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Subject: Potato for salad [and sub threads]
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Paul McQuown 
Date: Thu, 3 May 2001 17:02:24 -0500
--------
How do you folks cook your potatos when cooking them for salad? In the
jacket or peeled, and why.

============================

From: Archon 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 00:21:39 +0200
--------
I use peeled, boiled potatoes. I don't know why - I've always had them
this way, and everybody else makes it this way; also the factory made
potato salads. 

============================

From: Billy 
Date: Thu, 03 May 2001 19:50:30 -0400
--------
Archon wrote:
>I use peeled, boiled potatoes. I don't know why - I've always had them
>this way, and everybody else makes it this way; also the factory made
>potato salads. 

and I combine all ingredients while the potatoes are HOT...    Chill and enjoy!

============================

From: Archon 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 08:24:34 +0200
--------
Billy wrote:
> and I combine all ingredients while the potatoes are HOT...    Chill and enjoy!

Ok, I use the cold ones from the day before. Won't the hot potatoes do
terrible things to the sourcream-mayonnaisse mix???

============================

From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 06:57:36 GMT
--------
Archon wrote:
> Ok, I use the cold ones from the day before. Won't the hot potatoes do
> terrible things to the sourcream-mayonnaisse mix???

Yes, I think combining the hot potatoes with a mayonnaise mixture ruins the 
dressing.  OTOH, combining the hot potatoes with a mild vinaigrette and other 
seasonings imparts a wonderful flavor to the finished salad because it soaks 
into the potatoes.  Allow the potato mixture to cool completely before 
combining with any mayonnaise dressing.

============================

From: Archon 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 09:46:59 +0200
--------
Thierry Gerbault wrote:
> Yes, I think combining the hot potatoes with a mayonnaise mixture ruins the
> dressing.  OTOH, combining the hot potatoes with a mild vinaigrette and other
> seasonings imparts a wonderful flavor to the finished salad because it soaks

I think that we have differnt preferences what potato salad is. I'll
post mine...

============================

From: Martha Hughes 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 14:25:34 GMT
--------
Thierry Gerbault wrote:
>Allow the potato mixture to cool completely before 
>combining with any mayonnaise dressing.

German potato salad is warm.

I don't peel my potatoes, but Mom used to. I just like the extra roughage
from the skins.

============================

From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 16:44:00 GMT
--------
Martha,

Could you post your recipe for German potato salad?

Thanks...

============================

From: Martha Hughes 
Date: Sat, 05 May 2001 03:57:45 GMT
--------
> Could you post your recipe for German potato salad?

Yeah, let me dig it out.

============================

From: Archon 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 18:52:40 +0200
--------
I have a recipe for warm potato salad (Varmt kartoffelsalat), too. But
still it's the same cold peeled, boiled potatoes form the day before we
use. 

============================

From: sackv[at]uni-duesseldorf.de (Victor Sack)
Date: Sat, 5 May 2001 13:46:37 +0200
--------
Martha Hughes wrote:
> German potato salad is warm.

... or cold.

============================

From: Harry A. Demidavicius 
Date: Sun, 06 May 2001 05:21:20 GMT
--------
Victor Sack wrote:
>Martha Hughes wrote:
>> German potato salad is warm.
>... or cold.

Or in between ...

============================

From: bigdave[at]olywa.net (dave)
Date: Sun, 06 May 2001 07:44:38 GMT
--------
Looking for an old potato salad recipe posted here 5 years or so ago that I
lost. It was fairly lengthy and detailed, but it intrigued me as unusual and one
to try.
I think it was called something like Worlds Best Potato salad, and the thing I
remember most about it was the continuous addition of vinegar to the potatoes to
be soaked in.

Can anyone help me? Thanks in advance.

============================

From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Sun, 06 May 2001 07:51:41 GMT
--------
Dave wrote:
> I think it was called something like Worlds Best Potato salad, and the thing I
> remember most about it was the continuous addition of vinegar to the potatoes to
> be soaked in.

Hey, I remember that, and I probably copied it at the time.  I'll check my 
archives.

