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Subject: lobster mashed potatoes?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Lynn Rubin 
Date: Fri, 22 Dec 2000 15:12:56 -0500
--------
I got the brilliant idea to make lobster mashed potatoes.  So I ordered a
cooked lobster.  I figure I'll just flake the meat into the riced potatoes..
add butter and milk or cream and that's it.  Am I right?

============================

From: Lynn Rubin 
Date: Fri, 22 Dec 2000 18:43:25 -0500
--------
Since I got such arrogant and snobbish answers... I looked further and got
an answer...  perhaps some equally dim readers of this group would
appreciate it..

A big batch of potatoes that will serve eight can be lavishly flavored with
one small lobster. Just stirring chopped lobster into mashed potatoes won't
deliver the flavor,  though. For potatoes that are permeated           with
lobster, you need some lobster stock.

The stock is easy to make. The entire shell of the lobster -- claws, tail
and body -- is  simmered in water for 10 minutes,  producing a
lobster-flavored broth. Simmering longer will turn the broth bitter,  so
don't overdo it. To further concentrate the flavor, remove the shells and
boil the stock until reduced by half. Just a half-cup of stock is needed for
the recipe. Freeze the leftover stock and use it later in seafood bisque.

 Even more lobster flavor is added by sauteing the chopped lobster meat in
the butter that normally goes into mashed  potatoes. The combination of
lobster pieces, lobster broth and lobster-flavored  butter gives the
potatoes a deep lobster  flavor.

Some chopped green onions and the diced lobster are added to the potatoes
after mashing, in order to avoid pulverizing the meat and onion. The
finished dish is a         gorgeous pile of fluffy potatoes studded with
bits of pink and green.

Just an aside... didn't realize that in order to post here one must worry
about  whether one's question is perceived as "stupid."  I naively thought I
might benefit from someone else's wisdom.

Happy Holidays.

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sat, 23 Dec 2000 12:28:24 -0600
--------
> Dim-Wit maybe? I can't imagine wasting a lobster on a few cheap spuds.
> Gar (arrogant or snotty)

I can't imagine it either, but hey, if someone wants to use lobster that
way, let them.  I'd rather just steam the lobster and dip the meat in drawn
butter.  Can't quite imagine it in mashed potatoes.  If I had kids (which I
don't) they'd be going "ewwww, what are these LUMPS in here?"  In a
restaurant, I can imagine a side of mashed potatoes with lobster would cost
about $12.  I don't pay extra for garlic mashed potatoes, forget about the
lobster and green onion routine.

BTW (this is not addressed to you, Gar) making stock from seafood shells
(lobster, shrimp) is not new.  Asians make stock this way all the time.  A
few cookbooks and some reading might benefit the person who wanted the
lobster mashed potatoes.  The recipe posted sounds like it has a distinctly
East meets West ring to it.  In this case, I'm not sure the twain should
ever meet.

============================

From: Gargoylle 
Date: Sat, 23 Dec 2000 15:41:20 -0600
--------
On Sat, 23 Dec 2000 12:28:24 -0600, "Jill McQuown"
 wrote:

>I can't imagine it either, but hey, if someone wants to use lobster that
>way, let them. 

Yep. Your right. My smartass comment was actually more of a reaction
to the wording about her brilliant idea. I was surprised when I read
the headers, it didn't come from webtv. The thought of wasting a
lobster just added to it. 

>I'd rather just steam the lobster and dip the meat in drawn
>butter. 

Some things are meant to be left alone.(or with butter, which would be
my choice.)  

> Can't quite imagine it in mashed potatoes.  If I had kids (which I
>don't) they'd be going "ewwww, what are these LUMPS in here?"  In a
>restaurant, I can imagine a side of mashed potatoes with lobster would cost
>about $12.  I don't pay extra for garlic mashed potatoes, forget about the
>lobster and green onion routine.

I would imagine they would also cheat and use imitation lobster, or at
least partially. How nice. We do our spuds with gorgonzola quite
often. IMHO, they would be a great side for a lobster tail. 

