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Subject: BEST All American Potato Salad
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Eldiego[at]sds.org
Date: Sun, 01 Jul 2001 23:56:15 GMT
--------
Could someone from New England post a recipe for a typical All American
New England Potato Salad.
Every one I buy or taste tastes strange and is made with all kinds of
weird things.  My idea of a salad contains cider vinegar, mayo, mustard,
celery seed, celery lots of it, eggs, onions of some kind and other
stuff.  My mum makes it but I don't know how to do it.  Yes I does have
some potatoes in it.
Thanks

============================

From: DKNY44[at]webtv.net
Date: Sun, 1 Jul 2001 21:37:01 -0400 (EDT)
--------
you should ask your mum, to show you how to make it.   That's how most
of our favorite dishes  are past on to us.

============================

From: eldiego[at]sds.org
Date: Mon, 02 Jul 2001 21:45:02 GMT
--------
DKNY44 wrote:
> you should ask your mum, to show you how to make it.   That's how most
> of our favorite dishes  are past on to us.

Would love to but she has been dead four years this 4th.
Thanks though for the thought.

============================

From: notbob 
Date: Mon, 02 Jul 2001 08:02:57 GMT
--------
Here's my idea of a classic American potato salad:

CLASSIC POTATO SALAD

2 lbs baked potatoes (4 med)
1-2 stalks of celery, chopped 
1 large dill pickle, chopped (I substiture sweet pickles)
6 hard boiled eggs, chopped
1 large clove of garlic, minced
1 white onion, chopped
1 bunch of chopped green onions, with some green for color
1-2 tsp mustard
1 tsp sweet paprika
1/2 tsp cayaenne pepper
2 tsp lemon juice
2/3 C mayonnaise
1/4 C olive oil
fresh parsley, chopped
black olives (optional)
salt and black pepper to taste

Cook the potatoes, unpeeled, in boiling water until just barely tender,
about 20 minutes.  Rinse under cold running water and drain.  Let cool.

Peel the potatoes and cut in half lengthwise.  Cut each half into slices
1/4 inch thick.  Combine the pieces with the celery, onion, pickle,
olives, and eggs in a large bowl.  

Mash the garlic with the salt in a small bowl.  Whisk in the mustard,
paprika, cayenne, lemon juice, oil and mayonnaise.  Pour over the potato
mixture and toss gently to mix.  Sprinkle with the parsley and serve.

Adjust recipe to your tastes.  Instead of olive oil, I use more mayo cut
with a bit of milk to keep fat down, but the olive oil does make the
salad a bit more creamy.

NOTE:  Because of the eggs, immediately after assembly, put salad in
refrigerator and chill till just prior to serving.

----------

Here's a recipe for a NE potato salad:

OLD NEW ENGLAND POTATO SALAD

1 1/2 lb baked potatoes (4 small)
2 tblsp minced green bell pepper	
1/4 C sliced radishes
1 shallot, minced
1 tblsp lemon juice
3 eggs
3 tblsp water
3 tblsp red wine vinegar
pinch of cayenne pepper
1/4 C unsalted butter
fresh parsley, chopped
salt and pepper to taste
  
Cook the potatoes, unpeeled, in boiling water until just barely tender,
about 20 minutes.  Rinse under cold running water and drain.  Let cool.

Peel the potatoes and cut in half lengthwise.  Cut each half into slices
1/4 inch thick.  Combine the potatoes with the bell pepper, radishes and
shallot in a large bowl.  Sprinkle with the lemon juice.

Beat the eggs with the water, vinegar, salt, black pepper and cayenne
pepper in a bowl until light.

Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium-low heat.  Rmove from the heat
and whisk in the egg mixture.  Return to low heat and cook, whisking
constantly, until the mixture thickens, about 3 minutes.  Do not let
boil.  Pour over the potato mixture and toss gently to mix.  Sprinkle
with parsley and serve immediately.

