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Subject: Potato Salad Question
Newsgroups: alt.food.barbecue,rec.food.cooking

============================

From: jay 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 18:22:57 GMT
--------
I am lighting up the pit this weekend and want to make some potato salad to
go with the BBQ.  I have never made potato salad that was very/any good.
Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
that is not German style?  I looked at google and searched the archives of
this group and the BBQ group.  There are some really wild recipes, one even
had beans in it..lol  Thanks for any tips,  tricks or secret ingredients.
Cut the beans though.  I have Yukon gold potatoes.  

============================

From: Lou Decruss 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 13:36:44 -0500
--------
This is my favorite.  I have no clue how it would be with Yukons, but
it works with Q.

Lou

http://www.wchstv.com/gmarecipes/flospotatosalad.shtml

Flo's Potato Salad
From chef and author Emeril Lagasse

Flo's Potato Salad Potato Salad with that special Emeril BAM! on Good
Morning America.

Ingredients

# 6 large eggs
# A pinch plus 2 teaspoons salt
# 3 pounds new potatoes, washed and quartered
# 1/2 pound sliced bacon, cut into small dice
# 3/4 cup mayonnaise
# 1/4 Creole or whole-grain mustard
# 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
# 1 teaspoon hot sauce
# 3/4 cup finely chopped red onions
# 1/2 cup chopped green onions or scallions (green part only)
# 1 tablespoon chopped garlic
# 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Directions

1. Put the eggs in the saucepan and cover with water, add the pinch of
salt. Bring to a boil and boil for two minutes. Turn off the heat,
cover, and let stand for ten minutes. Drain, then cool in a bowl of
ice water. Peel and chop.

2. Put the potatoes in a large saucepan with 1 teaspoon of the salt
and enough water to cover. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to
medium and cook until fork-tender, about 12 minutes. Remove from the
heat and drain. Let cool to room temperature.

3. In a large salad bowl, combine the mayonnaise, mustard, lemon
juice, hot sauce, red onions, green onions, garlic, the remaining 1
teaspoon salt, and the black pepper. Whisk to blend. Add the eggs,
potatoes, and bacon and toss to coat evenly. Keep refrigerated until
ready to serve.

Makes 6 to 8 servings

Recipe copyright 2000, Emeril Lagasse

============================

From: Suburbomom 
Date: 5 Oct 2006 18:29:54 -0700
--------
Way to go, Lou!

I'm not a potato salad fan, but this stuff looks good!  The next time a
potato salad op rolls in, I'll make this instead of that awful yellow
glop everyone serves.  Thank you from the bottom of my yellop glop
despising soul!

============================

From: Lou Decruss 
Date: Mon, 09 Oct 2006 11:39:41 -0500
--------
Suburbomom wrote:
>I'm not a potato salad fan, but this stuff looks good!  The next time a
>potato salad op rolls in, I'll make this instead of that awful yellow
>glop everyone serves.  Thank you from the bottom of my yellop glop
>despising soul!

Glad you like it and I hope it turns out well for you.  "New" spuds
were on sale for $.88 for 5 pounds so I made it this weekend since is
was fresh on my mind.  (and cheap)  We like smaller chunks so I cubed
the spuds to about 1/2 inch.  I simmered them for about 7-8 minutes
and was afraid it was too much but they were perfect.  I didn't have
green or red onions so I used about a cup of a sweet white onion.  I
lightly caramelized the onions and quickly browned about 6 finely
chopped cloves of garlic in the bacon grease.  I used about 3 tbs. of
green tabasco sauce.  It was a little dry as the spuds broke down a
bit, so it needed a lot bit more mayo.   I didn't have lemon so I used
lime.  I topped my portion with a good dose of paprika.  My partner
took a pass on that.  LOL  

Obviously Emeril's recipe is just basic and can be improvised with
wonderful results.  This was probably my best potato salad attempt.

I grew up with the yellow "glop" stuff.  Everyone has their own
preferences but I don't like it.  Reminds me of the church potluck
"suppers" I was forced to attend as a child.  Even as a child I knew
that was some nasty food.      

