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Subject: Best way to cook a jacket potato in microwave?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Richard Baker 
Date: Sat, 8 Feb 2003 03:04:05 -0000
--------
I am looking for the best way to cook a jacket potato in my microwave.
Being only 19 when my mother isnt about to cook my dinner for me I tend  to
eat ready meals etc as I am lazy.  When I try and cook a jacket in the
microwave it always comes out to hard in places.  I have tried cooking it
for different times etc and different ways people have told me but still
isnt perfect.

It is a 900w microwave by the way.

I would like to know if i need to cut/stab the potato first and any other
methods for achieving the perfect jacket potato, cooked in a microwave.

While I am asking how long should I microwave a tin of baked beans for in a
900w microwave.

Should I be using a lower setting?  Next one down is 750w.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Cheers,

Richard

============================

From: hahabogus 
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 03:28:47 GMT
--------
Wash the potato well, rub it with oil and then roll in salt and poke a hole 
or two in it to prevent an explosion. Then put it in a conventional oven or 
toaster oven at 400+F for an hour....best baked spud you'll ever get.

============================

From: Chris Lemon 
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 03:33:16 GMT
--------
Richard Baker wrote:

> I would like to know if i need to cut/stab the potato first and any
> other methods for achieving the perfect jacket potato, cooked in a
> microwave.

I don't cook them myself, but I DO know they are prone to explode if you
don't vent them in some way. In fact, if you haven't been, it MAY be part of
your problem, I'm not sure.

> While I am asking how long should I microwave a tin of baked beans
> for in a 900w microwave.

Generally, any canned, prepared food like that takes around four minutes,
depending on if you like your food "warm" or "lavalike". (I tend to lean
towards the latter :))

============================

From: sue at interport dot net (Curly Sue)
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 04:00:38 GMT
--------
Richard Baker wrote:
> When I try and cook a jacket in the
>microwave it always comes out to hard in places.  I have tried cooking it
>for different times etc and different ways people have told me but still
>isnt perfect.
>
>It is a 900w microwave by the way.

If it's hard in places it might be overcooking.  Stab the raw potato a
few times and nuke it for 4 minutes at 700 w.  Stab it with a knife to
see if it's tender.  If not, turn it over and nuke for additional
one-minute intervals until it checks out done.  It helps to let the
potato sit for a couple of minutes after the intial cooking, but
sometimes it's hard to wait.

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 09:26:28 -0600
--------
I nuke potatoes in the microwave, and if there are hard places, it's
because they're undercooked.

About 4 minutes, maybe 5 per potato.

Gotta poke that hole!  I use a fork and poke a hole through to the
center, from the side, so that steam can escape easily.  For some
reason, when they go into the microwave, I put the holes down.

Often, the side I did NOT poke is the side that needs a little more
cooking, so you might consider poking each one twice, from opposite
sides, just to see if the venting steam cooks the whole thing more
evenly.  

After they're cooked, I either eat them with some butter, or mash them
and eat them with, er, some butter!

As to anything else that comes in a can?  Put it in a microwave save
container (NOT the can) and give it about 5 minutes and see how it is.
That would be a good time to stir it a bit, and if it needs another
minute or two give it that shot after you stir it.

============================

From: sue at interport dot net (Curly Sue)
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 17:44:54 GMT
--------
Alan Moorman wrote:
>I nuke potatoes in the microwave, and if there are hard places, it's
>because they're undercooked.

The microwave is funny like that.  Undercook it and it's still raw in
the middle.  Overcook it and it's hard in places, especially if it's
not turned during the cooking.

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 10:44:02 -0600
--------
Curly Sue wrote:
>The microwave is funny like that.  Undercook it and it's still raw in
>the middle.  Overcook it and it's hard in places, especially if it's
>not turned during the cooking.

That's not difficult to understand, since the microwave won't brown
anything.  

If you cooked the thing (whatever) in the over, or anywhere else but a
microwave,  you would see it browning and deal with it without over
cooking it.

But, with the microwave, you don't know the food has reached that
stage.

Thanks to the God of Amana, or whoever, that developed the rotating
food shelf for microwaves.  It helps them cook more evenly.

