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Subject: Mash potatoes with whisk?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 08:44:48 GMT
--------
Okay this has been bugging me ever since it was said to me.  Can't remember 
who here said they did it that way.  But they told me if I couldn't mash 
potatoes with my whisk I need a better whisk.

So I looked up whisks online.  I see flat ones.  They wouldn't mash 
potatoes.  I see ones like I have.  An assortment of wires coming back into 
the handle in sort of an oval shape. How could they mash?  Those wires do 
move, which I think is what a whisk is supposed to do.  I see one that is 
like that but has a little ball shaped wire thingie inside of it.

My mom had a whisk that was shaped sort of like a tornado.  My MIL had a 
plastic whisk.  Those wouldn't do.  I have a small coily one that is 
supposed to be used for making some kind of drinks.  I don't know.  I won it 
at a party.

At any rate, I see no way how any of these things could be used to make 
mashed potatoes.  Or am I missing something?

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 01:55:54 -0700
--------
Julie Bove wrote:

>So I looked up whisks online.  I see flat ones.  They wouldn't mash 
>potatoes.  I see ones like I have.  An assortment of wires coming back into 
>the handle in sort of an oval shape. How could they mash?  Those wires do 
>move, which I think is what a whisk is supposed to do.  I see one that is 
>like that but has a little ball shaped wire thingie inside of it.

The wires move?  How do you mean?  The whisks I have are much sturdier
than that, and the wires don't move.  Why should they move?

Where are you looking online?  

>At any rate, I see no way how any of these things could be used to make 
>mashed potatoes.  Or am I missing something?

Yes, the whisk needs to be very sturdy...not one with moveable wires.
The cheaper ones will tend to move a bit...as they are not as well
made.

I have a few hefty whisks which can handle stiff batters, etc...and
probably mashed potatoes.  I think I got them either at a restaurant
supply store like Surfas, or at another reputable kitchen shop.
The tornado shape you mentioned is one that can be very sturdy.

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 02:02:11 -0700
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
>I have a few hefty whisks which can handle stiff batters, etc...and
>probably mashed potatoes.  I think I got them either at a restaurant
>supply store like Surfas, or at another reputable kitchen shop.
>The tornado shape you mentioned is one that can be very sturdy.

Adding to my own post:

This is an example of the type of whisk you want.  As you will note,
in the description it does say that it can be used for mashed
potatoes.

<a href="http://www.culinarydistrict.com/Products/Whisks-Tongs/WHISK-10-in-FRENCH">http://www.culinarydistrict.com/Products/Whisks-Tongs/WHISK-10-in-FRENCH</a>

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' <barbschaller[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 12:09:08 -0600
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> This is an example of the type of whisk you want.  As you will note,
> in the description it does say that it can be used for mashed
> potatoes.
>
> <a href="http://www.culinarydistrict.com/Products/Whisks-Tongs/WHISK-10-in-FRENCH">http://www.culinarydistrict.com/Products/Whisks-Tongs/WHISK-10-in-FRENCH</a>

Holy crap, Christine!  That thing's only $3 ??   Amazing.

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 12:10:51 -0700
--------
>Holy crap, Christine!  That thing's only $3 ??   Amazing.

Yep.  This is why I head to Surfas anytime I am anywhere remotely in
the L.A. area.   I plan to stop by there next week, on my way to
whatever assignment I have.  They have some things calling my name...

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 14:23:47 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Yep.  This is why I head to Surfas anytime I am anywhere remotely in
> the L.A. area.   I plan to stop by there next week, on my way to
> whatever assignment I have.  They have some things calling my name...

OT:
Christine, you must have some helluva driving skills.  Geez, how do you do 
it?  Do you plan your route so well that you memorize it and don't have to 
look down on the seat for instructions?  Or do you just know about every 
street and highway in the U.S.?

I'm amazed.  Incredible!

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 12:37:29 -0700
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
>Christine, you must have some helluva driving skills.  Geez, how do you do 
>it?  Do you plan your route so well that you memorize it and don't have to 
>look down on the seat for instructions?  Or do you just know about every 
>street and highway in the U.S.?

Naw... I just had some contracts in the L.A. area a few years ago, so
I know my way around there well enough. There are quite a few
cities/areas that I know fairly well.   The SFBA is one (especially
the east bay) and parts of the L.A. area too.  I know Phoenix well
enough now, so that I can fairly easily find some stuff...  Same for
Sacramento.  Same for the DC area: I lived in that area back in the
late 70s to early 80s, and I took a contract back there in 2003-2004.
I can find my way around Louisville, KY, since I lived there for a few
years.  I just went back to Richmond, VA last year, and my years of
growing up there helped there.

For this trip which is more than likely taking me to California, I
will be driving from NM...and I will be going through southern Cal.  I
figure I can stay overnight in that area, if I get a contract in the
SFBA, head to both Penzeys and Surfas the next day.  Then drive up to
the bay area.   If I get a contract there in the L.A. area, I will be
close enough to Surfas and Penzeys, so I can probably be there every
few days if I wanted.   If I get the contract in San Diego...well..I
don't know that area yet, so it will be a learning experience.  But
Koko says she has a list of places to take me, so I guess I will learn
fast enough. Plus I get out and explore.  I have never been fearful of
driving around areas that I don't know... I usually have a map with
me, and if I get lost, I pull over and find out where I am...  I find
some great things that way.

To make this all food related, I am a fanatic about finding food
related places.  Not so much restaurants, but markets, etc.   I look
them up in the yellow pages, and if I see one that sounds intriguing,
I will go find it.   Or I read about such and such market on
Chowhound, or eGullet, or some other food forum or blog..and I have to
go check it out.  Except for the factor of the price of gas these
days, I am usually willing to explore a bit far afield...even if it
means going to the whole other side of town to find something.   I am
not the type of person that just stays in their own little part of
town and is afraid to venture beyond that.  If I had done that all
these years, I would be missing a whole lot and would have missed some
jewels.

Maybe that is why travel nursing fits me so well...

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 16:26:47 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Naw... I just had some contracts in the L.A. area a few years ago, so
> I know my way around there well enough. There are quite a few

Thanks for the chat!  What an adventurer.  Appreciate yourself, a great 
trait.

My first drive on my own was from Roswell, NM to San Diego, CA.  To this 
day, I recall staying at a strip hotel in Gila Bend.  It was a dump with all 
sorts of road traffic.  I had my car checked out at the dealership before I 
left, and they had failed to put any water in my radiator.  Then the car had 
a flat out in the desert and a trucker stopped and fixed my tire.  Today I 
would be scared to death.

When I got to San Diego, (in 1964, I believe it was) I was amazed that all 
the freeways were totally lit up.  Not so today, I'm sure.  As I was such a 
hick, it seemed to take forever to find my way around town.  I can't imagine 
how it's grown since I was there last in 1974 to visit.

WANTED: Traveling Nurse with Cookbooks. :-))

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 14:37:33 -0700
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
>WANTED: Traveling Nurse with Cookbooks. :-))

Hehehehehehe...you don't know how true that is.  I travel with more
cookbooks than most folks have in their whole collection.  And more
kitchen equipment than a lot of folks have. I try to pare both down,
but it's really hard for someone like me.

I base whatever I take, on where I am going, and what kind of
ingredients I can find, and what foodie folks I will meet and be able
to cook with.  Same with cookbooks, although sometimes I find a brand
new cookbook that just resonates so strongly with me, that I cannot
bear to leave it at home.  I usually end up taking anywhere from 100
to 250 books with me.

Since it seems so very likely I will be in a California city that has
a sizeable Asian population, and has good Asian markets, I am taking
one newish book with me, Cradle of Flavor.  I haven't been able to
find all the ingredients I would need for some dishes, where I am now.
The likelihood of me finding them in California is much higher.

To bring this back to the partial original subject, I will go to
Surfas somehow this time around. I am thinking of getting some more
heavy duty whisks there as well as a silicone mat to which to knead
and roll out dough. And they have some spices I want there: Pimento d'
espellete, and Grains of Paradise.  And I am looking for the ring mold
that Thomas Keller recommends for quiche...  And on and on and
on....LOL

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 18:03:28 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Hehehehehehe...you don't know how true that is.  I travel with more
> cookbooks than most folks have in their whole collection.  And more
> kitchen equipment than a lot of folks have. I try to pare both down,
> but it's really hard for someone like me.

How many books in a box?  Is that how you keep them, or do you try to take 
them out and stack them where you live?  I just went into a room to see how 
many shelves I have. Based on 25 per shelf, maybe 500.  Time to weed out 
again.

I looked at the Cradle of Flavor on Amazon just now -- I love that area of 
cusine.  You'll probably end up with a carload of staples to take home.

Thanks for the chat.

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 16:11:02 -0700
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
>How many books in a box?  Is that how you keep them, or do you try to take 
>them out and stack them where you live?  I just went into a room to see how 
>many shelves I have. Based on 25 per shelf, maybe 500.  Time to weed out 
>again.

I don't know how many books in a box. It just depends on the books.
Some of the ones I love are big coffee table sized books..like the Bay
Wolf Restaurant cookbook, and Anne Willan's From My Chateau Kitchen.
And Bouchon, by Thomas Keller.  Those books tend to fill up boxes
fast.  Then I have the little books from Williams-Sonoma, their
Kitchen Library series. I like those books, and I usually carry quite
a few if not all of them with me.

This time, depending on where I go, I might ship a box of my paperback
cookbooks...and put the rest of the boxes in the car.  I usually have
about 3-4 boxes of cookbooks...although last time I had it down to 2.
I came home with about 30 more books though...LOL.  

I carry folding bookcases with me and fill up those shelves with what
I take.

>I looked at the Cradle of Flavor on Amazon just now -- I love that area of 
>cusine.  You'll probably end up with a carload of staples to take home.

I hope to be able to cook enough from it, to determine if I indeed
want to bring home a bunch of staples for it.

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 20:16:36 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> I don't know how many books in a box. It just depends on the books.
> Some of the ones I love are big coffee table sized books..like the Bay
> Wolf Restaurant cookbook, and Anne Willan's From My Chateau Kitchen.

Am I wrong in my thinking that it was the French Laundry that Bourdain in 
one of his TV programs ate french fries and said they were the best he had 
ever eaten?

I would enjoying having all three of the books you mentioned above, but they 
are a bit 'advanced' for me.  ;-))
The picture of Ann Williams on her the book -- what a pleasant-looking 
woman.
Bay Wolf sounds interesting, too.  I enjoy reading 'about' Alice. An 
interesting time.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 01:22:52 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee told us...
> Am I wrong in my thinking that it was the French Laundry that Bourdain
> in one of his TV programs ate french fries and said they were the best
> he had ever eaten?
> 
> I would enjoying having all three of the books you mentioned above, but
> they are a bit 'advanced' for me.  ;-))

Now why on earth would you say that?  You're adventurous, investigative,
have good technique, and you practice 'til you get it down.  

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 21:10:56 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Now why on earth would you say that?  You're adventurous, investigative,
> have good technique, and you practice 'til you get it down.

It could be that you are partially right.  I must be gearing up for 
something new --  I've spent a good part of today taking stock of food - 
physically mostly - letting the right side of my brain make a PLAN.  ;-))) 
C'mon Brain!

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 04:06:13 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee told us...
> It could be that you are partially right.  I must be gearing up for 
> something new --  I've spent a good part of today taking stock of food - 
> physically mostly - letting the right side of my brain make a PLAN.  ;-))) 
> C'mon Brain!

Uh oh!  We're off and running!  Good luck and have fun!

============================

From: MG <who[at]where.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 07:28:29 GMT
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> Holy crap, Christine!  That thing's only $3 ??   Amazing.

I realise this may be a tad pedantic, but the ad says it can be used for 
whipping mashed potatoes...does this mean that the whipping with the whisk 
is done AFTER the mashing (with a masher/mouli/whatever)? ie to make it more 
fluffy or whatever

or is the mashing and whipping done together? 

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 07:35:00 GMT
--------
MG wrote:
> I realise this may be a tad pedantic, but the ad says it can be used for 
> whipping mashed potatoes...does this mean that the whipping with the whisk 
> is done AFTER the mashing (with a masher/mouli/whatever)? ie to make it 
> more fluffy or whatever
>
> or is the mashing and whipping done together?

They are claiming it will actually mash the potatoes. 

============================

From: Janet Bostwick <nospam[at]cableone.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 06:08:22 -0700
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> They are claiming it will actually mash the potatoes.

Where does it say that it will mash the potatoes?  Am I looking at the right 
link?

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 16:12:16 GMT
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote:
> Where does it say that it will mash the potatoes?  Am I looking at the 
> right link?

It doesn't.  This all started and one person said she uses a whisk to mash 
her potatoes.  I replied that I didn't see how a whisk could do that and she 
responded that I needed a better whisk.  Then I started this thread and 
another poster recommended that particular whisk and said it would mash 
potatoes.  I still don't believe it. 

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 12:21:30 -0500
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote:
> Where does it say that it will mash the potatoes?  Am I looking at the 
> right link?

When I boiled russets for Thanksgiving Dinner, then set them on the warm burner
after draining, then applied my masher to them, it was obvious that the masher'
was not necessary. They were soft and fluffy, not runny, and only needed a little
butter and milk, and to be blended with the whisk. They were great, no lumps
at all. I imagine if I had used waxy white potatoes or red potatoes this would not
have worked. 

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 09:03:04 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:

> The wires move?  How do you mean?  The whisks I have are much sturdier
> than that, and the wires don't move.  Why should they move?

They just sort of will move back and forth if you push on them.  Plus if you 
were to push it down into the pan, the part touching would be rounded.  Not 
flat.

> Where are you looking online?

I looked at Macy's.  Didn't really do too much looking since what I saw was 
similar to what I have.  And I have no intention of buying another whisk 
since I so rarely use the ones I have.

> I have a few hefty whisks which can handle stiff batters, etc...and
> probably mashed potatoes.  I think I got them either at a restaurant
> supply store like Surfas, or at another reputable kitchen shop.
> The tornado shape you mentioned is one that can be very sturdy.

Hmmm...  The tornado one was not sturdy at all.  At least not the one my mom 
had.  It was very flexible.  She used it to make scrambled eggs.  I don't 
make eggs any more but when I did I almost always just used a fork. 

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 02:04:40 -0700
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
>They just sort of will move back and forth if you push on them.  Plus if you 
>were to push it down into the pan, the part touching would be rounded.  Not 
>flat.

It's not supposed to be flat.  It is supposed to be rounded.  

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 02:13:56 -0700
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
>It's not supposed to be flat.  It is supposed to be rounded.  

