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Subject: Potato salad
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Karen O'Mara 
Date: Fri, 22 Jun 2001 22:49:35 -0700
--------
Our division at work had this summer bbq lunch and I signed
up to make a salad. OMG, I made a potato so huge, I got a
cramp in my wrist carrying it from the parking lot to the
bldg. I made enough for 50 people (at least) and I worried
all morning that my potato salad would be the huge albatross
that sat untouched and I'd have to carry it home.. I made
way too much... used 17 eggs and a sack of potatoes. I mean,
really, I get carried away.

Well, it was at least 3x bigger than all of the other salads
(taco, pasta, pilaf, bean) but guess what? .. it was
completely gone at the halfway mark of the lunch, and
everyone asked for my recipe. (The other salads, though
smaller, still remained half full..)

My potato salad was a real hit.

I used one hard boiled egg per each potato.. so it's really
egg-y. (like egg salad wth potato almost) I baked the
potatoes and removed the skins, diced them, drizzled on a
little oil and vinegar and let that "rest," while the
potatoes are still warm. chill for a few hours..

Add the diced eggs, mayo, dill pickle (used about 6), and
diced onion (used 3 small onions) salt, pep, paprika and
that is it. chill again real good.

============================

From: Michael 
Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 11:03:05 -0700
--------
What ...  no celery?  I'm curious as to the potatoes resting with the
vinegar and oil.  What exactly does this do for taste or is it to keep the
potato color from darkening?

============================

From: Ruddell 
Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 16:47:47 GMT
--------
Dog 3 wrote:
> What ...  no celery?

Yes, celery is a must and lately I've been on a black olive kick as
well.  I also like to chop some apple in as well.  Kernel corn is a nice
touch as well, adds some colour...

Dennis

============================

From: Rev Jim 
Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 14:54:50 -0700
--------
Ruddell wrote...
> Yes, celery is a must and lately I've been on a black olive kick as
> well.  I also like to chop some apple in as well.  Kernel corn is a nice
> touch as well, adds some colour...
> Dennis

Had not cosidered corn, will try.  Excellent idea.  Because it is easier to
comply than convince, at family reunions I use celery salt instead of
celery.  Unless I chop it to the point of mush.  Olives of both colors are
great in salads.

============================

From: Laura 
Date: Thu, 05 Jul 2001 16:42:12 GMT
--------
Just had to repost Karen's recipe with some notes of my own.  I think she
had posted later that she added one other ingredient but oh well - i lost
that part.

This by far made the best potato salad i've ever made - and i have a history
of screwing up potato salad for whatever reason.  Even with MY screwups
though this one came out great (though a little alchoholic more on that
below).

For potatoes I bought red potatoes.  Seems to be the ONE potato *I* can
judge doneness correctly on when boiling.

Went to do the 'marrinade potatoes' step and realized - duh - that was not
white wine vinegar i bought it was (yuck) white cooking wine!  Hmm...Potato
salad you can get drunk from!  Ended up mixing up potatoes with cooking
wine, vinegar. and canola oil - I wanted to do olive oil but was all out.

When cooled I chopped up the eggs - not quite Karen's ratio but about 8 eggs
to 12 or so potatoes.  Chopped up dill pickle chips - probably about
1/2 -3/4 cup chopped.  (flame away) I hate Mayo so i used miracle whip lite.

Any way, even with all my wierd mutations this was a great potato salad.
Advice - leave it *pleanty* of cooling time.  After everything is mixed
together it needs a good 4 hours of sitting time in the fridge, overnite
even better!  Also - you really don't need any additional salt.  Between the
pickles and the salad dressing it was salted just right.  That was something
I wondered about at least.

============================

From: monalassy[at]aol.com (Mona Lassy)
Date: 06 Jul 2001 03:53:24 GMT
--------
Laura writes:
>This by far made the best potato salad i've ever made - and i have a history
>of screwing up potato salad for whatever reason.  Even with MY screwups
>though this one came out great (though a little alchoholic more on that
>below).

me too! I havent yet been able to do a potato salad right, and this one was
delicious. thanks for posting it. 

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Fri, 06 Jul 2001 04:00:36 GMT
--------
Here's my own recipe for potato salad, if anyone would care to try it.