============================

From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Sun, 06 May 2001 07:56:13 GMT
--------
Dave, I think this is the one.  It was posted on rec.food.recipes in 1996...

From: kuenzli[at]polarnet.com (Bud Kuenzli)
Newsgroups: rec.food.recipes
Subject: The Best Potato Salad You'll Ever Try
Followup-To: rec.food.cooking
Date: 11 Sep 1996 21:26:11 -0600

This is not a light potato salad, but if you go to the trouble to make
it a day ahead, you'll be rewarded with a really excellent potato
salad.

Bud's Wisconsin Potato Salad
Uploaded by Bud Kuenzli 72411,3567

16 Med. - Small Potatoes
3/4 cup Mayonaise
(at least to start with...you=A6ll probably want more)
1 1/2 tsp Yellow Mustard
(the kind from the squeeze bottle; not dry mustard)
-- to 1 Tbs (as you prefer)
12 Eggs, hard boiled
1 cup apple cider vinegar, divided (this is minimum)
1-1/2 Tbs pickle relish
3/4 Tbs dry parsley flakes or twice that if fresh is available
1 big pinch Celery Salt
1/2 medium white onion, diced fairly small
  (you can use twice or three times this if you prefer)
4 celery stalks, split down middle of wider end, then chopped 
       about 1/4" or slightly smaller pieces (to your own 
     taste/texture. Again you can use more or less if you desire)

Gather ingredients. Boil potatoes whole. If your potato size varies much,
put in the larger ones first. A medium sized potato will take ABOUT 25
minutes total. A smaller one maybe 18 minutes. One of the keys here is to
boil the potatoes till cooked but still a little firm. If they are cooked
till soft, then the subsequent stirring will render the salad mushy. You
don't want them crunchy, but just cooked and still firm. That's the first
secret! Peel the potatoes when they are still warm. The warmer the better.
Peeling them AFTER they are cooked seems to make a difference in taste.
They MUST not cool entirely or the vinegar will not be absorbed properly.
I peel them almost straight out of the pot when still darn hot.  That's
the second secret! Cut them into irregular chunks, little wedges about an
inch or slightly less on a side with the greatest thickness about a half
inch. Just cut a little off one end, then cut another small chunk off,
then keep cutting pieces off in random sizes of varying shapes, mostly you
end up with very irregular pyramidal shapes....You want pieces big enough
to not turn into mush but small enough for ...your liking! The 'edges_
will eventually break off and mush up onto the salad while the larger
parts of the bodies will remain whole. You are cutting, peeling and
dropping them into a large bowl. There really should be two people doing
this or one should work as quickly as possible. After you have cut up a
potato or two, sprinkle them fairly generously vinegar and stir around a
bit in the bowl..just a bit so you get the vinegar that fell to the bottom
of the bowl on the potatoes. As you finish a potato or two, sprinkle each
(they should be warm to hot when you sprinkle, if possible...THAT's the
BIG secret to this recipe) fairly generously. I put my finger over the end
of the bottle of cider vinegar and drizzly drip it onto the potatoes
making sure each is sprinkled well. If you run out of the half cup, just
use more. Each potato gets a fairly generous sprinkling of vinegar. THAT
point is more important than the measurement of the 1/2 cup of vinegar
above. Note: I don't measure out a half cup and then pour it on them. That
would be awkward. I did measure this once so I could have a recipe for a
friend and I learned I sprinkled ABOUT a half a cup. Salt them at this
point; I don't know how much....Just salt them like you like. 

The vinegar needs a comment. The importance of a generous sprinkling of
vinegar while the potatoes are warm/hot can't be over emphasized. They
will soak up the vinegar. I am always amazed at how much vinegar it takes
and how when they are done, the vinegar is tasted, but the dish is not
'vinegary_ like a hot german potato salad which I hate....trust in a good
sprinkling of vinegar at this point and if in doubt, sprinkle a little
more! 

