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Subject: Potato pancakes
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Ruddell <ruddell[at]accesscomm.ca>
Date: Mon, 29 Oct 2001 19:29:24 GMT
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Often when I've got leftover mashed potatoes I make them into
pancakes.   Does anyone else do this and have any recipies or ideas for
binder other than eggs?

Dennis

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From: David Wright <dtwright[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 29 Oct 2001 19:43:03 GMT
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Ruddell wrote:
> Often when I've got leftover mashed potatoes I make them into
> pancakes.   Does anyone else do this and have any recipies or ideas for
> binder other than eggs?

Is this a test? You could make boxty, just in time for halloween ...
http://www.hookerycookery.com/hween007.htm

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From: sackv[at]uni-duesseldorf.de (Victor Sack)
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2001 08:26:59 +0100
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Ruddell wrote:
> Often when I've got leftover mashed potatoes I make them into
> pancakes.   Does anyone else do this and have any recipies or ideas for
> binder other than eggs?

What I do is better made with freshly-prepared mashed potatoes, but will
work with left-over ones, too.

Finely mince or grind some boiled, fried, or roasted meat or chicken and
mix it with some finely minced fried onions, salt and pepper.  Form
patties, or rather flat rissoles, out of mashed potatoes, make a well in
the centre of each one and fill it with the meat.  Close the well,
optionally paint the rissoles with an egg yolk, roll in some flour and
fry them in butter or oil on both sides until golden brown.  Serve with
mushroom sauce.  You can also use fry mushrooms and onions, mince them
finely and use them as a filling, and serve the rissoles either with
mushroom sauce or with sour cream.  Of course, you can omit the filling
altogether, but the result is not nearly as interesting or tasty.

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From: bigdodge68[at]aol.comyourbutt (Ben)
Date: 30 Oct 2001 12:48:24 GMT
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> Often when I've got leftover mashed potatoes I make them into
> pancakes.   Does anyone else do this and have any recipies or ideas for
> binder other than eggs?

Alot of times I will saute a chopped up onion and throw it in with the taters.
Add 1 egg, and a good bit of flour. I keep mixing in flour until my arm goes
numb, thats when I know its ready. Then just throw it in a buttered casserole
dish and bake for awhile. I'll usually cook this along side of a roast of some
sort with lots of gravy readily available.

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From: Melba's Jammin' <barbschaller[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2001 08:31:55 -0600
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Victor Sack wrote:
> Finely mince or grind some boiled, fried, or roasted meat or chicken and
> mix it with some finely minced fried onions, salt and pepper.  Form
> patties, or rather flat rissoles, out of mashed potatoes, make a well in

Those sound really interesting, Victor.   What are the approximate 
dimensions of a properly made whatever-you're-calling-it.  Epicurious 
defines rissole like so:

[rih-SOHL, ree-SOHL]
1. Sweet- or savory-filled pastry (often shaped like a turnover) that is 
fried or baked and served as an appetizer, side dish or dessert 
(depending on the size and filling). 2. Small, partially cooked potato 
balls that are browned in butter until crisp.

Thanks!

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 30 Oct 2001 16:07:24 GMT
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Melba's Jammin' writes:
>dimensions of a properly made whatever-you're-calling-it.  Epicurious 
>defines rissole like so:
>
>[rih-SOHL, ree-SOHL]
>1. Sweet- or savory-filled pastry (often shaped like a turnover) that is 
>fried or baked and served as an appetizer, side dish or dessert 
>(depending on the size and filling). 2. Small, partially cooked potato 
>balls that are browned in butter until crisp.

"New Oxford Dictionary of English" 

rissole   n. 

a compressed mixture of meat and spices, coated in breadcrumbs and fried.

—ORIGIN early 18th cent.: from French, from Old French dialect ruissole, from
a feminine form of late Latin russeolus 'reddish', from Latin russus 'red'.

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From: sackv[at]uni-duesseldorf.de (Victor Sack)
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 08:18:39 +0100
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Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> Those sound really interesting, Victor.   What are the approximate 
> dimensions of a properly made whatever-you're-calling-it.

