of butter with 
minced garlic or chives (or both) then use it in the initial stages.  Don't 
get too heavy of a hand there as most folks want mostly potato with only a 
little garlic or chive flavor. 

============================

From: sf
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 12:17:08 -0800
--------
Cshenk wrote:
>Hey, I *like* them lumpy.  In fact, we like them with the peel still on.

Those are called "dirty" mashed potatoes.  I'm not a fan of lumps or
skin in mashed potatoes.  I make "smashed" potatoes out of the ones
with skin.  I just put it on a plate, smash it with a fork and add a
dollop of butter.... gravy if there is any.

============================

From: ravenlynne 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 07:48:14 +0200
--------
sf wrote:
> Those are called "dirty" mashed potatoes.  I'm not a fan of lumps or
> skin in mashed potatoes.  I make "smashed" potatoes out of the ones
> with skin.  I just put it on a plate, smash it with a fork and add a
> dollop of butter.... gravy if there is any.

We'd use those for my grandmother's version of shepherd's pie...not the 
usual..we'd just fry off ground beef with onion, bell pepper, S&P, then 
make brown gravy, then dump the mess on top of the smashed 
potatoes...it's SO good.  I still make it every few months.

============================

From: Bobo Bonobo® 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 15:22:08 -0800
--------
Cshenk wrote:
> Boil that 5 lbs chopped up after peeling.  How long depends on how much you
> cut them up.  You can leave them whole too (takes longer but works better
> with idahos).  Done when a fork slides in easy and they no longer taste
> 'raw'.  If you wish a delightful but *small* flavor boost, add 1 cube
> chicken stock to the boiling water but be aware it will slightly color the
> potatoes.

One "cube" of "stock"?  You mean bouillon, not stock.  That stuff is
crappy.  Better to use Swanson canned broth than those cubes.
http://waltonfeed.com/self/labels/bullchik.html
http://www.pentaor.com/A1510.html
http://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/product_labels/chicken_bouillon_label.htm

> Add 1 stick softened butter and 1/2 cup sour cream (can use low or no fat
> sour cream if desired).  Do *not* use margarine or 'whipped butter' as both
> are filled with water (up to 50%) and you'll get weapy whimpy mashed
> potatoes.

Since when does whipped butter have "up to 50%" water in it?  It has
air whipped into it.

> Variations:  Garlic or chive types, melt 1/2 that first stick of butter with
> minced garlic or chives (or both) then use it in the initial stages.  Don't
> get too heavy of a hand there as most folks want mostly potato with only a
> little garlic or chive flavor.

A lot of folks would rather make their own decision about whether or
not they want sour cream in their mashed potatoes.

============================

From: Sarah Gray 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 00:00:03 GMT
--------
Bobo Bonobo® wrote:
> A lot of folks would rather make their own decision about whether or
> not they want sour cream in their mashed potatoes.

Yeah, some of us prefer creme fraiche!

:)

============================

From: Bobo Bonobo® 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 17:31:50 -0800
--------
Sarah Gray wrote:
> Yeah, some of us prefer creme fraiche!

That's a whole different story.  Creme fraiche is much nicer.  That
reminds me that I need to make some for Thanksgiving.

============================

From: Cshenk 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 18:50:47 -0800
--------
Bobo Bonobo® wrote:
> One "cube" of "stock"?  You mean bouillon, not stock.  That stuff is
> crappy.  Better to use Swanson canned broth than those cubes.

No, I mean 1 cube (yes, boullion).  I make my own stock and dont use that 
prepared garbage except the rare think like here.  I actually use osem 
powdered stock the few times i need some and dont have the right type of 
fresh.

She doesnt want yellow potatoes, so a small cube is right.

> Since when does whipped butter have "up to 50%" water in it?  It has
> air whipped into it.

It has both.  Worthless for this.

> A lot of folks would rather make their own decision about whether or
> not they want sour cream in their mashed potatoes.

Alot of people just want to boil potatoes to death then bash them with a 
fork too.  I don't recommend that for a holiday feast.  The sour cream will 
adjustaround her baking potato type.