>BTW (this is not addressed to you, Gar) making stock from seafood shells
>(lobster, shrimp) is not new.  Asians make stock this way all the time.  A
>few cookbooks and some reading might benefit the person who wanted the
>lobster mashed potatoes.  The recipe posted sounds like it has a distinctly
>East meets West ring to it.  In this case, I'm not sure the twain should
>ever meet.
>
>Jill

Hummmm. Now that sounds like an interesting idea. I just made the base
for cioppino. I'll bet the shrimp shells, simmered in the wine, would
be a great addition. Thanks for an idea. BTW, I seem to remember your
brother (or your Ray) being the one who likes oyster stuffing. I found
a few recipes for it, and have all the stuff I need. Do you have his
recipe? I would love to see it before I try one of these. Thanks if
you have it.

Gar 

============================

From: Ellen Smith 
Date: Sat, 23 Dec 2000 14:07:30 -0800
--------
Gargoylle wrote:

> >I can't imagine it either, but hey, if someone wants to use lobster that
> >way, let them.

I've heard of flavoring potatoes and rice with a teensy bit of truffle.
I've seen boiled potatoes garnished with creme fraiche and a bit of
caviar. I've seen pasta prepared with a wide variety of exotic and
expensive ingredients. Why not flavor potatoes with Lobster? 

> Yep. Your right. My smartass comment was actually more of a reaction
> to the wording about her brilliant idea. I was surprised when I read
> the headers, it didn't come from webtv. The thought of wasting a
> lobster just added to it.

Why do you perceive it as being a waste? As a flavoring agent I think it
sounds lovely. The local fishmonger has a huge pot of Lobster Bisque
going by the cup or quart right now as we speak, since so many folks
just buy the lobster meat and have no desire to use the shells. It's
FABULOUS! And because it didn't cost the fishmonger anything but the
butter, cream, seasonings, it's far cheaper than purchasing it in a
swanky restaurant and certainly just as delectable, albeit the
surroundings are a little colorful...lol.

> >I'd rather just steam the lobster and dip the meat in drawn
> >butter.

Perhaps your budget only allows you to perceive lobster as a luxury item
or your views on the use of lobster is part of your personal culture.
But I have friends who dive for pacific lobsters and actually get sick
of eating it that way. I have also known folks in New England who have
such an abundance of it that they actually eat it on hot dog buns with
mayonnaise...*grin*

> Hummmm. Now that sounds like an interesting idea. I just made the base
> for cioppino. I'll bet the shrimp shells, simmered in the wine, would
> be a great addition. Thanks for an idea. BTW, I seem to remember your
> brother (or your Ray) being the one who likes oyster stuffing. I found
> a few recipes for it, and have all the stuff I need. Do you have his
> recipe? I would love to see it before I try one of these. Thanks if
> you have it.

> Gar

A trick for using shellfish shells. Flambe the raw shells with a little
brandy or vodka (or whatever alcohol will burn off rapidly, as neutrally
flavored as possible) to superheat or flash heat them prior to simmering
in your liquid. This imparts a richness that simply cooking the "raw"
shells just quite doesn't muster.

For shrimp bisque, add a little garlic, a T of tomato paste, paprika to
the super heated shells, then pour whole milk over them to an inch over
the top - don't crowd the shells. Add a bouquet garni, salt and pepper.
Gently simmer for a half hour to an hour tasting for strength, strain
and return to saucepan. Flavor with a smidgen of sherry and nutmeg.
Gently whisk in enough light roux to thicken. Finish with some cream.
Pour over a couple Ts of chopped cooked shrimp and garnish with parsley. 

Ellen

============================

From: "Martha Hughes" 
Date: Sun, 24 Dec 2000 16:56:19 GMT
--------
Jack Schidt wrote:
> Ellen Smith wrote:

> hmmm....Pacific lobster?  I'd have no problem adding them to
> mashed potatoes or ovaltine or whatever.  I wouldn't do the
> same with Maine lobster, since it's so good as is.

Pacific lobster is nothing but oversized shrimp anyway. Maine lobster is the
real deal.

> >         I have also known folks in New England who have
> > such an abundance of it that they actually eat it on hot dog buns with
> > mayonnaise...*grin*
>
> Yes, we call that a "lobster roll" and it usually runs $8.95
> and up. Just one more reason I only eat lobster at home.

I remember when I was a kid we would summer in Mass. where my father grew
up. Lobster rolls were $3.00, which back then, was quite expensive if you
thought about it. I liked the deep fried clam rolls just as much.