Here is a description from Fantes,which is a wonderful kitchen supply
place:
> French, or sauce, whisks, are great for all mixing and whipping uses. The 
> stiffer (thicker) the wires, the stiffer the mixture they can work on.

And a picture of them.  Note the thicker wires.

<a href="http://www.fantes.com/images/3377whisks.jpg">http://www.fantes.com/images/3377whisks.jpg</a>

And whisks are not just for eggs or sauces.  They can be used for all
sorts of mixing.  

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 15:54:05 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> <a href="http://www.fantes.com/images/3377whisks.jpg">http://www.fantes.com/images/3377whisks.jpg</a>

That looks exactly like what I have.  And I don't make any sauces aside from 
pasta sauce. 

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 09:02:37 -0700
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
>That looks exactly like what I have.  And I don't make any sauces aside from 
>pasta sauce. 

That's what I just said. They are not just for sauces.  You can use
them for a lot of mixing.   Batters, viniagrettes, almost anything for
which you use a spoon/fork.   Use your imagination.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 16:32:16 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> That's what I just said. They are not just for sauces.  You can use
> them for a lot of mixing.   Batters, viniagrettes, almost anything for
> which you use a spoon/fork.   Use your imagination.

But I don't make anything that I would need one for.  The two I have get 
very little use.  Maybe once a year or every two years. 

============================

From: Lou Decruss <Me[at]notvalid.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 10:58:40 -0600
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
>But I don't make anything that I would need one for.  The two I have get 
>very little use.  Maybe once a year or every two years. 

I find it very odd that someone who posts as much as you do to a
cooking group only uses a whisk that often.

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 12:16:46 -0500
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> I find it very odd that someone who posts as much as you do to a
> cooking group only uses a whisk that often.

She's allergic to the fucking world, or thinks she is, and she has her child 
thinking the same way. There are only so many things you can whisk. FFS. 

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 23:25:26 GMT
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> I find it very odd that someone who posts as much as you do to a
> cooking group only uses a whisk that often.

We have food allergies so we don't eat a lot of things that would use a 
whisk to make. 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 17:51:32 GMT
--------
Julie Bove told us...
> But I don't make anything that I would need one for.  The two I have get 
> very little use.  Maybe once a year or every two years. 

Different strokes, I guesss.  I use at least one of my various whisks 
daily, and I cannot imagine not having one.

============================

From: Lou Decruss <Me[at]notvalid.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 21:22:25 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>Different strokes, I guesss.  I use at least one of my various whisks 
>daily, and I cannot imagine not having one.

I don't use them every day, but pretty close.  I have several, and
like you, couldn't imagine not using them.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 23:38:14 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Different strokes, I guesss.  I use at least one of my various whisks
> daily, and I cannot imagine not having one.

I guess it's because I grew up in a house without a whisk and I learned to 
do without.   My mom did get a whisk at some point after I moved out and she 
has gotten another one since.  She did have an old fashioned egg beater that 
I used for some things.  I bought an egg beater for my first apartment but 
after several years of it sitting with no use, I threw it out. 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 00:21:43 GMT
--------
Julie Bove told us...
> I guess it's because I grew up in a house without a whisk and I learned to 
> do without.   My mom did get a whisk at some point after I moved out and she 
> has gotten another one since.  She did have an old fashioned egg beater that 
> I used for some things.  I bought an egg beater for my first apartment but 
> after several years of it sitting with no use, I threw it out. 

My mom had a flat whisk unlike any I see on the market today.  She used it 
only for egg whites.  I never got the hang of it.  When I was living in my 
first apartment, Julia Child's "The French Chef" was on PBS and I don't 
think I never missed an episode.  From that I bought an assortment of 
kitchen equipment, including several different whisks.  I immediately found 
them invaluable.

My mom also had an old fashioned egg beater that was particularly effective 
in, guess what, beating eggs.  I couldn't find one exactly like the one she 
had (the beaters were made of flat steel blades), but I bought what was 
available at the time.  I didn't like it.  I kept it around for a while and 
then got rid of it.  I now have my mother's beater and I do use it for 
certain things that it's better at than a hand mixer or stand mixer.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 02:58:57 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> My mom had a flat whisk unlike any I see on the market today.  She used it 
> only for egg whites.  I never got the hang of it.  When I was living in my 
> first apartment, Julia Child's "The French Chef" was on PBS and I don't 
> think I never missed an episode.  From that I bought an assortment of 
> kitchen equipment, including several different whisks.  I immediately found 
> them invaluable.

I used to try to watch Julia Child.  My mom so despised the woman's voice 
that I could not watch it when she was around.  I think because of this I 
learned to despise my name which is actually Julia.  Never went by that 
because it reminded me of her.

Now that I think of it, I have seen a flat whisk that has little balls on 
the end of it.  Can't remember where I saw it though.

> My mom also had an old fashioned egg beater that was particularly effective 
> in, guess what, beating eggs.  I couldn't find one exactly like the one she 
> had (the beaters were made of flat steel blades), but I bought what was 
> available at the time.  I didn't like it.  I kept it around for a while and 
> then got rid of it.  I now have my mother's beater and I do use it for 
> certain things that it's better at than a hand mixer or stand mixer.

I don't even know where my hand mixer is.  I looked for it the other day, 
couldn't find it right away so I gave up.  I use my stand mixer on occasion. 
Since all of my baking is now gluten free, I generally don't use the mixer 
at all.  Those types of batters usually require only the most brief mixings. 
I do use it on occasion for gluten free breads.

I used to bake constantly.  These days hardly at all.  The gluten free stuff 
just doesn't keep very well and there seems no point in my making it when 
most of it will wind up in the trash since we can't eat it fast enough.  Now 
it's easier and in the end, more cost effective for me to just buy things 
pre-made, because I can buy things like bread, 2 slices at a time in a 
hermetically sealed package. 

============================

From: hahabogus <invalid[at]null.null>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 16:35:35 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Use your imagination.

Zebras with machine guns running all over downtown Utah...shooting the 
gaters. It's war I tell you, War!

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 17:52:11 GMT
--------
hahabogus told us...
> Zebras with machine guns running all over downtown Utah...shooting the 
> gaters. It's war I tell you, War!

It's better than this thread!  Zeesh!

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 12:00:26 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> And a picture of them.  Note the thicker wires.
>
> <a href="http://www.fantes.com/images/3377whisks.jpg">http://www.fantes.com/images/3377whisks.jpg</a>

The only reason I was able to whip my first try at mashed potatoes into grey 
gluten was because of a $#@%ed electric mixer.

I hate the things. I understand why bakers like them, but I have no use for 
them.

The whisk I used at Thanksgiving looks exactly like the one pictured. I 
began mashing with a masher, but noted that the potatoes were hot and so 
tender, they did not need it. The whisk sufficed. I think the tip about 
drying the potatoes out on a warm burner after draining is what made them so 
easy to  "mash." 

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 15:52:47 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> It's not supposed to be flat.  It is supposed to be rounded.

Then how could it mash potatoes? 

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 09:00:33 -0700
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
>Then how could it mash potatoes? 

You are taking it a bit literally here.  You aren't actually "mashing"
potatoes with it...you are whisking them, with the end product being
"mashed" potatoes.   With a sturdy enough whisk, it can be done.

============================

From: hahabogus <invalid[at]null.null>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 16:33:27 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> You are taking it a bit literally here.  You aren't actually "mashing"
> potatoes with it...you are whisking them, with the end product being
> "mashed" potatoes.   With a sturdy enough whisk, it can be done.

Think about what a masher does...It breaks up the potatoes and  turns 
them into a kinda puree. A whisk can do that as well. Myself I use a 
ricer or my food mill.

As to peeling tomatoes, again I use my food mill. Cause when I need 
skinless seedless tomato it is usually as a form of pulp for tomato sauce 
and a food mill can puree skin and seed tomatoes quite well and getting 
the tomatoes into a puree is a big part of tomato sauce making.

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 11:51:56 -0500
--------
hahabogus wrote
> Think about what a masher does...It breaks up the potatoes and  turns
> them into a kinda puree. A whisk can do that as well. Myself I use a
> ricer or my food mill.

The first time I made decent mashed potatoes was last Thanksgiving.
I followed the advice given here, to drain them and let them sit on
the warm burner to dry them a bit (they sat there maybe 5-10
minutes) and I found the masher was hardly needed, they were
so tender. I used a whisk and didn't even have to work hard.
They were perfect. 

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 16:33:50 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> You are taking it a bit literally here.  You aren't actually "mashing"
> potatoes with it...you are whisking them, with the end product being
> "mashed" potatoes.   With a sturdy enough whisk, it can be done.

She told me she mashes her potatoes with a whisk. 

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 11:38:59 -0600
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> She told me she mashes her potatoes with a whisk.

She who?

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 23:26:54 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> She who?

I can't remember.  She replied in my other post and then she replied here as 
well.  She does use the whisk to literally mash.  That was her reply.  Was a 
woman's name.  That's all I can remember. 

============================

From: merryb <msg144[at]juno.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 16:09:41 -0800 (PST)
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> I can't remember.  She replied in my other post and then she replied here as
> well.  She does use the whisk to literally mash.  That was her reply.  Was a
> woman's name.  That's all I can remember.- Hide quoted text -

It was me- I find this hilarious! Sorry if it kept you up all night
worrying about it...

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 19:16:08 -0500
--------
merryb wrote:
>It was me- I find this hilarious! Sorry if it kept you up all night
>worrying about it...

:D I do it too. We are SuperWomen. 

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 18:32:38 GMT
--------
cybercat wrote:
>:D I do it too. We are SuperWomen. 

i take it you handle all the pickle jar-opening duties, too.

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 13:51:20 -0500
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> i take it you handle all the pickle jar-opening duties, too.

No, I leave the brute labor to the brute. 

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 02:50:40 GMT
--------
merryb wrote:
> I can't remember. She replied in my other post and then she replied here as
> well. She does use the whisk to literally mash. That was her reply. Was a
> woman's name. That's all I can remember.- Hide quoted text -

It was me- I find this hilarious! Sorry if it kept you up all night
worrying about it...

I wasn't worried.  Just couldn't remember your name. 

============================

From: merryb <msg144[at]juno.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 08:38:17 -0800 (PST)
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> You are taking it a bit literally here.  You aren't actually "mashing"
> potatoes with it...you are whisking them, with the end product being
> "mashed" potatoes.   With a sturdy enough whisk, it can be done.

Not necessarily true- I do mash, and I suppose I stir a little with
it, but mostly squish. Mind you, if you want perfectly smooth spuds,
this won't work for you. You can get a good quality whisk at any
restaurant supply store.

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 11:55:41 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> You are taking it a bit literally here.  You aren't actually "mashing"
> potatoes with it...you are whisking them, with the end product being
> "mashed" potatoes.   With a sturdy enough whisk, it can be done.

The bovine is probably undercooking them if she has to work that
hard. 

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 11:57:36 -0500
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> It's not supposed to be flat.  It is supposed to be rounded.

You know that little light bulb that you see over people's heads in the 
comics?

Julie does not have one.

============================

From: Blinky the Shark <no.spam[at]box.invalid>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 01:24:50 -0800
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> The wires move?  How do you mean?  The whisks I have are much sturdier
> than that, and the wires don't move.  Why should they move?

Because they're wires?  :)

============================

From: "Michael \"Dog3\"" <don'task[at]donttell.huh>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 16:21:28 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney dropped this:
> Yes, the whisk needs to be very sturdy...not one with moveable wires.
> The cheaper ones will tend to move a bit...as they are not as well
> made.

On the metal whisks I have,  the wires are sturdy and stay stationary.  
I've been a little disappointed on the (for lack of a better word) plastic 
type whisks I use in non-stick pans and skillets.  The wirey things on some 
of those move a bit but it's not a big problem because most of the time I'm 
just whisking in something for a sauce. I don't like them when making a 
roux though.

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 11:26:00 -0500
--------
Michael "Dog3" wrote:
> On the metal whisks I have,  the wires are sturdy and stay stationary.  
> I've been a little disappointed on the (for lack of a better word) plastic 
> type whisks I use in non-stick pans and skillets.  The wirey things on some 
> of those move a bit but it's not a big problem because most of the time I'm 
> just whisking in something for a sauce. I don't like them when making a 
> roux though.

I dislike all plastic spoons, spatulas (pancake turning types) and the 
like. I find most of them flimsy and cheesy and question why people 
would buy them routinely? I do have one extra long pair of industrial 
strength ones that I use in my one huge teflon coated wok, but that's 
all. I want a substantial tool in my hand, not some POS. I want the tool 
to do the job, not me have to struggle to make it work.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 16:36:44 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> I dislike all plastic spoons, spatulas (pancake turning types) and the 
> like. I find most of them flimsy and cheesy and question why people would 
> buy them routinely? I do have one extra long pair of industrial strength 
> ones that I use in my one huge teflon coated wok, but that's all. I want a 
> substantial tool in my hand, not some POS. I want the tool to do the job, 
> not me have to struggle to make it work.

I have a bunch of plastic spoons that I use all the time.  They are black. 
I bought them for 99 cents each at the grocery store.  At the time I bought 
them, I considered them to be disposable.  I bought them for serving food at 
a party.  But they ended up working very well and are very durable. 

============================

From: hahabogus <invalid[at]null.null>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 16:43:12 GMT
--------
Julie Bove wrote: 
> I have a bunch of plastic spoons that I use all the time.  They are
> black. I bought them for 99 cents each at the grocery store.  At the
> time I bought them, I considered them to be disposable.  I bought them
> for serving food at a party.  But they ended up working very well and
> are very durable. 

Me too. I use my plastic black spoons (slotted and not)a great deal of 
the time. I have numerous pieces of cookware that don't like metal. 

I do have a serious steel egg flipper for turning burgers on the BBQ 
though, as I hate those flimsy flippers for serious food turning. I also 
have a light weight flipper for fish and more delicate stuff that 
requires more gentle handling. It is thinner and requires more finase to 
get it under stuff. 

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 11:55:56 -0500
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> I do have a serious steel egg flipper 

"egg flipper" ?? Is that the official title these days? I grew up 
calling it a spatula, but in Home-Ec class the teacher called it a 
"pancake turner" because a spatula was that softer flexible silcone 
blade that you used to clean a bowl out of batter and such...

Now, who has ever heard of calling a dishrag a "stoopala" (I'm sure not 
spelled that way).  That is what we grew up calling it in my father's 
Italian dialect.

============================

From: "Michael \"Dog3\"" <don'task[at]donttell.huh>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 17:51:05 GMT
--------
Goomba38 dropped this:
> I dislike all plastic spoons, spatulas (pancake turning types) and the
> like. I find most of them flimsy and cheesy and question why people 
> would buy them routinely? I do have one extra long pair of industrial 
> strength ones that I use in my one huge teflon coated wok, but that's 
> all. I want a substantial tool in my hand, not some POS. I want the
> tool to do the job, not me have to struggle to make it work.