Stir in the other ingredients, leaving the eggs to last. Chop up the eggs,
slicing, cutting in whatever size/shape you wish but we are not talking
about whole or half eggs here. Cut them up. The yolks will fall apart when
sliced up and that's ok. Stir all the eggs into the rest of the mix. The
yolks will incorporate into the salad and you don't have to worry about
them; don't stir forever or worry about being gentle or anything. Just mix
it up. Add the other 1/2 cup of vinegar. If you are a real chicken, you
may wish to add only a 1/4 cup but it will probably take it all (and maybe
even a bit more eventually). Take a taste. Add some more salt if needed.
It will be good but not perfect at this point. Taste it again. Note the
vinegar flavor peeking through.It may even be fairly vinegery (that's a
word, right?) at this point, in fact it should be almost too strong with
vinegar. The vinegar flavor will diminish over the next night and you'll
have to add more later, so don't worry about adding too much. Add as much
as you think tastes good. Cover and put in a fridge over night. THAT's the
last big secret. Taste again after sitting in the fridge overnight. Notice
that the vinegar flavor is much softer. Add some more vinegar and let that
absorb for an hour or two. You may well have used much more than the 1 cup
total by this point. Salt to taste if needed. You can serve this without
the overnight setting but it will truly be a noticeably better salad the
next day. You will want to adjust the amount of mayo to suit your taste. I
like a pretty mayoee salad. Probably even a bit more than this calls for.
Some don't. You may want more or less celery. My wife doesn't like any
(egads!)

None of these amounts need be exact, but they are close enough for a good
starting point. The key is to use more vinegar than you could have
imagined, sprinkling well while the potatoes are hot and firm but not
crunchy. The rest is all 'to taste'. 

I've never served this to a group that didn't ohh and ahh over it. It is a
bit of an effort but if you take the time you will have some of the best
potato salad ever. 

============================

From: bigdave[at]olywa.net (dave)
Date: Sun, 06 May 2001 08:43:35 GMT
--------
Thanks alot Thierry,

Wow that was fast! That's definately the one. I thought I'd lost it forever.
Have you tried it by any chance? 

============================

From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Sun, 06 May 2001 08:55:39 GMT
--------
Dave wrote:
> Wow that was fast! That's definately the one. I thought I'd lost it forever.
> Have you tried it by any chance? 

Glad I could help, Dave...

Actually I have made a very similar potato salad, especially where it comes to 
the vinegar.  However, we don't especially like hardboiled eggs, so those were 
omitted.  I add green onions, radishes, bits of carrots, green pepper, bits 
of diced pickle instead of the relish, etc.

Adding vinegar (or even a vinaigrette dressing) to the hot potatoes really does 
improve the overall texture and taste of most potato salads.  Then, when cool, 
adding the mayonnaise, sour cream, etc.

In short, definitely do try this.  It's a great potato salad, with or without 
eggs!

============================

From: timvanhoof[at]gmx.net (Tim Vanhoof)
Date: Sat, 5 May 2001 16:19:29 +0100
--------
Martha Hughes wrote:
> German potato salad is warm.

Until it goes cold, then it's cold.

This is a southern style German PS. North German ones often have
mayonnaise, this one doesn't.

Potatoes
Stock (I use vegetable)
some pickled cornichon-type gherkins, chopped
finely chopped onion
oil and vinegar 

Cook the potatoes and peel them while still hot. Slice, not dice.
Combine with the onion and gherkins, pour on some stock, being fairly
generous as the potatoes will absorb quite a lot. The final texture
should be slightly mushy, "gluschtig", meaning it should make a sort of
slurping sound when you take a spoonful. About a tablespoon each of
tasteless oil and vinegar to give it some edge.

============================

From: ndooley[at]blue.weeg.uiowa.edu (Nancy Dooley)
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 16:48:09 GMT
--------
> OTOH, combining the hot potatoes with a mild vinaigrette and other 
>seasonings imparts a wonderful flavor to the finished salad because it soaks 
>into the potatoes. 

The best way for full flavor is to boil the potatoes (with or without
skins, cut up or whole) - then get the dice the size you want for the
salad - when hot, put in your seasonings only - the pickle relish,
salt, pepper, vinegar, sugar, celery seed, whatever - let cool just to
room temperature and add whatever dressing you're using.  The hot
potatoes absorb the full flavors of your seasonings; but the mix is
room temp when you put in the dressing - refrigerate immediately.