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sat, 23 Dec 2000 18:05:44 -0600
--------
Gargoylle wrote:
> Hummmm. Now that sounds like an interesting idea. I just made the base
> for cioppino. I'll bet the shrimp shells, simmered in the wine, would
> be a great addition. Thanks for an idea. BTW, I seem to remember your
> brother (or your Ray) being the one who likes oyster stuffing. I found
> a few recipes for it, and have all the stuff I need. Do you have his
> recipe? I would love to see it before I try one of these. Thanks if
> you have it.

I only WISH Ray would give me the oyster dressing recipe!  He's promised to
call tomorrow, I'll see if I can get him to give it up.  He claims they will
have roasted pheasant with oyster dressing on Christmas and shrimp gumbo.
(I'm going, why am I not there?!  If nothing else it is 60 degrees on the
gulf coast as opposed to 15 degrees here!)

============================

From: Alan Zelt 
Date: Sun, 24 Dec 2000 01:13:39 GMT
--------
Lobster stock is at the heart of this wonderful Norman recipe.

                      *  Exported from  MasterCook  *

              Lobster Américaine with Rice and Haricots Verts

Recipe By     : Diana Sturgis,  Food & Wine, February 1995
Serving Size  : 2    Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    : Dinner                           French
                 Main Dish                        Seafood
                 Shellfish

   Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
    2      1 1/2 lb      live lobsters
    1      tablespoon    olive oil
    1      medium        onion -- coarsely chopped
    1      small         carrot -- coarsely chopped
    1                    garlic clove -- thinly sliced
      1/4  cup           Cognac
      3/4  cup           dry white wine
    2      large         Italian plum tomatoes -- finely chopped
    3                    fresh flat-leaf parsley sprigs
    1                    fresh thyme sprig or 1/4 teaspoon dried
    1                    bay leaf
                         Salt
                         Freshly ground pepper
      3/4  pound         haricots verts or thin green beans
    1      teaspoon      unsalted butter
    1 1/2  teaspoons     all-purpose flour
    1      tablespoon    minced fresh tarragon
    1      tablespoon    minced fresh chives
    4      cups          boiled  rice -- preferably jasmine

1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Plunge in the lobsters 
head first,  cover and simmer over moderate heat for 17 minutes. 
Transfer the lobsters to a  large bowl and let cool for about 1 hour.

2. Working over the bowl to catch the liquid, detach the lobster tails 
from the bodies. Using kitchen shears, snip through the soft underside 
of the tail shells  and remove the meat. Twist off the claws, crack them 
open and remove the  meat. Pull out and discard the intestinal vein that 
runs down the tail. Cut the lobster meat into 1/2-inch pieces and add it 
to the bowl. Discard the sand sac behind the eyes and chop the shells 
and head into 1-inch pieces.

3. Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy, nonreactive saucepan. Add the 
onion and carrot and cook over moderately high heat, stirring 
occasionally, until lightly  colored, about 3 minutes. Add the lobster 
shells and garlic and cook until  fragrant, about 3 minutes longer. Add 
the Cognac and ignite with a match. Cook  until the flame burns out, 
about 1 minute.

4. Add the wine, tomatoes, parsley, thyme, bay leaf, 1/4 teaspoon salt 
and 5 cups of water to the saucepan. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer 
over moderately low heat, stirring occasionally, for 50 minutes. Pass 
the stock through a fine strainer into a large clean saucepan and 
discard the solids. Add any liquid from the lobster meat and boil over 
high heat until reduced to 1 cup, about 15 minutes. Season the stock 
with salt and pepper.

5. In a medium saucepan of boiling salted water, cook the haricots verts 
over moderately high heat until tender, about 5 minutes. Drain and keep 
warm.

6. In a small bowl, work the butter into the flour to form a paste, then 
whisk the  paste into the hot lobster stock. Bring to a boil over high 
heat, whisking constantly. Reduce the heat to low, add the lobster meat, 
tarragon and half of the chives and stir until warmed through.

7. To serve, arrange the rice in a ring on a platter. Spoon the lobster 
and sauce in the center. Arrange the haricots verts around the rice and 
garnish with the  remaining chives.


                   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Suggested Wine: Sauvignon Blanc/Chasagne-Montrachet

NOTES : Is it Homard L'Amoricaine? Or is it Homard Bonnefoy?

The recipe can be prepared through Step 4 up to 4 hours ahead. Cover and 
let the lobster meat and stock stand separately at room temperature. 
Rewarm the stock before proceeding.