I don't use plastic spoons but I do use plastic spatulas.  I find that the 
spoons are just not adequate so I use wooden spoons in the non-stick pots 
and pans and metal for the other pots and pans. I have not found a plastic 
spoon that holds up to the use I give my spoons.

============================

From: hahabogus <invalid[at]null.null>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 18:27:23 GMT
--------
"Michael \"Dog3\"" wrote:
> I have not found a plastic 
> spoon that holds up to the use I give my spoons.

That's what I found out about my wooden spoons. Plastic spoons break and 
can be replaced for cheap. Wooden spoons break and can be replaced but 
for more bucks and a longer shopping trip then I normally want when I 
need a replacement. So for 2 bucks I pick up 2 plastic spoons and when 
they break I don't get excited. Or for 4 bucks I can get 1 wooden spoon 
that might last as long as the 2 plastic spoons. 

Plus the plastic spoons can be found at the closest grocery store (about 
a block away) and the wooden spoons require a trip to the mall (about 2 
miles away). 

I'd rather walk the block than drive the 2 miles in traffic with 5 or 6 
stop lights and all that traffic bother.

============================

From: Lou Decruss <Me[at]notvalid.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 21:26:27 GMT
--------
hahabogus wrote:
>That's what I found out about my wooden spoons. Plastic spoons break and 
>can be replaced for cheap. Wooden spoons break and can be replaced but 
>for more bucks and a longer shopping trip then I normally want when I 
>need a replacement. So for 2 bucks I pick up 2 plastic spoons and when 
>they break I don't get excited. Or for 4 bucks I can get 1 wooden spoon 
>that might last as long as the 2 plastic spoons. 

You shop at some weird places.  4 bucks for a wooden spoon?

Lou <------taking Dee Dee's advice and throwing one a week out.  

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 23:35:13 GMT
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> That's what I found out about my wooden spoons. Plastic spoons break and
> can be replaced for cheap. Wooden spoons break and can be replaced but
> for more bucks and a longer shopping trip then I normally want when I
> need a replacement. So for 2 bucks I pick up 2 plastic spoons and when
> they break I don't get excited. Or for 4 bucks I can get 1 wooden spoon
> that might last as long as the 2 plastic spoons.

I only had a set of wooden spoons once.  They got nasty really quickly.  I 
bought them for a recipe that said to use wooden spoon.  I remember sticking 
one in a moving blender and it took a chunk of wood out of it.  Eek!

My mom had some tool called a Spurtle that was put out by Graham Kerr when 
he had the Galloping Gourmet series.  It was made of wood and it never 
splintered or got funny. 

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 17:56:07 -0800 (PST)
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> I only had a set of wooden spoons once.  They got nasty really quickly.  I
> bought them for a recipe that said to use wooden spoon.  I remember sticking
> one in a moving blender and it took a chunk of wood out of it.  Eek!

Okay, I have a really stupid question.  I was trying to avoid asking
this, but it nags at me...
Why would you put ANY utensil, wooden or otherwise into a moving
blender and expect it to come out whole?

If that is how they get nasty really quickly, I wouldn't think to
blame it on the wooden spoon.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 01:59:21 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney told us...
> Okay, I have a really stupid question.  I was trying to avoid asking
> this, but it nags at me...
> Why would you put ANY utensil, wooden or otherwise into a moving
> blender and expect it to come out whole?
> 
> If that is how they get nasty really quickly, I wouldn't think to
> blame it on the wooden spoon.

And a damned good question it is!!!  Imagine what a food processor would do 
with a wooden spoon. :-)

I remember an accessory they used to make for the old Osterizers was a 
stirring rod or pusher that one put through the hole in the lid.  It had a 
shoulder on it to prevent it from reaching the blades.

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 19:13:43 -0700
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>And a damned good question it is!!!  Imagine what a food processor would do 
>with a wooden spoon. :-)
>
>I remember an accessory they used to make for the old Osterizers was a 
>stirring rod or pusher that one put through the hole in the lid.  It had a 
>shoulder on it to prevent it from reaching the blades.

Well..I would think a person would stop the blender or food processor
first, before sticking in the spoon, no matter what it is made of.

And...a lot of recipes say to use a wooden spoon..but if you don't
have one, does that mean you can't make the recipe?  You use what you
have..unless of course it is a specific utensil/gadget/appliance with
which the recipe will not work otherwise.  I do interchange my wooden
spoons with other spoons...be they metal, silicone, or
otherwise...depending on what kind of pan I am using, or what I am
cooking.

I personally love, love, love my wooden spoons. I grew up using them
and starting obtaining my own right after I graduated from nursing
school.  I still have some that date back 30 years or so..and are just
fine.  I am constantly keeping an eye out for other great wooden
spoons... Right now, I am keeping my eye out for a tasting spoon.

If you take care of them and don't stick them into moving
blenders/food processors, they will last just fine.  I have gotten one
of mine scorched a bit, but it was my own fault for letting it get too
near the gas flame...  But it still works fine.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 03:51:52 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:

> And...a lot of recipes say to use a wooden spoon..but if you don't
> have one, does that mean you can't make the recipe?  You use what you
> have..unless of course it is a specific utensil/gadget/appliance with
> which the recipe will not work otherwise.  I do interchange my wooden
> spoons with other spoons...be they metal, silicone, or
> otherwise...depending on what kind of pan I am using, or what I am
> cooking.

If I remember correctly this recipe was for  Amish Friendship bread which I 
do not believe is at all Amish.  It said to use a wooden spoon and only a 
wooden spoon.  Since I wasn't going to be using the spoon for anything else, 
I got a set of three at the dollar store.  They were probably junk.

I did not know why it said to use a wooden spoon.  I know some things will 
react with metal and you can't use metal for them.  I don't believe this 
would have reacted, but I did what the recipe said.

And yes, for me, if it said to use only a wooden spoon and I did not have 
one, I would not have made the recipe. Or I would have bought one, like I 
did.

> I personally love, love, love my wooden spoons. I grew up using them
> and starting obtaining my own right after I graduated from nursing
> school.  I still have some that date back 30 years or so..and are just
> fine.  I am constantly keeping an eye out for other great wooden
> spoons... Right now, I am keeping my eye out for a tasting spoon.

I guess this is just like the whisk thing.  Wooden spoons are something we 
never had in our house so I never felt they were necessary.

> If you take care of them and don't stick them into moving
> blenders/food processors, they will last just fine.  I have gotten one
> of mine scorched a bit, but it was my own fault for letting it get too
> near the gas flame...  But it still works fine.

I can't see any need for one for me. 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 04:08:59 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney told us...

> Well..I would think a person would stop the blender or food processor
> first, before sticking in the spoon, no matter what it is made of.

I would think so, too.

> And...a lot of recipes say to use a wooden spoon..but if you don't
> have one, does that mean you can't make the recipe?  You use what you
> have..unless of course it is a specific utensil/gadget/appliance with
> which the recipe will not work otherwise.  I do interchange my wooden
> spoons with other spoons...be they metal, silicone, or
> otherwise...depending on what kind of pan I am using, or what I am
> cooking.

No, yes, and yes.
 
> I personally love, love, love my wooden spoons. I grew up using them
> and starting obtaining my own right after I graduated from nursing
> school.  I still have some that date back 30 years or so..and are just
> fine.  I am constantly keeping an eye out for other great wooden
> spoons... Right now, I am keeping my eye out for a tasting spoon.

I do, too.  I have many that I bought, but I also have some of my mothers 
and some of my grandmothers.  Treated properly, they will last a lifetime.  
I particularly like my olivewood spoons, but I don't have too many of 
those.
 
============================

From: Janet Bostwick <nospam[at]cableone.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 21:31:11 -0700
--------
Wooden spoons are funny things.  I have probably 6 of different shapes that 
are 40 plus years old.  One of them I use for nothing but making cream-type 
sauces because it has a hole in the middle, a flat bottom and one edge is 
rounded and the other is pointed.  In other words, it will reach into every 
part of a pot.  I've tried to get other spoons over the years -- even 
spending a fair amount of money -- only to have the handles go twisty or 
splintery.  About 5 or 6 Christmas's ago, my husband bought me two stirring 
spoons similar to my cream sauce one.  He got them at Wal-Mart for less than 
$2 a piece.  I use both of them every day and they go in the dishwasher 
every day and the wood is as smooth as the day that I got them.  I wish that 
I had purchased a couple more at the time.

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 22:01:19 -0700
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote:
>Wooden spoons are funny things.  I have probably 6 of different shapes that 
>are 40 plus years old.  One of them I use for nothing but making cream-type 
>sauces because it has a hole in the middle, a flat bottom and one edge is 
>rounded and the other is pointed.  In other words, it will reach into every 
>part of a pot.  I've tried to get other spoons over the years -- even 
>spending a fair amount of money -- only to have the handles go twisty or 
>splintery.  About 5 or 6 Christmas's ago, my husband bought me two stirring 
>spoons similar to my cream sauce one.  He got them at Wal-Mart for less than 
>$2 a piece.  I use both of them every day and they go in the dishwasher 
>every day and the wood is as smooth as the day that I got them.  I wish that 
>I had purchased a couple more at the time.

Oh, those are my favorite spoons. Those shapes. I must have about 5 or
6 like that, and I am always looking for more.  They aren't as common
as the others.... 

I will have to look in Walmart for them now...I haven't seen them in
some time..but maybe I can find more there.  I just love them, for the
same reasons you do.

============================

From: Janet Bostwick <nospam[at]cableone.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 06:14:24 -0700
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Oh, those are my favorite spoons. Those shapes. I must have about 5 or
> 6 like that, and I am always looking for more.  They aren't as common
> as the others....
>
> I will have to look in Walmart for them now...I haven't seen them in
> some time..but maybe I can find more there.  I just love them, for the
> same reasons you do.

If you find them there, I hope they are still the good ones.  I've paid $15 
for a spoon like that and had poor results.  I would never put any of my 
wooden spoons in the dishwasher or let them stand in water, but the ones 
from Wal-Mart were so cheap I fugured I'd run them through the DW until they 
were no longer useable. I didn't expect anything except bad results.  What a 
surprise.

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 08:45:44 -0500
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote
> If you find them there, I hope they are still the good ones.  I've paid 
> $15 for a spoon like that and had poor results.  I would never put any of 
> my wooden spoons in the dishwasher or let them stand in water, but the 
> ones from Wal-Mart were so cheap I fugured I'd run them through the DW 
> until they were no longer useable. I didn't expect anything except bad 
> results.  What a surprise.

I wonder if they are made of olivewood.  That's the only kind of
wooden spoon I buy, though I'd beat anyone who dared to put them
in the dishwasher.  The one's I've had over the years are very smooth
and retain that smoothness.

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 14:39:14 -0500
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
> I wonder if they are made of olivewood.  That's the only kind of
> wooden spoon I buy, though I'd beat anyone who dared to put them
> in the dishwasher.  The one's I've had over the years are very smooth
> and retain that smoothness.

I don't generally do wooden spoons, but a few years ago bought a set of 
wooden spoons/spatula type spoons very cheaply at the military 
commissary (something like 3 bucks max for the set) and they're marked 
"Cook-eez" but I've never seen them or the brand since. They are holding 
up extremely well.  I don't know what type of wood it is,as it has a bit 
of shine to it and is a tad darker than the standard new wooden spoons I 
see sold cheaply. Olivewood might be it but could it be bamboo, I don't 
know? I use it for my Le Creuset dutch oven in particular and it goes 
into the dishwasher almost daily. I A few burn marks on it just add 
character :)

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 16:53:33 -0500
--------
Goomba38 wrote

> I don't generally do wooden spoons, but a few years ago bought a set of 
> wooden spoons/spatula type spoons very cheaply at the military commissary 
> (something like 3 bucks max for the set) and they're marked "Cook-eez" but 
> I've never seen them or the brand since. They are holding up extremely 
> well.  I don't know what type of wood it is,as it has a bit of shine to it 
> and is a tad darker than the standard new wooden spoons I see sold 
> cheaply. Olivewood might be it but could it be bamboo, I don't know?

Olivewood has a beautiful grain, while bamboo would have lines.
I image bamboo would be a decent material for spoons, too.

> I use it for my Le Creuset dutch oven in particular and it goes into the 
> dishwasher almost daily. I A few burn marks on it just add character :)

I have one of those, too.  Not one of my olivewood spoons, though.
Luckily for he who abuses spoons.

============================

From: sf
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 22:30:57 -0800
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
>I wonder if they are made of olivewood.  That's the only kind of
>wooden spoon I buy, though I'd beat anyone who dared to put them
>in the dishwasher.  The one's I've had over the years are very smooth
>and retain that smoothness.

We used to buy those sets of spoons for about $3 at Cost Plus before
it became "World Market"... they were/are bamboo (I still have most of
them).  Never took a liking to the one with a hole in it and have no
idea what happened to it.  Maybe someone used it to stir paint.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 07:48:44 -0600
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> And...a lot of recipes say to use a wooden spoon..but if you don't
> have one, does that mean you can't make the recipe?

Oh damn!  I don't have a wooden spoon!  What to do, what to do?!  LOL

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 09:40:24 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Oh damn!  I don't have a wooden spoon!  What to do, what to do?!  LOL

Don't worry.  Have you ever smelled a 'washed' wooden spoon that had been 
used to stir spaghetti sauce, or left in the pan of garlic and onion while 
sauteeing?

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 09:46:34 -0600
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
> Don't worry.  Have you ever smelled a 'washed' wooden spoon that had
> been used to stir spaghetti sauce, or left in the pan of garlic and
> onion while sauteeing?

Of course... and it smells heavenly to me.  But don't worry.  A little lemon
juice will cure you of that fetish :)

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 11:15:34 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> Of course... and it smells heavenly to me.  But don't worry.  A little lemon
> juice will cure you of that fetish :)

Hmmm -- rfc is great.  It was just a few posts ago we were discussing a foot 
fetish.
Now it is a wooden-spoon fetish!  LOL.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 18:44:14 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
>Hmmm -- rfc is great.  It was just a few posts ago we were discussing a foot 
>fetish.
>Now it is a wooden-spoon fetish!  LOL.

thank god the two are rarely present in the same person.

============================

From: sf
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 22:33:26 -0800
--------
blake murphy wrote:
>thank god the two are rarely present in the same person.

Sure they could be.... use the spoon to spank the foot smeller.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 16:29:13 GMT
--------
sf wrote:
>Sure they could be.... use the spoon to spank the foot smeller.

it's really hard to get those kind of movies.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 16:23:06 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
> Don't worry.  Have you ever smelled a 'washed' wooden spoon that had been 
> used to stir spaghetti sauce, or left in the pan of garlic and onion while 
> sauteeing?