============================

From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 21:53:50 GMT
--------
Nancy Dooley wrote:
> The best way for full flavor is to boil the potatoes (with or without
> skins, cut up or whole) - then get the dice the size you want for the
> salad - when hot, put in your seasonings only - the pickle relish,
> salt, pepper, vinegar, sugar, celery seed, whatever - let cool just to
> room temperature and add whatever dressing you're using.  The hot
> potatoes absorb the full flavors of your seasonings; but the mix is
> room temp when you put in the dressing - refrigerate immediately.

Yep, that's what I said earlier.

============================

From: Valerie 
Date: Thu, 3 May 2001 17:32:51 -0500
--------
Paul McQuown wrote:
> How do you folks cook your potatos when cooking them for salad? In the
> jacket or peeled, and why.

I use unpeeled boiled red potatoes, only because I think it would "lock in"
more of the potato flavor and I think they would be less likely to fall
apart.

============================

From: Darkginger 
Date: Fri, 4 May 2001 07:48:17 +0100
--------
Valerie wrote:
> I use unpeeled boiled red potatoes, only because I think it would "lock in"
> more of the potato flavor and I think they would be less likely to fall
> apart.

I do the same, because I enjoy the extra crunch of the skins. On the other
hand, I also use small new white potatoes, when available. Preferably Jersey
(as in the Channel Island, not New Jersey) potatoes, but I doubt you get
them in the US, do you?

Jo

============================

From: Peter G. Aitken 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 00:13:40 GMT
--------
Paul McQuown wrote:
> How do you folks cook your potatos when cooking them for salad? In the
> jacket or peeled, and why.

Steam the spuds - results in more even texture.

============================

From: sue[at]addressin.sig (Curly Sue)
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 00:52:35 GMT
--------
Paul McQuown wrote:
> How do you folks cook your potatos when cooking them for salad? In the
> jacket or peeled, and why.

I peel them first, then boil them, because I hate peeling cooked
potatoes.

Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!

sue at interport dotnet

============================

From: Coloradostar[at]webtv.net (JEM)
Date: Thu, 3 May 2001 23:51:35 -0400 (EDT)
--------
Paul McQuown wrote:
> How do you folks cook your potatos when cooking them for salad? In the
> jacket or peeled, and why.

     I hate "wet" potatoes, so I micro them; this also keeps the
vitamins/minerals and, more importantly (IMO), *flavor* from being
leached out. Even better, it doesn't add the heat and humidity to the
house that boiling does -- that's a *big* plus in midsummer, IMO! Saves
me from choosing between having an indoor "swamp" or moving everything
out onto the porch and cooking them there. Keeps the a/c from working so
hard, too, if it's on. Considering the price of electricity, that's also
a big plus.
     I use the smallest red potatoes I can find, and leave the skins on
'em -- well-scrubbed, of course. I think the skins add to the potato
taste, and the color adds visual interest.

============================

From: Tony Pelliccio 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 22:34:30 GMT
--------
Coloradostar says...
>      I hate "wet" potatoes, so I micro them; this also keeps the
> vitamins/minerals and, more importantly (IMO), *flavor* from being
> leached out. Even better, it doesn't add the heat and humidity to the
> house that boiling does -- that's a *big* plus in midsummer, IMO! Saves
> me from choosing between having an indoor "swamp" or moving everything
> out onto the porch and cooking them there. Keeps the a/c from working so
> hard, too, if it's on. Considering the price of electricity, that's also
> a big plus.

White, red, russet, whatever. I've always had good luck starting the 
water to boil, chopping the potatoes into small chunks and then cooking 
them in the boiling water for 5-6 minutes. When done, they get drained 
then dumped into an ice bath. Let cold water run through for 5-10 
minutes and your potatoes are perfect. 

============================

From: Peter G. Aitken 
Date: Sat, 05 May 2001 00:25:42 GMT
--------
Tony Pelliccio wrote:
> White, red, russet, whatever. I've always had good luck starting the
> water to boil, chopping the potatoes into small chunks and then cooking
> them in the boiling water for 5-6 minutes. When done, they get drained
> then dumped into an ice bath. Let cold water run through for 5-10
> minutes and your potatoes are perfect.