That said, all I use my microwave for is potatoes, and the occasional
thawing session.

Well..... microwave popcorn, now and then, too.  Although I usually
make popcorn on the stove, which is about as simple as making it in
the microwave.

============================

From: Dave Brower 
Date: Fri, 7 Feb 2003 22:28:11 -0600
--------
Richard Baker wrote:
> While I am asking how long should I microwave a tin of baked beans for in a
> 900w microwave.

Never put metal in the microwave!!!

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 15:28:22 GMT
--------
Richard Baker wrote:
>   When I try and cook a jacket in the
> microwave it always comes out to hard in places.  I have tried cooking it
> for different times etc and different ways people have told me but still
> isnt perfect.

I see you have lots of advice, but one thing is missing.  Waiting time.
Microwaves tend to cook unevenly.  After the food is heated and the MW shuts
off, let the food sit for a few minutes.  Rule of thumb is that it will
continue to cook for about 50% of the heating time.

For a potato, wrap it in a dish towel, let it rest for about 10 minutes, and
it will still be very hot and the cooking will be much more even.  Microwave
stimulate molecular action to make heat.  They continue to be active and
continue to cook the food afterwards.  In general, they penetrate the food
about 1 to 1 1/4" so cooking a thick piece will take longer and it best done
on a lower power setting.

============================

From: Richard Baker 
Date: Sat, 8 Feb 2003 23:08:42 -0000
--------
Cheers for all the advice people.  I can cook other things but when I want
something quick and easy I sometimes fancy a jacket potato (forgot most of
you would be from over the pond).  Still not sure about the cooking times,
responses saying 4-5 minutes then some others saying 10 mins.  I have never
left it to stand before so this might be worth a try.

============================

From: candeh[at]thelast.mile
Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 10:49:33 GMT
--------
Richard Baker wrote:
>  Still not sure about the cooking times,
>responses saying 4-5 minutes then some others saying 10 mins.  I have never
>left it to stand before so this might be worth a try.

Try putting microwave safe plastic wrap around it. Poke a couple of
holes in the potato, but no need to poke holes in the plastic wrap.
However long you cook it, just test it by putting a fork in it. If it
slides in smoothly all the way to the center, you're good to go. I
must be the only one here that does that, because no one else has
mentioned it. It holds in the steam, and it should come out quite
well.

============================

From: Sheryl Rosen 
Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 14:22:57 GMT
--------
candeh wrote:
> Try putting microwave safe plastic wrap around it. Poke a couple of
> holes in the potato, but no need to poke holes in the plastic wrap.
> However long you cook it, just test it by putting a fork in it. If it
> slides in smoothly all the way to the center, you're good to go. I
> must be the only one here that does that, because no one else has
> mentioned it. It holds in the steam, and it should come out quite
> well.

Might as well boil that potato, if you're gonna wrap it in plastic wrap.

============================

From: candeh[at]thelast.mile
Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 14:49:58 GMT
--------
Sheryl Rosen wrote:
>Might as well boil that potato, if you're gonna wrap it in plastic wrap.

You might as well boil it if you're going to put it in a microwave as
well. Either way, it's not going to taste baked. Personally, I think
that if you're going to microwave a potato in the first place. then
wrap it in plastic wrap. It should eliminate the OP's problem
altogether. He's using a 900 watt microwave, so using full power for
however many minutes should be just about right. Microwave cooking is
more about power levels and moisture content than it is about cooking
times. I have a 1200 watt microwave. The only time I use it on full
power is on big frozen dinners (and that ain't me, my wife eats that
shit) and boiling water. The rest of the time I adjust the power level
accordingly depending on what I'm heating up. I have never actually
cooked anything in a microwave. I only heat stuff. (Except for a few
times when I cooked an egg or potato.) Don't get me wrong, I would
never give up my microwave, it's an integral part of the kitchen. I
just don't cook in it.
Next time you microwave a potato, just wrap it in plastic wrap.I'll
betcha it'll turn out good. Overcook it, do whatever. It'll still be
better than if you left it unwrapped. You'd have to fall asleep with
the microwave timed for twenty minutes before the outside turned hard,
like the OP was complaining about. I'd never shit  you, Sheryl, you're
my favorite turd.   :-)        

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 10:53:14 -0600
--------
candeh wrote:

>You might as well boil it if you're going to put it in a microwave as
>well. Either way, it's not going to taste baked. 

