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Subject: potato questions
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: braun_chris[at]mindspring.com (Chris Braun)
Date: Thu, 06 Mar 1997 01:24:50 GMT
--------
Tonight DH must have been hungry -- he made about 3 times as much
mashed potatoes as we could eat.  Any ideas for what to do with
leftover mashed potatoes?  (I was inspired to ask because I was so
impressed by everyone's creativity in suggesting ways to use much more
obscure things like pickle juice!)

Also, while I was thinking about posting this question, I thought I'd
ask another question I have about potatoes: what's the best way to
store them?  Ours always seem to go bad awfully fast.

Thanks in advance for any advice,

============================

From: rain[at]hothouse.iglou.com (Rain)
Date: Wed,  5 Mar 1997 01:40:00 GMT
--------
CB->Also, while I was thinking about posting this question, I thought I'd
CB->ask another question I have about potatoes: what's the best way to
CB->store them?  Ours always seem to go bad awfully fast.

Mine do best in a hanging basket. The air can circulate around them,
and they seem to stay good longer.  But it's very important to sort
them before storing and occasionally thereafter, and take out any
with bad spots; the rot spreads fast.

============================

From: nancy-dooley[at]uiowa.edu (Nancy Dooley)
Date: Thu, 06 Mar 1997 21:38:06 GMT
--------
> Mine do best in a hanging basket. The air can circulate around them,
> and they seem to stay good longer.  But it's very important to sort

I have the best luck storing them in a cupboard that is dark and cool
(kinda remembering mom storing them in the "cellar," on the farm).

============================

From: Brawny[at]knox.mindspring.com (Brawny)
Date: Thu, 06 Mar 1997 01:59:10 GMT
--------
Chris Braun wrote:

>Tonight DH must have been hungry -- he made about 3 times as much
>mashed potatoes as we could eat.  Any ideas for what to do with
>leftover mashed potatoes? 

They will heat up very well in the microwave oven....    

but my favorite is to take leftover mashed potates...add one egg and chopped
onion and they pan saute them in butter until brown.   Wonderful with a dollop
of sour cream on top after they have browned.  

>Also, while I was thinking about posting this question, I thought I'd
>ask another question I have about potatoes: what's the best way to
>store them?  Ours always seem to go bad awfully fast.

Store your potatoes in a cool dark place.....	AWAY FROM ONIONS!!     They
should keep for quite a while.  

============================

From: whelanj[at]aecl.ca (Judith Whelan)
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 1997 20:26:11 GMT
--------
>Store your potatoes in a cool dark place.....   AWAY FROM ONIONS!!     They
>should keep for quite a while.  

Why away from onions?  Last longer?

============================

From: Brawny[at]remove.knox.mindspring.com (Brawny)
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 1997 12:00:14 GMT
--------
Judith Whelan wrote:
>Why away from onions?  Last longer?

Judy...I heard that on the FOODTV channel.   I tried it and it does work!  

============================

From: nancy-dooley[at]uiowa.edu (Nancy Dooley)
Date: Fri, 07 Mar 1997 16:35:48 GMT
--------
Judith Whelan wrote:
>Why away from onions?  Last longer?

Don't know the answer, but they seem to egg each other on in terms of
which can spoil the fastest.

============================

From: phos8516[at]uriacc.uri.edu (maxine in ri)
Date: Sat, 15 Mar 1997 13:03:09 GMT
--------
>Any ideas for what to do with leftover mashed potatoes? 

Another use would be Shepherd's Pie.  Put a layer of ground protein in
a baking dish, add a layer of frozen veggies, and top with a
"frosting" of mashed potatoes.  Bake at 350 until protein is cooked.

>what's the best way to store them?

Dark is very important.  The green spots that form are from light, and
are toxic.  

============================

From: Judy or Andrew 
Date: Thu, 06 Mar 1997 06:48:41 -0600
--------
Chris Braun wrote:
>  Any ideas for what to do with leftover mashed potatoes?  