I've *seen* them.  I don't think wood is the best thing for cooking. 

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 14:43:51 -0500
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> I've *seen* them.  I don't think wood is the best thing for cooking. 
 
...because we've heard so often over the past century or so of the 
families struck down in the prime of their life from the wooden spoons??

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 15:16:05 -0500
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> ...because we've heard so often over the past century or so of the 
> families struck down in the prime of their life from the wooden spoons??

Things were less scientific then, so they thought a lot of the Wooden Spoon 
Deaths were from natural causes. 

============================

From: Ophelia <O[at]nix.co.uk>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 20:20:49 -0000
--------
cybercat wrote:
> Things were less scientific then, so they thought a lot of the Wooden
> Spoon Deaths were from natural causes.

Hmm have you had a spurtle attack yet? 

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 15:53:27 -0500
--------
Ophelia wrote:
> Hmm have you had a spurtle attack yet?

*Smiling fondly* I remember many spurtle attacks with great fondness. :) A 
porridge stirrer, eh? 

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 17:22:37 -0500
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> ...because we've heard so often over the past century or so of the 
> families struck down in the prime of their life from the wooden spoons??

I thought that was Lizzie with the ax, and the like.  Hadn't she been 
chopping wood to make a spoon?

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 17:24:16 -0500
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> ...because we've heard so often over the past century or so of the 
> families struck down in the prime of their life from the wooden spoons??

I think you're confused ... it was me as a *child* struck with the
wooden spoons.

============================

From: sf
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 22:34:50 -0800
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
>...because we've heard so often over the past century or so of the 
>families struck down in the prime of their life from the wooden spoons??

Spare the rod, spoil the child.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 18:41:41 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
>Oh damn!  I don't have a wooden spoon!  What to do, what to do?!  LOL

post about it, obviously.

============================

From: Janet Baraclough <janet.and.john[at]zetnet.co.uk>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 19:38:59 GMT
--------
The message from blake murphy contains these words:
> post about it, obviously.

That's only the first step on the road to recovery. There are 11 others.

============================

From: sf
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 22:37:10 -0800
--------
Janet Baraclough wrote:
> That's only the first step on the road to recovery. There are 11 others.

1.  plant a tree

2.....

============================

From: Nancy Young <rjynly[at]comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 16:50:36 -0500
--------
Jill McQuown wrote
> Oh damn!  I don't have a wooden spoon!  What to do, what to do?!  LOL

I'm sure it was Reader's Digest, years ago.  A woman took a cooking
class and the teacher told them all to make sure they used the wooden
spoon! to stir whatever it was they were making.  Curious, the student
asked why wooden spoons, were they better somehow?  The teacher
said, Oh, the sound of all those metal spoons would drive me up the wall!

(laugh)

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 16:41:17 GMT
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
>I'm sure it was Reader's Digest, years ago.  A woman took a cooking
>class and the teacher told them all to make sure they used the wooden
>spoon! to stir whatever it was they were making.  Curious, the student
>asked why wooden spoons, were they better somehow?  The teacher
>said, Oh, the sound of all those metal spoons would drive me up the wall!

too funny.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 18:38:38 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
>I personally love, love, love my wooden spoons. I grew up using them
>and starting obtaining my own right after I graduated from nursing
>school.

for what applications do you find them better, christine?  or is it
just the way they feel?

============================

From: Ophelia <O[at]nix.co.uk>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 19:02:30 -0000
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> for what applications do you find them better, christine?  or is it
> just the way they feel?

I have wooden spoons, wooden forks and spurtles!!

<a href="http://tinyurl.com/2pgo5b">http://tinyurl.com/2pgo5b</a>

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 19:18:25 GMT
--------
Ophelia told us...
> I have wooden spoons, wooden forks and spurtles!!
> 
> http://tinyurl.com/2pgo5b

According to the description on the  spurtle page, I have summoned the 
devil!

Aussie spurtles are different, if you can believe Graham Kerr. :-)

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 12:24:59 -0700
--------
blake murphy wrote:
>for what applications do you find them better, christine?  or is it
>just the way they feel?

Well..I guess I like the way they feel.  I have all sizes and shapes..
They are the first spoons I reach for when stirring something at the
stove, other than the whisk.  I do like them for custards especially.

A pic of my wooden spoon crock:
http://bigspud.com/pics/2mxr445.jpg

Some of them are discolored after many, many years of use, but they
work just fine, and don't seem to retain any odors.  I am now trying
to decide which ones to take traveling with me...

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 16:27:09 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
>Well..I guess I like the way they feel.  I have all sizes and shapes..
>They are the first spoons I reach for when stirring something at the
>stove, other than the whisk.  I do like them for custards especially.

i'm just trying to remember specific tasks the wooden spoon is
recommended for.  i've seen cooking scrambled eggs, and maybe stirring
jam.

you'd think stainless steel would take care of any reactivity
problems.

============================

From: Janet Baraclough <janet.and.john[at]zetnet.co.uk>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 19:09:54 GMT
--------
The message from blake murphy contains these words:
> i'm just trying to remember specific tasks the wooden spoon is
> recommended for.  i've seen cooking scrambled eggs, and maybe stirring
> jam.
>
> you'd think stainless steel would take care of any reactivity
> problems.

   Metal also transmits heat from the pan contents to the hand. A wooden
spoon is always cooler to the touch when stirring  jam,  sauce, gravy,
soup, porridge, eggs. They are also  quieter and don't scratch the pan. 

============================

From: Blinky the Shark <no.spam[at]box.invalid>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 11:57:09 -0800
--------
Janet Baraclough wrote:
>    Metal also transmits heat from the pan contents to the hand. A wooden
> spoon is always cooler to the touch when stirring  jam,  sauce, gravy,
> soup, porridge, eggs. They are also  quieter and don't scratch the pan.

And a nice, natural non-slip grip.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 18:09:53 GMT
--------
Janet Baraclough wrote:
>   Metal also transmits heat from the pan contents to the hand. A wooden
>spoon is always cooler to the touch when stirring  jam,  sauce, gravy,
>soup, porridge, eggs. They are also  quieter and don't scratch the pan. 

not trying to be a wise guy, but the spoon i cook with most is
stainless with a wooden handle, and most of my pans are stainless
steel also (not coated).

============================

From: Janet Baraclough <janet.and.john[at]zetnet.co.uk>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 18:45:31 GMT
--------
The message from blake murphy contains these words:
> not trying to be a wise guy, but the spoon i cook with most is
> stainless with a wooden handle, and most of my pans are stainless
> steel also (not coated).

  Ew, horrid metallic scratchy noise :- (
  I use uncoated stainless pans too, I still stir with wooden spoons.
I've been surprised at the number of people here who don't use wooden
spoons; they are pretty much universal kitchen kit in the UK. 

============================

From: Blinky the Shark <no.spam[at]box.invalid>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 12:36:47 -0800
--------
Janet Baraclough wrote:
>   Ew, horrid metallic scratchy noise :- ( I use uncoated stainless pans
>   too, I still stir with wooden spoons.
> I've been surprised at the number of people here who don't use wooden
> spoons; they are pretty much universal kitchen kit in the UK.

Count me as a wooden spoon user, as well.  (USA)

============================

From: sf
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 10:15:36 -0800
--------
blake murphy wrote:
>i'm just trying to remember specific tasks the wooden spoon is
>recommended for.  i've seen cooking scrambled eggs, and maybe stirring
>jam.
>
>you'd think stainless steel would take care of any reactivity
>problems.

I used wood to stir in anodized and teflon coated pans before the
nylon variety appeared.

============================

From: hahabogus <invalid[at]null.null>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 18:23:48 GMT
--------
sf wrote:
> I used wood to stir in anodized and teflon coated pans before the
> nylon variety appeared.

 I use nylon spoons in the rice cooker and in soup making or elsewhere 
where a taste might be required. I use silicon spatula for scrambling 
eggs and genereal farting around in a frying pan.

============================

From: sf
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 12:38:25 -0800
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> I use nylon spoons in the rice cooker and in soup making or elsewhere 
>where a taste might be required. I use silicon spatula for scrambling 
>eggs and genereal farting around in a frying pan.

Silicon came a lot later.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 21:36:15 GMT
--------
hahabogus told us...
>  I use nylon spoons in the rice cooker and in soup making or elsewhere 
> where a taste might be required. I use silicon spatula for scrambling 
> eggs and genereal farting around in a frying pan.

Please do not fry anything for me, Alan, if you fart in your fry pan.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 03:48:08 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> And a damned good question it is!!!  Imagine what a food processor would do
> with a wooden spoon. :-)
>
> I remember an accessory they used to make for the old Osterizers was a
> stirring rod or pusher that one put through the hole in the lid.  It had a
> shoulder on it to prevent it from reaching the blades.

My food processor is designed so that if you attempt to open it while it is 
on or remove the food pusher from it, it stops working.  I presume this is 
to prevent injuries.  I don't know if today's blenders are designed in such 
a manner or not.  I have a very old Osterizer that I presume still works. 
Don't know.  Since I got my immersion blender I've had no need to use it.

The blender I had at the time certainly was not.  I was using a recipe I had 
from a blender cookbook.  I can't remember now what I was making but it said 
if the food got stuck around the blades to stir it with a spoon to loosen. 
So that's what I did.  I don't recall anything about turning the blender off 
to do it.  And I had seen my mom do the same countless times with no 
problems.  She used to make Weight Watchers milkshakes with frozen berries, 
crushed ice and I think powdered milk.  Maybe some water.  It has been a 
long time.  The ice and berries would tend to get clumped up around the 
blades and she'd push a rubber scraper through a hole in the top to dislodge 
them. 

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 22:59:09 -0500
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> The blender I had at the time certainly was not.  I was using a recipe I had 
> from a blender cookbook.  I can't remember now what I was making but it said 
> if the food got stuck around the blades to stir it with a spoon to loosen. 
> So that's what I did.  I don't recall anything about turning the blender off 
> to do it.
 
Silly thought I know but.. perhaps she didn't put it in *all the way* to 
the blades? Just above them?  Kinda like I do when pushing things down 
into the disposal. I know aproximately how far down the blades are and I 
know I can keep well above that and still assist it down the drain.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 04:01:54 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> Silly thought I know but.. perhaps she didn't put it in *all the way* to 
> the blades? Just above them?  Kinda like I do when pushing things down 
> into the disposal. I know aproximately how far down the blades are and I 
> know I can keep well above that and still assist it down the drain.

I have no clue.  I didn't really pay all that much attention. 

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 23:05:31 -0500
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> I have no clue.  I didn't really pay all that much attention. 
 
But you couldn't imagine the potential problem either?
There seems like a little problem with critical thinking skills here, to 
be honest?

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 05:00:01 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> But you couldn't imagine the potential problem either?
> There seems like a little problem with critical thinking skills here, to 
> be honest?

You're starting to sound like cybercat. 

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 07:59:07 -0600
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> You're starting to sound like cybercat.

You're starting to sound clueless.  I would no more put a utensil in a
running blender (or my hand in a running garbage disposal, Goomba!) than I
would stick my foot under a running lawnmower that was clogged with damp
grass.  Some things are simply common sense.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 16:24:55 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> You're starting to sound clueless.  I would no more put a utensil in a
> running blender (or my hand in a running garbage disposal, Goomba!) than I
> would stick my foot under a running lawnmower that was clogged with damp
> grass.  Some things are simply common sense.

I was young when I did it.  Now I know better.  I suppose you never had any 
kitchen mistakes? 

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 12:44:36 -0600
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> I was young when I did it.  Now I know better.  I suppose you never
> had any kitchen mistakes?

How young?  I knew better by the time I was 10.  Apparently I've not made
mistakes like your kitchen mistakes.  I've burned my hand on an oven burner
a couple of times to turn a baking dish when I knew I should have been
wearing oven mitts.  I've spilled hot soup on my hand by not using a ladel.
But stick a spoon (wooden or otherwise) in a running blender?  NOPE.  Never
done that.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 00:13:54 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> How young?  I knew better by the time I was 10.  Apparently I've not made
> mistakes like your kitchen mistakes.  I've burned my hand on an oven burner
> a couple of times to turn a baking dish when I knew I should have been
> wearing oven mitts.  I've spilled hot soup on my hand by not using a ladel.
> But stick a spoon (wooden or otherwise) in a running blender?  NOPE.  Never
> done that.

We didn't have a blender when I was 10.  We didn't get one until I was 12 
and I had never used one until years later.  I don't remember how old I was. 
An adult but a young one.  And as I said, my mom always stuck a rubber 
scraper in her running blender.  I probably had no rubber scraper at the 
time and opted for the wooden spoon.  The only thing I can remember about 
the blender cookbook I had said not to put metal in it. 

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 11:45:05 -0600
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> We didn't have a blender when I was 10.  We didn't get one until I
> was 12 and I had never used one until years later.  I don't remember
> how old I was. An adult but a young one.  And as I said, my mom
> always stuck a rubber scraper in her running blender.  I probably had
> no rubber scraper at the time and opted for the wooden spoon.  The
> only thing I can remember about the blender cookbook I had said not
> to put metal in it.

So sorry you were deprived, Julie.  We had a blender when I was 10.
Probably had one when I was 5.  I don't know for sure and my parents
wouldn't remember now.  Just know I didn't go around sticking spoons in them
while they were running.  Common sense... hello?

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 13:36:38 -0500
--------
Jill wrote:
> So sorry you were deprived, Julie.  We had a blender when I was 10.
> Probably had one when I was 5.  I don't know for sure and my parents
> wouldn't remember now.  Just know I didn't go around sticking spoons in them
> while they were running.  Common sense... hello?

I don't think one actually needs to own a blender to be able to foresee 
the problem putting sticks down into blades? Although there must be some 
out there, eh? Those people who can't are the reason we have stupid 
stickers on the hairdryers saying "Do not use while bathing"

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 23:29:18 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> I don't think one actually needs to own a blender to be able to foresee 
> the problem putting sticks down into blades? Although there must be some 
> out there, eh? Those people who can't are the reason we have stupid 
> stickers on the hairdryers saying "Do not use while bathing"

I did not attempt to put the spoon in the blades.  It just went there. 
Jeez!  Can we drop this already!?  I'm sorry that ya'll are so perfect and 
nothing bad ever happens to you. 

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 20:27:56 -0500
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> I did not attempt to put the spoon in the blades.  It just went there. 
> Jeez!  Can we drop this already!?  I'm sorry that ya'll are so perfect and 
> nothing bad ever happens to you. 
 