We know this.  We like what we get.  And we call it "baked" even
though we know it isn't oven-baked.

>Personally, I think
>that if you're going to microwave a potato in the first place. then
>wrap it in plastic wrap. 

Hot plastic and food are a scary combination, to me.  When "they"
finally prove that it is harmless, maybe I'll think about using
plastic wrap.

For the nonce, au naturelle.

============================

From: candeh[at]thelast.mile
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 10:07:52 GMT
--------
Alan Moorman wrote:
>Hot plastic and food are a scary combination, to me.  When "they"
>finally prove that it is harmless, maybe I'll think about using
>plastic wrap.

I *meant* to say microwave safe plastic wrap. They do sell that stuff.
Hell, for that matter, contrary to popular belief, you can put metal
in a microwave as well. As long as it doesn't have pointy edges, it
should be just fine. As a matter of fact, the manual that came with
mine says that if you're going to cook something delicate like fish,
then you can cover the outside edges with aluminum foil to keep it
from overcooking at the edges, as long as you tuck in the edges of the
foil under the plate or whatever you're cooking the fish on. When it
gets close to being done, just remove the foil and finish cooking. Now
I know you're going to tell me I'm full of crap, so I took the liberty
of looking this up. See:
http://www.sharp-usa.com/products/FunctionFaqs/0,1072,2,00.html#13
And my oven does come from Sharp, so I guess I can't speak for all
microwaves, but from my understanding, using aluminum in a microwave
isn't a problem unless your microwave is a 150 pound monster from
1975. (Or thereabouts.)

============================

From: kate 
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 06:12:39 -0600
--------
candeh wrote:
> Hell, for that matter, contrary to popular belief, you can put metal
> in a microwave as well. As long as it doesn't have pointy edges, it
> should be just fine.

I have put a saucer with gold trim in my oven, ( samsung - 1200 - w , four
months old ) and had an ark. Scary, to me.  So I want try metal in mine.
As to the plastic , I found it sweats the patatoes. Therefore I get the
boiled affect. I don't advise anyone to try my method . Just telling you I
get a "baked " potato using it. Sorry, to disagree. hugs ....  k.

============================

From: Sheryl  Rosen 
Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 20:02:35 GMT
--------
candeh wrote:
>      I'd never shit  you, Sheryl, you're
> my favorite turd.   :-)

I'm scratchin' my head....is that supposed to be a compliment or an insult?
I can't figure it out!

Anyway, my microwave has a potato button. I wash them, pop them in, hit the
button once for one potato, twice for 2.  And I usually do this when I start
cooking.  And they sit in the mw oven until the rest of the meal is ready.
So they sit for 5 or more minutes after they cook.

I've never had a bad nuked potato using this method.

And I agree, they aren't baked, they are somewhere between boiled and baked.
But they are good. I like the skin a little drier than wrapping in plastic
wrap would give me.  That wouldn't be a pleasing texture for me. YMMV of
course.

For boiled potatoes, I like the skin off. I hate the texture of boiled
potato skins.  For mashing, I even used nuked potatoes.  And I leave the
skin on.  

Sometimes I nuke it for 4 minutes and if the oven is on anyway, I will pop
it in for 15-20 minutes (if what I'm making in the oven needs less than an
hour) and the skin will crisp up and it's almost exactly like it baked for
an entire hour.

============================

From: kate 
Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 14:43:38 -0600
--------
Sheryl Rosen wrote:
> Might as well boil that potato, if you're gonna wrap it in plastic wrap.

