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Subject: "New Potato" dilemma
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: cockle_thing 
Date: 8 Feb 2005 08:41:24 -0800
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I hate going to stores to buy potatoes because i never know what
they're going to turn out like once i've boiled/mashed/roasted, etc.
them. I went to the store to buy some potatoes to make fishcakes. What
i wanted were potatoes described as "creamy" by chefs. Anyway, i got to
the store and found that the only bag of potatoes i could possibly
carry home was a small bag of 'new potatoes' and before you ask it did
not say what the best way to cook them was. When boiled, these potatoes
were quite dry and flaky, sort of watery, rather than creamy. Anyone
have any ideas of which varieties are 'creamy'? And if so- what variety
is 'new potato', or is it a type on it's own?

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From: Pierre 
Date: 8 Feb 2005 09:18:45 -0800
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Yukon Gold is creamy.

(My guess about new potato's, are they're just small red potato's.
Best roasted with some garlic, olive oil, S&P, and your favorite herb.)

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From: The Ranger 
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2005 09:44:28 -0800
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There are several different types of potatoes currently available in
many markets. I'm unfamiliar with the UK produce distribution but would
think it's very much like the American distribution of produce.

You can do two things to help yourself: 1) Establish a relationship with
the produce manager at the grocery store you frequent. You'd be amazed
at how much info these guys are willing to part with! They'll "teach"
you to pick the best for a particular dish. 2) Go to your local library
and browse their cookbooks. Many authors love to talk up the dishes
listed in their book and will offer some insight into the "creamy"
comment that's seemed to have thrown you. You might also see a recipe
that you will try.

Here's a link that might be helpful for you specifically:


Or


There were many more Googled links but that will allow you to get
started.

To be slightly more specific:
I use Yukon Golds for roasting, mashed, and boiled; Whites for boiling
and mashed; Reds (or News) for roasting, mashed, and boiling; Russets
for mashed and baking.

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From: Dimitri 
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 18:06:09 GMT
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See below from epicurious:

potato
The ancient Incas were cultivating this humble tuber thousands of years ago. 
The potato was not readily accepted in Europe, however, because it was known 
to be a member of the nightshade family (as are the tomato and eggplant) and 
therefore thought to be poisonous. In the 16th century, Sir Walter Raleigh 
was instrumental in debunking the poisonous potato superstition when he 
planted them on property he owned in Ireland. The Irish knew a good thing 
when they saw it and a hundred years later were growing and consuming the 
potato in great quantities. Today, hundreds of varieties of this popular 
vegetable are grown around the world. In America, the potato can be divided 
into four basic categories: russet, long white, round white and round red. 
The russet Burbank potato (also simply called russet  and Idaho ) is long, 
slightly rounded and has a brown, rough skin and numerous eyes. Its low 
moisture and high starch content not only give it superior baking qualities 
but also make it excellent for FRENCH FRIES. The russet Burbank was named 
for its developer, horticulturalist Luther Burbank of Idaho. Although grown 
throughout the Midwest, the russet is also commonly called IDAHO POTATO 
(whether or not it's grown there). Long white potatoes have a similar shape 
as the russet but they have thin, pale gray-brown skins with almost 
imperceptible eyes. They're sometimes called white rose  or California long 
whites , after the state in which they were developed. Long whites can be 
baked, boiled or fried. The thumb-sized baby long whites are called finger 
potatoes. The medium-size round white and round red potatoes are also 
commonly referred to as boiling potatoes . They're almost identical except 
that the round white has a freckled brown skin and the round red a 
reddish-brown coat. They both have a waxy flesh that contains less starch 
and more moisture than the russet and long white. This makes them better 
suited for boiling (they're both commonly used to make mashed potatoes) than 
for baking. They're also good for roasting and frying. The round white is 
grown mainly in the Northeast where it's sometimes referred to by one of its 
variety names, Katahdin . The round red is cultivated mainly in the 
Northwest. Yukon gold potatoes have a skin and flesh that ranges from 
buttery yellow to golden. These boiling potatoes have a moist, almost 
succulent texture and make excellent mashed potatoes. There are a variety of 
relatively new potatoes in the marketplace, most of which aren't new at all 
but rather heritage vegetables that date back centuries. Among the more 
distinctive examples are the all blue potatoes, which range in color from 
bluish purple to purple-black. These small potatoes have a dense texture and 
are good for boiling. Other purple potatoes have skin colors that range from 
lavender to dark blue and flesh that can be from white to beige with purple 
streaking. Among the red-fleshed potatoes are the huckleberry  (red skin and 
flesh) and the blossom  (pinkish-red skin and flesh). New potatoes are 
simply young potatoes (any variety). They haven't had time to convert their 
sugar fully into starch and consequently have a crisp, waxy texture and 
thin, undeveloped wispy skins. New potatoes are small enough to cook whole 
and are excellent boiled or pan-roasted. Because they retain their shape 
after being cooked and cut, new potatoes are particularly suited for use in 
potato salad. The season for new potatoes is spring to early summer. 
Potatoes of one variety or another are available year-round. Choose potatoes 
that are suitable for the desired method of cooking. All potatoes should be 
firm, well-shaped (for their type) and blemish-free. New potatoes may be 
missing some of their feathery skin but other types should not have any bald 
spots. Avoid potatoes that are wrinkled, sprouted or cracked. A green 
tinge - indicative of prolonged light exposure - is caused by the alkaloid 
solanine, which can be toxic if eaten in quantity. This bitter green portion 
can be cut or scraped off and the potato used in the normal fashion. Store 
potatoes in a cool, dark, well-ventilated place for up to 2 weeks. New 
potatoes should be used within 3 days of purchase. Refrigerating potatoes 
causes them to become quite sweet and to turn dark when cooked. Warm 
temperatures encourage sprouting and shriveling. Potatoes are probably the 
most versatile vegetable in the world and can be cooked in any way 
imaginable. They're available in a wide selection of commercial products 
including POTATO CHIPS, instant mashed potatoes (dehydrated cooked 
potatoes), canned new potatoes and a plethora of frozen products including 
HASH BROWNS, FRENCH FRIES and stuffed baked potatoes. Potatoes are not at 
all hard on the waistline (a 6-ounce potato contains only about 120 
calories) and pack a nutritional punch. They're low in sodium, high in 
potassium and an important source of complex carbohydrates and vitamins C 
and B-6, as well as a storehouse of minerals. Neither SWEET POTATOES nor 
YAMS are botanically related to the potato.
© Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD 
LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst. 