============================

From: Alan Zelt 
Date: Sun, 24 Dec 2000 01:10:54 GMT
--------
> Dim-Wit maybe? I can't imagine wasting a lobster on a few cheap spuds.
> Gar (arrogant or snotty)

Well, I don't know if you are arrogant or snotty. Un-informed would be a 
good word. I tried this recipe long ago, and found it wonderful. Maybe 
you would, too.

                      *  Exported from  MasterCook  *

               Lobster w Crystallized Potato and Garlic Cloves

Recipe By     : Jean-Marie Marat, St. James Rest, Bordeaux
Serving Size  : 4    Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    : Dinner                           French
                 Main Dish                        Seafood
                 Shellfish

   Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
					
    4      1 lb          lobsters
   72                    balls    potato scooped out with a spoon
   32      cloves        garlic -- unpeeled
    1      tablespoon    parsley -- chopped with 1/2
                         clove of garlic
    2 7/8  ounces        butter
   40                    parsley leaves
    1 3/4  ounces        butter
    2      tablespoons   olive oil
    2      tablespoons   peanut oil

Separate the claws, bodies and tails of the live lobsters. Place the 
claws in salty, boiling water for 2 minutes. Cut the tails of the 
lobster at every other joint to make rings. Put the potatoes and the 
cloves of garlic into the oven with 80 g of butter and two spoonfuls of 
peanut oil for 20 minutes at400 °F. When the potatoes and cloves of 
garlic are cooked, salt the pieces of lobster and add them. Cook gently. 
Put the shelled claws into a frying pan with 50 g butter and the chopped 
parsley-garlic mixture. Cook rapidly, making sure that the butter 
remains frothy. Serve onto plates
with a spoon.

                    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

============================

From: Harry A. Demidavicius 
Date: Mon, 25 Dec 2000 20:55:14 GMT
--------
>Interesting. I guess I was un-informed. I'm sure it was tasty.
>I'll still eat my lobster dipped in butter. 
>Gar

And a hint for Dems Wot Cain't Have that much butter, especially
all at once - substitute white vinegar [plain old no name], for
the butter and dip into it. Works very well.

============================

From: Gargoylle 
Date: Tue, 26 Dec 2000 13:29:48 -0600
--------
>And a hint for Dems Wot Cain't Have that much butter, especially
>all at once - substitute white vinegar [plain old no name], for
>the butter and dip into it. Works very well.
>Harry

I knew someone who liked malt vinegar on seafood. It smelled like an
old stinky shoe to me. "Plain" might be better :-)

Gar

============================

From: suehutt[at]erols.com (Sue)
Date: Wed, 27 Dec 2000 08:10:19 -0500
--------
>I knew someone who liked malt vinegar on seafood. It smelled like an
>old stinky shoe to me. "Plain" might be better :-)
>Gar

When we have steamed crabs at the beach, we like to dip the meat in seasoned
rice vinegar.

============================

From: Gargoylle 
Date: Wed, 27 Dec 2000 14:23:46 -0600
--------
>When we have steamed crabs at the beach, we like to dip the meat in seasoned
>rice vinegar.
>sue

What did you season it with?

Gar

============================

From: suehutt[at]erols.com (Sue)
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 07:28:56 -0500
--------
>What did you season it with?
>Gar

OK, I have the bottle right here.  

Marukan
Seasoned Gourmet
Rice Vinegar

Ingredients

Rice vinegar,suar and salt

That's it.

I believe dipping crab in vinegar is an old Eastern shore thing.  My neighbor
did it and I got to like it too.
I just like it better with the rice vinegar.

I also use it on cucumber salad.

============================

From: Gargoylle 
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 16:05:11 -0600
--------
Sue wrote:

>OK, I have the bottle right here.  

Thanks. I'll be trying it.

Gar

============================

From: blakem[at]ix.netcom.com (blake murphy)
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2000 22:32:12 GMT
--------
suehutt@erols.com wrote:
>Ingredients
>Rice vinegar,suar and salt
>That's it.

try it with a little bit of the seasoning used on the crabs.

your pal,
blake

============================

From: Gabby 
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 08:58:09 -0400
--------
Harry A. Demidavicius wrote:
> And a hint for Dems Wot Cain't Have that much butter, especially
> all at once - substitute white vinegar [plain old no name], for
> the butter and dip into it. Works very well.