I know some of you are going to say I'm nuts. But potatoes are one of my most
favorite foods. I have eaten them anyway  you can mention, most likely.  One of
our favorite " baked " potatoes happens to be micro waved ones. I hesitate to
tell you the way we do them. I have heard some say it is dangerous to put paper
in the micro wave. I have never had a problem.  But here goes. I put a folded
newspaper in the floor of the micro wave, add a paper towel on top of the
newspaper. put two very large potatoes on the paper towel . Pierce a few times.
Cover with another paper towel, tucking it in around the potatoes. Micro wave one
minute ( mine is a 12000 -w ) at a time and turn , reposition. Keep doing this
until they are soft and give as you push them.  There you go ......  hugs , k

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 18:58:22 -0600
--------
kate wrote:
>I know some of you are going to say I'm nuts. But potatoes are one of my most
>favorite foods. I have eaten them anyway  you can mention, most likely.  One of
>our favorite " baked " potatoes happens to be micro waved ones. I hesitate to
>tell you the way we do them. I have heard some say it is dangerous to put paper
>in the micro wave. I have never had a problem.  But here goes. I put a folded
>newspaper in the floor of the micro wave, add a paper towel on top of the
>newspaper. put two very large potatoes on the paper towel . Pierce a few times.
>Cover with another paper towel, tucking it in around the potatoes. Micro wave one
>minute ( mine is a 12000 -w ) at a time and turn , reposition. Keep doing this
>until they are soft and give as you push them.  There you go ......  hugs , k

I wonder why you feel the need to put anything in the microwave with
your food, when that stuff you're putting in there is not food grade
material, and might give off fumes or chemicals which might be harmful
to you???????

Why do you feel you have to 'tuck them in' that way?  
You feel better if they're 'cozy'?

============================

From: kate 
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 03:47:27 -0600
--------
Alan Moorman wrote:
> Why do you feel you have to 'tuck them in' that way?
> You feel better if they're 'cozy'?

See what'd I tell you   ??????

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 10:50:47 -0600
--------
candeh wrote:
>Try putting microwave safe plastic wrap around it. Poke a couple of
>holes in the potato, 

My reaction to this is:  Why waste the plastic?  And the wrapping
effort/time.  Poke it and toss it in, and hit "start"!

Besides, I'm none to confident that hot plastic and food mix in a
healthy way!

:-)

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 10:49:30 -0600
--------
Richard Baker wrote:
>  Still not sure about the cooking times,
>responses saying 4-5 minutes then some others saying 10 mins.

When I want it quick, I want it quick.  I nuke one potato for 4
minutes.  Usually two for 9-10 minutes.

I mush them up on the plate with some butter. (Or make mashed
potatoes.)  And, I don't care if they are perfectly evenly done!

That isn't what the microwave is all about.  It's about speed, not
finesse!

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 10:47:36 -0600
--------
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
>For a potato, wrap it in a dish towel, let it rest for about 10 minutes, and
>it will still be very hot and the cooking will be much more even.  Microwave
>stimulate molecular action to make heat.  They continue to be active and
>continue to cook the food afterwards. 

Actualy, any food behaves like this, no matter were it's cooked.  It
is standard, for example, to take a roast out of the oven when it is
15 degrees (f) cooler than the intended cooked temperature.  Cover it
and let is stand for 15 minutes, and it will finish cooking.

Any cooking device "stimulates molecular action" whether it is the
heat from an oven or skillet that is applied from the outside to
stimulate it, or whether microwaves stimulate the molecules directly.

============================

From: Alan Zelt 
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 04:46:23 GMT
--------
Richard Baker wrote:
> I am looking for the best way to cook a jacket potato in my microwave.
> Being only 19 when my mother isnt about to cook my dinner for me I tend  to
> eat ready meals etc as I am lazy.  When I try and cook a jacket in the
> microwave it always comes out to hard in places. 

I would think that it would be easier to cook the potato if you took its
jacket off before letting it in the microwave.

============================

From: Sheryl Rosen 
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 05:58:52 GMT
--------
Alan Zelt wrote:
> I would think that it would be easier to cook the potato if you took its
> jacket off before letting it in the microwave.

Is everything a "joke" to you?
This is a KID, for goodness sake, with a legitimate cooking question.
Give him a break and give him a legitimate answer.

Isn't it obvious he means a potato that hasn't been peeled?