LOL, oh don't worry. We've all had "bad" happen now and then. Just 
different stupid stuff than that.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 23:28:25 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> So sorry you were deprived, Julie.  We had a blender when I was 10.
> Probably had one when I was 5.  I don't know for sure and my parents
> wouldn't remember now.  Just know I didn't go around sticking spoons in 
> them
> while they were running.  Common sense... hello?

I can't remember now but I am sure the recipe said to do something with the 
spoon or I would not have done it.  And I was not deprived at all for not 
having a blender. 

============================

From: merryb <msg144[at]juno.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 08:30:14 -0800 (PST)
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> There seems like a little problem with critical thinking skills here, to
> be honest?

Agreed! A few dishes short of a full load??

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 16:33:09 GMT
--------
merryb wrote:
> Agreed! A few dishes short of a full load??

Not nice!  :( 

============================

From: merryb <msg144[at]juno.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 08:42:46 -0800 (PST)
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> Not nice!  :(

You're right, I'm sorry. This just seems like a ridiculous topic for
all the responses you're getting.

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 12:25:08 -0500
--------
merryb wrote:
>You're right, I'm sorry. This just seems like a ridiculous >topic for all 
>the responses you're getting.

The Bitter Cole Slaw thread is what got her kill filed. I could not stand 
one more word about the allergies. I am soooo not nice, I know. 

============================

From: Ophelia <O[at]nix.co.uk>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 18:52:50 -0000
--------
cybercat wrote:
> The Bitter Cole Slaw thread is what got her kill filed. I could not
> stand one more word about the allergies. I am soooo not nice, I know.

Nodnodnod.  I told ya didn't I???  You never listen to a word I 
say............................... 

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 12:15:53 -0500
--------
merryb wrote:
> Agreed! A few dishes short of a full load??

It must be the allergies. 

============================

From: sf
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 22:43:08 -0800
--------
merryb wrote:
>Agreed! A few dishes short of a full load??

What on earth are you two talking about?

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 06:46:45 GMT
--------
sf told us...
> What on earth are you two talking about?

How to load a dishwasher efficiently.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 06:52:58 GMT
--------
sf wrote:
> What on earth are you two talking about?

They're being mean to me.  Apparently I am the one to be picked on at the 
moment... 

============================

From: sf
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 23:11:26 -0800
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
>They're being mean to me.  Apparently I am the one to be picked on at the 
>moment... 

Ah, thanks for bringing me up to speed.

<handing Julie a dish towel>

============================

From: merryb <msg144[at]juno.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 08:25:10 -0800 (PST)
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> They're being mean to me.  Apparently I am the one to be picked on at the
> moment...

If you didn't notice, I did apologize...

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 16:30:49 GMT
--------
merryb wrote:
> If you didn't notice, I did apologize...

Yes, you did.  Thanks. 

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 18:46:04 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
>But you couldn't imagine the potential problem either?
>There seems like a little problem with critical thinking skills here, to 
>be honest?

well, she did use the spoon instead of her fingers.

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 23:47:33 -0500
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> Silly thought I know but.. perhaps she didn't put it in *all the way* to 
> the blades? Just above them?  Kinda like I do when pushing things down 
> into the disposal. I know aproximately how far down the blades are and I 
> know I can keep well above that and still assist it down the drain.

Shivering at the thought ....
Is there anyone there that might give you a big hug all of a sudden, or you 
might slip on a apple peel while you are keeping your fingers at bay?

(Covering eyes)

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 00:07:58 -0500
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
> Shivering at the thought ....
> Is there anyone there that might give you a big hug all of a sudden, or you 
> might slip on a apple peel while you are keeping your fingers at bay?

LOL, Awww come on... pushing your fingertips down 1/2 inch into the 
rubber stopper at the sink drain into the disposal is not going to cut 
anything... I seem to have remained full digited so far :)

I will suggest that folks make sure to load those knifes into the 
dishwasher point downwards. THAT is dangerous stuff! I've been known to 
stab or slice something while emptying the silverware rack. In fact, a 
few years ago a kid in KY did die while being playfully being chased 
around his grandma's house by a sibling and he slipped and fell on the 
open dishwasher and a knife got him :(

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 00:37:23 -0500
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> I will suggest that folks make sure to load those knifes into the 
> dishwasher point downwards. THAT is dangerous stuff! I've been known to 
> stab or slice something while emptying the silverware rack. In fact, a few 
> years ago a kid in KY did die while being playfully being chased around 
> his grandma's house by a sibling and he slipped and fell on the open 
> dishwasher and a knife got him :(

Awww, you've got me nuts!  You are living too dangerously.  Knives in a 
dishwasher?  I use 5 or 6 pairs of scissors each dishwasher full and I am 
always careful to place them downward.  I don't even put a knife in the 
dishrack receptacle.  Just thinking about it, the back of my legs are 
getting those running-things running down them -- do you know what I mean --  
like one gets when you look down from a cliff, high building.

What are those little creepy little nervous-system electrical system things 
called.  Other than leg 'shudders.'

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 06:05:21 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
> Awww, you've got me nuts!  You are living too dangerously.  Knives in a 
> dishwasher?  I use 5 or 6 pairs of scissors each dishwasher full and I am 
> always careful to place them downward.  I don't even put a knife in the 
> dishrack receptacle.  Just thinking about it, the back of my legs are 
> getting those running-things running down them -- do you know what I 
> mean --  like one gets when you look down from a cliff, high building.

I wash my sharp knives by hand and put them back in the rack.  I usually 
wash the scissors by hand but will put them in the dishwasher on occasion. 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 06:11:59 GMT
--------
Julie Bove told us...
> I wash my sharp knives by hand and put them back in the rack.  I usually
> wash the scissors by hand but will put them in the dishwasher on
> occasion. 

I wash all my sharp knives by hand, too.  Washing them in a dishwasher can 
dull the edge.  I usually put all kitchen scissors in the dishwasher.  For 
some reason it doesn't seem to dull them.

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 04:25:18 -0500
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> I wash my sharp knives by hand and put them back in the rack.  I usually 
> wash the scissors by hand but will put them in the dishwasher on occasion. 
 
I hand wash my good knives too, but there are a lot of other knives that 
go in the ole' Maytag. Dinner knives and the like. My Henkles kitchen 
shears do get disassemble and go into the dishwasher frequently though.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 18:50:48 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
>I hand wash my good knives too, but there are a lot of other knives that 
>go in the ole' Maytag. Dinner knives and the like. My Henkles kitchen 
>shears do get disassemble and go into the dishwasher frequently though.

dishwasher preferences are odd.  i would never think of putting any
serious knife or any scissors in the machine.

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 14:52:53 -0500
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> dishwasher preferences are odd.  i would never think of putting any
> serious knife or any scissors in the machine.

But you would put your nightly stainless dinner service knife in, right? 
That was what the kid fell on, not some particularly sharp knife. Just 
the run of the mill cheap place setting knife, but pointed upwards. The 
momentum of the fall  assisted in the oooomph that caused it to enter 
his torso.

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 17:27:53 -0500
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> dishwasher preferences are odd.  i would never think of putting any
> serious knife or any scissors in the machine.

I close up my scissors, knowing that they might not get clean enough inside 
that closure, but I do it anyway.  I would not put a good chicken scissor, 
for instance in their, only the cheap yellow Fiskars.

Does this count for half-assed serious.'

============================

From: sf
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 22:25:44 -0800
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
>I close up my scissors, knowing that they might not get clean enough inside 
>that closure, but I do it anyway.  I would not put a good chicken scissor, 
>for instance in their, only the cheap yellow Fiskars.

I don't bother closing my kitchen scissors, but come to think of it I
rarely put them in the dishwasher either.  Don't know why, just don't.
they are sturdy and they don't rust.  Oh, I bought them at the Dollar
Store.  I have two and they've been with me for years.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 16:31:11 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
>I close up my scissors, knowing that they might not get clean enough inside 
>that closure, but I do it anyway.  I would not put a good chicken scissor, 
>for instance in their, only the cheap yellow Fiskars.

i guess i just let mine get filthy.

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 07:57:03 -0600
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> The blender I had at the time certainly was not.  I was using a
> recipe I had from a blender cookbook.  I can't remember now what I
> was making but it said if the food got stuck around the blades to
> stir it with a spoon to loosen. So that's what I did.  I don't recall
> anything about turning the blender off to do it. (snippage)

How about a little common sense?  When I write down recipes I sometimes
neglect to say when browning meat for a dish you should turn it (the meat,
not the pan!) over.  Some things are generally understood when reading a
recipe.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 16:24:06 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> How about a little common sense?  When I write down recipes I sometimes
> neglect to say when browning meat for a dish you should turn it (the meat,
> not the pan!) over.  Some things are generally understood when reading a
> recipe.

Like I said...  I had seen my mom do the same thing countless times with a 
rubber scraper.  She never had any problems. 

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 14:44:50 -0500
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> Like I said...  I had seen my mom do the same thing countless times with a 
> rubber scraper.  She never had any problems. 
 
She sounds like she was bright enough to figure something out here. Why 
not ask her what she does differently from you?

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 00:20:56 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> She sounds like she was bright enough to figure something out here. Why 
> not ask her what she does differently from you?

Since I don't use the blender any more that would not be necessary.  And 
since she is not noted as being a particularly good cook, she is not the one 
I ask for advice. 

============================

From: sf
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 22:39:31 -0800
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
>Like I said...  I had seen my mom do the same thing countless times with a 
>rubber scraper.  She never had any problems. 

Kids don't see the nicks in spatulas if moms don't talk about them.  I
can testify that blenders eat spatulas and wooden spoons.

============================

From: "Michael \"Dog3\"" <don'task[at]donttell.huh>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 16:32:38 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright dropped this:
> And a damned good question it is!!!  Imagine what a food processor
> would do with a wooden spoon. :-)

Actually it *is* a good question.  In my case I was pulsing the blender 
while shoving the spinach a small amount at a time into the blender with 
the spoon.  You know, shove, shove, pulse, pulse.  Well, I got my shoves 
and pulse steps mixed up and wound up shredding the spoon.

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 12:26:38 -0500
--------
Michael "Dog3" wrote:
> Actually it *is* a good question.  In my case I was pulsing the blender
> while shoving the spinach a small amount at a time into the blender with
> the spoon.  You know, shove, shove, pulse, pulse.  Well, I got my shoves
> and pulse steps mixed up and wound up shredding the spoon.

Not suggesting you buy another appliance -- but just saying:

Vita-Mix, which has a tall container, provides a long plastic tube to move 
around the ingredients while the blender is working.  It falls just short of 
the blades.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 03:43:12 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> Okay, I have a really stupid question.  I was trying to avoid asking
> this, but it nags at me...
> Why would you put ANY utensil, wooden or otherwise into a moving
> blender and expect it to come out whole?
>
> If that is how they get nasty really quickly, I wouldn't think to
> blame it on the wooden spoon.

Because I didn't know any better?  My mom always put things in a moving 
blender.  Then again, she uses her hand to push stuff down the garbage 
disposal while it is on... 

============================

From: "Michael \"Dog3\"" <don'task[at]donttell.huh>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 16:33:24 GMT
--------
Julie Bove dropped this:
> My mom always put things in a
> moving blender.  Then again, she uses her hand to push stuff down the
> garbage disposal while it is on... 

Oh Gawd... 

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 18:52:18 GMT
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
>Because I didn't know any better?  My mom always put things in a moving 
>blender.  Then again, she uses her hand to push stuff down the garbage 
>disposal while it is on... 

lefty, we call her...

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' <barbschaller[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 20:21:18 -0600
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> I only had a set of wooden spoons once.  They got nasty really quickly.  I 
> bought them for a recipe that said to use wooden spoon.  I remember sticking 
> one in a moving blender and it took a chunk of wood out of it.  Eek!

Um, what did you *think* would happen to it if you stuck it in a blender?

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 22:41:40 -0500
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> Um, what did you *think* would happen to it if you stuck it in a blender?

Might've been worse if it were hard plastic.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 03:53:11 GMT
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> Um, what did you *think* would happen to it if you stuck it in a blender?

No clue.  It was the first time I ever used the blender aside from making 
margaritas. 

============================

From: "Michael \"Dog3\"" <don'task[at]donttell.huh>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 16:34:30 GMT
--------
Julie Bove dropped this:
> No clue.  It was the first time I ever used the blender aside from
> making margaritas. 

My smoothie machine is sacred in this household. Nothing goes near it 
that isn't edible ;)  That includes spoons.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 18:55:02 GMT
--------
Michael \"Dog3\" wrote:
>My smoothie machine is sacred in this household. Nothing goes near it 
>that isn't edible ;)  That includes spoons.

do fingers count?

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 18:54:29 GMT
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
>No clue.  It was the first time I ever used the blender aside from making 
>margaritas. 

you shouldn't have used it for the margaritas first.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 18:53:20 GMT
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>Um, what did you *think* would happen to it if you stuck it in a blender?

i'd say she has a hell of a blender.

============================

From: "Michael \"Dog3\"" <don'task[at]donttell.huh>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 16:30:27 GMT
--------
Julie Bove dropped this:
> I only had a set of wooden spoons once.  They got nasty really
> quickly.  I bought them for a recipe that said to use wooden spoon.  I
> remember sticking one in a moving blender and it took a chunk of wood
> out of it.  Eek! 

I had a plastic spoon shred in a mixer once. I was doing something with 
creamed spinach and water chestnuts. Thought I'd gotten it all out but my 
dinner guests kept finding pieces of it in the spinach. I had pre-warned 
them thought so it wasn't a big surprise ;)

The spinach would have been perfect had it not been for the shredded 
plastic. 

============================

From: "Michael \"Dog3\"" <don'task[at]donttell.huh>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 17:02:34 GMT
--------
hahabogus dropped this:
> That's what I found out about my wooden spoons. Plastic spoons break and 
> can be replaced for cheap. Wooden spoons break and can be replaced but 
> for more bucks and a longer shopping trip then I normally want when I 
> need a replacement.

Hmmm... I'm just the opposite.  I've never paid $4 for a wooden spoon 
though.  I've found the wooden to be less expensive than the plastic. I 
guess it depends on what retail outlets one has available to them.

============================

From: Ms P <ms_peacock[at]wbsnet.org>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 14:11:03 -0600
--------
Michael "Dog3" wrote:
> Hmmm... I'm just the opposite.  I've never paid $4 for a wooden spoon
> though.  I've found the wooden to be less expensive than the plastic. I
> guess it depends on what retail outlets one has available to them.

I have a wooden spoon I paid almost 15 bucks for.  But it's hand carved from 
white oak.  I love that spoon.  It has more of a bowl than the flatter 
spoons you buy in the store.