It's wonderful with vinegar!  Remember my dad dumping a pot of steaming
lobster on a newspaper covered table outside and the family digging in.
Saltines and vinegar were the only 2 other edibles in sight.  When I was
older & heard of drawn butter I thought folks were nuts!  Tried it and hated
it.  Lobster is rich enough without adding fat.  Fresh lemon also works for
me.  Wish lobster was still cheap enough to be able to afford to cook 10-20
lbs at a time like me old dad did.  Wish I could have that for my New Year's
Eve treat.

============================

From: Harry A. Demidavicius 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2000 00:48:05 GMT
--------
Gabby wrote:
>  Wish lobster was still cheap enough to be able to afford to cook 10-20
>lbs at a time like me old dad did.  Wish I could have that for my New Year's
>Eve treat.

Every year Calgary gets flooded with canners on the Cheap
[relatively speaking]  I maintain an extra large pot for such
occasions. 

Other than that we must mortgage our first born and get the big
lobster tails for the grilling of.

============================

From: Gabby 
Date: Thu, 28 Dec 2000 21:09:23 -0400
--------
Harry A. Demidavicius wrote:
> Every year Calgary gets flooded with canners on the Cheap
> [relatively speaking]  I maintain an extra large pot for such
> occasions.

Haven't seen a live lobster in the last 4 years, Goose Bay just isn't on
their flight path  ;o)      Haven't eaten any in 3 years.  Must admit I'd
rather have one   1 to 1.5 pounder than  several canners, but that's because
I like the bodies as well as the tails and claws, and canners don't have
much meat in the bodies.   Since my hubby and kids don't eat them, I used to
indulge once and a while when we lived in N.S. but it's a lot less fun when
you can hear people gagging in the next room while you're eating.    Oh, for
a great big lobster boil with friends and good beer   (or beer and good
friends)!

============================

From: Harry A. Demidavicius 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2000 05:53:50 GMT
--------
Gabby wrote:
>Haven't seen a live lobster in the last 4 years, Goose Bay just isn't on
>their flight path  ;o)      Haven't eaten any in 3 years.  Must admit I'd

Goose Bay - In labrador?  Aren't you closer to them than we
Calgarians? [BTW trade in the Hub and the Kids ;]

============================

From: Gabby 
Date: Fri, 29 Dec 2000 06:39:19 -0400
--------
Harry A. Demidavicius wrote:
> Goose Bay - In labrador?  Aren't you closer to them than we
> Calgarians? [BTW trade in the Hub and the Kids ;]

That's what I thought when we first came up here.  But fresh fish is not
usually available unless you go fish it yourself, and that usually involves
flying in to one of the camps.  We get fresh farmed salmon and trout at the
Co-op once in a blue moon.  Anything that's fished in the area is processed
on the coast or on the Rock and shipped elsewhere.  Occasionally someone
will fly to Nain (the northernmost inhabited community) and bring back fresh
scallops, but you have to know who and when.

I saw more fresh fish when I lived in Moose Jaw than I've ever seen here.

============================

From: Ellen Smith 
Date: Sat, 23 Dec 2000 11:07:28 -0800
--------
Lynn Rubin wrote:
> I got the brilliant idea to make lobster mashed potatoes.  So I ordered a
> cooked lobster.  I figure I'll just flake the meat into the riced potatoes..
> add butter and milk or cream and that's it.  Am I right?

Blue Point Grille
Lobster Mashed Potatoes
Recipe altered for six servings

INGREDIENTS

8 ozs. Yukon Gold potatoes (peeled)
8 ozs. Idaho Russet potatoes (peeled)
6 ozs. Parsnips (peeled)
1/2 cup creme fraiche
1 head garlic
1/2 cup heavy cream
Salt and white pepper (to taste)

2 ea. 1 1/4 Ib. Live Maine Lobsters
1 tbsp. reduced lobster stock
1 cup dry white wine
1 cup ea. celery, white onion, carrot (diced for mire piox)

DIRECTIONS

Bring large pot of water to rapid boil
Cut claw bands loose on lobsters - let relax at least ten minutes
Drop lobsters in boiling water head first
Cook approximately 8 minutes, remove from water and let cool
Clean lobsters, dice meat