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From: Mark Thorson 
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 20:11:51 GMT
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cockle_thing wrote:
> And if so- what variety
> is 'new potato', or is it a type on it's own?

"New Potato" is the authorized marketing designation
for genetically-modified potatoes.  Over the next six months,
you'll also see the introduction of New Corn, New Tomatoes,
and New Brussels Sprouts.  I especially like the latter,
because they have completely removed the bitterness,
making them slightly sweet.  Hope this helps!  :-)

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From: zxcvbob 
Date: Tue, 08 Feb 2005 14:21:35 -0600
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Mark Thorson wrote:
> "New Potato" is the authorized marketing designation
> for genetically-modified potatoes.  Over the next six months,
> you'll also see the introduction of New Corn, New Tomatoes,
> and New Brussels Sprouts.  I especially like the latter,
> because they have completely removed the bitterness,
> making them slightly sweet.  Hope this helps!  :-)


You forgot to use the registered trademark symbol ®.  Hopefully the New 
Potato® Consortium doesn't monitor this newsgroup very closely.  They 
are a powerful group that you'd rather not piss off...

Best regards, :-)
Bob

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From: cockle_thing 
Date: 8 Feb 2005 14:12:35 -0800
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Mmm, I'm particularly looking forward to the 'new cauliflower'- yes
it's supposed to be bigger and sweeter...and they come in different
colours...oh, and they can fly...and they're meant to be good at
imitating broccoli, especially if it's cauliflower fool's day- you had
better pick those cauli's carefully.

And what ever you do- (important!) don't put them anywhere near cheese-
they can turn pretty nasty indeed... :-)

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From: sd 
Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2005 03:59:17 -0600
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cockle_thing wrote:
> Mmm, I'm particularly looking forward to the 'new cauliflower'- yes
> it's supposed to be bigger and sweeter...and they come in different
> colours...oh, and they can fly...and they're meant to be good at
> imitating broccoli, especially if it's cauliflower fool's day- you had
> better pick those cauli's carefully.