============================

From: baranick[at]shen-heightsaccess.net ()
Date: Mon, 02 Jul 2001 13:02:49 GMT
--------
The basic recipe's printed on the back of
a Hellmans Mayonnaise jar.
Add other stuff to suit your taste.
Personally, I add chopped pickle, and
some ( Hormel ) bacon bits.

============================

From: eldiego[at]sds.org
Date: Mon, 02 Jul 2001 21:46:48 GMT
--------
> The basic recipe's printed on the back of
> a Hellmans Mayonnaise jar.

What is Hellmans?  I have never seen it out here.
Thanks.

============================

From: bbr1[at]ritz.cec.wustl.edu (Brian B. Rodenborn)
Date: 2 Jul 2001 16:47:25 -0500
--------
>What is Hellmans?  I have never seen it out here.

It may be called Best Foods in your area.

============================

From: eldiego[at]sds.org
Date: Mon, 02 Jul 2001 21:57:39 GMT
--------
> It may be called Best Foods in your area.

Thanks, I will check that out.  I use Kraft so have never paid any particular
attention to the other mayos.

============================

From: ericDONOTSPAMMEthered[at]eudoramail.com
Date: Tue, 03 Jul 2001 09:32:09 -0500
--------
Save money, the generic mayo brands are just as good @ 30% - 50% of
the price.

============================

From: aquari[at]aol.comNOJUNK (Aquari)
Date: 03 Jul 2001 22:12:55 GMT
--------
>Save money, the generic mayo brands are just as good @ 30% - 50% of
>the price.

I think you will find that most of us will disagree with that statement.  Best
Foods/Hellman's is worth the extra pennies.

============================

From: Togigo[at]webtv.net
Date: Wed, 4 Jul 2001 09:19:16 -0500 (CDT)
--------
It is worth it to ge the premium brand of mayo.  The cheap-stuff tastes
like white gelatin.

============================

From: pattee[at]spot.colorado.edu (Donna Pattee)
Date: 5 Jul 2001 15:57:54 GMT
--------
>>Save money, the generic mayo brands are just as good @ 30% - 50% of
>>the price.
>
>I think you will find that most of us will disagree with that statement.  Best
>Foods/Hellman's is worth the extra pennies.

I don't usually pay too much attention to the price of food, but last week
when I needed mayo, I compared the price of Helman's to the price of the
Albertson's store brand. The Helman's was almost exactly twice as much for
a quart - hardly pennies. I have a hard time believing that the Helman's
mayo is twice as good as the store brand. Maybe I'll try making a batch of
potato salad, then divide it in half and use store brand in one half and
Helman's in the other. If the Helman's half is twice as good, I'll spend
the extra money thereafter.

============================

From: Young 
Date: Thu, 05 Jul 2001 12:32:13 -0400
--------
I don't mess with my Hellmann's!  (smile)  Actually store brands I
tend to stay away from.  At any rate, they often offer good sales on
Hellmann's, 2fer, that kind of thing, plus coupons.  Where I shop is
not named Albertson's, but it's owned by them.  I stock up when it's
cheap.

Truth is, you're probably right, but I am fussy about my mayo. 
Obviously homemade would be better, but when I want a sandwich, I 
don't want to go to a lot of trouble. 

nancy

============================

From: aquari[at]aol.comNOJUNK (Libby)
Date: 05 Jul 2001 18:38:52 GMT
--------
>Truth is, you're probably right, but I am fussy about my mayo. 
>Obviously homemade would be better, but when I want a sandwich, I 
>don't want to go to a lot of trouble. 

I agree totally, Nancy!  It is certainly worth the extra money and, as you
said, you can get it fairly inexpensively with coupons, sales, etc.

============================

From: blakem[at]ix.netcom.com (blake murphy)
Date: Fri, 06 Jul 2001 11:55:54 GMT
--------
>Obviously homemade would be better, but when I want a sandwich, I 
>don't want to go to a lot of trouble. 

also, the homemade stuff doesn't 'keep' very long, does it?

your pal,
blake

============================

From: ericDONOTSPAMMEthered[at]eudoramail.com
Date: Fri, 06 Jul 2001 16:28:43 -0500
--------
Donna Pattee wrote:
>I have a hard time believing that the Helman's
>mayo is twice as good as the store brand.