============================

From: Bobo Bonobo® 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 16:23:41 -0800
--------
Cshenk wrote:

> No, I mean 1 cube (yes, boullion).  I make my own stock and dont use that
> prepared garbage except the rare think like here.  I actually use osem
> powdered stock the few times i need some and dont have the right type of
> fresh.

So, you think that bouillon cubes are better than Swanson broth?
I notice you trimmed out the links showing what bouillon is made out
of.

That Osem stuff is imitation chicken flavor.  It is FAKE chicken
flavored.
http://www.kosher.com/store/grocery-store/soups/osem/077544527409-osem-chicken-style-consomme-instant-soup-and-seasoning-mix.html
Swanson broth is made with REAL chicken.

> She doesnt want yellow potatoes, so a small cube is right.

A cube of junk.

> It has both.  Worthless for this.

No.  It does not have added water:
http://www.landolakes.com/Products/ViewProduct.cfm?ProductID=19406
Look at the ingredients.

> Alot of people just want to boil potatoes to death then bash them with a
> fork too.  I don't recommend that for a holiday feast.  The sour cream will
> adjustaround her baking potato type.

You act as if sour cream only alters texture, not taste.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 00:26:36 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, Bobo Bonobo® meant to say...
> No.  It does not have added water:
> http://www.landolakes.com/Products/ViewProduct.cfm?ProductID=19406
> Look at the ingredients.

Perhaps not Land o' Lakes, Bryan, but others might have added water.  Many 
baking recipes warn against using whipped butter or margarine (even if one 
is weighing) because of added liquid.

============================

From: Cshenk 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 19:45:20 -0800
--------
Bobo Bonobo® wrote:
>So you think that bouillon cubes are better than Swanson broth?
>I notice you trimmed out the links showing what bouillon is made out
> of.

Are you an idiot or do you just sound like one due to reading comrehension 
problems?

You twisted everything said out of shape and wasted everyone's time. 

============================

From: Alden Bugley 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 19:49:20 -0500
--------
Cshenk wrote:
> Are you an idiot or do you just sound like one due to reading comrehension 
> problems?
>
> You twisted everything said out of shape and wasted everyone's time.

That's what "It" does best.  It's also why "It" has been in my Bozo Bin 
since right after "It" showed up. 

============================

From: Bobo Bonobo® 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 17:26:30 -0800
--------
Cshenk wrote:
> Are you an idiot or do you just sound like one due to reading comrehension
> problems?

Your spelling is so atrocious that reading your posts is a challenge.

> You twisted everything said out of shape and wasted everyone's time.

So, what IS in your precious bouillon?  How about your imitation
powdered chicken broth?

============================

From: deja.blues 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 22:35:58 GMT
--------
cybercat wrote:
> Got five pounds of big, fresh Idaho potatoes at Aldi, and a pound of 
> butter. I guess I need milk, right?

I never use milk,  I use some of the leftover cooking water. Can't remember 
where I heard this technique, but I like the results a lot better. I 
sometimes add a little cream cheese or sour cream if I have it.
I also use a ricer. Waxy like Yukon Gold, redskins, or regular old white 
potatoes work better than Idahos,which are more suited to baking or frying - 
I find they fall apart as they boil. 

============================

From: Cshenk 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 18:54:33 -0800
--------
deja.blues wrote:
> I never use milk,  I use some of the leftover cooking water. Can't 
> remember where I heard this technique, but I like the results a lot 
> better. I sometimes add a little cream cheese or sour cream if I have it.
> I also use a ricer. Waxy like Yukon Gold, redskins, or regular old white 
> potatoes work better than Idahos,which are more suited to baking or 
> frying - I find they fall apart as they boil.

Yes, but that is what she has.  Use of sourcream (vice milk) will help 
offset that.  Yukon Golds would be better. 

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 16:58:39 -0700
--------
Cshenk wrote:
>Yes, but that is what she has.  Use of sourcream (vice milk) will help 
>offset that.  Yukon Golds would be better. 

But Idahos make the best mashed potatoes-they have the starch that is
needed.   And you want them to fall apart when you start mashing them.
;)

Yukon golds are also very good.