============================

From: sf
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 22:49:19 -0800
--------
Ms P wrote:
>I have a wooden spoon I paid almost 15 bucks for.  But it's hand carved from 
>white oak.  I love that spoon.  It has more of a bowl than the flatter 
>spoons you buy in the store.

Oh, you just reminded me of the myrtle wood "tasting spoon" I bought
up in Corvallis OR years ago.  It had a spoon on both ends with a
groove running from one spoon to the other.  You dip with one end and
taste with the other.

I need to dig around and see if I still have it.

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 11:13:52 -0500
--------
sf wrote
> Oh, you just reminded me of the myrtle wood "tasting spoon" I bought
> up in Corvallis OR years ago.  It had a spoon on both ends with a
> groove running from one spoon to the other.  You dip with one end and
> taste with the other.

That sounds pretty neat. 

============================

From: sf
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 22:22:08 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
>That sounds pretty neat. 

Just plain pretty too!

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 11:30:44 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
> Just plain pretty too!

I want to see! 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 06:55:51 GMT
--------
sf told us...
> I need to dig around and see if I still have it.

I'd probably pour the contents all over myself in attempting to taste from 
the other end.

============================

From: Blinky the Shark <no.spam[at]box.invalid>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 01:23:55 -0800
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> My mom had a whisk that was shaped sort of like a tornado.

So did mine.  Wide and flat on the bottom, right?  And the coils tapered
into the handle?  I don't know that I've seen any of those since hers.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 15:54:19 GMT
--------
Blinky the Shark wrote:
>> My mom had a whisk that was shaped sort of like a tornado.
>
> So did mine.  Wide and flat on the bottom, right?  And the coils tapered
> into the handle?  I don't know that I've seen any of those since hers.

Yep. 

============================

From: koko
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 16:56:32 -0800
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
>Yep. 

Are you talking about one like the one in my utensil caddy?
http://bigspud.com/pics/dpv0gh.jpg

That's been in our family for as long as I can remember. 

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 17:59:20 -0700
--------
koko wrote:
>Are you talking about one like the one in my utensil caddy?
>http://bigspud.com/pics/dpv0gh.jpg
>
>That's been in our family for as long as I can remember. 

I used to have one like that, but I found I didn't use it very much. I
tend to use the regular whisks a lot more...for general mixing,
whipping, etc.   I think I gave the one like that, away.  

Christine, who still doesn't know where she is going.  Now submitted
to Long Beach Memorial, as of today

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 01:06:12 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney told us...
> Christine, who still doesn't know where she is going.  Now submitted
> to Long Beach Memorial, as of today

I was born in the "original" Long Beach Memorial Hospital in '45.  Back 
then it was called "Seaside Memorial Hospital".

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 18:11:04 -0700
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>I was born in the "original" Long Beach Memorial Hospital in '45.  Back 
>then it was called "Seaside Memorial Hospital".

Heh.  It actually might be fun to be in that area.  Close enough to
Surfas and Penzeys...not that far from San Diego, close enough to
Squeaks to get together with her, if she wants to (Hi Squeaks!!),
close enough to the Santa Monical farmers market to get there once in
a while...  

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 01:12:31 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney told us...
> Heh.  It actually might be fun to be in that area.  Close enough to
> Surfas and Penzeys...not that far from San Diego, close enough to
> Squeaks to get together with her, if she wants to (Hi Squeaks!!),
> close enough to the Santa Monical farmers market to get there once in
> a while...  

You'll be close enough to so many things and places that you won't have 
time to work! :-)

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 18:18:00 -0700
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>You'll be close enough to so many things and places that you won't have 
>time to work! :-)

Oh, I have to work, to fund all this...LOL.  

Christine, trying to think of all the other rfc'ers in the L.A.
area....

============================

From: koko
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 18:27:35 -0800
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
>Heh.  It actually might be fun to be in that area.  Close enough to
>Surfas and Penzeys...not that far from San Diego, close enough to
>Squeaks to get together with her, if she wants to (Hi Squeaks!!),
>close enough to the Santa Monical farmers market to get there once in
>a while...  

I hope if you don't get San Diego at least some place close. 

============================

From: Christine Dabney <artisan2[at]ix.netcom.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 19:33:59 -0700
--------
koko wrote:
>I hope if you don't get San Diego at least some place close. 

Do you think Long Beach is reasonably close?  I could see making a
trip down there to San Diego.  Or you could drive up to Long Beach
(stop and pick up Squeaks on the way) and we could go adventuring to
places like Surfas, Penzeys, even Langers(for Squeaks) and the Santa
Monica market...  Plus a gazillion other places.

You do know about Langers, doncha? ;)

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 20:28:08 -0500
--------
koko wrote:
> Are you talking about one like the one in my utensil caddy?
> http://bigspud.com/pics/dpv0gh.jpg

I have that one.  I think I used it to 'try' to get the lumps out of the 
gravy.  You know, jump the thingie up-and-down smashing them up ;-))

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 02:59:38 GMT
--------
koko wrote:
> Are you talking about one like the one in my utensil caddy?
> http://bigspud.com/pics/dpv0gh.jpg

That's the one! 

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 11:56:31 -0500
--------
Blinky the Shark wrote:
> So did mine.  Wide and flat on the bottom, right?  And the coils tapered
> into the handle?  I don't know that I've seen any of those since hers.

I hace one.

:) 

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' <barbschaller[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 12:06:44 -0600
--------
Blinky the Shark wrote:
> So did mine.  Wide and flat on the bottom, right?  And the coils tapered
> into the handle?  I don't know that I've seen any of those since hers.

Check Target.  They're back in fashion, too.

============================

From: Blinky the Shark <no.spam[at]box.invalid>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 13:44:18 -0800
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> Check Target.  They're back in fashion, too.

I wish you'd said that two days ago when I was in that department at
Target looking for a small-jar-sized silicone spatula.  :)

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 21:58:38 GMT
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>Check Target.  They're back in fashion, too.

is the technique for using them the same?  for some reason i think
you'd oscillate them up and down like a toilet plunger instead of a
circular motion with the wrist.

your ignorant pal,
blake

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 23:41:19 GMT
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> is the technique for using them the same?  for some reason i think
> you'd oscillate them up and down like a toilet plunger instead of a
> circular motion with the wrist.

Yes.  MIL had one that was supposed to work the same way but hers didn't 
work very well.  Hers was made of plastic and sort of spring loaded.  When 
you pressed down on it, it twirled.  Only problem was you had to press down 
on the bottom of the bowl to activate it and by doing that it only whisked 
that tiny portion of the mixture. 

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' <barbschaller[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 20:19:34 -0600
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> is the technique for using them the same?  for some reason i think
> you'd oscillate them up and down like a toilet plunger instead of a
> circular motion with the wrist.

Shoot, I wouldn't use it to try to make mashed potatoes.  I always 
thought that up and down motion was for smashing flour lumps in gravy 
and then you'd do the circular move to just mix the mixture.   My niece 
lets her boys use it with eggs for scrambled eggs.  

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 23:39:31 GMT
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> Check Target.  They're back in fashion, too.

I will try to look next time I go which will be probably in a year, if that. 
They are not a favorite store of mine.  The one here is always very crowded 
and you have to wait in line for a long time. 

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' <barbschaller[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 20:17:34 -0600
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> They are not a favorite store of mine.  The one here is always very crowded 
> and you have to wait in line for a long time. 

As a stockholder, that's music to my ears!

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 22:54:23 -0500
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> As a stockholder, that's music to my ears!

Well then you better shop at Lowes too.. for me. :)
I'll take ChezTarjay over Walmart ANY day.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 03:58:03 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> Well then you better shop at Lowes too.. for me. :)
> I'll take ChezTarjay over Walmart ANY day.

Not me.  Walmart is close to where I live.  Not that I go there a lot 
either.  I'm more likely to go to Fred Meyer. 

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 23:44:09 -0500
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> Well then you better shop at Lowes too.. for me. :)
> I'll take ChezTarjay over Walmart ANY day.

I wonder which is doing the best these past few days.
On the 10-year haul, I'll take Lowe's over the other two.

Hope your stock is OK.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 05:06:40 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee told us...
> I wonder which is doing the best these past few days.
> On the 10-year haul, I'll take Lowe's over the other two.
> 
> Hope your stock is OK.

I'll take Lowe's over Home Depot and Walmart over Target.  I've rarely ever 
found anything in a Target store that I'm looking for or want.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 18:58:44 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
>I wonder which is doing the best these past few days.
>On the 10-year haul, I'll take Lowe's over the other two.
>
>Hope your stock is OK.

bloated plutocrats!

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 14:55:50 -0500
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> bloated plutocrats!

<deadpan look> Do I look bloated?
Don't answer that. I might be PMS-y and would be obligated to hurt you.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 16:32:56 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
><deadpan look> Do I look bloated?
>Don't answer that. I might be PMS-y and would be obligated to hurt you.

just a figure of speech.  you looked fine when i saw you.

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 17:20:06 -0500
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> bloated plutocrats!

plutocrat   noun
someone who obtains power because they are rich

============================

From: JoeSpareBedroom <dishborealis[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 12:00:50 GMT
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> Okay this has been bugging me ever since it was said to me.  Can't 
> remember who here said they did it that way.  But they told me if I 
> couldn't mash potatoes with my whisk I need a better whisk.

You can also pound in nails with the flat end of a screwdriver handle, but 
it's not a good idea.

It's time to invoke the words of mothers everywhere:  "Just because your 
friends are jumping off a bridge doesn't mean you have to do it, too." 

============================

From: jacqui{JB} <shining-one-whMUNGE.ME[at]hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 15:17:45 +0100
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> Okay this has been bugging me ever since it was said to me.
> Can't remember who here said they did it that way.  But they
> told me if I couldn't mash potatoes with my whisk I need a
> better whisk.
> ...
> At any rate, I see no way how any of these things could be
> used to make mashed potatoes.  Or am I missing something?

Of the half-dozen or so whisks I have, only one is sturdy enough to mash 
potatoes.  I prefer a regular ol' potato masher though:

<a href="http://www.oxo.com/OA_HTML/xxoxo_ibeCCtpOXOPrdDtl.jsp?item=46677">http://www.oxo.com/OA_HTML/xxoxo_ibeCCtpOXOPrdDtl.jsp?item=46677</a>

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 15:55:54 GMT
--------
jacqui{JB} wrote:
> Of the half-dozen or so whisks I have, only one is sturdy enough to mash 
> potatoes.  I prefer a regular ol' potato masher though:
>
> <a href="http://www.oxo.com/OA_HTML/xxoxo_ibeCCtpOXOPrdDtl.jsp?item=46677">http://www.oxo.com/OA_HTML/xxoxo_ibeCCtpOXOPrdDtl.jsp?item=46677</a>

That type of masher doesn't work at all well for me.  And I will never again 
buy OXO Good Grips.  They are fine for a year or two but then the handle 
breaks down and isn't at all stable.  One thing you need with a masher is 
stable! 

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 11:16:52 -0500
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> That type of masher doesn't work at all well for me.  And I will never again 
> buy OXO Good Grips.  They are fine for a year or two but then the handle 
> breaks down and isn't at all stable.  One thing you need with a masher is 
> stable! 

What in the world are you doing to those poor grips?! I have an Oxo 
vegetable peeler and their tongs. Neither seems to show any wear and 
tear and they go into the dishwasher often.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 16:33:16 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> What in the world are you doing to those poor grips?! I have an Oxo 
> vegetable peeler and their tongs. Neither seems to show any wear and tear 
> and they go into the dishwasher often.

I don't know.  The peelers seem fine.  The masher gave out at the part where 
it joins the base.  My dad bought a set of assorted pieces for his sisters 
and hers wore out at the same part. 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 17:48:13 GMT
--------
Julie Bove told us...
> That type of masher doesn't work at all well for me.  And I will never
> again buy OXO Good Grips.  They are fine for a year or two but then the
> handle breaks down and isn't at all stable.  One thing you need with a
> masher is stable! 

I've had an OXO vegetable peeler and an OXO paring knife  for about 10 
years and they're both like new.  The get at least weekly use and go 
through the dishwashser cycle.  What's up with yours?

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 18:09:12 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> I've had an OXO vegetable peeler and an OXO paring knife  for about 10 
> years and they're both like new.  The get at least weekly use and go 
> through the dishwashser cycle.  What's up with yours?
 
<guffaw> they have allergies.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 00:15:43 GMT
--------
Goomba38 told us...
> <guffaw> they have allergies.

<G>

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 23:29:31 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> I've had an OXO vegetable peeler and an OXO paring knife  for about 10
> years and they're both like new.  The get at least weekly use and go
> through the dishwashser cycle.  What's up with yours?

My peelers are fine.  I have two.  One for me, one for daughter.  She helps 
me do the canning.  The masher's handle broke down in the same manner as 
described by my aunt.  My dad bought her a set of assorted kitchen tools for 
Christmas one year.  She said they didn't last any length of time at all. 
Somehow it is where the handle attaches.  It comes loose.  Not fully 
detached but loose enough to where the tool is not stable.  Appears to 
happen only on the longer handled tools.  Prior to that happening, I was 
mashing up a storm with it! 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 00:16:20 GMT
--------
Julie Bove told us...
> My peelers are fine.  I have two.  One for me, one for daughter.  She
> helps me do the canning.  The masher's handle broke down in the same
> manner as described by my aunt.  My dad bought her a set of assorted
> kitchen tools for Christmas one year.  She said they didn't last any
> length of time at all. Somehow it is where the handle attaches.  It
> comes loose.  Not fully detached but loose enough to where the tool is
> not stable.  Appears to happen only on the longer handled tools.  Prior
> to that happening, I was mashing up a storm with it! 

If it had been me, I'd have written OXO.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 02:52:53 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> If it had been me, I'd have written OXO.

I don't usually write to companies.  Now I did do that with my Wusthoff 
knives with the lifetime guarantee, when they broke or began to break.  I 
have written a few times to other companies I was displeased with and got no 
response back whatever.  I guess it depends on my mood at the time that 
something bad happens. 

============================

From: "Michael \"Dog3\"" <don'task[at]donttell.huh>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 16:18:23 GMT
--------
Julie Bove dropped this:
> At any rate, I see no way how any of these things could be used to
> make mashed potatoes.  Or am I missing something?