It's not... if you do a double-blind taste test, noone will be able to
tell them apart.

============================

From: Dimitri 
Date: Fri, 06 Jul 2001 21:45:54 GMT
--------
Eric wrote:
> It's not... if you do a double-blind taste test, noone will be able to
> tell them apart.

Wrong - I can tell the difference and so can a lot of other people.
Hellmans/Best Foods has a very unique taste, and/or lack of a
rancid/oxidized oil after taste.

============================

From: ericDONOTSPAMMEthered[at]eudoramail.com
Date: Fri, 06 Jul 2001 16:27:27 -0500
--------
>I think you will find that most of us will disagree with that statement.  Best
>Foods/Hellman's is worth the extra pennies.

I have not found this to be the case... I can't discern any difference
between my store's generic and Hellman's, which I used for years and
years.  I think the store brand is probably made by Hellman's and is
re-labelled.

============================

From: Marydq[at]webtv.net (Mary DQ)
Date: Wed, 4 Jul 2001 07:23:43 -0500 (CDT)
--------
Hellmans is called Best Foods in parts of the U.S.A. Best Foods is also
the Corp. that makes it!! Mary

============================

From: Marydq[at]webtv.net (Mary DQ)
Date: Mon, 2 Jul 2001 09:42:29 -0500 (CDT)
--------
I use the classic recipe off the Hellmans Mayo. Jar"
1 cup hellmans mayo
2 tbsps Cider Vinegar
1 tsp sugar
25 tsp. pepper
4 cups cubed cooked potatoes
1 cup sliced celery
50 cup chopped onion
2 chopped hard boiled eggs.

Mix the first 5 ingredients--stir in the rest--chill- I add a couple of
shakes of paprika, garlic powder and dried parsley to make it MINE.
Mary---red pepper or chili powder also sounds good, going to try them
the next time I make P.S. thanks for the new ideas!!!!

============================

From: Dimitri 
Date: Mon, 02 Jul 2001 15:56:33 GMT
--------
Mary DQ wrote:
> I use the classic recipe off the Hellmans Mayo. Jar"
> 25 tsp. pepper
> 50 cup chopped onion

Was this potato or onion salad?  Isn't 50 cups pf onion a lot?  also 25
teaspoons of pepper?

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Mon, 02 Jul 2001 16:11:11 GMT
--------
Dimitri wrote:
>Was this potato or onion salad?  Isn't 50 cups pf onion a lot?  also 25
>teaspoons of pepper?

I'll betcha that's 1/2 cup onion and 1/4 teaspoon pepper.  Drop a decimal
point and all kinds of wonderful things happen!

============================

From: Raymond <99r99[at]home.com>
Date: Mon, 02 Jul 2001 16:57:28 GMT
--------
Mary DQ wrote:
>I use the classic recipe off the Hellmans Mayo. Jar"

Ain't potatoe (Quayle spelling) salad without mustard.  Hmmmm, wonder
if French's recipe contains mayo.  

============================

From: notbob 
Date: Mon, 02 Jul 2001 17:29:06 GMT
--------
Raymond wrote:
> Ain't potatoe (Quayle spelling) salad without mustard.  Hmmmm, wonder
> if French's recipe contains mayo.

Who do you think invented mayo?  The French are generally considered the
ones who adapted the German hot oil based potato salad to a mayonnaise
based dish.

[French mahonnaise, mayonnaise, possibly from Mahón Spanish city on
Minorca captured by Louis François Armand de Vignerot du Plessis, Duc de
Richelieu (1696-1788), in 1756 (the duke's chef is said to have
introduced mayonnaise in honor of this victory).]