Return lobster carcass to large pot
Add mire piox, wine, and one qt water
Simmer on low heat for 45 to 60 minutes, stirring occasionally
Strain remaining liquid through chinoix (fine mesh strainer)
Reduce liquid over low heat in small sauce pan until consistency is
syrupy
Let cool at room temp

Boil potatoes and parsnips seperately until tender

Preheat oven to 425 degrees
Slice top of garlic head off exposing tops of cloves
Rub whole head of garlic with olive oil
Wrap in foil and roast in oven approx. 20 minutes
Remove and let cool
Squeeze cloves to remove skins, discard skins

Whip potatoes and parsnips together
Add garlic, lobster stock, creme fraiche and butter
Continue whipping till smooth
Warm cream in sauce pan over low flame
Adjust consistency of potatoes to liking by slowly adding cream
Add salt and pepper to taste
Fold in diced lobster meat

============================

From: sbg732[at]aol.com (Sbg732)
Date: 23 Dec 2000 19:31:57 GMT
--------
Here are some recipes for it I found online:

http://www.virtualvallarta.com/vallarta/articles/fw00-marksrecipe.html

http://homecooking.about.com/food/homecooking/library/archive/blsea19.htm

============================

From: "K3" 
Date: Sat, 23 Dec 2000 15:06:01 -0500
--------
Sbg732 wrote:
> Here are some recipes for it I found online:
> http://www.virtualvallarta.com/vallarta/articles/fw00-marksrecipe.html
> http://homecooking.about.com/food/homecooking/library/archive/blsea19.htm

Thank you very much!   I've been searching for a recipe since I saw Lynn's
post yesterday (I gotta get better at this search engine stuff).   Sounds
delicous to me and lobsters don't cost me a penny -- my dad got his license
to fish a few years ago down in the Ellsworth/Bar Harbor, Maine area and we
get all the lobsters we want!   Thanks Dad for the Lobsters and thanks
Sbg732 for the links to the recipes!

============================

From: sbg732[at]aol.com (Sbg732)
Date: 24 Dec 2000 09:38:51 GMT
--------
When I did a google search, it seemed like  "lobster mashed potatoes" was on
the menu of maybe 20-30 restaurants. InStyle had a recipe for it dating back to
1996.
Here's an excerpt of a 1999 article I found on this supposedly esoteric dish:

One of the best of the upscale, down-home dishes is lobster mashed potatoes, an
oxymoron if I ever heard one. Pairing lobster with smashed spuds? Are they
crazy? 

Nope. The silky texture of potatoes whipped with real butter and cream is a
perfect complement to the rich, sweet flavor of lobster. 

Suddently, lobster mashed potatoes are everywhere. They've sprouted on menus
all across the country. They are a great side dish for fish, although no chef
worth his checked chef's pants would think of serving them on the side. They go
under the fish, darling. The fish fillet is tilted against the fluffy pile of
potatoes, or perhaps balanced right on top, and the whole shebang is showered
with a trendy Asian slaw or crisp little bits of fried herbs. 

A big batch of potatoes that will serve eight can be lavishly flavored with one
small lobster. Just stirring chopped lobster into mashed potatoes won't deliver
the flavor, though. For potatoes that are permeated with lobster, you need some
lobster stock. 

The stock is easy to make. The entire shell of the lobster _ claws, tail and
body _ is simmered in water for 10 minutes, producing a lobster-flavored broth.
Simmering longer will turn the broth bitter, so don't overdo it. To further
concentrate the flavor, remove the shells and boil the stock until reduced by
half. Just a half-cup of stock is needed for the recipe. Freeze the leftover
stock and use it later in seafood bisque. 

Even more lobster flavor is added by sauteing the chopped lobster meat in the
butter that normally goes into mashed potatoes. The combination of lobster
pieces, lobster broth and lobster-flavored butter gives the potatoes a deep
lobster flavor. 

The tricky part, of course, is getting the meat out of the lobster. You can use
nutcrackers on the shell, but heavy-duty kitchen scissors make the job go
faster. Just snip the length of the underside of the tail and pull out the
meat. Then yank off the claws, cut through the shell and lift out the meat. 

Some chopped green onions and the diced lobster are added to the potatoes after
mashing, in order to avoid pulverizing the meat and onion. The finished dish is
a gorgeous pile of fluffy potatoes studded with bits of pink and green. 


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