============================

From: Sarah Gray 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 00:03:03 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> But Idahos make the best mashed potatoes-they have the starch that is
> needed.   And you want them to fall apart when you start mashing them.
> ;)
> 
> Yukon golds are also very good.

I like using red potatoes, unpeeled, for the color. But you are right, 
russets make a better-textured mashed potato.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 19:12:33 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> But Idahos make the best mashed potatoes-they have the starch that is
> needed.   And you want them to fall apart when you start mashing them.
> ;)
>
> Yukon golds are also very good.

Well, good, I'm glad I bought Idahos. 

============================

From: azazello[at]koroviev.de (Victor Sack)
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 23:49:32 +0100
--------
cybercat wrote:
> How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

You want perfect?  Here you are.  It takes some serious work, though.

Here is a recipe for the famous mashed potatoes by Joël Robuchon I
posted a year or two ago.  It is from _Simply French_ by Patricia Wells,
complete with her comments. I've made it once and it was probably the
best mashed potatoes I've ever had, not excluding those I got served at
Robuchon's restaurant.  I won't make them again, though - no matter the
result - as the effort is really disproportionate.... YMMV.


                        Potato Purée 
                  Purée de Pommes de Terre 

Ever homey, ever elegant, ever irresistible, this is the dish that
helped make chef Robuchon's reputation.  Clever man that he is, he
realized early on that if you give people potatoes, potatoes, and more
potatoes, they'll be eternally grateful, forever fulfilled.  These are,
of course, no ordinary mashed potatoes, but a purée that is softened
with an avalanche of butter and mellowed with bubbly boiling milk.  The
quantity of butter and milk needed for a successfully silken and satiny
purée will vary according to the potatoes and the season.  Early-season
potatoes will be firmer, demanding more butter and milk for a perfectly
soft, almost fluffy purée.

The keys here are potatoes of uniform size (so they are uniformly
cooked), and a strong arm for drying the potatoes with a flat wooden
spatula.  Be sure that the butter is well chilled, for it will help make
a finer, smoother purée.  Also follow the proportions of salt to water
when cooking the potatoes:  You won't be able to make up for it with
additional salt at the end.  I agree, this is a lot of work for a simple
potato purée.  But once you taste the results, you'll agree that your
labor has been pleasantly rewarded.  For exceptionally rich potatoes,
the quantity of butter may be doubled.

EQUIPMENT:  A food mill; a flat fine-mesh (drum) sieve 

2 pounds potatoes, such as Idaho Russets 
3/4 to 1 1/4 cups whole milk 
About 16 tablespoons (1 cup) unsalted butter, chilled, cut into pieces 
Sea salt to taste 

1.  Scrub the potatoes, but do not peel them.  Place the potatoes in a
large pot, add salted water (1 tablespoon salt per quart of water) to
cover by at least 1 inch.  Simmer, uncovered, over moderate heat until a
knife inserted into a potato comes away easily, 20 to 30 minutes. Drain
the potatoes as soon as they are cooked.  (If they are allow to cool in
the water, the potatoes will end up tasting reheated.)

2.  Meanwhile, in a large saucepan, bring the milk just to a boil over
high heat.  Set aside.

3.  As soon as the potatoes are cool enough to handle, peel them.  Pass
the potatoes through the finest grid of a food mill into a large
heavy-bottomed saucepan set over low heat.  With a wooden spatula, stir
the potatoes vigorously to dry them, 4 to 5 minutes.  Now begin adding
about 12 tablespoons of the butter, little by little, stirring
vigorously after each batch of butter is thoroughly incorporated; the
mixture should be fluffy and light.  Then slowly add about three fourths
of the hot milk in a thin stream, stirring vigorously until the milk is
thoroughly incorporated.