Mashed potatoe pancakes

============================

From: nancy-dooley[at]uiowa.edu (Nancy Dooley)
Date: Thu, 06 Mar 1997 17:39:54 GMT
--------
There are recipes for kolaches made with mashed potatoes; spud-nut
donuts; other bread doughs with mashed potatoes.  However, I love
potato pancakes:  mix one beaten egg (add a little flour if you need
to), onion, parsley, garlic - mix and make into little thick pancakes
- fry slowly in hot butter until browned on both sides.

============================

From: pdavis[at]pipeline.com (Pamela Davis)
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 1997 22:12:10 GMT
--------
Nancy Dooley wrote:
>There are recipes for kolaches made with mashed potatoes; spud-nut
>donuts; other bread doughs with mashed potatoes.  However, I love
>potato pancakes:  mix one beaten egg (add a little flour if you need
>to), onion, parsley, garlic - mix and make into little thick pancakes
>- fry slowly in hot butter until browned on both sides.

They fry even better if you dip them in flour just before plopping them 
in the pan.  Mashed potatoes also make great fritters when mixed 
with leftover tidbit and  some green onion.

============================

From: Martin & Deborah 
Date: 10 Mar 1997 22:46:01 GMT
--------
How are fritters made?  The potato pancakes are a good idea.  We eat them
more than I realized.

============================

From: pdavis[at]pipeline.com (Pamela Davis)
Date: Wed, 12 Mar 1997 19:51:25 GMT
--------
Martin & Deborah wrote:
>How are fritters made?  The potato pancakes are a good idea.  We eat them
>more than I realized.

You can literally put anything you want in the mashed
potatoes so long as there is enough potato to make it all
stick together.  I always use chopped green onion because it
is a nice texture contrast then whatever I've got left.
Leftover rice bound together with egg is also a nice
fritter.  Face it. Most anything tastes good when fried and
crispy.

============================

From: rain[at]hothouse.iglou.com (Rain)
Date: Fri,  7 Mar 1997 03:37:21 GMT
--------
> > Mine do best in a hanging basket. The air can circulate around them
> > and they seem to stay good longer.  But it's very important to sort
>
> I have the best luck storing them in a cupboard that is dark and cool
> (kinda remembering mom storing them in the "cellar," on the farm).

In my experience, they sprout and get rubbery faster that way than
out in the light and air, presumably because it's more like being
underground.  But whatever works for you, go fo it; it's probably
less humid in Iowa than here, too.  (And not just when we're in
the middle of a major flood, as now.)

============================

From: mtzeng[at]ucs.indiana.edu (Mimi W. Tzeng)
Date: 9 Mar 1997 19:31:20 GMT
--------
Well, I've been saving up some real basic potato questions also and 
this looks like a good place to butt in ;)

What happens if you freeze a whole potato? I have a small apartment
which is uniformly 70 degrees throughout and I've been storing them in
the fridge, which does make them last longer than a week before 
sprouting, but now they are looking really bizarre. Which brings me
to the next question: 

If the potato looks like it is wrinkling up from shrinking (especially 
around wounds), and the wrinkly areas are squishy, and the insides start 
feeling more springy instead of firm, but the inside is still a nice 
uniform creamy-white color - is there anything wrong with eating it? 
(I'm thinking about red potatoes here more than the Idaho type. The 
Idaho ones just seem to become more squishy and squeezable all around). 

What does a rotting potato LOOK like? 

How far can a potato sprout before it is no longer safe to eat?

============================

From: kate 
Date: 10 Mar 1997 04:30:32 GMT
--------
I have read that storing the potato in the fridge is a big "No No".  The
starches from the potato convert to sugar below 45 degrees and the potatoes
blacken quickly.  Potatoes in my experience can last several weeks if
stored in a dark, cool (NOT cold) place.  Potatoes should also, in my
experience and based upon what I read, NOT be stored in close proximity to
onions.  The two interact with each other and make bad things happen ;-). 
I have also read that some people, including Julia Child, quarter peeled
potatoes before boiling in the preparation of mashed potatoes.  I disagree
with the latter but I guess that's what makes cooking and storing
interesting ;-).