                      * Exported from MasterCook *

                           Dilled Potato Salad

Recipe By     :  Damsel in dis Dress
Serving Size  : 0     Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    : side dishes

  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
  8             medium  russet potatoes -- diced
  4              large  eggs -- hard cooked
  1                cup  mayonnaise
  1         tablespoon  prepared mustard
  3         tablespoon  dill pickle juice -- *
     1/2           cup  dill pickles -- minced
     1/2      teaspoon  dill weed
     1/2      teaspoon  onion powder
  1                     salt and pepper -- to taste

* If red potatoes are used, reduce pickle juice to 2 tbsp.

1. Hard cook the eggs; chill, remove shells, and cut in half. Remove yolks
and dice the whites. Set aside
2. Cook potatoes in water until desired tenderness. Drain; rinse under
cold, running water to stop the cooking process.
3. While potatoes are cooking, combine mashed egg yolks with remaining
ingredients.
4. Combine chilled potatoes and the sauce mixture. Add egg whites.
5. Refrigerate for several hours or overnight, to allow flavors to blend.
6. Check for moisture. If too dry, add more pickle juice or milk until
desired consistency is achieved.
7. Sprinkle paprika on top just prior to serving, if desired.

VARIATIONS:
 - Use dill pickle relish instead of chopped pickles.
 - Use fresh minced onions in place of onion powder.
 - Add finely chopped celery for crunchiness.
 - Add a dash of tabasco sauce for a little extra zing.

Source:
  "Original"

============================

From: Karen O'Mara 
Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 09:58:59 -0700
--------
Dog 3 wrote:
> What ...  no celery?  I'm curious as to the potatoes resting with the
> vinegar and oil.  What exactly does this do for taste or is it to keep the
> potato color from darkening?

Recently, there was a thread on celery in ba.food and I was surprised how
many people detest celery in potato salad, so I left it out.

The olive oil and vinegar adds a little moisture and flavor to the potatoes.
That's it. Cuts down on the mayo later, for certain... it's not as
mayonnaise-y in the end.

============================

From: Mike D 
Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 17:57:48 GMT
--------
Karen O'Mara  wrote:
>Recently, there was a thread on celery in ba.food and I was surprised how
>many people detest celery in potato salad, so I left it out.

Maybe that is why your salad was so popular. You could be on to something.

============================

From: Peter Aitken 
Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 19:15:22 GMT
--------
I am particularly fond of French potato salad, which uses no mayo. You boil
the potatoes whole, then peel and slice them while still hot. Then you toss
them with a little white wine and let cool. Finally you dress them with a
vinagairette (I bet I misspelled that!) that includes some mustard. Very
light and tasty, a welcome change from the mayo-bomb style of potato salad
that is 50% mayo.

============================

From: Karen O'Mara 
Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 12:51:19 -0700
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
> I am particularly fond of French potato salad, which uses no mayo.

I think German-style potato salad is mayonnaise-less, too...?

============================

From: Michael 
Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 13:14:21 -0700
--------
> The olive oil and vinegar adds a little moisture and flavor to the potatoes.
> That's it. Cuts down on the mayo later, for certain... it's not as
> mayonnaise-y in the end.

Hmmm...  I'm going to have to try this.  I like the baked potato idea.  I
might just leave part of the skin on for kicks.

============================

From: Martha Hughes 
Date: Sun, 24 Jun 2001 05:48:16 GMT
--------
The best potato salad I have ever had was one I made from Cooking Light. It
involved roasted cubes of potato along with roasted smashed & diced garlic
cloves. Once done, you make a dressing out of yogurt, no mayo. I don't have
an exact recipe, but it's an awesome potato salad.

============================

From: Myra S 
Date: 24 Jun 2001 01:39:45 GMT
--------
Karen O'Mara wrote:
> The olive oil and vinegar adds a little moisture and flavor to the potatoes.
> That's it. Cuts down on the mayo later, for certain... it's not as
> mayonnaise-y in the end.

I like to use a mixture of half mayonnaise and half sour cream.

============================

From: Karen O'Mara 
Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 21:33:42 -0700
--------
Myra S wrote:
> I like to use a mixture of half mayonnaise and half sour cream.