4.  Pass the mixture through a flat fine-mesh (drum) sieve into another
heavy-bottomed saucepan.  Stir vigorously, and if the puree seems a bit
heavy and stiff, add additional butter and milk, stirring all the while.
Note: few of us have a real French flat bottomed screen for scraping
potato puree.  Simply use any mesh sieve you have in the kitchen and
press down on the potato puree as you push it through the sieve.  This
second step of puréeing is the true secret behind Chef Robuchon's
recipe.  Taste for seasoning.  (The purée may be made up to 1 hour in
advance.  Place in the top of a double boiler, uncovered over simmering
water.  Stir occasionally to keep smooth.)

Yield:  6 to 8 servings

============================

From: rosie 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 14:51:43 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
> How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

Peel potatoes, cut in large chunks, and cook till tender( boil them )

Put  milk and butter in a pan, heat them, add to potatoes that you
have put through a ricer,

Add salt to taste. Butter is really good, lots of it. Sometimes  I
will add some sour cream, even cream cheese.

Eat till you pop.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 18:04:32 -0500
--------
rosie wrote:
> Peel potatoes, cut in large chunks, and cook till tender( boil them )
>
> Put  milk and butter in a pan, heat them, add to potatoes that you
> have put through a ricer

I think the ricer is the key. Thanks!

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 23:11:59 GMT
--------
Oh pshaw, cybercat meant to say...
> I think the ricer is the key. Thanks!

If you want perfectly smooth and creamy potatoes, it's probably the best 
way.  I most often use the ricer, although I sometimes use a hand mixer.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 19:23:58 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote
> If you want perfectly smooth and creamy potatoes, it's probably the best
> way.  I most often use the ricer, although I sometimes use a hand mixer.

My MIL made the mashed potatoes at a couple of our holiday dinner.
She used the hand mixer and essentially stuccoed the kitchen walls. :)
She bought me a bigger bowl after the second time she did that. She
will be at this Thanksgiving dinner, so I hope to impress her with smooth
mashed potatoes that are all in the bowl and not on the walls. 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 11:34:00 -0000
--------
cybercat wrote:
> My MIL made the mashed potatoes at a couple of our holiday dinner.
> She used the hand mixer and essentially stuccoed the kitchen walls. :)
> She bought me a bigger bowl after the second time she did that. She
> will be at this Thanksgiving dinner, so I hope to impress her with
> smooth mashed potatoes that are all in the bowl and not on the walls.

Hehe:)  I am sure she will be impressed:)  Maybe you can teach her a thing 
or two:)

Let us know please!

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 11:42:34 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote

> Hehe:)  I am sure she will be impressed:)  Maybe you can teach her a thing 
> or two:)

When we met I could not make gravy, either!

> Let us know please!

You bet I will! :) 

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 16:01:33 -0700
--------
Van wrote:
>Got a KitchenAid mixer, by any chance?  I use mine to make killer *WHIPPED* 
>potatoes using butter & cream, a little salt & white pepper.   Not a lump in 
>sight.  You can also use sour cream or Half & Half if that's what's in your 
>fridge.
>
>You could use a hand-held mixer as well - it's just a little more effort, I 
>guess.

Ack!!  Don't use the kitchenaid!!!  It will tend to turn the potatoes
to glue.... Same with a food processor.  The hand mixer is better for
this...

============================

From: Terry Pulliam Burd 
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2007 17:34:52 -0800
--------
cybercat fired up random neurons and synapses to opine:
>How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

I have a really good recipe for doing ahead, carrying afield, and
reheating. It also multiples beautifully. If you don't want the
cheese, leave it out and just reheat it covered.

@@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

Chantilly Potatoes

vegetables

4 whole potatoes; quartered
3 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  salt
  pepper

Boil potatoes until tender. Mash with butter and 1/4 cup cream. Season
with salt and pepper.Whip the remaining 1/4 cup cream until stiff.
Spread mashed potatoes in a greased 1-1/2 quart baking dish. Spread
whipped cream over the mashed potatoes; sprinkle with grated Parmesan
cheese. Bake at 475 degrees F until the cheese melts and the top is
golden brown, about 20 minutes.