============================

From: Kate Connally 
Date: Mon, 10 Mar 1997 13:38:37 -0800
--------
kate wrote:

> I have read that storing the potato in the fridge is a big "No No".  The
> starches from the potato convert to sugar below 45 degrees and the potatoes
> blacken quickly.  Potatoes in my experience can last several weeks if
> stored in a dark, cool (NOT cold) place. 

Yet another old wives tale.  I've been storing my potatoes
in the vegetable bin of the fridge for many years.  They 
last a lot longer than if left out and they don't do any
of the things listed above.  They taste exactly like the
ones I eat the day I bring them home from the store.

> I have also read that some people, including Julia Child, quarter peeled
> potatoes before boiling in the preparation of mashed potatoes.  I disagree
> with the latter but I guess that's what makes cooking and storing
> interesting ;-).

Well, I don't see what's to "disagree" with.  It's only a 
matter of how fast they cook.  If you want to cook
them whole and wait longer that's fine but I always cut mine
up in quarters or eighths because they cook faster, that's all.   

============================

From: mtzeng[at]ucs.indiana.edu (Mimi W. Tzeng)
Date: 10 Mar 1997 22:59:36 GMT
--------
kate wrote:

: I have read that storing the potato in the fridge is a big "No No".  The
: starches from the potato convert to sugar below 45 degrees and the potatoes
: blacken quickly.  Potatoes in my experience can last several weeks if
: stored in a dark, cool (NOT cold) place.  

You know, I've read that same thing too - but so far I haven't had a problem
with them being in the fridge (at least not with them turning black or 
tasting like sugar). And they definitely have lasted a lot longer than if
I put them anywhere else in the apartment - there aren't any cool places 
in my apartment. ;) 

Besides, it doesn't make much sense - surely potatoes left to go 
through the rest of their life cycles spend plenty of time in the ground
frozen, below 45 degrees, etc., without turning black. But I wanted to hear
what others have to say about storing whole potatoes in the freezer 
before trying it myself.

: Potatoes should also, in my
: experience and based upon what I read, NOT be stored in close proximity to
: onions.  The two interact with each other and make bad things happen ;-). 

I've heard that one too, but I buy my onions prechopped and frozen so I
don't have that problem. ;)

============================

From: Edwin Pawlowski 
Date: 11 Mar 1997 03:36:04 GMT
--------
kate wrote...
> I have also read that some people, including Julia Child, quarter peeled
> potatoes before boiling in the preparation of mashed potatoes.  I disagree
> with the latter but I guess that's what makes cooking and storing
> interesting ;-).

I thought the whole world did them that way.  What do you do?

Making potato salad, we boil them with skins on and peel after cooled to
room temperature.  Don't want to do that with mashed. 

============================

From: weeden[at]leland.Stanford.EDU (Kimberly Ann Weeden)
Date: 10 Mar 1997 16:56:48 -0800
--------
Mimi W. Tzeng wrote:

>If the potato looks like it is wrinkling up from shrinking (especially 
>around wounds), and the wrinkly areas are squishy, and the insides start 
>feeling more springy instead of firm, but the inside is still a nice 
>uniform creamy-white color - is there anything wrong with eating it? 

Nope.  (But I would use them for mashed potatoes rather than a
dish in which the texture matters.)  Just wash them well, peel,
and prepare as normal.

>What does a rotting potato LOOK like? 

Signs of rot include: leaking clear-ish or opaque white liquid; 
white fuzz on the outside of the potato; and/or a black spot 
in the center. 

>How far can a potato sprout before it is no longer safe to eat?

If you have to water it every day to keep the leaves from wilting...
Seriously, though, I've never heard that there is a sprout 
point-of-no-return.  In my family home, potatoes that made it 
through the winter (which, in Alaska, was from August to May) 
became the next year's crop.  The maximum sprouting time was 
thus 8 months. 

Now that I live on my own, I try to avoid having 500 pounds 
of potatoes around at once....

============================

From: pattee[at]CUBoulder.Colorado.EDU (Donna Pattee)
Date: 13 Mar 1997 09:56:25 -0700
--------
>What does a rotting potato LOOK like? 

When potatoes start to rot, you'll know immediately from the smell. No way
will you find it pleasant - real distinctive.