OOoops, I forgot to say I added a drizzle of regular mustard in the salad, too...
I can't believe I forgot to mention the mustard. And, decorated the top with
slices of hard boiled egg and sprinkles of paprika and black pepper on top.

============================

From: Mike D 
Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 17:57:09 GMT
--------
Dog 3 wrote:
>I'm curious as to the potatoes resting with the
>vinegar and oil.  What exactly does this do for taste or is it to keep the
>potato color from darkening?

Potatoes absorb flavors from other ingredients best when the potatoes are
warm. When dressing potatoes do it when they are warm.

============================

From: Laura 
Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 14:04:32 -0400
--------
Karen O'Mara wrote:
> My potato salad was a real hit.

Well of course they loved it - You stuck to the ingredients folks are used
to (ie eggs, potatoes, creamy dressing) but added  a bit of a flavor twist
with the basically marinated step to the potatos. Oh and the baked potato
step.  Different but not 'weird', know what i mean? I'm saving your post to
try later in the summer - minus the onions I'm afraid as my SO strongly
dislikes onions.  You may just make it to my 4th of july table!

============================

From: w84mrcl[at]aol.com (W84mrcl)
Date: 23 Jun 2001 18:42:55 GMT
--------
I'm famous for my potato salad, if I do say so myself. (even if I did lift it
from my friends Mom years ago) The real trick to it is adding everything when
the potatoes are still warm to hot, adding lots of crumbled bacon, eggs,a
little green onion,some dry mustard, celery, LAWRY'S, and bacon grease. Of
course, mayo also, until desired consistency. Then sprinkle liberally with
paprika. It ends up almost like mashed potatoes with some bigger lumps, and the
bacon grease just makes it extra yummy. Sorry I don't have the exact recipe, I
am a fly by the seat of my pants kinda cook. This disapears first everywhere I
take it to. Try it, it's yummy.   Regards, Jaeden

============================

From: Ruddell 
Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 19:08:35 GMT
--------
W84mrcl wrote:
> I'm famous for my potato salad, if I do say so myself. (even if I did lift it
> from my friends Mom years ago) The real trick to it is adding everything when
> the potatoes are still warm to hot, adding lots of crumbled bacon, eggs,a
> little green onion,some dry mustard, celery, LAWRY'S, and bacon grease.

Crumbled bacon and bacon grease is something I've never considered...

> Of
> course, mayo also, until desired consistency. Then sprinkle liberally with
> paprika. 

Oh yes...lots of paprika, a potato salad must!

> It ends up almost like mashed potatoes with some bigger lumps, and the
> bacon grease just makes it extra yummy

Sounds great...doubt if I'll have time tonight, but maybe tomorrow I'll
give it a go.

> Sorry I don't have the exact recipe, I
> am a fly by the seat of my pants kinda cook.

For things like this that's how I do it too.  Often depends on my mood
and what's in the house...

> This disapears first everywhere I
> take it to. Try it, it's yummy.

A full report will be posted asap...

Dennis

============================

From: w84mrcl[at]aol.com (W84mrcl)
Date: 23 Jun 2001 19:20:04 GMT
--------
Dennis,
    If you need any pointers on the potato salad, just email. I'm bad at
recipes, but good at explaining, if you know what I mean. Let's see....for
about 5 big russets, use half a pound of bacon, crumbled, 5 eggs, teaspoon dry
mustard, 2 green onions and 2 stalks cerery, a couple big glops mayo and about
1/4 of the bacon grease, pouring off the rest until you only have the grease
with all the little burnt bits, then use that for your 1/4 grease. Yum. Not too
heart healthy, but what the hay.... Oh, yeah... Lawry's season salt is
essential. This is SO good, you're gonna love it!    I think I need to go to
the store!  LOL    J

============================

From: Karen O'Mara 
Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 21:30:03 -0700
--------
W84mrcl wrote:
>     If you need any pointers on the potato salad, just email. I'm bad at
> recipes, but good at explaining, if you know what I mean. Let's see....for
> about 5 big russets, use half a pound of bacon, crumbled, 5 eggs, teaspoon dry
> mustard, 2 green onions and 2 stalks cerery, a couple big glops mayo and about
> 1/4 of the bacon grease, pouring off the rest until you only have the grease
> with all the little burnt bits, then use that for your 1/4 grease. Yum. Not too
> heart healthy, but what the hay.... Oh, yeah... Lawry's season salt is
> essential. This is SO good, you're gonna love it!    I think I need to go to
> the store!  LOL    J

Is this served warm or cold? (This seems more like a side dish, or even a main
course.. not a salad.)