============================

From: hrbrickerNOSPAM[at]ij.net
Date: Mon, 9 Oct 2006 21:23:31 GMT
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> I grew up with the yellow "glop" stuff.  Everyone has their own
> preferences but I don't like it.  Reminds me of the church potluck
> "suppers" I was forced to attend as a child.  Even as a child I knew
> that was some nasty food.

Hint about that "Yellow Glop Stuff". Use the boiled eggwhites, but
throw the yolks away. That's where all the cholesterol is anyway.
From there on, let your conscience be your guide. I'm generally
a Miracle Whip man for sandwiches, but Hellmans Real
Mayonaise is preferred for potato salad. Just getting rid of those
yucky yokes is a vast improvement. Some sweet pickle relish,
finely minced onion, celery seed and S&P. Try some fresh ground
aromatic pepper. Check the Penzey's or Penderey's catalogs
for some good ideas. Forget that shit you get at the grocery store.
I've substituted Clausen Kosher Dill pickle for the sweet pickle
relish with no complaints. No CYM at my house. Dijon, stone-
ground deli style mustards and horseradish mustard found here.
I usually use a stoneground brown in my potato salad. Just
throwing out some ideas. YMMV and rightfully so. Not even my
wife has to eat at my table. She has her own income. (She
doesn't spend it though)

============================

From: Kevin S. Wilson 
Date: Tue, 10 Oct 2006 10:17:29 -0600
--------
hrbricker wrote:
>Just getting rid of those
>yucky yokes is a vast improvement.

Nothing to lose but your chains.

============================

From: B-Worthey 
Date: Fri, 6 Oct 2006 02:35:54 -0500
--------
Lou Decruss wrote:
> Flo's Potato Salad
> From chef and author Emeril Lagasse

My mom has made this, and it is really good!

As for the yellow glop stuff, that's what my mom used to make and I still 
make.  I guess the difference is that I like mine a little less lumpy, ends 
up a little more like mashed potatoes (see other post) than with the 
potatoes being cubed.  I think it's in finding a balance between the mustard 
and mayo though too.  Anyway for my tater salad, all I put is mayo, mustard, 
eggs, sweet pickles (or relish) and a little salt.  My mom used to put 
onion, you could do this if you wish, but I've found I like it just as well 
with out it.  The other key is the pickle/pickle relish.  I like homemade 
sweet pickles in it best.  I haven't found a lot of store bought pickle 
relishes that I like, there is one brand called Rainbow that was the best, 
but I can't find it anymore.  Anyway, good luck in your search.  I learned 
quickly that there are a million variations to this recipe.

============================

From: merryb 
Date: 5 Oct 2006 11:40:56 -0700
--------
jay wrote:
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style? 

Good spuds- make sure all your ingredients are cold before assembly so
no one gets sick later- also, it will taste better if you make it the
day before, whatever recipe you decide to use

============================

From: Nancy2 
Date: 5 Oct 2006 12:02:51 -0700
--------
merryb wrote:
> Good spuds- make sure all your ingredients are cold before assembly so
> no one gets sick later- also, it will taste better if you make it the
> day before, whatever recipe you decide to use

Actually, I don't believe that having the ingredients cold before
assembly does anything to prevent illness.  It's leaving a chilled
salad with eggs in it out too long so the ingredients warm up to allow
bacteria to grow (2 hours is the maximum without any refrigerant).

The very best potato salad, in my view, is put together with the
potatoes just out of the pan - hot or warm potatoes will absorb the
other flavor much better than mixing stuff when it's all cold.  In
addition, I like to put the eggs in when they are still warm and then
chill everything at once after it is all mixed.