============================

From: not[at]thisrate.com (Dreaming on, America)
Date: Mon, 02 Jul 2001 20:23:08 GMT
--------
notbob wrote:
>Who do you think invented mayo?  The French are generally considered the
>ones who adapted the German hot oil based potato salad to a mayonnaise
>based dish.

I'm guessing that was French's as in the company that makes mustard.

Tim

============================

From: sf
Date: Tue, 03 Jul 2001 05:55:31 GMT
--------
I want a recipe for German potato salad!  Got one?  It uses bacon
drippings (not oil) and vinegar, doesn't it?

============================

From: Andy Katz 
Date: Tue, 03 Jul 2001 10:05:11 -0400
--------
sf wrote:
>I want a recipe for German potato salad!  Got one?  It uses bacon
>drippings (not oil) and vinegar, doesn't it?

Use the bacon grease to make a vinegairette?

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 03 Jul 2001 15:26:10 GMT
--------
Andy Katz writes:
>Use the bacon grease to make a vinegairette?

You of couse have not ever done that simply because it can't be done... anyone
ever try blending bacon grease with vinegar, bacon grease will instantly
solidify.  

German style potato salad calls for adding the hot bacon fat to hot potatoes so
that the potatoes will absorb the fat, and THEN add vinegar and other
seasonings... or you can use the hot bacon fat to prepare a 'cooked' salad
dressing.  See below:

GERMAN POTATO SALAD  

8 slices bacon
3 tablespoons flour
4 teaspoons chopped onion
2/3 cup vinegar
2/3 cup water
1/2 cup sugar
4 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon powdered dry mustard
1/2 teaspoon crumbled whole rosemary leaves
2 quarts cooked diced potatoes
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley 

Fry bacon until crisp. Remove from pan, drain and crumble. Add flour and onion
to the bacon fat left in the pan. Stir in vinegar, water, sugar, salt and
spices. Cook only until mixture is of medium thickness. Add to potatoes,
parsley and crumbled bacon. Mix carefully to prevent mashing the potatoes. 

Serves 8 to 10.
   
House & Garden 
February 1957 

============================

From: sf
Date: Wed, 04 Jul 2001 07:37:56 GMT
--------
Sheldon wrote:
>German style potato salad calls for adding the hot bacon fat to hot potatoes so
>that the potatoes will absorb the fat, and THEN add vinegar and other
>seasonings... or you can use the hot bacon fat to prepare a 'cooked' salad
>dressing.  See below:

THANK YOU!

xoxoxo

============================

From: Jack 
Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2001 20:46:07 -0400
--------
99r99 says...
> Ain't potatoe (Quayle spelling) salad without mustard.  Hmmmm, wonder
> if French's recipe contains mayo.  

Euuwwwwwwwwwwwwww! Mustard in potato salad is as bad as eggs in/on 
potato salad. I feel the same way about egg on macaroni salad (NOT tuna 
salad) - I'd rather do without, thank you very much.

============================

From: sf
Date: Wed, 04 Jul 2001 07:53:24 GMT
--------
Jack wrote:
>  Euuwwwwwwwwwwwwww! Mustard in potato salad is as bad as eggs in/on 
>potato salad.

Here is a prime example of a picky eater and a potato salad heathen.

============================

From: aintlifegrand[at]yup.com
Date: Wed, 04 Jul 2001 13:17:12 GMT
--------
I just made this recipe. It tastes great.  I got it from
the Sun-Sentinel's website.

ttfn,
jan

DELECTABLE EDIBLES' BALSAMIC AND
ROASTED GARLIC POTATO SALAD 

3 pounds red potatoes, carefully washed

1 yellow onion, minced

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1 1/4 cups good-quality mayonnaise (not low fat or fat free)

4 cloves roasted garlic from Delectable
Edible's Garlic Oil (recipe given)

Kosher salt and fresh-ground black pepper, to taste

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Cut the potatoes in half or in quarters if
they are large. Place the potatoes in a pot
of water to cover. Bring to a boil and cook
15 minutes or until potatoes are tender but
not falling apart. Drain and let potatoes cool.

