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Subject: Potato salad
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Robin <robin.jonesNOroSPAM[at]us.abb.com.invalid>
Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2000 13:28:35 -0700
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Summer is barbecue weather, and my family loves potato salad.  I
wish I could get potato salad like my mother’s at the deli, but
alas, nobody makes it “like Mom”.  (I’m the Mom now.)

Here’s my recipe:

Mom’s Potato Salad

8 medium potatoes (I like red ones)
2 hard boiled eggs, diced
1-2 stalks of celery, finely chopped
½ onion, finely chopped
¼ green pepper, finely chopped
1 small jar diced pimento
1 tablespoon sweet pickle relish
½ teaspoon celery seed
½ teaspoon dried parsley
Salt
Pepper
1 tablespoon yellow mustard
3-4 tablespoons Miracle Whip salad dressing
Dash salad vinegar (optional)
1 teaspoon sugar (optional)

Boil the potatoes (whole, unpeeled) until just done, about 15-20
minutes.  Dump them in a colander and cool.  Peel and large dice
and put in a large bowl.  Add eggs, celery, onion, green pepper,
pimento (with juice), and relish.  Add seasonings to taste.  Add
mustard, then “some” Miracle Whip.  I start with 3-4
tablespoons, then mix it up. If too dry, add a little more.  Now
taste.  If too sweet, add a dash of vinegar.  If too tart, add a
little sugar. Makes about 6-8 servings.

Robin from Houston -

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From: zxcvbob <bob[at]area51online.net>
Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2000 22:44:05 -0500
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> Boil the potatoes (whole, unpeeled) until just done, about 15-20
> minutes.  Dump them in a colander and cool.  Peel and large dice
> and put in a large bowl...

What do you do with the boiled potato peels?

A couple of weeks ago, I made a batch of potato salad just about like
yours.  When I was cleaning up, I almost threw away the peelings.  I
caught myself just in time (what was I thinking???)

I sauted some onion and diced red bell pepper and sliced fresh jalapeno
pepper in butter in a small non-stick pan.  Added the boiled potato
peels, and a couple of beaten eggs, salt, black pepper.  Topped with
some cheese, and cooked covered over very low heat until the eggs were
fully set.  Yum.

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From: sue at interport net (Curly Sue)
Date: Sat, 22 Jul 2000 04:20:28 GMT
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zxcvbob <bob@area51online.net> wrote:
>I sauted some onion and diced red bell pepper and sliced fresh jalapeno
>pepper in butter in a small non-stick pan.  Added the boiled potato
>peels, and a couple of beaten eggs, salt, black pepper.  Topped with
>some cheese, and cooked covered over very low heat until the eggs were
>fully set.  Yum.

Boiled potato peel fritatta- now that's thinking outside of the box!

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From: sue at interport net (Curly Sue)
Date: Sat, 22 Jul 2000 17:25:27 GMT
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Curly Sue wrote:
>Boiled potato peel fritatta- now that's thinking outside of the box!

Thinking about it, I think I'd sautee the peels first.

Anyway, it reminds me of a story about my grandfather.  My father said
his father would say "We were so poor, all we had to eat was potato
peels!"  To which my father asked "But what happened to the rest of
the potato?"  (I don't think he got a satisfactory answer ;>)

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From: zxcvbob <bob[at]area51online.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Jul 2000 23:53:03 -0500
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> Thinking about it, I think I'd sautee the peels first.
> 
> Anyway, it reminds me of a story about my grandfather.  My father said
> his father would say "We were so poor, all we had to eat was potato
> peels!"  To which my father asked "But what happened to the rest of
> the potato?"  (I don't think he got a satisfactory answer ;>)

Yeah, I wasn't very clear in my description.  I added the boiled potato
peels to the onions and peppers and cooked them a little before I added
the eggs.

I love your "what happened to the rest of the potato" story :-)

Bob

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From: malan6[at]uswest.net
Date: Sat, 22 Jul 2000 09:37:47 -0500
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zxcvbob <bob@area51online.net> gave this insight:

:> Boil the potatoes (whole, unpeeled) until just done, about 15-20
:> minutes.  Dump them in a colander and cool.  Peel and large dice
:> and put in a large bowl...
:
:What do you do with the boiled potato peels?

I just leave them on the potatoes. . . . . . .

:-)

Alan

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From: Robin <robin.jonesNOroSPAM[at]us.abb.com.invalid>
Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2000 10:12:08 -0700
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>What do you do with the boiled potato peels?

Sounds great!  I always threw them away, alas... I'll have to
try this.  BTW, my dog loves *fresh* *raw* potato peels.  What a
weirdo... but he's sweet!