In my exerience, cutting the potatoes into small pieces before cooking is a
guarantee of soggy tasteless potatoes. It is however easy and therefore
appeals to those who want to minimize their effort.

============================

From: Archon 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 08:22:35 +0200
--------
> I peel them first, then boil them, because I hate peeling cooked
> potatoes.

Exactly! And they taste like soil...

============================

From: Martha Hughes 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 14:25:35 GMT
--------
Archon  wrote:
> Exactly! And they taste like soil...

Not if you wash them well.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 04 May 2001 15:11:34 GMT
--------
Martha Hughes wrote:
>Not if you wash them well.

Washing of course goes without saying, but potatoes are supposed to taste
earthy... potato salad is supposed to taste of duh, potato.  And the best way
to maintain that earthy potato flavor is to boil em in their skins.  If new
potatoes are used, true new potatoes that is (not just small mature/old
potatoes), their skins will slip off easily after boiling... and so what if a
few bits of skin adhere, just indicates the potato salad is homemade rather
than that mass produced slime from the stupidmarket.  Those whose taste buds
aren't refined enough to appreciate the taste of potato perhaps should opt for
macaroni salad (totally tasteless except for the dressing).

In this recipe the potatoes aren't peeled at all.

FINGERLING POTATO SALAD WITH GREEN CHILE-CILANTRO SALSA   

4 lb fingerling potatoes or other small boiling potatoes
4 tablespoons cider vinegar
3 fresh jalapeño chiles, seeds and ribs removed from 2 of them
2 cups fresh cilantro sprigs, coarsely chopped
1 1/2 shallots, coarsely chopped
1 garlic clove, coarsely chopped
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 

Cover potatoes with salted cold water by 1 inch, then simmer until just tender,
10 to 15 minutes. (Potatoes will continue to cook after draining; do not
overcook or they will break apart.) 

Drain potatoes and rinse under cold water until slightly cooled. Halve
lengthwise and while still warm gently toss with 1 tablespoon vinegar. Cool
potatoes to room temperature, then season with salt and pepper.

While potatoes cook, coarsely chop jalapeños and pulse in a food processor
with cilantro, shallots, garlic, oil, and remaining 3 tablespoons vinegar until
finely chopped.

Toss potatoes with salsa.

Cooks' notes: 
• We cool the potatoes before tossing them with the salsa so the herbs won't
discolor.

• Salsa may be made 1 day ahead and chilled, covered. 
   
Gourmet 
June 2000 
Gourmet Entertains  
 
Reviews:
 
A Cook from Matthews, NC on 11/06/00    
Loved it, what a mouth wake-up!

A Cook from Chicago, Illinois on 10/27/00    
I loved this dish! Cilantro lovers of the culinary world will buckle at the
knees after one bite. I modified this recipe to include some chorizo sausage
and a few more pepper pieces than called for. I then sent it along to work with
my boyfriend and the whole office loved it! (They are big fans of spicy
dishes). Also, I don't think fingerling potatoes are necessary; any potato
salad potato should work great. Olive oil makes this dish healthier than a
traditional mayonnaise based salad---great benefit!

A Cook from Toronto on 08/27/00    
Easy and WONDERFUL! I came accross fingerling potatoes by chance at an out of
the way farmer's market, and this dish came to mind immediately. I also added
some unusual purple potatoes for color's sake, and it was beautiful. I
partially seeded 2 jalepenos, and did not seed the last one. It was spicy, just
delicious. The salsa is also killer on plain ol' French baguette. I'll gladly
make this dish again and again.

( jonwar1@aol.com ) from chicago on 07/08/00    
This is a superb recipe. Served at room temperature, the flavors really come
out. Wow!!