Further, I prefer potato salad without skins, even if they are new
potato skins.  I use russets - peel and cut up before cooking (yes, I
know, they should be boiled whole with skins on, but I don't have the
patience, and the outsides get too done while the insides are still
raw).  Spread them out in a big mixing bowl - for 2 pounds' worth of
potatoes:

Sprinkle hot potatoes with 2 T. of cider vinegar.
Toss around on top of this, 2 T. of plain granulated sugar.
Sprinkle on about 1/4 C. drained relish (I like sweet; some people like
dill).
Add 1 1/2 T. of celery seed.
Add salt & pepper to taste (go with minimums at this point).
Then let this cool to room temperature.
Add about 4 diced hard-boiled eggs,* 1/4 c. diced celery (with green
tops, if you want), 1/4 C. diced green pepper, 1/4 C. peeled, diced,
drained, seeded cucumber,** and quartered, sliced red radishes
(optional).  Add some big spoonsful of mayonnaise (I don't measure it -
just eyeball it, in a conservative way) and about 3 T. of yellow
mustard.

Mix gently; taste and correct seasonings.  Garnish with quartered
hard-boiled eggs and/or a fresh tomato divided into 8 spears.  Chill
thoroughly.

If you like onion, use scallions; if you like just a little of the
flavor, cut an onion in half, put it cut-side down on top the salad;
remove before serving.  I don't use onion because the left-overs get
too strong.

*I use my egg-slicer to chop the eggs, first cutting them one
direction, and then turning them around and cutting them the other
direction.  I have also sometimes used my pastry cutter to dice them.
(I use my pastry cutter to make egg salad.)

**Cucumber:  This will make the leftovers watery, unless they are
allowed to drain - to drain, dice them up and put them in a strainer
over the sink, and sprinkle generously with salt.  After about 45
minutes, rinse them thoroughly, pat dry on paper towels, and add to
salad.

All the veggies I add are optional, of course.  When the boys are home
to eat it, I don't put in celery because they don't like it - they
don't mind the celery seed, though.  If I know I'll have leftovers, I
don't put in cucumber, but it makes the salad really crispy.

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 13:08:04 -0600
--------
Nancy2 wrote:
>The very best potato salad, in my view, is put together with the
>potatoes just out of the pan - hot or warm potatoes will absorb the
>other flavor much better than mixing stuff when it's all cold. 

This is the way I was taught to make potato salad, to use potatoes
just out of the pan, as you say.  

I was taught to use boiling type potatoes, as they hold together
better,and to peel, slice and salt them while they were still hot.

============================

From: Nancy2 
Date: 5 Oct 2006 13:22:37 -0700
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> This is the way I was taught to make potato salad, to use potatoes
> just out of the pan, as you say.
>
> I was taught to use boiling type potatoes, as they hold together
> better,and to peel, slice and salt them while they were still hot.

Yeah, me, too but I decided a couple decades ago that I was tired of
burning my fingers peeling hot potatoes.  LOL.

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 14:35:13 -0600
--------
Nancy2 wrote:
>Yeah, me, too but I decided a couple decades ago that I was tired of
>burning my fingers peeling hot potatoes.  LOL.

I use a potholder to hold them, as I peel them....so my hands don't
suffer.  A very clean potholder, by the way.  ;)

============================

From: Mr Libido Incognito 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 21:48:53 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
> I use a potholder to hold them, as I peel them....so my hands don't
> suffer.  A very clean potholder, by the way.  ;)

Wry do you peel them? Best part of the salad.

============================

From: Nancy2 
Date: 6 Oct 2006 07:35:01 -0700
--------
Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
> Wry do you peel them? Best part of the salad.

They may be the best nutrient part, but I hate them in any dish, except
baked potatoes or 'skins.  They slide around and get stuck in your
teeth.  Ick.

============================

From: Joseph Littleshoes 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 13:37:35 -0700
--------
Nancy2 wrote:
> Christine Dabney wrote:
> 
>>>>Good spuds- make sure all your ingredients are cold before assembly so
>>>>no one gets sick later- also, it will taste better if you make it the
>>>>day before, whatever recipe you decide to use

I use fresh and at room tempt ingredients but i agree with chilling it 
afterwards and keeping it so, at least as much as possible, and i also 
agree that it gets better with age, as many foods do.