============================

From: Alan Zelt 
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 07:36:32 GMT
--------
Sheryl Rosen wrote:
> Is everything a "joke" to you?
> This is a KID, for goodness sake, with a legitimate cooking question.
> Give him a break and give him a legitimate answer.

Get a fucking life Sheryl. He IS 19. If that is a kid too you, I guess
you must be an old woman. And get that lemon out of your mouth.

People of British or similar types refer to potatoes with peels as
jackets.

============================

From: revjoelle[at]aol.comgoaway (Joelle)
Date: 08 Feb 2003 16:29:27 GMT
--------
Sheryl Rosen wrote:
> Isn't it obvious he means a potato that hasn't been peeled?

I thought "jacket potato" was either some kind of potato breed I'd never heard
of or some brand he bought in the freezer section.

============================

From: gtwy4cb[at]aol.com (Gtwy4cb)
Date: 08 Feb 2003 04:52:08 GMT
--------
Ditch the micro and get a simple cookbook. You'll love it!

============================

From: Sheryl Rosen 
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 06:04:45 GMT
--------
Richard Baker wrote:
> I am looking for the best way to cook a jacket potato in my microwave.

Wash the potato and dry it well. Pierce it with a fork in several places.

Put it in the middle of the microwave oven and assuming it's no bigger than
your fist cook it on high for 4 minutes, then let it sit for about 2-3
minutes.  Then test it.  It should be soft all over.  Letting it sit for
about 2-3 minutes after cooking it is part of the cooking process. It allows
the steam in the microwave oven to finish cooking the potato evenly. It's
important not to open the door of the mw oven during that rest time.

Seems to me it's not cooked evenly.

Good Luck. And bravo for trying to learn to cook for yourself. Today, a
potato, next week, maybe a full meal!

============================

From: blake murphy 
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 02:32:26 -0500
--------
Sheryl Rosen wrote:
>Good Luck. And bravo for trying to learn to cook for yourself. Today, a
>potato, next week, maybe a full meal!

and next month, a joke!

your pal

============================

From: Alan Zelt 
Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 07:37:14 GMT
--------
Sheryl Rosen wrote:
> Wash the potato and dry it well. Pierce it with a fork in several places.
> 
> Put it in the middle of the microwave oven and assuming it's no bigger than
> your fist cook it on high for 4 minutes, then let it sit for about 2-3
> minutes.  Then test it.  It should be soft all over.  Letting it sit for
> about 2-3 minutes after cooking it is part of the cooking process. It allows
> the steam in the microwave oven to finish cooking the potato evenly. It's
> important not to open the door of the mw oven during that rest time.
> 
> Seems to me it's not cooked evenly.
> 
> Good Luck. And bravo for trying to learn to cook for yourself. Today, a
> potato, next week, maybe a full meal!

Psst. Sheryl. Stop talking to him like a baby. He is 19.

============================

From: Piscanthropus Profundus 
Date: Sat, 8 Feb 2003 10:25:26 -0500
--------
Alan Zelt wrote:
> > Good Luck. And bravo for trying to learn to cook for yourself. Today, a
> > potato, next week, maybe a full meal!
>
> Psst. Sheryl. Stop talking to him like a baby. He is 19.

My wife is 32 and she can't/doesn't cook at all.  Sheryl could talk to her
that way and she'd still be confused.  8') [No, I am not exaggerating]  8'(

============================

From: candeh[at]thelast.mile
Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 10:44:42 GMT
--------
Piscanthropus Profundus wrote:
>My wife is 32 and she can't/doesn't cook at all.  Sheryl could talk to her
>that way and she'd still be confused.  8') [No, I am not exaggerating]  8'(

If she makes up for it in, uh, other ways, then the hell with the
cooking! Bake the potatoes yourself and give her some meat to go along
with 'em! My wife doesn't cook either, but she loves the stuff I cook.
And she shows her appreciation by doing something she does quite well.
She does maintenance. My pipes never need unclogging. It works out
really welll that way.
Whoo hoo!

============================

From: Frenchy 
Date: Sat, 8 Feb 2003 19:54:55 +1300
--------
Richard Baker wrote:
> I am looking for the best way to cook a jacket potato in my microwave.