I've never mashed potatoes (the actual mashing part)with a whisk,  but I 
have one whisk I use to whip them with after I've added the milk and 
butter.  It's wire with a metal handle.  I've never seen it in stores or 
online and it is very, very old. I've had it for at least 20 years. Think I 
bought it in a garage sale.  It's real strong and has never rusted.  I like 
my mashed on the lumpy side so the whisk does the whipping part just fine.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 16:34:45 GMT
--------
Michael "Dog3" wrote:
> I've never mashed potatoes (the actual mashing part)with a whisk,  but I
> have one whisk I use to whip them with after I've added the milk and
> butter.  It's wire with a metal handle.  I've never seen it in stores or
> online and it is very, very old. I've had it for at least 20 years. Think I
> bought it in a garage sale.  It's real strong and has never rusted.  I like
> my mashed on the lumpy side so the whisk does the whipping part just fine.

Hmmm...  I never whip my potatoes.  Just mash and then use a spoon to blend. 

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 22:03:07 GMT
--------
Michael "Dog3" wrote:
>I've never mashed potatoes (the actual mashing part)with a whisk,  but I 
>have one whisk I use to whip them with after I've added the milk and 
>butter.  It's wire with a metal handle.  I've never seen it in stores or 
>online and it is very, very old. I've had it for at least 20 years. Think I 
>bought it in a garage sale.  It's real strong and has never rusted.  I like 
>my mashed on the lumpy side so the whisk does the whipping part just fine.

i'm not a big potato masher, but in reading this thread i can't help
thinking you'd use a masher, then the whisk with the rest of the
ingredients.

============================

From: "Michael \"Dog3\"" <don'task[at]donttell.huh>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 16:27:35 GMT
--------
blake murphy dropped this:
> i'm not a big potato masher, but in reading this thread i can't help
> thinking you'd use a masher, then the whisk with the rest of the
> ingredients.

That is usually what I do.  I like my masher. It does a pretty job and is 
real sturdy. I usually whisk in the milk, butter and whatever else I'm 
putting into the 'taters.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 18:29:47 GMT
--------
Michael \"Dog3\" wrote:
>That is usually what I do.  I like my masher. It does a pretty job and is 
>real sturdy. I usually whisk in the milk, butter and whatever else I'm 
>putting into the 'taters.

o.k., good.  i was getting seriously disoriented there for a while.

============================

From: sf
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 22:42:19 -0800
--------
blake murphy wrote:
>o.k., good.  i was getting seriously disoriented there for a while.

I use my masher *as* a whisk.  No need to dirty two utensils.

============================

From: "Michael \"Dog3\"" <don'task[at]donttell.huh>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 11:18:51 GMT
--------
sf dropped this:
> I use my masher *as* a whisk.  No need to dirty two utensils.

It's all in the consistency wanted. If I want super lumpy I use the 
masher only.  If I want a little bit lumpy I use a whisk too. 

============================

From: Blinky the Shark <no.spam[at]box.invalid>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 10:46:05 -0800
--------
Michael "Dog3" wrote:
> It's all in the consistency wanted. If I want super lumpy I use the masher
> only.  If I want a little bit lumpy I use a whisk too.

I guess I'm the only one that uses a fork, when I'm blending in the other
ingredients after the heavy mashing is done and I'm at the - I don't want
to say "whipping" but I can't think of a better word - stage.

============================

From: "Michael \"Dog3\"" <don'task[at]donttell.huh>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 21:44:57 GMT
--------
Blinky the Shark dropped this:
> I guess I'm the only one that uses a fork, when I'm blending in the
> other ingredients after the heavy mashing is done and I'm at the - I
> don't want to say "whipping" but I can't think of a better word -
> stage. 

I have tried a fork but I always wind up bending it. Maybe I just have 
cheap forks? I dunno.

============================

From: Blinky the Shark <no.spam[at]box.invalid>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 22:09:51 -0800
--------
Michael "Dog3" wrote:
> I have tried a fork but I always wind up bending it. Maybe I just have
> cheap forks? I dunno.

Or you forgot to cook your taters.  ;)

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 11:31:46 -0500
--------
Blinky the Shark wrote:
> Or you forgot to cook your taters.  ;)

I am wondering if anyone else is getting so tired of the mashed potato topic 
they are thinking about stuffing them
up somebody's nose? 

============================

From: Ophelia <O[at]nix.co.uk>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 18:01:12 -0000
--------
cybercat wrote:
> I am wondering if anyone else is getting so tired of the mashed
> potato topic they are thinking about stuffing them
> up somebody's nose?

LOL OK what will you stuff yours with.. and I don't mean nose:) 

============================

From: sf
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 10:10:30 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
>I am wondering if anyone else is getting so tired of the mashed potato topic 
>they are thinking about stuffing them
>up somebody's nose? 

When I get tired of a topic, I either stop reading it or KF the topic.
I usually opt to KF (because I have one) when the topic I don't want
to see is an active one that generates 100 or more posts.

I'm not tired of the thread yet, but IMO everything that could be said
has been said, so it will become redundant soon.  I'll KF the topic at
that point.  I'm in the stage of not some reading subthreads.

============================

From: Blinky the Shark <no.spam[at]box.invalid>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 10:34:06 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
> I am wondering if anyone else is getting so tired of the mashed potato
> topic they are thinking about stuffing them up somebody's nose?

Since recently discoving turnips I've been making potatoes less
than I used to.  I also sometimes mash the two together.  The group of
vegetables that included turnips, rutabagas and parnsips was always off my
radar, and come to think of it I don't remember them being made when I
was a lad either.  It's been fun to belatedly discover them.

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 14:53:12 -0500
--------
Blinky the Shark wrote:
> Since recently discoving turnips I've been making potatoes less
> than I used to.  I also sometimes mash the two together.  The group of
> vegetables that included turnips, rutabagas and parnsips was always off my
> radar, and come to think of it I don't remember them being made when I
> was a lad either.  It's been fun to belatedly discover them.

I've always been a lover of turnips and rutabagas, starting when I was a 
wee-one.  I like turnips and rutabagas mixed with potatoes sometimes, but 
for some reason, I prefer parsnips separate.  Unless they are in a soup or 
stew or roasted vegetables, of course.

Parsnips, to me, is a stronger vegetable, and it overpowers the subtle taste 
of the rutabaga.

============================

From: Blinky the Shark <no.spam[at]box.invalid>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 12:34:55 -0800
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
> I've always been a lover of turnips and rutabagas, starting when I was a
> wee-one.  I like turnips and rutabagas mixed with potatoes sometimes, but
> for some reason, I prefer parsnips separate.  Unless they are in a soup or
> stew or roasted vegetables, of course.

Aye.  I just tried parsnips the other day for the first time, and I did
them alone, rather than as a mix with potatos.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 18:13:01 GMT
--------
Michael \"Dog3\" wrote:
>I have tried a fork but I always wind up bending it. Maybe I just have 
>cheap forks? I dunno.

you just don't know your own strength.

============================

From: Janet Baraclough <janet.and.john[at]zetnet.co.uk>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 18:49:30 GMT
--------
The message from blake murphy contains these words:
> you just don't know your own strength.

Or, maybe he is to forks what Uri Geller is to spoons. 

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 18:11:59 GMT
--------
Blinky the Shark wrote:
>I guess I'm the only one that uses a fork, when I'm blending in the other
>ingredients after the heavy mashing is done and I'm at the - I don't want
>to say "whipping" but I can't think of a better word - stage.

whip it!  whip it good!

your pal,
mark

============================

From: Blinky the Shark <no.spam[at]box.invalid>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 12:08:11 -0800
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> whip it!  whip it good!

shape it up.  get straight.

============================

From: sf
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 22:20:43 -0800
--------
Michael \"Dog3\" wrote:
>It's all in the consistency wanted. If I want super lumpy I use the 
>masher only.  If I want a little bit lumpy I use a whisk too. 

I hate lumpy mashed potatoes.  Period.  Mine are perfect - not a lump
in the batch....  and no need for a whisk.  It's all in the timing.
:)

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 06:44:13 GMT
--------
sf wrote:
> I hate lumpy mashed potatoes.  Period.  Mine are perfect - not a lump
> in the batch....  and no need for a whisk.  It's all in the timing.

I only got lumpy ones with that bad nylon one that was open at the ends. 
The potatoes just stick in it and it is pretty close to worthless.  Had to 
spend about 5 times as long as I should and there would still be a few 
lumps.  No lumps at all with the new masher. 

============================

From: Nancy2 <nancy-dooley[at]uiowa.edu>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 09:39:31 -0800 (PST)
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> At any rate, I see no way how any of these things could be used to make
> mashed potatoes.  Or am I missing something?

Why worry about it?  Use what works.  For me, a whisk, no matter how
sturdy/expensive, would never work as well as a regular potato
masher.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 23:27:13 GMT
--------
Nancy2 wrote:
> At any rate, I see no way how any of these things could be used to make
> mashed potatoes. Or am I missing something?

Why worry about it?  Use what works.  For me, a whisk, no matter how
sturdy/expensive, would never work as well as a regular potato
masher.

That's what I thought. 

============================

From: sf
Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2008 22:05:21 -0800
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
>At any rate, I see no way how any of these things could be used to make 
>mashed potatoes.  Or am I missing something?

Don't you have a regular potato masher, Julie?  I've used a whisk
before and frankly, it's not something I prefer for the job.  With a
real masher, you mash them and then "whisk" them (with the masher) to
fluff.  It just takes a minute or two from start to finish.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 06:13:55 GMT
--------
sf told us...
> Don't you have a regular potato masher, Julie?  I've used a whisk
> before and frankly, it's not something I prefer for the job.  With a
> real masher, you mash them and then "whisk" them (with the masher) to
> fluff.  It just takes a minute or two from start to finish.

When I first read that, Barbara, I read it as "from starch to finish".  I 
guess that really isn't inappropriate, though. :-)  It's late, I should go 
to bed.

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 09:43:59 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> When I first read that, Barbara, I read it as "from starch to finish".  I
> guess that really isn't inappropriate, though. :-)  It's late, I should go
> to bed.

Perhaps there was a lot of  ironing happening in your childhood home?
I remember my grandmother ironing creases in those khaki pants for the boys.

And I think she proably didn't even wear a bra!

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 15:39:30 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee told us...

> Perhaps there was a lot of  ironing happening in your childhood home?
> I remember my grandmother ironing creases in those khaki pants for the
> boys. 

I remember both my grandmother and mother ironing creases in those pants.  
I hated starched pants!  Remember dungarees?
 
> And I think she proably didn't even wear a bra!
> Dee Dee

My grandmother rarely wore a bra.  My mother rarely if ever went without 
one.

============================

From: Janet Bostwick <nospam[at]cableone.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 09:17:53 -0700
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> My grandmother rarely wore a bra.  My mother rarely if ever went without
> one.

If you calculate backwards, grandma was a young woman when wearing a bra was 
not in style.  Most of my aunts didn't wear bras.

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 12:18:35 -0500
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote:
> If you calculate backwards, grandma was a young woman when wearing a bra 
> was not in style.  Most of my aunts didn't wear bras.
> Janet

Women in the 1920s sometimes strapped their breasts down, because being 
flat-chested
was fashionable and worked with the new style clothes much better than full 
bustlines. 

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 12:29:04 -0500
--------
Janet Bostwick wrote:
> If you calculate backwards, grandma was a young woman when wearing a bra 
> was not in style.  Most of my aunts didn't wear bras.

I don't know what years your grandmas were grandmas.
My grandmas were b. abt. 1893.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 17:41:39 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee told us...
> I don't know what years your grandmas were grandmas.
> My grandmas were b. abt. 1893.

My maternal grandmother was:

Born November 29, 1894
Lamar County
Moscow, Alabama

My paternal grandmother was much older, but I don't have a birth year.

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 12:57:00 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> My maternal grandmother was:
>
> Born November 29, 1894
> Lamar County
> Moscow, Alabama
>
> My paternal grandmother was much older, but I don't have a birth year.

One born 1892, the other 1893.
Both born in West "By God" Virginia.

making me a 'double hick'! :-)))

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 18:18:13 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee told us...
> One born 1892, the other 1893.
> Both born in West "By God" Virginia.
> 
> making me a 'double hick'! :-)))
> Dee Dee 

Wow, "double hick", that says something! :-)

My maternal grandfather was born in 1887.  My paternal grandmother was old 
enough at the time to "babysit" him.  I think she was born in the late 
1870s.

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 15:23:41 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

> Wow, "double hick", that says something! :-)

I was keeping it a secret -- I'm a quadruple hick!  Mother and Dad born in 
WV, too.

> My maternal grandfather was born in 1887.  My paternal grandmother was old
> enough at the time to "babysit" him.  I think she was born in the late
> 1870s.

my f-i-l and m-i-l - difference in ages: 13 years (19 &amp; 31) .  The marriage 
didn't last, but 50+ years.

Her parents said, "What do you want, to be married to a baby all your life?" 
I guess she did. :-))

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 11:17:55 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> My grandmother rarely wore a bra.  My mother rarely if ever went without
> one.

I think probably at the grandmother stage, many women did say to heck with 
it.
The let the 'chips' fall where they may.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 19:02:19 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
>Perhaps there was a lot of  ironing happening in your childhood home?
>I remember my grandmother ironing creases in those khaki pants for the boys.
>
>And I think she proably didn't even wear a bra!

one should always wear a safety bra when ironing.  i know i do.

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 15:25:00 -0500
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> one should always wear a safety bra when ironing.  i know i do.

When you google for one, can you find those on the same pages as chastity 
belts?  Those don't work!

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 20:41:50 GMT
--------
> When you google for one, can you find those on the same pages as chastity 
> belts?  Those don't work!

And what about "training bras"?  What are they in training for?

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 16:13:54 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> And what about "training bras"?  What are they in training for?

One can certainly make a good guess.

That is about the silliest name I've ever heard.
I wonder how many wore those.   (and for how long!)

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 00:18:59 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
> One can certainly make a good guess.
>
> That is about the silliest name I've ever heard.
> I wonder how many wore those.   (and for how long!)

I wore them for years.  Apparently they worked.  I wore a 44F when pregnant. 
Not available in any stores that I found.  Had to get them online. 

============================

From: Janet Baraclough <janet.and.john[at]zetnet.co.uk>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 00:35:38 GMT
--------
The message from Julie Bove contains these words:
> I wore them for years.  Apparently they worked.  I wore a 44F when
> pregnant. 

You were impregnated by a training bra?

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 00:59:00 GMT
--------
Janet Baraclough wrote:
> You were impregnated by a training bra?

Um...  No. 

============================

From: Lou Decruss <Me[at]notvalid.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 22:00:20 -0600
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
>Um...  No. 

This maybe?