Robin from Houston -

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From: kathysch[at]ptdprolog.net (Kathy)
Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2000 18:46:41 GMT
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Wow, I am *thrilled* to find not only a great-sounding potato salad
recipe, but something to do with the skins as well.  I've never yet
found a potato salad recipe that I'm completely satisfied with, but I
keep trying! :-)  Thanks for these!

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From: "rob" <buster[at]owc.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2000 02:03:00 GMT
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Related I hope. I like making potato salad, sometimes chunked, sometimes
sliced. What is the best way to get a potato to that step, where it is
cooked yet firm, where I can then cut it up? If I boil the whole potato it
usually overcooks and if I do chunks of it in boiling water, it falls apart
when I mix in seasoning. By the way, red or white potato? Thanks...

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From: zxcvbob <bob[at]area51online.net>
Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2000 21:18:52 -0500
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rob wrote:
> By the way, red or white potato? Thanks...

It doesn't really matter (imo) whether you use red or white potatoes,
just make sure they are "waxy" or "boiling" potatoes rather than baking
potatoes.  Just about anything except russets should be OK.  If you
don't know what I'm talking about, just use red potatoes.  I boil them
whole and unpeeled, but it really should be OK to cut them up.

Regards,
Bob

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From: sue at interport net (Curly Sue)
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2000 03:44:50 GMT
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Make sure the potatoes are cool before you mix up the salad.

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From: Elaine Parrish <esp[at]ebicom.net>
Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2000 22:51:04 -0500
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On Tue, 25 Jul 2000, rob wrote:

> Related I hope. I like making potato salad, sometimes chunked, sometimes
> sliced. What is the best way to get a potato to that step, where it is
> cooked yet firm, where I can then cut it up? If I boil the whole potato it
> usually overcooks and if I do chunks of it in boiling water, it falls apart
> when I mix in seasoning. By the way, red or white potato? Thanks...

Hi Rob,

I like red potatoes best for boiling; white for baking.

Over the years, I've made potato salad out of potatoes cooked a
variety of ways including boiled in the jacket (skin) and peeled and
cut-up and boiled -- I've even made potato salad out of leftover baked
potatoes and leftover mashed potatoes. Boiled in the jacket yields 
the best potato for me. 

The trick is not to overcook them no matter which method you choose.

Boiling in the jacket is not the reason yours are overcooked.
Keep a closer eye on yours and don't cook them so long. The same
is true for the ones you cook cut up. Try to choose whole potatoes
that are about the same size (when I didn't have this option, I'd
start the bigger ones and then add the smaller ones or start them
all at the same time and pull out the smaller ones sooner) so the
cooking time will be the same. I use a sharp edged knife to check
doneness. The potato should be just soft enough for the knife to
cut into it. It should be done, but firm.

Elaine


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From: "Peter G. Aitken" <peter[at]pgacon.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2000 20:27:23 GMT
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rob wrote:
> By the way, red or white potato? Thanks...

I forgot to mention - the color of the potato does not tell you whether it
is a baker or a boiler. It has to do with the starch content and maybe some
other factors. Needless to say any potato can be either baked or boiled but
certain types come out better when baked (e.g. russet) and other are better
when boiled (e.g. Yukon gold). One way to tell with generally reliable
results is that a spud with a dry rough skin is better for baking, and one
with a smooth waxy skin is better for boiling.

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From: "Peter G. Aitken" <peter[at]pgacon.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2000 20:51:28 GMT
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rob wrote:
> By the way, red or white potato? Thanks...

Use Yukon gold or the red skinned type. Make sure all the potatoes are about
the same size, but not too big. Oval ones about 2 by 1-1/2 inches are great.
Bring water to a boil, add potatoes, and reduce heat so they simmer very
slowly. After about 18 minutes test by poking a small sharp knife into one
of the spuds. When the outer part is soft but the core still has some
resistance, drain then and put on a cutting board to cool. As soon as they
can be handled, peel if desired then cut into the desired size chunks. Mix
immediately with the dressing and other ingredients. Here's what I like for
about 1 quart of potatoes:

1/2c mayo mixed with 2 tsp Dijon mustard, 1 tsp wine vinegar, salt and
pepper to taste.
1/2 c finely diced vidalia or Bermuda onion, or 1/4c drained capers.
2 chopped hard boiled eggs.

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From: rob <buster[at]owc.net>
Date: Wed, 26 Jul 2000 03:07:19 GMT
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Thanks to all for the quick and knowledgeable tips. rob


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