Cut a big cross in one side (about 1" deep).  Then when it is cooked, you
squeeze it on each side and it pops open at the cross, ready for salt and
Sour cream.

At 900 watts, nuke it for 6 minutes (assuming a medium sized spud) and turn
it over half way thru.

Good idea to wrap it in foil when finished and it will continue to cook and
stay warm for an hour.

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sat, 8 Feb 2003 07:07:02 -0600
--------
Richard Baker wrote:
> I am looking for the best way to cook a jacket potato in my microwave.

Personally, I'd forget the microwave and fire up the oven.  Microwaves tend
towards uneven cooking of potatoes.

Yes, you'll need to stab it (or poke it with a fork).  While you're at it,
bake several because they're good cold, too :-)  Rub the outside with
butter, sprinkle all over with salt.  Cook for an hour at 400F (about 200C).
The jacket will be nice and crispy from the butter, wonderfully flavoured by
the salt.

If you insist on using the microwave, wash the potato well, poke it with a
fork.  Time depends on the weight.   If you are talking about a normal sized
baking potato, microwave it about 5 minutes and turn it over at least once.
Then cover it with an inverted bowl or casserole dish (or wrap it in foil)
and let it sit for about 5 minutes to finish cooking.

============================

From: stan[at]temple.edu
Date: 8 Feb 2003 13:34:51 GMT
--------
Richard Baker wrote:
> While I am asking how long should I microwave a tin of baked beans for in a
> 900w microwave.

Just dump the baked beans into a microwave-safe bowl and nuke on full
power for a minute or two. The exact amount of time depends on the amount
of baked beans. Just keep an eye on the beans while they're in the oven
and take them out when they're nice and hot. Do not nuke the beans in the 
tin. You might also want to read the instruction guide that came with your 
microwave oven for information on how to use it properly.

============================

From: Piscanthropus Profundus 
Date: Sat, 8 Feb 2003 09:59:03 -0500
--------
Richard Baker wrote:
> I am looking for the best way to cook a jacket potato in my microwave.

Wash the potato, stab it a few times with a fork, place it on a paper towel
in the microwave, and nuke at 100% power for 10 minutes [for a large -
fist-sized - potato].

============================

From: Max Thames 
Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 01:23:33 GMT
--------
Richard Baker wrote:
> I am looking for the best way to cook a jacket potato in my microwave.

Boy, that one got you a mass of comebacks.  Microwaves don't bake they
steam.  Since it only takes an hour to bake a good jacketed potato, why not
do that?  Preheat the oven to 375 degrees, poke a cross pattern in the
scrubbed spud with a fork (this helps them split nice when you "scrunch" to
make em fluffy and releases the steam), and bake them unwrapped on the
middle oven rack.  If you like a crisp skin, don't do anything.  If you like
a supple skin, rub some cooking oil on first...

If they aren't soft after an hour, just keep them in a little longer until
they do soften.  It'll be the best tater you ever ate and worth the extra
time....

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 03:13:22 GMT
--------
Max Thames wrote:
> Boy, that one got you a mass of comebacks.  Microwaves don't bake they
> steam.  Since it only takes an hour to bake a good jacketed potato, why not
> do that?

Sure, real baked spuds are superior, but not everyone wants to heat an oven
in the summer for one potato or take an hour of their lunch hour too cook.

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 10:54:57 -0600
--------
Max Thames wrote:
>Boy, that one got you a mass of comebacks.  Microwaves don't bake they
>steam.  Since it only takes an hour to bake a good jacketed potato, why not
>do that?

Well, of course, Max.  We all know that.

If I could get an oven-baked potato in 4 minutes, that's what I'd
have.

But I can't.   

So I nuke.

============================

From: tweety2cool[at]webtv.net (Tweety)
Date: Sun, 9 Feb 2003 19:46:31 -0600 (CST)
--------
Someone told me this way to fix  baked potatoes in a microwave...After
making a slice in the potato with a knife.  Wrap it in wax paper then
put in microwave....Cooks faster, and evenly cooked...Can also rub
alittle bacon grease on skin before wrapping with wax paper, gives the
skins a good flavor if you like to eat the skins...Tweety......


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