============================

From: w84mrcl[at]aol.com (W84mrcl)
Date: 24 Jun 2001 16:09:01 GMT
--------
It's served cold, but usually by the time it's cooled off my kids and their
friends have already eaten half of it. It's not meant to be served warm, but
it's really good to taste as you go along.  :-)  That's the only way I know if
it has enough bacon grease and Lawry's. It's so good, now I have to make some
with all this talking about it.   :-)   Happy Eating, Jaeden

============================

From: Mike D 
Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 20:22:54 GMT
--------
w84mrcl wrote:
>I'm famous for my potato salad, if I do say so myself. (even if I did lift it
>from my friends Mom years ago) The real trick to it is adding everything when
>the potatoes are still warm to hot, adding lots of crumbled bacon, eggs,a
>little green onion,some dry mustard, celery, LAWRY'S, and bacon grease. Of
>course, mayo also, until desired consistency. Then sprinkle liberally with
>paprika. It ends up almost like mashed potatoes with some bigger lumps, and the
>bacon grease just makes it extra yummy. Sorry I don't have the exact recipe, I
>am a fly by the seat of my pants kinda cook. This disapears first everywhere I
>take it to. Try it, it's yummy.   Regards, Jaeden

Please take 10-15 mins out of your day to write the recipe here as best
you can. It sounds good.

============================

From: Karen O'Mara 
Date: Sat, 23 Jun 2001 21:35:32 -0700
--------
Laura wrote:
> Well of course they loved it - You stuck to the ingredients folks are used
> to (ie eggs, potatoes, creamy dressing) but added  a bit of a flavor twist

Thanks... oh, btw, I forgot to mention the mustard. I also put in a little
French's mustard.. it gives a nice flavor and color.

============================

From: lee 
Date: 26 Apr 2002 13:05:26 GMT
--------
i have a bit of a craving for potato salad, but... the recipe in my 1943 
Better Homes & Gardens cookbook calls for 1/4 cup of sweet relish to 3 cups 
of potatoes. i know that's not going to be what i want (sounds like relish 
salad). anyone have a really good potato salad? cold, hot, German... i'll 
try almost anything that doesn't involve so much relish ;) TIA

============================

From: stan[at]temple.edu
Date: 26 Apr 2002 14:12:47 GMT
--------
enigma wrote:
>  i'll 
> try almost anything that doesn't involve so much relish

The potato salad my mom makes is always a hit when she serves it
at parties. For some reason, the only time my mom makes potato salad
is for a party, although making it is fairly easy. This is a fairly
basic recipe too, but its good. I am going by memory, but here it goes:

6 or so medium size waxy skin potatoes
4 celary ribs
1 small or medium red skinned onion
1 green bell pepper
1 or 2 carrots
1 or 2 pimentoes packed in oil
salt, pepper, celary seed, and dried dill weed
1 cup of mayo
1 tablespoon or two of lemon juice
3 tablespoons of plain white vinegar

Before you make the sauce for this salad, peel the potatoes and cut  
them up into whatever size chunks you want. Use those red pototoes 
with the waxy skins. Feel free to leave the skins on the potatoes 
if you prefer. Gently boil the spuds in a big pot of salted water until 
they are fork tender. Drain the potatoes and let them sit until all
the water has evaporated and the steam has stopped rising from them.
The pototoes should sit for at least ten minutes so they have time to 
cool off a bit.

While waiting for the potatoes to cool, dice four ribs of celary,
a small red onion, the carrots, a green pepper, and two pimmentos. 
Everything is optional though. If you prefer to omit or add any vegies, 
do it. Dice the vegies fairly fine, maybe about 1/4 inch dice. Some people
like to add in one or two chopped hard boiled eggs too.