============================

From: aasimon 
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 1997 16:38:04 -0600
--------
Chris Braun wrote:
> Any ideas for what to do with leftover mashed potatoes?

1.
Divide it up into balls of about 2 tbs each and freeze
in foil. Toss these into soups as thickener. Works even
better if you whip  a little butter into the taters before
you freeze them, and the extra oil makes peeling the foil
of even easier.

2.
Use them as faux potatoes duchesse. Thin a bit with a little
milk, put into cake decorating bag with ornate tip, pipe 
around pork roast, meat loaf, etc. Brush top gently or spray
with a little oil. Brown slightly under broiler. Serve.

============================

From: andspud[at]primenet.com (The Weekly Spud)
Date: 17 Mar 1997 18:59:02 -0700
--------
Hope you don't think this is an ad...it's not!
I love taters too and have created a web page that I update weekly
with potatoe recipes. There's also access to all the old recipes too.
This is my own personnal page..no ads..no money..just SPUDS!
Here's the address (URL):

http://www.primenet.com/~andspud/recipe.htm

Here's this week's:

Irish Mashed Potatoes (Colcannon)

2 cups - Green cabbage, shredded
2 cups - Mashed potatoes
1/4 cup - Green onions, sliced
1/8 tsp - Pepper
Butter or margarine
Parsley

Heat 1/2-inch water to boiling.
Stir in cabbage, cover and heat to boiling.
Cook 5 minutes, drain.
Prepare mashed potatoes, fold in cabbage, onions and pepper.
Dot with butter, sprinkle with parsley.
Serves 4.

============================

From: JohnS 
Date: Fri, 21 Mar 1997 17:42:02 -0800
--------
Chris Braun wrote:
> Any ideas for what to do with leftover mashed potatoes?  

Simple to fry them up as you would hash browns for breakfast.

Also, make gnocchi.

============================

From: kris[at]doit.pgh.net (Kris Dow)
Date: 19 Mar 1997 23:31:55 -0500
--------
Chris Braun wrote:
>Any ideas for what to do with leftover mashed potatoes?

	You could try making Lefse, which is a sort of Scandanavian
potato tortilla-looking type of thing. (I have a couple recipies around
someplace, if you're interested.) Eaten warm with butter and sugar and
cinnamon, they're quite nice. It's a bit of a different flavour. :)

============================

From: rain[at]hothouse.iglou.com (Rain)
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 1997 18:23:16 GMT
--------
> Any ideas for what to do with leftover mashed potatoes?

Or heat them up mixed together with leftover cabbage or kale and some
chopped onion and grated cheese for a great one-dish meal similar to
colcannon.

Or spread 'em on top of leftover stew or mixed veggies in sauce and
bake for a quick shepherd's-pie sorta thing.

Or stretch meatloaf, burgers or stuffed-pepper filling with them.
For that matter, mix 'em with chopped canned tomato, minced onion,
grated or cottage cheese, garlic and herbs and make great meatless
stuffed peppers with them.  You can do this to supplement the cheese
in _chiles rellenos_, too, if you want a lower-fat dish.

Or add stock, milk and seasonings for quick potato soup.

Or use them in baking; several people have given recipes here for
potato doughnuts or bread.

============================

From: mjfriedm[at]e4e.oac.uci.edu (Marni J Friedman)
Date: 25 Mar 1997 05:57:39 GMT
--------
Mashed potatoes freeze well in tupperware-type containers.  It is a 
wonderful feeling to come home hungry and find a forgotten stash of mash 
lurking in the freezer.

By the way, it is nice to be back in circulation.  After nine months in 
my residency, I've managed to figure out the basics of this complicated 
newsreader.  I'm working on getting my home computer on line.
Although healing the sick, etc., is time-consuming, I have been cooking 
like a fiend.  Having won a breadmaker, I've now plowed through 2 jars of 
yeast and 20 or 30 pounds of flour.

============================

From: Heather Davis 
Date: Sun, 30 Mar 1997 23:40:25 -0330
--------
I have a potato question...what are the grey spots on the potatoes after
you've boiled them?  They look just fine to me when they go into the
boiling water but when they've been coming out they've got grey patches on
them....do I want to know this is??