>>>The very best potato salad, in my view, is put together with the
>>>potatoes just out of the pan - hot or warm potatoes will absorb the
>>>other flavor much better than mixing stuff when it's all cold.

With a 12 - 24 hour waite time before serving this dont seem to be an 
issue with me, plus, i also dont like mucking about with very hot potatoes.

>>This is the way I was taught to make potato salad, to use potatoes
>>just out of the pan, as you say.
>>
>>I was taught to use boiling type potatoes, as they hold together
>>better,and to peel, slice and salt them while they were still hot.
 
> Yeah, me, too but I decided a couple decades ago that I was tired of
> burning my fingers peeling hot potatoes.  LOL.

New red or white, very fresh potatoes, are the tastiest IMO, red i peel, 
white i dont, some what underdone and placed in the fridge or freezer 
for a few minutes to quickly cool them and stop any continuation of 
cooking due to residual heat in the potato.  I dont like to rinse in 
cold water boiled potatoes.

Boiling the whole potato rather than pre slicing them gives me a bit 
more time for other things and dont require as much attention as boiling 
  sliced potatoes.  When i am making potato salad it means i am doing a 
lot of other cooking also.

I have had French potato salad that is really only different in the 
slicing of the potato, they being sliced in large but thin slices of the 
whole, medium sized potato.

============================

From: Leonard Blaisdell 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 15:37:58 -0700
--------
Nancy2 wrote:
> If you like onion, use scallions; if you like just a little of the
> flavor, cut an onion in half, put it cut-side down on top the salad;
> remove before serving.  I don't use onion because the left-overs get
> too strong.

I'm with you on your onion opinion. Even scallions become too strong for 
me in the mild potato salad I make. I use chives. I haven't tried fairly 
finely chopped red onion which I use in macaroni salad. Hmmm... Nah, 
I'll stick with chives. Potato salad is the only thing I use chives for.

============================

From: Nancy2 
Date: 6 Oct 2006 07:33:55 -0700
--------
Leonard Blaisdell wrote:
> I'm with you on your onion opinion. Even scallions become too strong for
> me in the mild potato salad I make. I use chives. I haven't tried fairly
> finely chopped red onion which I use in macaroni salad. Hmmm... Nah,
> I'll stick with chives. Potato salad is the only thing I use chives for.

Chopped chives make cottage cheese a whole lot tastier. ;-)

============================

From: sandi 
Date: 06 Oct 2006 14:54:54 GMT
--------
Nancy2 wrote:
> Chopped chives make cottage cheese a whole lot tastier. ;-)

Add some caraway seed, let sit over night...
The chives and caraway make an even tastier cottage cheese.
Yum!

============================

From: Harry Demidavicius 
Date: Sat, 07 Oct 2006 00:13:02 GMT
--------
Nancy2 wrote:
>Chopped chives make cottage cheese a whole lot tastier. ;-)

Nancy, Nancy, Nancy! - a gallon of Scotch will make cottage cheese
tastier - provided you lose the cottage cheese.

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Fri, 06 Oct 2006 20:04:08 -0500
--------
You can always saute the minced onions first to cook out the odor and 
bring out the natural sweetness instead.

============================

From: DougW 
Date: Sat, 7 Oct 2006 01:14:13 -0500
--------
Harry Demidavicius wrote:
> Nancy, Nancy, Nancy! - a gallon of Scotch will make cottage cheese
> tastier - provided you lose the cottage cheese.

A gallon?  Heck, one dram of Dalmore 28 will make anything you throw
away tasty.

============================

From: Harry Demidavicius 
Date: Sun, 08 Oct 2006 00:13:26 GMT
--------
DougW wrote:
>A gallon?  Heck, one dram of Dalmore 28 will make anything you throw
>away tasty.

Ah!  I recognize greatness here ;o)

============================

From: Nancy2 
Date: 9 Oct 2006 08:23:38 -0700
--------
Harry Demidavicius wrote:
> Ah!  I recognize greatness here ;o)

Harry, you crack me up.  ;-)  Thanks.