Put the mayo in a mixing bowl, then add some white vinegar and lemon juice. 
Add in a bit of salt, and pepper, a pinch or two each of mild paprika, celary 
seed and dried dill. Stir thoroughly with a fork or whisk (not a spoon) and 
taste. Adjust the seasonings to suit your taste. Add more vinegar and/or
lemon juice if you want a thinner sauce. Feel free to substitute the 
plain white vinegar with some other type of vinegar such as cider vinegar,
but don't use any vinegar that would color the potatoes because that just
looks to weird. If you want to add in some pickle relish, feel free to do
so; its a pretty popular addition to this type of potato salad.

Put the potatoes in a serving bowl, mix with the diced vegies, and
stir in the mayo mixture. Sprinkle a bit of paprika on top just for the
color, and maybe decorate the top with some slided radishes and/or
carrots. Cover the bowl tightly and let the potato salad chill in the
'fridge for at least a couple of hours, if not overnight.

============================

From: lee 
Date: 29 Apr 2002 14:58:08 GMT
--------
stan@temple.edu wrote:
> The potato salad my mom makes is always a hit when she serves it
> at parties.

thanks Stan. this sounds a lot like my mom's potato salad. i think this 
is just what i wanted.

============================

From: moosemeat 
Date: Mon, 29 Apr 2002 16:13:12 GMT
--------
.Just don't put radishes in your salad!

============================

From: Alistair Gale 
Date: Tue, 30 Apr 2002 16:33:23 -0300
--------
moosemeat wrote:
>.Just don't put radishes in your salad!

Radishes are the new BEETS!  (Now that Herr. Sack is besporting
himself amorously I thought it would be safe to expand the pantheon of
hideous vegetables.)

============================

From: dancertm 
Date: Fri, 26 Apr 2002 08:09:08 -0700
--------
>i have a bit of a craving for potato salad,

Go to the rec.food.recipies archive, check out the Great American
Potato Salad. I think, on my own site, in the food section under
recipies, I've a zipped collection of German dishes, the HOT version
may be in there. 

http://exo.com/~dancertm/food/food.htm

"Happy Coooooking" Jaques Pepin

============================

From: Priscilla Ballou 
Date: Fri, 26 Apr 2002 16:23:46 GMT
--------
>i have a bit of a craving for potato salad,

I like a nice potato salad with eggs.  Easy peasy.  I boil potatoes (I 
like Yukon Golds) until they give to a fork, then chill them.  When 
they're cold I mince some onion fine and mix with the potatoes, which I've 
chopped into appropriately sized pieces.  (Note: I do not peel my potatoes 
for potatoe salad.)  Then I chunk up some hard cooked eggs and mix it all 
together with mayo and salt.  Now comes the hard part.  Let it sit 
overnight in the fridge for the flavors to meld!  The next day, dig in.

============================

From: sf[at]pipeline.com (sf)
Date: Sat, 27 Apr 2002 04:12:46 GMT
--------
Priscilla Ballou wrote:
> (I like Yukon Golds) 

Please forgive my ignorance.  I've NEVER seen a potato called Yukon
Gold in a grocery store.  

However, my DIL  talks about Yukon Gold, so
they are sold down there.  What do they look like?  Are they what we
ordinary people call "boiling potatoes" - thin skinmed, light brown
potatoes with a white interior that is between baking and waxy... the
kind that is often my only choice during the wintertime when what I
really want is russet?

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Sat, 27 Apr 2002 00:21:13 -0400
--------
sf wrote:

> Please forgive my ignorance.  I've NEVER seen a potato called Yukon
> Gold in a grocery store.

Oh, look more closely or ask the manager.  They are common.  I have
a bag of them in my kitchen.  Don't you live in san francisco?
They must have them there.  I live in the northeast and it's no
problem getting them.

> However, my DIL  talks about Yukon Gold, so
> they are sold down there.  What do they look like?  Are they what we
> ordinary people call "boiling potatoes" - thin skinmed, light brown
> potatoes with a white interior that is between baking and waxy... the
> kind that is often my only choice during the wintertime when what I
> really want is russet?

The flesh is yellow, hence the 'gold' ... they make really niced mashed
potatoes if that helps.  They are somewhat buttery.