A Cook from New York, NY on 06/19/00    
Spectacular! I needed a quick, easy, yet dazzling dish to take to a picnic and
this was it. As I unveiled the dish, friends swarmed around wanting to try it.
The potatoes looked and smelled so inviting, wonderful color. While I was still
dishing the potatoes out, friends stood around asking for the recipe. I doubled
the recipe, but still only kept the seeds to one chile and it was spicy but not
too hot. I substituted rice vinegar for cider vinegar. I used both fingerling
and tiny red potatoes to add color and sprinkled a very small amount of olive
oil on the potatoes just before adding the salsa. The salsa was so good you can
use it in other dishes. I added a dollop of the salsa to a basil, tomato and
mozzarella salad to add a little zing, and my friends loved that too. I had to
give up the recipe to that as well.

============================

From: Archon 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 18:51:02 +0200
--------
> > Exactly! And they taste like soil...
> >
> Not if you wash them well.

I still think they taste of soil. I'm not very fond of potatoes at all,
but if I'm to eat them, it's without the soil. Perhaps becasue they
donøt taste like potates, then :)

============================

From: Dimitri 
Date: Thu, 3 May 2001 18:53:39 -0700
--------
> How do you folks cook your potatos when cooking them for salad? In the
> jacket or peeled, and why.

If I need the salad to be very uniform then I peal the potatoes first and
then dice them into a even size.  Finally I cook them to an "al dente" stage
and then stop the cooking in cold water.  Why? Well I think this type of
salad should be as uniform as possible and pealing and dicing boiled
potatoes is difficult at best.

============================

From: Gargoylle 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 11:24:35 -0500
--------
>How do you folks cook your potatos when cooking them for salad? In the
>jacket or peeled, and why.

Here's a recipe I've tried that is wonderful. No boiling involved. The
next time I do it, I'll be roasting them on the grill. 


FLO'S CILANTRO AND ROASTED POTATO SALAD 

Recipe Courtesy of Emeril Lagasse

2 pounds new potatoes 
10 cloves of fresh garlic 
drizzle of olive oil 
salt 
freshly ground black pepper 
3/4 cup Homemade Mayonnaise 
2 tablespoons Creole Mustard 
juice of one fresh lemon 
1/4 cup fresh cilantro leaves, washed and patted dry 
4 hard-boiled eggs, sliced 
1/2 small red onions, thinly sliced 

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. In a mixing bowl, toss the potatoes
and garlic with a drizzle of olive oil. Toss well. Season
with salt and pepper. Place on a baking sheet and roast for 15
minutes. Remove from the oven and cool completely. Using a mini
food processor, combine the mayonnaise, mustard and lemon juice.
Process until smooth. Season with salt and pepper. Add the
cilantro and continue to process until incorporated. In a mixing bowl,
toss the roasted potatoes and garlic, cilantro mayonnaise,
sliced eggs, and red onions. Mix well. Season with salt and pepper.
Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2 hours. Remove
from the refrigerator and mix the salad. Reseason with salt and pepper
if needed

Yield: 4 to 6 servings 

Show # EM1B56 

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 6 May 2001 07:15:35 -0500
--------
Paul McQuown wrote:
> How do you folks cook your potatos when cooking them for salad? In the
> jacket or peeled, and why.

Admit it, Pablo, you did this just to see how long the thread would get!
(laughing)

Don't you have Grandma Mac's potato salad recipe?!  It's not made with
mayonnaise.  Here's the recipe.  And you peel the potatoes and then boil
them... why?  Because Grandma said so, that's why?  Don't want to?  Okay,
then don't!

8 medium red or white potatoes
8 strips bacon
1/2 c. chopped onion
2 Tbs. flour
2 Tbs. sugar
1 tsp. celery seed
pepper to taste
2/3 c. white vinegar
1/2 c. water

Cook potatoes until tender and cube while still hot; place in a deep
casserole dish.  Fry bacon and onion until golden brown. Strain and reserve
bacon fat.  Add bacon and onion to potatoes.  In frying pan, heat bacon fat
along with flour, sugar, pepper, vinegar and water, stirring until thick
(about a minute). Pour over potatoes and blend carefully. Sprinkle celery
seed over and stir in.  Serve warm.

============================

Subject: REC:  My favorite potato salad...
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 07:13:08 GMT
--------
This is a great potato salad for warm weather since it contains no mayonaise or 
eggs.  It should be served room temperature, but remaining salad should be 
refrigerated.  This is one of our favorites...