Aproximately 1/2-2/3 of the average fast-food hamburger patty size, but
rather thicker.  It also doesn't have to be round - in fact, I prefer it
to be oval-shaped.  Two-three make an average helping (average for me,
that is...).

>  Epicurious 
> defines rissole like so:

Forget Epicurious and all the other dictionaries - they have no clue.
Each of them defines rissoles differently and some contradict
themselves.  For example, the Oxford English Reference Dictionary
defines rissoles as a meat dish, yet defines felafel as a rissole, too.

Here's *my* definitive definition - forget all the others!  A rissole is
made of any minced ingredient(s) pressed into a ball or patty-like form.
It may or may not be enclosed in a pastry shell or coated in breadcrumbs
or flour.

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From: Rhonda Anderson <schumacher11[at]bigpond.com>
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 13:13:13 GMT
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Victor Sack wrote: 
> Aproximately 1/2-2/3 of the average fast-food hamburger patty size, but
> rather thicker.  It also doesn't have to be round - in fact, I prefer
> it to be oval-shaped.  Two-three make an average helping (average for
> me, that is...).

Rissoles are almost always round in Australia - hence the saying "See ya 
round like a rissole". You might also hear someone say they're going down 
the rissole, in which case they mean the RSL (Returned Servicemen's League) 
Club. Of course, as with many uniquely Australian slang expressions, 
they're not so common now as they used to be.

> Forget Epicurious and all the other dictionaries - they have no clue.
> Each of them defines rissoles differently and some contradict
> themselves.  For example, the Oxford English Reference Dictionary
> defines rissoles as a meat dish, yet defines felafel as a rissole, too.
> 
> Here's *my* definitive definition - forget all the others!  A rissole
> is made of any minced ingredient(s) pressed into a ball or patty-like
> form. It may or may not be enclosed in a pastry shell or coated in
> breadcrumbs or flour.

Rissole almost exclusively refers to a meat dish here. I've seen pumpkin 
rissoles at the takeaway shop near work, but most people will assume a meat 
dish if they hear the word rissole. They're similar to a hamburger patty, 
though thicker and usually smaller in surface area. Most commonly made from 
minced beef,or sausage mince, but you will also see ready to cook chicken 
rissoles for sale at butchers/supermarkets. They're usually coated in dried 
breadcrumbs. 

You've made me think, I haven't made rissoles for years. I've got some 
mince in the freezer so maybe next week I'll make some - I'd do it this 
weekend but we'll be in Canberra visiting Rob's sister, I've got Friday and 
Monday off work (yaaay!! - that'll knock a whole 15 hours off my 
accumulated 58 hour flextime credit <g>) We're going down Friday and coming 
back Monday, travelling by train. I suppose I'll have _lots_ of posts to 
read through Monday night <g>. So, any of the other Aussies out there have 
any favourite rissole tips/tricks??

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From: Melba's Jammin' <barbschaller[at]earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 16:34:39 -0600
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Victor Sack wrote:
> Here's *my* definitive definition - forget all the others!  

Feh!  THIS from a man who doesn't know what the proper shape of pirohy 
are!

A rissole is
> made of any minced ingredient(s) pressed into a ball or patty-like form.
> It may or may not be enclosed in a pastry shell or coated in breadcrumbs
> or flour.

So, does a meatball or a good ol' burger patty get the pedigreed name of 
rissole, too?

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From: sackv[at]uni-duesseldorf.de (Victor Sack)
Date: Thu, 1 Nov 2001 06:41:33 +0100
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Melba's Jammin' <barbschaller@earthlink.net> wrote:
> Feh!  THIS from a man who doesn't know what the proper shape of pirohy
> are!

Says a heathen who can't tell 'em from uszki!  Feh!

> So, does a meatball or a good ol' burger patty get the pedigreed name of
> rissole, too?

Yes, I would say.  Rissole is a more general, broader term; meatballs
and patties are more particular.  The same is true of my oft-posted
Chicken Pojarsky recipe and even of the syrniki (curd-cheese patties)
one.


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