============================

From: werty 
Date: 9 Oct 2006 15:11:34 -0700
--------
 Its the brain . It fools us . We want energy and taste at same time .

 Why do people eat patato salad  , cottage cheese ( cool ) et al ..

  Brain remembers theres energy in ......
  So its impatient .....
  But ya trade off pleasure for hurry !

         warm pot' salad and cheddar .....?
         warm cottage cheese with cheddar ?   .
         Broil a cold cut 20 seconds  before ya cheese it in that sandwich ?
           What meat tastes bad warm/hot ?
Only ice cream tastes good cold ....


 You're in too much of a hurry , dont have time to
warm it ..

============================

From: Raging Chef (Aka Ben) 
Date: Mon, 09 Oct 2006 11:44:45 -0700
--------
> Further, I prefer potato salad without skins, even if they are new
> potato skins.  I use russets - peel and cut up before cooking (yes, I
> know, they should be boiled whole with skins on, but I don't have the
> patience, and the outsides get too done while the insides are still
> raw).  

If you are boiling fairly large chunks or whole potatoes always start with
cold water.   Add Potatoes  and turn on.   This will insure that they are
cooked evenly through and through.  Takes a little more cooking time but
oyou get perfect results every time.

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 15:14:12 -0400
--------
merryb wrote:
> Good spuds- make sure all your ingredients are cold before assembly so
> no one gets sick later- also, it will taste better if you make it the
> day before, whatever recipe you decide to use

I'm not sure what you mean by cold ingredients = no one sick??
Can you elaborate please? Many, many potato salad recipes start with 
warm cooked potatoes that have some sort of dressing applied to them 
while warm, then  they're allowed to come to room temp or chilled as 
desired. I prefer potato salad unchilled as the flavors are diminished 
somewhat by being "cold"

============================

From: merryb 
Date: 5 Oct 2006 12:41:03 -0700
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> I'm not sure what you mean by cold ingredients = no one sick??
> Can you elaborate please? Many, many potato salad recipes start with
> warm cooked potatoes that have some sort of dressing applied to them
> while warm, then  they're allowed to come to room temp or chilled as
> desired. I prefer potato salad unchilled as the flavors are diminished
> somewhat by being "cold"

Ok, Ok, I mis-spoke. But I have known people to make it the day they
plan on eating it- if it doesn't have time to chill thouroughly, I
think you could be asking for trouble. That's what I meant.

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 15:57:35 -0400
--------
merryb wrote:
> Ok, Ok, I mis-spoke. But I have known people to make it the day they
> plan on eating it- if it doesn't have time to chill thouroughly, I
> think you could be asking for trouble. That's what I meant.

Only if their ingredients are somehow contaminated already, or they 
allow it to become contaminated somehow.

============================

From: Peter Aitken 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 22:06:47 GMT
--------
msg144@juno says...
> Good spuds- make sure all your ingredients are cold before assembly so
> no one gets sick later-

Terrible idea. The best potato salads are made by putting the dressing - 
whether it be mayo or a vinaigarette - on the cut-up potatoes while they 
are still warm.

Sitting for a day is a great idea, though.

============================

From: Zilbandy 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 16:49:43 -0700
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
>Terrible idea. The best potato salads are made by putting the dressing - 
>whether it be mayo or a vinaigarette - on the cut-up potatoes while they 
>are still warm.

Scrap the mayo. I use Miracle Whip.

============================

From: jesskidden[at]LYC0S.C0M
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 14:42:10 -0400
--------
jay wrote:
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style? 

Without checking all those recipes you might have come across and, thus, 
not knowing how common these ingredients are, I say the potato salads 
I've liked the best have included eggs, onions, celery seed and some 
mustard (powdered or out of a jar) & apple cider vinegar to cut the 
sweetness of the mayo (among other things, of course).  Also, potato 
salad always tastes better a day or so after it's made, so all the 
ingredients can blend together and to allow the potatoes to absorb those 
flavors.