---------- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.06
 
      Title: Red Potato and Green Bean Salad
 Categories: Salads, Vegetables
      Yield: 8 servings
 
  2 1/2 lb New potatoes, scrubbed
  1 1/2 lb Green beans
    1/3 c  Herb vinegar (see below)
    1/3 c  Extra-virgin olive oil
    1/3 c  Vegetable oil
      2 tb Granulated sugar
      1 ts Paprika
    1/2 ts Salt
      1    Clove garlic
      1 ts Coleman's dry mustard
      2 ts Caraway seeds, crushed
    3/4 ts Celery seeds
      1 c  Walnut pieces, toasted
      1    Medium sweet red pepper
      6    Scallions (half green tops)
      1    Bunch parsley
    1/2 ts Black pepper, freshly ground
 
  To prepare dressing, in blender container combine herb vinegar, olive oil,
  vegetable oil, granulated sugar, paprika, salt, garlic, dry mustard,
  caraway seeds, and celery seeds. Blend until well emulsified.
  
  Cut green beans on the diagonal in 1-1/2-inch pieces and cook in a large
  pot of boiling water until just tender-crisp. Refresh in cold water, drain
  and pat dry.
  
  Cook the potatoes in a large pot of boiling water until just tender when
  pierced with aknife, 12-15 minutes. Drain and pat dry. Allow the potatoes
  to cool slightly. Slice potatoes into 1/4-inch thick slices, drizzling a
  small amount of dressing over potato slices and tossing to coat as you
  slice.
  
  Add green beans to potato slices and toss to combine, drizzling a small
  amount of dressing to coat.
  
  Cut red pepper in slivers, chop scallions and parsley, and add with remaining
  ingredients and toss to combine, drizzling just enough additional dressing
  to evenly coat salad. Grind black pepper over salad to taste and lightly
  toss again. Taste and adjust seasonings.  Serve at room temperature.

 
  Herb Vinegar:

  White wine vinegar, cloves, thyme, rosemary, fennel seeds, bay laurel leaves, 

  basil, and marjoram.  Steep spices and herbs in hot wine vinegar, allow
  to cool and store overnight.  Strain and store any remaining vinegar 
  refrigerated. 

-----

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Subject: Kold kartoffelsalat (Cold Potato Salad)
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Archon 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 10:18:02 +0200
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Kold kartoffelsalat

Prepare peeled, boiled white potatoes. Refrigerate.

1 1/2 dl Sourcream or Ymer*
200 gr Mayonniasse (2 dl)
3/4 tablespoon Mustard (Strong) or 1 teaspoon curry
1 kg cold peeled, boiled potatoes sliced in cubes or slices.
1/2 grated onion (1 if it's small)
salt and pepper
Cucumber, slices in small cubes
2 tomatoes sliced
Chopped chive

And everything in a bowl and stir.

Serve with grilled food, sausages, or frikadeller.
We always eat this at barbecues in DK. 


*Ymer: The dictionary says "Junket" but translating that back to Danish
it becomes something else. Ymer is kinda neutral Yoghurt - a thick sour
milk. We often use it as breakfast served only with a topping of either
rye bread crumbs and sugar, or just plain brownsugar. We also make Ymer
Fromage. 

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From: Kaari Jae 
Date: Sun, 06 May 2001 04:29:23 GMT
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Archon wrote:
> *Ymer: The dictionary says "Junket" but translating that back to Danish
> it becomes something else. Ymer is kinda neutral Yoghurt - a thick sour
> milk. We often use it as breakfast served only with a topping of either
> rye bread crumbs and sugar, or just plain brownsugar. We also make Ymer
> Fromage.

Is Ymer the same as filmjölk in Swedish? Or is it more like gräddfil? If
it's filmjölk, I'd say it's closer to buttermilk in the US than
youghurt. If it's gräddfil, then I think it's closer to sour cream in
the US although the consistency differs.

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From: Archon 
Date: Sun, 06 May 2001 10:50:42 +0200
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Kaari wrote:
> Is Ymer the same as filmjölk in Swedish? Or is it more like gräddfil? If
> it's filmjölk, I'd say it's closer to buttermilk in the US than
> youghurt. If it's gräddfil, then I think it's closer to sour cream in
> the US although the consistency differs.