In a large mixing bowl, combine remaining
ingredients to form a creamy dressing. Cut
potatoes into about 1-inch pieces. Carefully
combine the cooked potatoes with the dressing
until the potatoes are well-covered. Take
care not to break up the cooked potatoes.
Chill and serve. Makes 8 servings.

Per serving: 508 calories, 61 percent
calories from fat, 4 grams protein, 46 grams
carbohydrates, 4 grams total fiber, 35 grams
total fat, 25 milligrams cholesterol, 250
milligrams sodium.

Recipe adapted from one from Delectable
Edibles, 2811E. Commercial Blvd., Fort
Lauderdale, 954-772-6411.

DELECTABLE EDIBLES' GARLIC OIL 

USE THE OIL TO BASTE STEAKS AND CHOPS BEFORE AND
DURING GRILLING. USE IT TO COAT VEGETABLES
YOU PLAN TO ROAST. IT WORKS GREAT IN SALAD
DRESSINGS. ADD SOME FRESH HERBS AND SHAVED
PARMESAN AND YOU HAVE A DIP FOR BREAD. THE
GARLIC CLOVES MAKE A WONDERFUL SPREAD ON
BREAD OR GARNISH FOR SOUPS. OF COURSE, THEY
ALSO GO GREAT IN DELECTABLE EDIBLES' BALSAMIC
AND ROASTED GARLIC POTATO SALAD (RECIPE
GIVEN). USE YOUR IMAGINATION. 

1 cup extra-virgin olive oil

14 peeled garlic cloves

In a small, heavy saucepan, place oil and
garlic. Cook over very low heat 30 minutes.
Remove from heat and let cool. Store in jar
in refrigerator. Makes 1 cup oil; 14
oil-poached garlic cloves.

Per 1-tablespoon oil: 123 calories, 99
percent calories from fat, .17 gram protein,
.87 gram carbohydrates, .06 gram total fiber,
14 grams total fat, no cholesterol, .45
milligram sodium.

Recipe adapted from one from Delectable
Edibles, 2811E. Commercial Blvd., Fort
Lauderdale, 954-772-6411.

Copyright © 2001, South Florida Sun-Sentinel

============================

From: notbob 
Date: Wed, 04 Jul 2001 14:46:29 GMT
--------
Jack wrote:
> Euuwwwwwwwwwwwwww! Mustard in potato salad is as bad as eggs in/on
> potato salad. I feel the same way about egg on macaroni salad (NOT tuna
> salad) - I'd rather do without, thank you very much.

A classic American potato salad HAS TO have mustard.  The trick is to
not use too much.  I do it by adding just enough mustard to flavor, but
no color, the salad.  If you put in enough mustard to make the salad
noticeably yellow, it's too much.  If the salad has a yellow color to
it, the yellow should be from hard cooked egg yolks, not mustard.  Mix
the cooked yolks into the mayo dressing.  Mahhh-velous.

============================

From: meawe229[at]aol.com (MEAWE229)
Date: 04 Jul 2001 14:54:49 GMT
--------
>A classic American potato salad HAS TO have mustard.

I agree, it enhances the flavor.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 04 Jul 2001 18:02:27 GMT
--------
>>A classic American potato salad HAS TO have mustard. 
>>
>I agree, it enhances the flavor.

There are myriad exciting flavor enhancers for potato salad, of which mustard
is at the bottom of the list.

============================

From: Jack 
Date: Wed, 4 Jul 2001 15:45:43 -0400
--------
> I agree, it enhances the flavor.

  It screws up the flavor, you mean. Then again, you probably like 
mustard on a hoagie!
  Mustard only belongs on hotdogs or hamburgers, NOT salads.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 04 Jul 2001 18:02:27 GMT
--------
notbob writes:
>A classic American potato salad HAS TO have mustard.