============================

From: lea[at]sirius.com (Lea)
Date: Tue, 01 Apr 1997 18:46:24 GMT
--------
You got me!!!  Ive never heard of this.  Are you adding anything to
the water?  Do you have well water?

The only thing I can think of is that there is some chemical reaction
going on because Ive never noticed this and I cook a lot of potatoes.
I don't put salt in the water, maybe thats it.

stumped on this---

============================

From: mtzeng[at]ucs.indiana.edu (Mimi W. Tzeng)
Date: 2 Apr 1997 03:16:15 GMT
--------
Lea wrote:
: The only thing I can think of is that there is some chemical reaction
: going on because Ive never noticed this and I cook a lot of potatoes.
: I don't put salt in the water, maybe thats it.

I do use salt with mine, and I've never noticed gray spots on my potatoes
either. (Well, unless they were there before I started cooking them...).

============================

From: Heather Davis 
Date: Wed, 2 Apr 1997 22:54:11 -0330
--------
Lea wrote:
> You got me!!!  Ive never heard of this.  Are you adding anything to
> the water?  Do you have well water?

Nope, I just add salt to the water and that's it.... gee looks bad that I can't even boil up some potatoes without them
looking funny...

============================

From: Deborah Zemek 
Date: Thu, 03 Apr 1997 10:52:32 -0700
--------
Heather Davis wrote:
> Nope, I just add salt to the water and that's it.... shame> gee looks bad that I can't even boil up some potatoes without them
> looking funny...

Sometimes...when I boil my potatoes with the cover on...there's this
grayish foam that boils up...I presume from the potato starch, but
I could be wrong...it sticks to the potatoes sometimes - maybe that's
it?    Are you starting the potatoes out in cold water?  Or do you
add the potatoes after the water boils?

Now, I have also noticed that sometimes potatoes develop grayish 
spots when I boil them and then put them in the fridge to cool
for potato salad...I don't think it's harmful or anything...it's
just something potatoes do...it would be interesting to know why...

debz

============================

From: aasimon 
Date: Thu, 03 Apr 1997 15:54:17 -0600
--------
Deborah Zemek wrote:

> Sometimes...when I boil my potatoes with the cover on...there's this
> grayish foam that boils up...I presume from the potato starch, but
> I could be wrong...it sticks to the potatoes sometimes -

Not from the potato starch, that''s pure white. Although the grey scum
would correlate with the loss of starch into the water, which *does* foam,
just usually white. 

Try this. She's using iodized salt in the water, and something (excess
chlorine? I don't remember my chemistry here...) is displacing the iodide
to form a small amount of free iodine, which would react with the starch
dissolved in the water to form a grey foam. Possible test: Use water from
the hot water tap and let it cool before using it to cook the potatoes, or add
excess water and boil a few minutes (to allow the chlorine to evaporate),
*before* adding salt, then proceeding normally. Another: Boil potatoes in
distilled water from the market, remove them with a slotted spoon and than
adding a droplet of medicinal tincture of iodine, bringing back to a boil and
comparing the appearance of the foam to what she's been getting.

>  Now, I have also noticed that sometimes potatoes develop grayish
> spots when I boil them and then put them in the fridge to cool

Spots I think are a separate problem.

> for potato salad...I don't think it's harmful or anything...it's
> just something potatoes do...it would be interesting to know why...

More likely: Potatoes in her area are coming in bruised or with incipient
(I believe the disease is called) blackheart. Occasionally I get potatoes
that look fine on the outside, but when they're peeled there are pale
grey areas or area of frank black spoilage.

============================

From: Bobbie Best 
Date: Sat, 05 Apr 1997 17:06:20 -0500
--------
aasimon wrote:
> Possible test: Use water from
> the hot water tap and let it cool before using it to cook the potatoes, or add
> excess water and boil a few minutes (to allow the chlorine to evaporate),
> *before* adding salt, then proceeding normally. 