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 15:17:26 -0400
--------
jesskidden wrote:
> Without checking all those recipes you might have come across and, thus, 
> not knowing how common these ingredients are, I say the potato salads 
> I've liked the best have included eggs, onions, celery seed and some 
> mustard (powdered or out of a jar) & apple cider vinegar to cut the 
> sweetness of the mayo (among other things, of course).  Also, potato 
> salad always tastes better a day or so after it's made, so all the 
> ingredients can blend together and to allow the potatoes to absorb those 
> flavors.

If your mayo is "sweet" you're using the wrong mayo, lol.
A good Hellmanns (Best Food) will improve your salad.
And NO eggs in mine, please. Blech! No pickle relish in mine, either.
I always add diced celery, and use celery seed in the dressing or 
sprinkled on top.

============================

From: jesskidden[at]LYC0S.C0M
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 16:08:43 -0400
--------
Goomba38 wrote:

> If your mayo is "sweet" you're using the wrong mayo, lol.
> A good Hellmanns (Best Food) will improve your salad.

I use Hellman's (one of the ingredients of which is sugar).  "Sweet", of 
course, is in the tongue of the taste and relative- I've certainly 
tasted a lot of potato salads that are "sweet", and lack (to my taste) 
any vinegar or mustard tartness.

> And NO eggs in mine, please. 

You mean the third ingredient of Hellman's ("whole eggs and egg yolks")?

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Thu, 5 Oct 2006 16:29:48 -0400
--------
jesskidden wrote
> I use Hellman's (one of the ingredients of which is sugar).  "Sweet", of 
> course, is in the tongue of the taste and relative- I've certainly tasted 
> a lot of potato salads that are "sweet", and lack (to my taste) any 
> vinegar or mustard tartness.

I have to have the pickle relish, and the minced celery.
And the hard boiled egg, onion, mayo, mustard.  Celery salt.

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 13:52:21 -0500
--------
jay said...
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style? 

jay,

Try www.allrecipes.com for a recipe. They have a good user review system. 
Shoot for ***** reviews, read them and decide for yourself.

That's where I get the majority of my recipes from, if that's any 
assurance. ;)

Andy

============================

From: denise~* 
Date: 5 Oct 2006 11:55:40 -0700
--------
jay wrote:
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style? 

I never made a good potato salad either, till I developed this recipe.
My mom's always gets raves, but she doesn't have a recipe.  I finally
got something close to hers.  It's not exact, but it's close, and good.
 You will need to get some Russetts though.

"Moms" Potato Salad

4 Large Russett potatoes.  Boiled, Chilled & Cubed
4 Eggs, Chopped
1 Medium Stalk Celery chopped fine (can also use celery seed)
1/4 cup Sweet Relish
1/2 cup chopped Sweet Pickles
2 T Prepared Mustard
1/2 - 3/4 cup Mayo
1/2 - 3/4 cup Miracle Whip
1/8 tsp Tumeric
1/4 cup Chives, (or tender green part of green onion)
Salt & Pepper
Sweet Pickle Juice

In a large bowl, combine the mayo, miracle whip, sweet relish, pickles,
garlic, mustard, mayonnaise tumeric, chives, salt and pepper.
Combine mixture with the potatoes, eggs, and celery.  At this point,
determine if you need more miracle whip & mayo.
Add spoonfuls of pickle juice until the consistency is nice & creamy
(not thick).

============================

From: Little.Malice[at]gmail.communge (Little Malice)
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 18:56:31 GMT
--------
One time on Usenet, jay said:
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style? 

Mine is potatoes (naturally), chopped hard-cooked eggs, diced 
onion, diced sweet pickle (you could use dills if you prefer), 
salt & pepper, a couple of dashes Worchestershire sauce, mustard, 
and good mayo. You could add other diced veggies too. although I
prefer not to -- maybe some celery, scallions, green pepper, etc. 
I use the same recipe for macaroni salad, just using salad macaroni
(go figure) instead of the spuds...