I like the look of yellow potato salad, so the trick is to add a wee bit of
ground turmeric. If not for turmeric mustard wouldn't be yellow anyways, it'd
be grey, and who wants grey potato salad.  If you're willing to splurge, then a
bit of saffron simmered into the vinegar is nice, adds great color and flavor. 
And of course on St. Paddy's Day smoosh in a big wad of parsley or dill.

This one is yummy. . . www.honey.com

Red-Skin Potato Salad with Honey Dill Dressing 

Makes 6 servings.   

1-1/2 lbs. small red new potatoes  
4 strips bacon  
1 medium red onion, diced   
6 Tbsp.  honey  
6 Tbsp.  apple cider vinegar  
1/2 tsp. cornstarch  
1/2 tsp. water  
2 Tbsp. chopped fresh dill, or 1 Tbsp. dried dill weed  
1 bunch watercress, washed and chopped 

In a large pot, boil whole potatoes in salted water until tender but firm.
Drain and cool. While potatoes are cooling, sauté bacon until crisp in large
frying pan. Remove bacon and set aside. Add onion to bacon drippings; cooking
until soft, about 3 minutes. Add honey and vinegar to pan; stir to combine and
bring to a boil. Blend cornstarch with water; stir into honey mixture. Cook
until mixture thickens. Remove from heat. Crumble bacon; stir bacon and dill
into dressing. Cut cooled potatoes in half, leaving skins on. In a large bowl,
combine potatoes and watercress. Pour dressing over salad and toss gently.
Serve immediately.  Goes perfectly with Honey Jalapeno Chicken with Tomato
Olivada.
---
Honey Jalapeno Chicken with Tomato Olivada 

Makes 4 servings. 

1/2 red jalapeno pepper, stemmed, seeded and chopped (about 1 tsp.) 
1/4 cup honey, divided   
1/4 tsp. salt    
4 chicken breast halves    
1 medium tomato, peeled, seeded, and diced    
1/2 cup minced red onion    
1/4 cup finely chopped green bell pepper    
12 Kalamata olives, pitted and chopped    
1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar    
1 Tbsp.   olive oil    
watercress sprigs, for garnish    

In a blender, puree jalapeno with 2 Tbsp. honey and 1/8 tsp. salt. Rub chicken
with mixture; cover and refrigerate 1 hour.  

To prepare Tomato Olivada, in a small bowl, mix remaining 2 Tbsp. honey and 1/8
tsp. salt with tomato, onion, green pepper, olives, vinegar and olive oil.
Grill chicken over medium coals, cooking and turning until skin is browned and
crisp and juices run clear. Serve Tomato Olivada alongside chicken and garnish
with watercress sprigs.   
---

============================

From: eldiego[at]sds.org
Date: Mon, 02 Jul 2001 21:48:11 GMT
--------
Mary DQ wrote:
> 50 cup chopped onion

What does it taste like with so much onion?
Thanks.

============================

From: Billy 
Date: Mon, 02 Jul 2001 18:11:12 -0400
--------
Mary DQ wrote:
>50 cup chopped onion

how many people does this onion salad feed?

============================

From: spagah[at]earthlink.net
Date: Mon, 02 Jul 2001 22:51:32 GMT
--------
Just came back from my favourite book store Vromans in Pasadena, CA.
There was a book which I purchased called 101 recipes for potato salads.
All kinds with everything you can think of including one called, "The All
American Salad."
The book is by Simonson.  It was one of the $25.00 marked down to $6.00 I
consider it a real bargain.

============================

From: J. Helman 
Date: Tue, 03 Jul 2001 13:01:29 -0400
--------
My family comes from New England; this is my mother's recipe.  Sorry I
can't give you exact proportions, Mom never measured, she just dumped
stuff in, and now that's what I do as well.