I thought it was a bad idea to ingest water from the hot water tap.
Dan#1 would always yell at us not to use the hot water tap for our
coffee cause there were nasties (I can't remember but I think they
were some kinds of trace metals and such).  Just curious.

> grey areas or area of frank black spoilage.

You mean the spoilage is honest and sincere? ;)

============================

From: sue[at]interport.net (Curly Sue)
Date: Sat, 05 Apr 1997 06:15:39 GMT
--------
Bobbie Best wrote:
>I thought it was a bad idea to ingest water from the hot water tap.
>Dan#1 would always yell at us not to use the hot water tap for our
>coffee cause there were nasties (I can't remember but I think they
>were some kinds of trace metals and such).  Just curious.

Consider this--- in most  houses (in the US anyway) hot water is
heated and is held in a tank, which never, ever gets cleaned!  Stuff
accumulates.  And heated water, sitting there, waiting to be used, can
pick up that stuff.  Yech.

Even for cold water, it's recommended that the water be run until it's
cold to flush out things like lead (Pb) before using it to drink.

============================

From: Heather Davis 
Date: Fri, 4 Apr 1997 11:38:01 -0330
--------
Deborah Zemek wrote:
> it?    Are you starting the potatoes out in cold water?  Or do you
> add the potatoes after the water boils?

I add the spuds to boiling water...I haven't really noticed any chlorine
odour (I also use filtered water).

I also peeled and cut them up into quarters so I didn't observe any
initial grey spots either...hmmm..

============================

From: Mary Elizabeth <"beth(at)orph(dot)org"[at]remove.this>
Date: Sun, 06 Apr 1997 11:17:00 -0400
--------
Heather Davis wrote:
> I have a potato question...what are the grey spots on the potatoes after
> you've boiled them?  They look just fine to me when they go into the
> boiling water but when they've been coming out they've got grey patches on
> them....do I want to know this is??

Goodness, this gave me a flashback!  I hardly ever boil potatoes any
more, and when I do it's usually small new potatoes, not the big "potato
salad for the whole crowd" sort (you know, big ones peeled and cut up),
but now you mention it, I do remember this happening...my impression is
that I observed this mainly in my grandmothers' kitchens, and both lived
in areas of extremely hard water, strongly flavored but widely differing
in taste.  Perhaps this had some effect?

============================

From: Beth R. Jarvis 
Date: Sun, 6 Apr 97 00:36:15 CDT
--------
Bobbie Best wrote:
>I thought it was a bad idea to ingest water from the hot water tap.
>Dan#1 would always yell at us not to use the hot water tap for our
>coffee cause there were nasties (I can't remember but I think they
>were some kinds of trace metals and such).  Just curious.

Hi Bobbie and all,
  I know this has been addressed before, but, hot water should NOT be 
used in cooking where there is a possibility that lead from lead pipes 
or lead solder is present in the water.  Lead solder was used well 
into the 1970's.  It is carried more easily in hot water than cold.  
For cooking, always use cold water.  If the tap has not been used for 
6 hrs or so, let it run until the water is cold.
  I always cook spuds in water taken from the cold tap.  Yes there's 
chlorine and fluoride in the water but that does not affect the 
potatoes.

Beth Jarvis Hart

============================

From: robert.goodman[at]accbbs.com (Robert Goodman) 
Date: 7 Apr 97 17:16:00 GMT
--------
> I know this has been addressed before, but, hot water should NOT be
> used in cooking where there is a possibility that lead from lead
> pipes or lead solder is present in the water.  Lead solder was used
> well into the 1970's.  It is carried more easily in hot water than
> cold.

I used to follow this rule.  Then a few months ago in a news group I
read someone's results from actually testing.  The cold water had MORE
Pb than the hot!  Okay, only one observation, but sure makes you wonder.
He pointed out that cold water holds more CO2, hence has a lower pH,
hence might dissolve lead faster for that reason.  This should be
studied more thoroughly.

Also, lead toxicity has been overblown.  Sure, it's poisonous, but how
much?  Pb is now suspected to be an essential nutrient, too.  So avoid
high lead concentrations, but don't be a nut about it.

Robert Goodman
Ph.D. biochemist


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