Contributor:  Elizabeth Powell

Yield: 4 servings

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 01:29:39 -0500
--------
Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
> I have a really good recipe for doing ahead, carrying afield, and
> reheating. It also multiples beautifully. If you don't want the
> cheese, leave it out and just reheat it covered.
>
> @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format
>
> Chantilly Potatoes

This sounds wonderful, thank you! 

============================

From: sf
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 12:47:00 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
>This sounds wonderful, thank you! 

I haven't deleted any messages in this thread, so I know that one
didn't make it to my server.  Will you please email the recipe to me?

TIA

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 15:53:11 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
> I haven't deleted any messages in this thread, so I know that one
> didn't make it to my server.  Will you please email the recipe to me?

You bet. I just sent it on. 

============================

From: Terry Pulliam Burd 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 19:31:58 -0800
--------
sf fired up random neurons and synapses to opine:
>I haven't deleted any messages in this thread, so I know that one
>didn't make it to my server.  Will you please email the recipe to me?

Done - just sent it. Hope you like it as much as my famly and I do!

============================

From: Miche 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 18:37:55 +1300
--------
cybercat wrote:
> How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

Run them through a food mill, then add butter and milk.

============================

From: hahabogus 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 05:44:21 GMT
--------
Miche wrote:
> Run them through a food mill, then add butter and milk.

I do the ricer or food mill method myself. I don't add butter or cream 
...just some chicken stock. Those were the days...when my type 2 wasn't 
there and I could eat mashed spuds with abandonment. Now when I eat them 
they're a guilty pleasure and a rare occurance.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 01:23:42 -0500
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> I do the ricer or food mill method myself. I don't add butter or cream
> ...just some chicken stock. Those were the days...when my type 2 wasn't
> there and I could eat mashed spuds with abandonment. Now when I eat them
> they're a guilty pleasure and a rare occurance.

We're in that  "boat." Only one of my guests is diabetic, but the rest are
all related, and so high-risk. We are all careful of what we eat. I have
mashed potatos three-four times a year at the most. I will make them with
real butter and milk or cream, and make home made full-fat gravy too,
just for the holiday. 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 13:07:44 -0000
--------
cybercat wrote:
> We're in that  "boat." Only one of my guests is diabetic, but the
> rest are all related, and so high-risk. We are all careful of what we
> eat. I have mashed potatos three-four times a year at the most. I
> will make them with real butter and milk or cream, and make home made
> full-fat gravy too, just for the holiday.

When you have them so rarely I think you appreciate and enjoy them far more 
then if you have them every week:))  I love mashed potatoes but like you, 
they are a rare treat:) 

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 11:39:18 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> When you have them so rarely I think you appreciate and enjoy them far 
> more then if you have them every week:))  I love mashed potatoes but like 
> you, they are a rare treat:)

I think you're right about the enjoyment factor. And, the main reason I
have them so seldomly is because they are one of the foods I love so much,
I toss moderation to the wind! Plain boiled russets are the same, with just
a bit of butter and salt and pepper. Now, the only time my husband and I
have potatoes is when we split a baked one. Instant portion control! ;) 

============================

From: Ophelia 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 17:50:14 -0000
--------
cybercat wrote:
> I think you're right about the enjoyment factor. And, the main reason
> I have them so seldomly is because they are one of the foods I love
> so much, I toss moderation to the wind! Plain boiled russets are the
> same, with just a bit of butter and salt and pepper. Now, the only
> time my husband and I have potatoes is when we split a baked one.
> Instant portion control! ;)

Indeed:)))))) 

============================

From: Jon v Leipzig 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 11:36:13 -0500
--------
cybercat wrote:
> How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

My "best" is the same as my worst....those instant psuedo-potatoes in 
the bag.

Why the need for "perfect" potatoes.....are you having *perfect*
guests over....??

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 13:03:48 -0500
--------
Jon v Leipzig wrote:
> My "best" is the same as my worst....those instant psuedo-potatoes in the 
> bag.
>
> Why the need for "perfect" potatoes.....are you having *perfect*
> guests over....??

Some of us simply enjoy the pursuit of excellence. 

============================

From: Nancy2 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 08:41:08 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
> How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

I make sure they are cooked thoroughly so they're not at all hard.
Drain well or dump them in a collander, empty the saucepan of water,
or save it for gravy, and return the potatoes to the pan.