Potato Salad

Potatoes
Celery, finely chopped
Onion, finely chopped
Cucumber, finely chopped
Bread & butter pickles, finely chopped
Hard-boiled eggs, coarsely chopped
Celery seed
Parsley
Juice from pickles
Mayonnaise *
Salt
Pepper

When the potatoes are cool, cut them into small chunks. Add chopped
celery, onion, cucumber, and pickles. Add celery seed and parsley. Pour
some juice from the jar of pickles over everything, then spoon in some
mayonnaise and stir up.  Refrigerate overnight if possible before
serving, or at least for a few hours.

*Or Miracle Whip or comparable white salad dressing.  Low-fat is
acceptable. Fat-free is too bland.

============================

From: "J. Helman" 
Date: Tue, 03 Jul 2001 15:41:02 -0400
--------
J. Helman wrote:
> When the potatoes are cool, cut them into small chunks.

Sorry, I didn't bother to read Mom's recipe in detail before I
posted...Of course, you must cook the potatoes first.  I usually steam
them.  When a knife can go through a large one easily, they're done.

============================

From: lurline4[at]earthlink.net
Date: Thu, 05 Jul 2001 15:09:36 GMT
--------
The award winning recipe is as follows:

8 large russet potatos that have been boiled and pealed or baked and
chopped.
2 cups of mayo
1/4 cup of mustard
1/4 cup of vinegar (we like red wine vinegar)
1 med onion chopped finely
1 bunch of green onions chopped finely
1 doz. hard boiled eggs chopped
celery seeds, dill and summer savory to taste. Salt and pepper (lots of
both).
2 cups of celery med. chop
Mix all together and let sit overnight add more salt and pepper as needed.
Set out in a nice bowl and add sliced rings of red and green peppers and
perhaps some olives on top (easily removed for those that hate olives.)
Serve with gardenburgers.

============================

From: lurline4[at]earthlink.net
Date: Sun, 08 Jul 2001 01:34:40 GMT
--------
By the way I use Kraft Mayo.  I find it to be the best tasting and not that
cloying sweet taste I find with the other brands.  I has a nice crisp taste
and does well on potato salad and fruit salads.

============================

Subject: Re: BEST All American Potato BOO
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Marydq[at]webtv.net (Mary DQ)
Date: Mon, 2 Jul 2001 11:25:35 -0500 (CDT)
--------
BOOOO!!!! On my web-tv keyboard there are no keys for one quarter or one
half!!!! It is suppose to read a quarter teaspoon pepper and one half
cup chopped onion. the  periods I used to indicate a half and a quarter
did not show up. God that would be a horrible tasting mess!!!! Mary

============================

From: SonofJorEl[at]webtv.net (Alan Ladd)
Date: Mon, 2 Jul 2001 14:26:30 -0700 (PDT)
--------
Mary DQ wrote:
>On my web-tv keyboard there are no
>keys for one quarter or one half!!!!

Actually there is.... Press ALT and the number 5 (¼) or 6 (½).
Unfortunately, some computer users won't be able to see those
characters, so perhaps the safest way to denote quarters or halves is by
using the decimal point or using the slash such as 1/2 or 1/4. Hope this
helped.

============================

From: bbr1[at]ritz.cec.wustl.edu (Brian B. Rodenborn)
Date: 2 Jul 2001 16:49:34 -0500
--------
>Actually there is.... Press ALT and the number 5 (=BC) or 6 (=BD).
>Unfortunately, some computer users won't be able to see those
>characters, so perhaps the safest way to denote quarters or halves is by
>using the decimal point or using the slash such as 1/2 or 1/4. Hope this
>helped.

In particular, me. My newsreader uses a different extended ASCII set than
many, so usually when someone uses the symbols for 1/4 or whatever, I see
meaningless line drawing symbols.

To make your recipes comprehensible to the maximum number of readers, 
have the courtesy to write out the fractions.

============================

From: lscanlon[at]nospamerols.com (Leo Scanlon)
Date: Tue, 03 Jul 2001 09:45:35 GMT
--------
Mary DQ wrote:
>BOOOO!!!! On my web-tv keyboard there are no keys for one quarter or one
>half!!!! 

Try 1/4 for one-quarter and 1/2 for one-half.


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