<a href="http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20041023/f5475_2237.jpg">http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20041023/f5475_2237.jpg</a>

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 04:25:09 GMT
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> This maybe?
>
> <a href="http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20041023/f5475_2237.jpg">http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20041023/f5475_2237.jpg</a>

Not nice.  :( 

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 00:05:58 -0500
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> Not nice.  :( 
 
I have to agree. I'm a tad embarrassed that it has sunk down to this 
level of taunting.
But in some potentially misplaced attempt to help you yet will probably 
come back to bite me in the ass, I want to explain that many of the 
readers here have expressed a growing annoyance over things you've said 
here that just aren't logical or perhaps don't need to be said so 
frequently. The seemingly non-stop, mind numbing allergy issues and 
other stated reasons you can't do  something is driving many a patient 
soul here to write you off as nothing more pest.  But making fun of your 
physical appearance while you were pregnant (and had no control over) 
isn't the same as making fun of things you say and which you *do* have 
control over. <shrug>

Please take this in the spirit is is offered.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 05:10:24 GMT
--------
Goomba38 told us...
> I have to agree. I'm a tad embarrassed that it has sunk down to this 
> level of taunting.

I have to say that I really liked Julie at first.  However, these non-
ending allergy issues coupled with the "I can't", "I don't", and "I won't", 
is not only enough to drive anyone away from her, but also enough to drive 
one frickin' nuts!  I've finally reached the attitude of "who gives a 
shit"!  I haven't KF'd her yet, but it's come close.

============================

From: Lou Decruss <Me[at]notvalid.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 15:35:31 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>I have to say that I really liked Julie at first.  However, these non-
>ending allergy issues coupled with the "I can't", "I don't", and "I won't", 
>is not only enough to drive anyone away from her, but also enough to drive 
>one frickin' nuts!  I've finally reached the attitude of "who gives a 
>shit"!  I haven't KF'd her yet, but it's come close.

I would have never said what I did if I hadn't reached the same point
as you.  The obese breasts seemed to be just another instance of her
constantly calling attention to her uniqueness.  Her constant "I
can't" comments in a cooking group would be like Blake babbling on and
on in a soccer forum about how he couldn't play.

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 18:15:12 GMT
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
>I would have never said what I did if I hadn't reached the same point
>as you.  The obese breasts seemed to be just another instance of her
>constantly calling attention to her uniqueness.  Her constant "I
>can't" comments in a cooking group would be like Blake babbling on and
>on in a soccer forum about how he couldn't play.

how'd you know i can't play soccer?  i'm pretty good at drinking beer
in the stands, though.

your hooligan pal,
blake

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 00:49:25 -0500
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> I have to agree. I'm a tad embarrassed that it has sunk down to this level 
> of taunting.

Perhaps, you, Julia, were acting silly along with others (including me), 
when you mentioned 44F; that's what I thought.

  I have allergies myself, so it was interesting initially.  Serious food 
allergies that extreme should be worked out with nutritionist for 
recipes/menus/dishes that you can eat.   If you don't have someone helping 
you with your food allergies, you should think about it.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 05:58:30 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
> Perhaps, you, Julia, were acting silly along with others (including me), 
> when you mentioned 44F; that's what I thought.
>
>  I have allergies myself, so it was interesting initially.  Serious food 
> allergies that extreme should be worked out with nutritionist for 
> recipes/menus/dishes that you can eat.   If you don't have someone helping 
> you with your food allergies, you should think about it.

This all started when I asked about the coleslaw.  I wanted a recipe that 
didn't contain eggs or milk and yet people kept giving me recipes with the 
things I am allergic to.  I was rather specific, if you don't recall the 
thread.

As for a nutritionist, anyone can call themselves that.  I have been to 
three registered dieticians.  I also have diabetes.  All three were pretty 
much useless to me and didn't tell me anything I didn't already know.  I can 
read a cookbook and I can read a nutrition label.  I don't need anyone to 
help me with my food allergies.  It's easy enough to know what foods to 
avoid.  And there are forums for food allergies.  Heck there's even a 
newsgroup but nobody posts to it.

 But I did ask about a recipe and also to inquire what might have made the 
coleslaw bitter.  Apparently *my* questions are not good enough to be posted 
here?  I don't know.  I seem to be making enemies right and left.

As for my 44F comment, yes it was being smart ass but it was also true. 
That is what size bra I wore.  Whatever.  *poof* 

============================

From: Lou Decruss <Me[at]notvalid.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 15:36:34 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:

>I have to agree. 

Me too.

>I'm a tad embarrassed that it has sunk down to this 
>level of taunting.

Why are you embarrassed?  You didn't say anything nasty.  I did.

>But in some potentially misplaced attempt to help you yet will probably 
>come back to bite me in the ass, 

I think you'll be ok.  The truth works just fine as long as you're not
a politician.

>I want to explain that many of the 
>readers here have expressed a growing annoyance over things you've said 
>here that just aren't logical or perhaps don't need to be said so 
>frequently. The seemingly non-stop, mind numbing allergy issues and 
>other stated reasons you can't do  something is driving many a patient 
>soul here to write you off as nothing more pest.  

You missed a word or two, but well stated.

>But making fun of your 
>physical appearance while you were pregnant (and had no control over) 
>isn't the same as making fun of things you say and which you *do* have 
>control over. <shrug>

A woman with 44F breasts was obese to begin with.  A woman may not
have control over how big her breasts become during pregnancy, but she
sure has a bit of control over how much she weighed beforehand.  I
wouldn't have said anything if she wasn't such a nutcase to begin
with.  Someone else here stated she weighed over 300 pounds.  Although
I find that disgusting, she's not annoying and I didn't say anything.
I don't care what anyone here looks like or how much they weigh. But I
do judge people who constantly write silly things, as words are all we
have here.

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 13:42:48 -0500
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> I don't care what anyone here looks like or how much they weigh. But I
> do judge people who constantly write silly things, as words are all we
> have here.

Yes, I agree. We're all judged by what we're saying here.
I like to think I'm a logical person. I tend to expect others to be so 
too. It doesn't always work out that way though, huh?

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 14:22:59 -0500
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> Yes, I agree. We're all judged by what we're saying here.
> I like to think I'm a logical person. I tend to expect others to be so 
> too. It doesn't always work out that way though, huh?

And everyone so hates to disappoint you, because you are such a delightful 
person. 

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 20:27:16 GMT
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> A woman with 44F breasts was obese to begin with.  A woman may not
> have control over how big her breasts become during pregnancy, but she
> sure has a bit of control over how much she weighed beforehand.  I
> wouldn't have said anything if she wasn't such a nutcase to begin
> with.  Someone else here stated she weighed over 300 pounds.  Although
> I find that disgusting, she's not annoying and I didn't say anything.
> I don't care what anyone here looks like or how much they weigh. But I
> do judge people who constantly write silly things, as words are all we
> have here.

You're such a liar!  I never weighed anywhere close to 300 pounds, not even 
when I was pregnant.  And you don't know anything about bra sizes.  F is the 
cup size.  And a woman's ribcage tends to expand while she is pregnant.  I 
wore a 38B (a mere 2" larger than average) before I was pregnant.  Hardly 
obese like you claim. 

============================

From: Goomba38 <Goomba38[at]comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 15:31:19 -0500
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> You're such a liar!  I never weighed anywhere close to 300 pounds, not even 
> when I was pregnant.  And you don't know anything about bra sizes.  F is the 
> cup size.  And a woman's ribcage tends to expand while she is pregnant.  I 
> wore a 38B (a mere 2" larger than average) before I was pregnant.  Hardly 
> obese like you claim. 
 
Julie..go back and re-read what he said. He said "Someone else..." 
meaning NOT you. I recall the post he is mentioning, in fact.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 20:35:57 GMT
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> Julie..go back and re-read what he said. He said "Someone else..." meaning 
> NOT you. I recall the post he is mentioning, in fact.

But he also called me obese.  And since I only gained 20 pounds by the end 
of the pregnancy you can guess where the weight was that wasn't baby. 

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 00:16:58 -0500
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> This maybe?
>
> http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20041023/f5475_2237.jpg

Bove-ein?
awwh,  that's not fair.

============================

From: Lou Decruss <Me[at]notvalid.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 15:35:46 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
>Bove-ein?
>awwh,  that's not fair.

Sorry Dee Dee

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 11:49:48 -0500
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> Sorry Dee Dee

No -- I was commenting on my own comment, that MY comment wasn't fair,  in 
that her name is "Bove."  (Female Bove = fraulein = Bove-ein.)

============================

From: Lou Decruss <Me[at]notvalid.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 17:08:16 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
>No -- I was commenting on my own comment, that MY comment wasn't fair,  in 
>that her name is "Bove."  (Female Bove = fraulein = Bove-ein.)

Gotcha!  Sometimes I get mixed up.

============================

From: Lou Decruss <Me[at]notvalid.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 21:27:09 -0600
--------
Janet Baraclough wrote:
> You were impregnated by a training bra?

Her real name is Julia Bovine.

Here is where she buys her clothes.

<a href="http://www.simplybovine.com/">http://www.simplybovine.com/</a>

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 04:01:54 GMT
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> Her real name is Julia Bovine.
>
> Here is where she buys her clothes.
>
> <a href="http://www.simplybovine.com/">http://www.simplybovine.com/</a>

That is not nice at all!  :( 

============================

From: Lou Decruss <Me[at]notvalid.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 15:34:47 GMT
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
>That is not nice at all!  :( 

It wasn't meant to be nice.  But I'm sure you now that.  

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 00:15:09 -0500
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> I wore them for years.  Apparently they worked.  I wore a 44F when pregnant. 

Dd they help you grow big enough to become pregnant
or
How to become pregnant and grow to a 44F?
Corn-fused.

============================

From: Lou Decruss <Me[at]notvalid.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Jan 2008 15:35:40 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
>Dd they help you grow big enough to become pregnant
>or
>How to become pregnant and grow to a 44F?
>Corn-fused.

Corn-fed sounds more like it with 44f's

============================

From: Lou Decruss <Me[at]notvalid.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 21:22:42 -0600
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
>I wore them for years.  Apparently they worked.  I wore a 44F when pregnant. 
>Not available in any stores that I found.  Had to get them online. 

Didn't you wonder why stores didn't carry them?  You should have
whined about your "special needs."

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 04:01:26 GMT
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> Didn't you wonder why stores didn't carry them?  You should have
> whined about your "special needs."

No I didn't wonder why stores didn't carry them.  I worked retail for most 
of my life and for a few years I was the person who did the ordering of 
lingerie.  So I know what the popular sizes were.  And I would never whine 
in a store.  That wouldn't get me anywhere. 

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 16:34:39 GMT
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>And what about "training bras"?  What are they in training for?

to become real bras.

============================

From: Blinky the Shark <no.spam[at]box.invalid>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 10:48:16 -0800
--------
blake murphy wrote:
> to become real bras.

For that, I think you just have to take off the little wheels.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright[at]gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 19:15:33 GMT
--------
Blinky the Shark told us...
> For that, I think you just have to take off the little wheels.

So that's what those odd shapes were!

============================

From: blake murphy <blakepm[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 16:33:54 GMT
--------
Dee.Dee wrote:
>When you google for one, can you find those on the same pages as chastity 
>belts?  Those don't work!

why would i wear a chastity belt?  that would be silly.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 06:25:04 GMT
--------
sf wrote:
> Don't you have a regular potato masher, Julie?  I've used a whisk
> before and frankly, it's not something I prefer for the job.  With a
> real masher, you mash them and then "whisk" them (with the masher) to
> fluff.  It just takes a minute or two from start to finish.

Yes.  I have a brand new masher.  See the "<a href="http://bigspud.com/files/pmasherjulie.htm">Julie and the GIANT potato 
masher</a>" thread.  That's where this all started.  She replied to me that she 
mashes with a whisk and I just couldn't fathom this.  If I were to use a 
whisk to whisk them with, they would be more runny than I'd like. 

============================

From: merryb <msg144[at]juno.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 08:40:19 -0800 (PST)
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> Yes.  I have a brand new masher.  See the "<a href="http://bigspud.com/files/pmasherjulie.htm">Julie and the GIANT potato
> masher</a>" thread.  That's where this all started.  She replied to me that she
> mashes with a whisk and I just couldn't fathom this.  If I were to use a
> whisk to whisk them with, they would be more runny than I'd like.- Hide quoted text -

I'm sorry- I don't understand how using a whisk to mash would make
your spuds runny.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 16:46:38 GMT
--------
merryb wrote:
> Yes.  I have a brand new masher.  See the "<a href="http://bigspud.com/files/pmasherjulie.htm">Julie and the GIANT potato
> masher</a>" thread.  That's where this all started.  She replied to me that she
> mashes with a whisk and I just couldn't fathom this.  If I were to use a
> whisk to whisk them with, they would be more runny than I'd like.- Hide quoted text -

I'm sorry- I don't understand how using a whisk to mash would make
your spuds runny.

It wouldn't.  But they'd have to be fairly runny to be able to whisk them. 
I like my mashed potatoes stiff.  Not creamy. 

============================

From: merryb <msg144[at]juno.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 09:08:51 -0800 (PST)
--------
Julie Bove wrote:
> I'm sorry- I don't understand how using a whisk to mash would make
> your spuds runny.
>
> It wouldn't.  But they'd have to be fairly runny to be able to whisk them.
> I like my mashed potatoes stiff.  Not creamy.- Hide quoted text -

I don't whisk them, I mash them. I also do not like them runny. Since
you don't have the need for a good whisk, I guess you will never find
out that it works just fine.

============================

From: cybercat <cyberpurrs[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 12:14:26 -0500
--------
merryb wrote
>I don't whisk them, I mash them. I also do not like them runny. Since
>you don't have the need for a good whisk, I guess you will never find
>out that it works just fine.

I have never even SEEN runny mashed potatoes. 

============================

From: merryb <msg144[at]juno.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 09:23:12 -0800 (PST)
--------
cybercat wrote:
> I have never even SEEN runny mashed potatoes.

Usually too much liquid- either not drained/dried after cooking, or
adding too much milk/cream/butter. I have the best luck when I start
with minimal liquid, and add as needed.

============================

From: Dee.Dee <deedovey[at]shentel.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 12:58:23 -0500
--------
merryb wrote:
> Usually too much liquid- either not drained/dried after cooking, or
> adding too much milk/cream/butter. I have the best luck when I start
> with minimal liquid, and add as needed.

On one of the food cooking contests countdowns, one of the would-be chefs 
was preparing mashed potatoes (I believe it was Ramsay), this kid had 
potatoes that would pour.  It was soooo funny.

============================

From: Julie Bove <juliebove[at]verizon.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 00:04:56 GMT
--------
cybercat wrote:
> I have never even SEEN runny mashed potatoes.

I have. 

============================

From: sf
Date: Thu, 24 Jan 2008 22:21:55 -0800
--------
cybercat wrote:
>I have never even SEEN runny mashed potatoes. 

I bet you've made the gluey kind at least once in your life.  That's
how you learn what *not* to do.  ;)


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