Mash them really well with butter before adding any milk or cream.
After mashing (up and down) use the masher to go 'round and 'round in
the potatoes, really vigorously.  When they appear fairly lump-free,
then start adding milk/cream a little at a time.  Make sure you warm
the milk/cream before adding it, so your potatoes end up hot.

Mash/stir the same way as before.  When they are a little softer than
you want the finished product, take your hand-mixer and give them a
high-speed whirl for about 30 seconds (not any longer, or they get
glue-y).  Put the lid back on the pan you cooked them in (and mashed
them in) and set it on your warmer burner until serving time, or tuck
them in the microwave for keeping hot (nice enclosed space - they stay
hot longer).

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Mon, 12 Nov 2007 14:13:25 -0600
--------
cybercat wrote:
> How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

1) Use a mealy, rather than a waxy, potato.
2) Cook until very tender, add a tsp of salt halfway through the 
estimated cooking time.
3) Drain well (I sometimes pour through a colander rather than just 
pouring the liquid from the cooking pot)
4)  Shake potatoes (back in their cooking pan or kettle) over low heat 
to dry them
5) Heat maybe 1/2 cup cream or milk and melt 1/4 cup butter into it
6) Mash, adding the milk butter mixture to your satisfaction, mashing 
and mixing and combining as you do
7) Season - a little salt if necessary, a little white pepper
8) Heap into a warmed serving bowl
9) Stick a tablespoon-size pat of butter on top and garnish with a light 
dusting of paprika
10)  Serve
11) Make sure the gravy is REALLY hot.

A couple lumps in the potatoes are no sin.

============================

From: Doug Weller 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 13:32:51 +0000
--------
cybercat wrote:
>How do you make your best mashed potatoes?

Here is how Heston Blumenthal does his
http://www.guardian.co.uk/weekend/story/0,,1192494,00.html
but in his book he suggests making baked potatoes and just scooping them
out...

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 13:10:29 -0500
--------
Doug Weller wrote:
> Here is how Heston Blumenthal does his
> http://www.guardian.co.uk/weekend/story/0,,1192494,00.html

This seems like a lot of trouble, requiring too many tools. Have you
tried it?

I don't understand the point of cutting them into precisely sized
pieces and cooking for 40 minutes at a certain temp, then draining
and cooking "as one would for mashed potatoes." The a ricer,
beater, AND a sieve? These would have to be some seriously good
potatoes. And they may be! 

============================

From: Janet Baraclough 
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2007 19:00:15 GMT
--------
The message from cybercat contains these words:
> This seems like a lot of trouble, requiring too many tools. Have you
> tried it?

  Reinventing the wheel.

  Heston Blumenthal runs a UK restaurant called Fat  Duck, which won an
award as "best restaurant in the world" and spun him a TV series.

blogs.warwick.ac.uk/dangoodman/entry/return_to_the/

  gives you a "flavour" of his mindset

  :-)

============================

From: val189 
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2007 17:15:00 -0800 (PST)
--------
I only buy Idahos.
Peel, cut into quarters, boil til a knife slips in easily.  Drain,
then put spuds back on warm stove to dry em out. I use a ricer - a bit
of a pain, but we like the texture.  I never add any type of mild
product or butter - mashed potatoes are merely a base for a great
sauce or gravy in my house.

============================

From: cybercat 
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2007 10:51:12 -0500
--------
val189 wrote:
> I only buy Idahos.
> Peel, cut into quarters, boil til a knife slips in easily.  Drain,
> then put spuds back on warm stove to dry em out. I use a ricer - a bit
> of a pain, but we like the texture.  I never add any type of mild
> product or butter - mashed potatoes are merely a base for a great
> sauce or gravy in my house.

Interesting. The one thing most people do that my mother and MIL
never did/do it put the potatoes back on the warm stove to dry out.
I will definitely do that. You're the first I've heard of who adds no
milk or butter. I guess this is the reason my MOL calls her milky
potatoes "creamed." 


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