============================

From: sf[at]pipeline.com (sf)
Date: Sat, 27 Apr 2002 20:04:17 GMT
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
>sf wrote:
>
>> Please forgive my ignorance.  I've NEVER seen a potato called Yukon
>> Gold in a grocery store.
>
>Oh, look more closely or ask the manager.  They are common.  I have
>a bag of them in my kitchen.  Don't you live in san francisco?
>They must have them there. 

I do - and you'd think they'd be all over the place, but they aren't.

> I live in the northeast and it's no
>problem getting them.

Are they in every market or do you make a special trip to get them?

>The flesh is yellow, hence the 'gold' ... they make really niced mashed
>potatoes if that helps.  They are somewhat buttery.

Thanks - I'll try to remember to ask about them the next time I go
grocery shopping.  You know the saying: "Out of sight, out of mind."

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Fri, 03 May 2002 11:53:26 -0400
--------
sf wrote:
> Nancy Young wrote:
> >a bag of them in my kitchen.  Don't you live in san francisco?
> >They must have them there.
> 
> I do - and you'd think they'd be all over the place, but they aren't.

That just surprises me ... if you lived in a one horse town, I could
see.  

> > I live in the northeast and it's no
> >problem getting them.
> 
> Are they in every market or do you make a special trip to get them?

Nope, every market.  Often on sale.

> >The flesh is yellow, hence the 'gold' ... they make really niced mashed
> >potatoes if that helps.  They are somewhat buttery.
> 
> Thanks - I'll try to remember to ask about them the next time I go
> grocery shopping.  You know the saying: "Out of sight, out of mind."

I hear ya.  If I don't keep a list, I forget half the stuff I wanted
once I walk through the supermarket door.  Sad, but true.

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Fri, 03 May 2002 16:13:42 GMT
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
>sf wrote:

>> >> Please forgive my ignorance.  I've NEVER seen a potato called Yukon
>> >> Gold in a grocery store.
>> >
>> >Oh, look more closely or ask the manager.  They are common.  I have
>> >a bag of them in my kitchen.  Don't you live in san francisco?
>> >They must have them there.
>> 
>> I do - and you'd think they'd be all over the place, but they aren't.

Hmm...

I live in the San Francisco bay area and I see them all over the place.  They
are in grocery stores, in farmers markets, in produce stores...you name it.  

============================

From: Pat Meadows 
Date: Fri, 03 May 2002 16:43:24 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
>I live in the San Francisco bay area and I see them all over the place.  They
>are in grocery stores, in farmers markets, in produce stores...you name it.  

We live in rural northern Pennsylvania - which is not
exactly the culinary capital of the world!  (This is an
understatement.)  

Anyway, even the supermarkets here carry Yukon Golds.  

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Fri, 26 Apr 2002 16:24:20 -0400
--------
enigma wrote:
>  i'll
> try almost anything that doesn't involve so much relish ;) TIA

I never measure when I make potato salad, I don't see any reason why
you have to add relish at all if you don't want to.  I happen to like
it, but that's me ... add less or none. 

============================

From: Susan 
Date: Sat, 27 Apr 2002 11:11:42 -0400
--------
Hi Enigma,

I like to think of my potato salad as one of my "specialties" (*grin*). It's
actually a simplified version of my dad's recipe. I usually make some sort
of pasta salad along with it or turkey sandwiches cut into triangles and
feast on that over the week end (great for breakfast). Here's what I do:

I peel, dice and cook 3-4 medium sized potatoes, drain them and let them
cool. While they're cooking, I dice about a half a cup of each of the
following fresh vegetables: green onions, green bell pepper, radishes and
celery. I mix the vegetables with the potatoes and mayo (Helleman's), add
salt and lots of freshly cracked pepper plus a little garlic powder. The
finishing touch is parsley (fresh or dried). Let that cool a couple of hours
in the fridge (go mix and taste a few times). It's as good as it looks
(looks VERY pretty and colourful).

Variations include popping an egg along with the potatoes for boiling and
cutting it up and mixing it with the rest, or adding leftover ham cut up in
small cubes, or diced cheddar cheese, or green olives thinly sliced or diced
pickles.

Hope this helps

============================

From: lee 
Date: 29 Apr 2002 15:02:04 GMT
--------
yes, thank you. i like the variations ideas quite a bit. this seems easy 
enough for the sprog to help with. he's 20 months but loves to help cook. 


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