It's closest to sour cream.

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Subject: Varmt Kartoffelsalat and Svensk Poelseret (Hot potato Salad - probably 
 what they call German - and Swedish Sausage Dish)
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Archon 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 19:15:03 +0200
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So quantities are not exact. It's just something we do....

Prepare 300-500 g potatoes. Peel, boil, refrigerate.

25-50 g margarine or butter
2 onions, chopped
300-500 g cold peel, boiled potatoes slices into cubes
salt
pepper
1 - 1 1/2 dl milk
1/2 dl vinegar
sugar to taste

Melt shortening in a pot. fry the onions so they are soft. 
Add potatoes and salt and pepper. 
When they are hot add milk (just enough to almost cover the potatoes). 
When the milk boils, add vinegar and sugar. 
Boil so the milk/vinegar thickens. 
If needed, add salt, sugar and pepper to taste.

Serve with red sausages or frikadeller.

If you want to make Svensk Pølseret (Swedish sausage dish):

Replace vinegar and sugar with 3 dl Ketchup and pieces of red hot dog
sausages.

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Subject: Re: Potato for salad - German style
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Martha Hughes 
Date: Sat, 05 May 2001 04:29:14 GMT
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Not sure how authentic this really is, but it's very close to what I've had
that was called German Potato Salad.

From James Beard's American Cookery

8 med. sized potatoes - or the equivalant red potatoes
5 thick slices bacon
1 thinly sliced onion
3 tblsp. red wine vinegar
1 teas. salt
1 teas. black pepper
2 tblsp. chopped fresh parsley

Boil potatoes and when nearly done, saute bacon, so that they are both done
at same time. Peel potatoes if desired, if they are red potatoes, no need to
peel. Slice potatoes into a warmed bowl. When bacon is crisp, break into
small pieces. Add to the potatoes, along with the onion. Add vinegar, salt
and pepper to the bacon fat, heat thoroughly. Add to salad and toss. Serve
hot.

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From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Sat, 05 May 2001 04:33:37 GMT
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> Not sure how authentic this really is, but it's very close to what I've had
> that was called German Potato Salad.
> 
> From James Beard's American Cookery

Thanks, Martha.  This sounds delicious and is on the menu for tomorrow!  
Anything from James Beard can't be anything but good.

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From: mou 
Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 23:35:00 -0700
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>From James Beard's American Cookery

No celery seed? Blasphemy!

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From: Archon 
Date: Sat, 05 May 2001 09:39:23 +0200
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> No celery seed? Blasphemy!

No celery!! Now, don't you give her any ideas.

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From: Martha Hughes 
Date: Sun, 06 May 2001 04:55:55 GMT
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> No celery!! Now, don't you give her any ideas.

heehee!!!!

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Subject: Re: Varmt Kartoffelsalat and Svensk Poelseret (Hot potato Salad - 
 probably what they call German - and Swedish Sausage Dish)
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Kaari Jae 
Date: Sun, 06 May 2001 05:10:31 GMT
--------
Archon wrote:
> If you want to make Svensk Pølseret (Swedish sausage dish):
> 
> Replace vinegar and sugar with 3 dl Ketchup and pieces of red hot dog
> sausages.

Good heavens! I knew the Danes don't much care for the Swedes in general
and Swedish food in particular but blaming this concoction to the Swedes
is downright evil ;) I mean, seriously, boiled potatoes, milk, ketchup
and sausages, yech! This sounds utterly totally terrible!!
Is this dish intended as a revenge since Sweden forbade the food
colouring used in the "Röde pölse" Danish red hot dogs?? ;)

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From: Archon 
Date: Sun, 06 May 2001 10:47:10 +0200
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Kaari wrote:
> Good heavens! I knew the Danes don't much care for the Swedes in general
> and Swedish food in particular but blaming this concoction to the Swedes
> is downright evil ;) 

I don't know it's origins - it's just what it's called :)

It's a well known dish - you can go to the "butcher" department
(Delikatessen) in supermarkets and get it premade.


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