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Subject: Best potatoes for roasting and a recipe?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: rfdjr1[at]optonline.net
Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 20:49:14 -0500
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Can anyone tell me the right potato for roasting, and your favorite
recipe if you'd wish to share it? I'll be serving them with a rib
roast, but the roast will be cooked on a rotisserie, so I'll be
without drippings. In the past, I've cut up the potatoes, tossed them
in oil, seasoned them and put them in a hot oven. Works, but I'm open
to suggestions. Also never sure which is the right spud. Thanks.

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From: Lynn from Fargo 
Date: 20 Dec 2004 18:11:24 -0800
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Yukon Gold are really good; not as "waxy" as round reds or as flaky as
russets or Idaho bakers. The best for roasting, IMHO however, are new
small thin skinned red ones. Don't peel all the way - just a strip from
around the middle or halve them. Toss in melted butter or olive oil and
roast in a hot oven.

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From: Brick 
Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 01:17:08 GMT
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Lynn from Fargo wrote:
> Yukon Gold are really good; not as "waxy" as round reds or as flaky as
> russets or Idaho bakers. The best for roasting, IMHO however, are new
> small thin skinned red ones. Don't peel all the way - just a strip from
> around the middle or halve them. Toss in melted butter or olive oil and
> roast in a hot oven.

Lynn's recipe makes a great potato dish, but I wouldn't serve it with
rib roast. I picture a small steak along with a vegetable medley for
the oven fried potatoes. BTW, I do that quite a lot. Oven fried is good,
easy, and it doesn't cut into my drinking or TV much. Like Lynn said,
Yukon Gold, small red, and 'new potatoes' are excellent candidates for
oven fried. Cut them into medium sized chucks, not too small and toss
them with melted butter mixed with some oil. I use real butter and EVOO.
Don't forget the S&P.

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From: Scotty 
Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 02:56:36 GMT
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rfdjr1@optonline wrote:
> Can anyone tell me the right potato for roasting, and your favorite
> recipe if you'd wish to share it? I'll be serving them with a rib
> roast, but the roast will be cooked on a rotisserie, so I'll be
> without drippings. In the past, I've cut up the potatoes, tossed them
> in oil, seasoned them and put them in a hot oven. Works, but I'm open
> to suggestions. Also never sure which is the right spud. Thanks.

I prefer russets for roasting, though Yukon Golds are good, too, (a little 
sweeter). I usually just coat them in a light film of extra virgin olive 
oil, and season with salt, pepper, garlic powder, flat-leaf parsley, and 
sometimes thyme. Roast @ 450 for about 20 - 30 minutes.

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From: Dave Smith 
Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2004 22:20:47 -0500
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Scotty wrote:
> I prefer russets for roasting, though Yukon Golds are good, too, (a little
> sweeter). I usually just coat them in a light film of extra virgin olive
> oil, and season with salt, pepper, garlic powder, flat-leaf parsley, and
> sometimes thyme. Roast @ 450 for about 20 - 30 minutes.

I do a similar thing, but usually chop the potatoes into half or quarter,
smear with olive oil, salt pepper, and crush a little dried rosemary over
them.

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From: George 
Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 08:25:21 -0500
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rfdjr1@optonline wrote:
> Can anyone tell me the right potato for roasting, and your favorite
> recipe if you'd wish to share it? I'll be serving them with a rib
> roast, but the roast will be cooked on a rotisserie, so I'll be
> without drippings. In the past, I've cut up the potatoes, tossed them
> in oil, seasoned them and put them in a hot oven. Works, but I'm open
> to suggestions. Also never sure which is the right spud. Thanks.

Yukon gold. We just wash them and put them on the oven rack.

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 21 Dec 2004 15:20:17 GMT
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rfdjr1@optonline wrote:
> Can anyone tell me the right potato for roasting, and your favorite
> recipe if you'd wish to share it? I'll be serving them with a rib
> roast, but the roast will be cooked on a rotisserie, so I'll be
> without drippings. In the past, I've cut up the potatoes, tossed them
> in oil, seasoned them and put them in a hot oven. Works, but I'm open
> to suggestions. Also never sure which is the right spud.

Any potato is good for roasting.  I tend to prefer small new potatoes,
fingerlings are good... tossed with oil and s n' p... pared or not.  I also
like large russets chunked with a ripple knife... again tossed with oil and s
n' p... pared or not.   The real secret to potatoes, regardless how prepared,
is that they are *fresh*, storage potatoes as are typical at stupidmarkest,
well, suck.  Unless you've eaten freshly dug spuds 
you've never tasted a potato.

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From: Dennis Ruddell 
Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 01:18:05 -0000
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Sheldon wrote:
> Any potato is good for roasting.  I tend to prefer small new potatoes,
> fingerlings are good... tossed with oil and s n' p... pared or not.  I 
> also like large russets chunked with a ripple knife... again tossed 
> with oil and s n' p... pared or not.   The real secret to potatoes, 
> regardless how prepared, is that they are *fresh*, storage potatoes as 
> are typical at stupidmarkest, well, suck.  Unless you've eaten freshly 
> dug spuds  you've never tasted a potato.