So you haven't seen these then? :-)

http://www.fotosearch.com/comp/corel1/CPH212/169008.jpg

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From: "cockle_thing" 
Date: 11 Feb 2005 02:09:20 -0800
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I can't believe it!!!!!! There are such things as green
cauliflower!!!!! This is insane- imitating broccoli. What is the world
coming to? So I was actually describing something in jest which really
exists (well, partly, unless they can fly to)? That's uncanny.

Thanks sd for the weblink- i'll be laughing about the pictures all day!

Anyone tried them- don't tell me- they taste like cauliflower with a
hint of broccoli....??!

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From: kilikini 
Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2005 10:45:29 GMT
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cockle_thing wrote:
> I can't believe it!!!!!! There are such things as green
> cauliflower!!!!! This is insane- imitating broccoli. What is the world
> coming to? So I was actually describing something in jest which really
> exists (well, partly, unless they can fly to)? That's uncanny.
>
> Thanks sd for the weblink- i'll be laughing about the pictures all
> day!
>
> Anyone tried them- don't tell me- they taste like cauliflower with a
> hint of broccoli....??!

It's called, broccoflower or something like that.  Yes, it's a hybrid
between broccoli and cauliflower.  I've never tried it, but I've seen it in
stores as long ago as about 12 years ago.

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From: Pierre 
Date: 11 Feb 2005 03:13:57 -0800
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kilikini wrote:
> It's called, broccoflower or something like that.  Yes, it's a hybrid
> between broccoli and cauliflower.  I've never tried it, but I've seen it in
> stores as long ago as about 12 years ago.

I've tried the stuff.  yecchh.  Its not interesting enough to have any
defined character of either one.  Needs salt.

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From: brent97g[at]aol.com.jp (Brent97G)
Date: 09 Feb 2005 00:19:05 GMT
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Mark Thorson wrote:
>New Brussels Sprouts.  I especially like the latter,
>because they have completely removed the bitterness,
>making them slightly sweet. 

So they are no longer really brussel sprouts, but green vegetal matter with a
designer flavor to appeal to a larger demographic. Maybe they'll come out with
super sour in the near future.

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From: Lynn from Fargo 
Date: 8 Feb 2005 19:43:31 -0800
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Just wait till you taste the "New" pinto beans. The gas you pass is
neon . . . in Technicolor!

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From: brent97g[at]aol.com.jp (Brent97G)
Date: 09 Feb 2005 00:14:35 GMT
--------
cockle_thing wrote:
> I went to the store to buy some potatoes to make fishcakes. What
> i wanted were potatoes described as "creamy" by chefs. 

While some chefs may describe a potato as creamy, they are also using lots of
cream in their mashed potatos and lots of dairy and fats to enhance that
texture. When reading/trying recipes by many chefs I find they forgetfully omit
that extra dollop of cream, pat of butter and/or extra drizzle of olive oil
which makes the dish special.

============================

From: barry in indy 
Date: Wed, 09 Feb 2005 11:07:28 GMT
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Brent97G wrote:
> While some chefs may describe a potato as creamy, they are also using lots of
> cream in their mashed potatos and lots of dairy and fats to enhance that
> texture. When reading/trying recipes by many chefs I find they forgetfully omit
> that extra dollop of cream, pat of butter and/or extra drizzle of olive oil
> which makes the dish special.

When I was cooking in a restaurant in Pennsylvania, we used 
small, round, thin-skinned red potatoes which we cooked in a 
convection steamer. They turned out to be very "creamy." The bags 
were labeled "red creamers", and I have never been able to find 
anything like them in supermarkets. They were delicious, with 
just a little salt and clarified butter added.

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From: cockle_thing 
Date: 9 Feb 2005 11:22:34 -0800
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I don't know if anyone is interested to know how I do my jacket
potatoes (baked potatoes)- Well, just microwave them until they're
cooked through. Then take some extra virgin olive oil and rub into the
skin. Then take some salt and rub into the skin also. Be careful not to
scald yourself!

Put the potatoes on a a roasting tray and out in the oven until they
start to brown. The oil and salt really crisp the outside and adds a
lovely flavour all round. How long you leave the potatoes in the oven
depends on how crispy you like them. I usually go for about 10-15
minutes.

Make a cross on the top, and fill with a little butter and your
favourite topping. Serve with a side salad. Just Fabulous!


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