We have a vegetable garden and potatoes are a big part of it so I know 
what you're saying.  But it's supposed to be -27 tonight and the garden 
is a bit off this time of year ;-)

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 22 Dec 2004 03:40:51 GMT
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Ruddell wrote:
>We have a vegetable garden and potatoes are a big part of it so I know 
>what you're saying.  But it's supposed to be -27 tonight and the garden 
>is a bit off this time of year ;-)

Well, then hopefully you've put up enough potatoes for vodka.  Wow, -27, and I
thought it got cold here... but wait, it hit -20 F here in upstate NY last
winter and it's only the beginning.  We're having a heat wave right now, it's
only a balmy 8 F. My veggie garden is deep asleep now too, won't be waking up
until around May.

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From: Chuck 
Date: Wed, 29 Dec 2004 00:14:43 +0000 (UTC)
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Sheldon wrote:
> Any potato is good for roasting.  snip [.....

You might try Pentland Dell, Golden Wonder, King Edward, Desiree, Romano or
Maris Piper.

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From: "Bob (this one)" 
Date: Tue, 21 Dec 2004 11:53:01 -0500
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George wrote:
> Yukon gold. We just wash them and put them on the oven rack.

Classic baked potato recipe.

To get an interesting roasted potato dish, I usually use a few kinds 
of spuds (Yukon, redskins, russets, etc.), cut into similar-sized 
pieces. Toss with a seasoned oil (olive infused with garlic, rosemary, 
basil, oregano, sage) and fresh herbs chiffonade. The herbs will vary 
from time to time, depending on what's growing outside or sitting in 
the fridge. In a pinch, dried herbs with a Mediterranean spirit. In a 
bowl large enough to hold everything, oil and seasonings stirred 
together. Cut (I don't peel) the spuds, drop them into the bowl and 
toss. Dump out onto a baking sheet, spread to as close to a single 
layer as possible and cook. These things are very forgiving and will 
be fine across a large variability of time and temperature. An hour at 
375? Sure. Two hours at 250? Sure.

I like to put the baking sheet under a roast on a rack. The meat 
juices permeate the spuds in more delightful fashion. In the case of a 
rotisserie roast, it will still provide some drippings if you start it 
low (250 or so) to a center temp of about 120 and then crank it hot 
for 20 - 30 minutes to crust the outside. The cheat way is to tie some 
suet to the outside of the roast. It helps protect it from the heat 
and, well, drips. I've also tossed a splash of stock in there so it'll 
flavor the potatoes and evaporate by the time the cook is over.

Good with onion, peppers, hunks of different squashes, green beans, 
carrots, etc. in there, too.

Pastorio

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From: Brick 
Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 01:04:35 GMT
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rfdjr1@optonline wrote:
> Can anyone tell me the right potato for roasting, and your favorite
> recipe if you'd wish to share it? I'll be serving them with a rib
> roast, but the roast will be cooked on a rotisserie, so I'll be
> without drippings. In the past, I've cut up the potatoes, tossed them
> in oil, seasoned them and put them in a hot oven. Works, but I'm open
> to suggestions. Also never sure which is the right spud. Thanks.

Rib roast screams for baked potatoe with an obscene amount of
butter, sour cream and chives. The common Idaho is the way to
go and size them at about three to a pound. Most people aren't
going to eat that much, but it looks killer on the plate and costs
practically nothing compared to rib roast. Make sure you have
a nice crisp salad to round it out. Everything else you serve will
be icing on the cake so to speak.

The best baked potatoes are cooked directly buried in hot coals,
but that takes some fairly critical timing and some will be put off
by the black crust. Wrapping them in tin foil will steam them and
wrapping and nuking does about the same thing. A real gourmet
is going to take the hour to do them in a proper oven and hang
the wait time. No I don't do that. I wrap them in dish towells and
nuke them. Close to the real thing, maybe, but no cigar. They're
right up there with almost, but not quite crisp lettuce.

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From: Fudge 
Date: Wed, 22 Dec 2004 17:11:29 -0500
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   This year, I grew a Russet type potato called Gold Rush. The nearest
supermarket equivalent would probably be an Idaho type. I grew these
potatoes organically in soil that had fall rye green manure turned in and
partially rotted. Some of these potatoes were huge. They were harvested in
September and placed in a root cellar where the moisture content was reduced
slightly. I wrap a few of the larger potatoes in tin foil with about 1 oz of
salty pork and baked them for about 1 hour. If you do not have salt pork,
butter would do. Served with a minced shallot, butter and sour cream they
were fantastic. I would highly recommend the Russet type potato.

Farmer John


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