============================

From: merryb 
Date: 5 Oct 2006 12:57:44 -0700
--------
Little Malice wrote:
> Mine is potatoes (naturally), chopped hard-cooked eggs, diced
> onion, diced sweet pickle (you could use dills if you prefer),
> salt & pepper, a couple of dashes Worchestershire sauce, mustard,
> and good mayo. You could add other diced veggies too. although I
> prefer not to -- maybe some celery, scallions, green pepper, etc.
> I use the same recipe for macaroni salad, just using salad macaroni
> (go figure) instead of the spuds...

That's funny- I do the same for my macaroni, but it has to be dill
pickles- Nalley's, of course!

============================

From: Joseph Littleshoes 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 12:25:02 -0700
--------
jay wrote:
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style? 

Using an aioli (garlic mayo) with paper thin slices of celery, green 
onion, small dice of green pepper and a very good mustard and some 
freshly ground black pepper is about all i need in a potato salad.

For variation and i sometimes add thin slices of daikon and/or cleric, 
chervil, tarragon, crumbled crisp bacon or small dice of smoked ham.

A friend of mine puts well drained pickled hearts of artichoke 
(commercial version in the jar) cut up in to small chunks in her potato 
salad to good effect.

There is a French version called Salade Port Royal that has its 
variations in American cooking but is basically a combination of 
potatoes, apples, green beans in mayo.

I have seen the occasional potato salad heavily seasoned with paprika, 
if a good sweet paprika is used its not bad, though the colour is not to 
my taste for such a thing.

I have read of marinated asparagus tips being used in a potato salad but 
have never done so myself.

Just for interest here is a recipe for

Salade Brimont

Mix in equal parts potatoes and artichoke bottoms cut in dice, with 
mayonnaise seasoned with curry.

Surround with crayfish tails and stoned olives seasoned with oil and 
vinegar, in small heaps separated from each other by quartered hard 
boiled eggs.  Garnish the top of the salad with sliced truffles.

============================

From: Jason Tinling 
Date: 5 Oct 2006 13:00:22 -0700
--------
jay wrote:
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style? 

Potatoes cubed and cooked, then set in the fridge for a day or so
in ziplocs w/ a splash of cider vinegar.  Dressing is a mix of sour
cream, mayo, and dijon.  Green onions chopped fine and crumbled bacon
to finish the dressing, S & P as needed.  Even better the second day,
if it lives that long. 

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 16:21:43 -0400
--------
Jason Tinling wrote:
> Potatoes cubed and cooked, then set in the fridge for a day or so
> in ziplocs w/ a splash of cider vinegar.  Dressing is a mix of sour
> cream, mayo, and dijon.  Green onions chopped fine and crumbled bacon
> to finish the dressing, S & P as needed.  Even better the second day,
> if it lives that long. 

Your potato salad sounds great to me.
I'm always undecided about if there is any notable difference if you 
cube then cook the potatoes rather than cooking them whole and peeling 
and cubing them after?? It is obviously easier to peel and cube them 
when raw, but so many people do it the other way I keep thinking I'm 
missing some subtle flavor difference...

============================

From: Jason Tinling 
Date: 5 Oct 2006 15:28:43 -0700
--------
Goomba38 wrote:
> Your potato salad sounds great to me.
> I'm always undecided about if there is any notable difference if you
> cube then cook the potatoes rather than cooking them whole and peeling
> and cubing them after?? It is obviously easier to peel and cube them
> when raw, but so many people do it the other way I keep thinking I'm
> missing some subtle flavor difference...
> Goomba

Goomba,

I typically cube mine (no peeling) then cook.  The standard in our
house is red potatoes.  I've tried boiling them whole a few times, but
was not happy with the results for a couple of reasons.

1) I like to put the vinegar and potatoes in the ziploc while the
potatoes are still warm/hot.  Getting them cut while they're still in
that stage is no fun.

2) Mismatched potato sizes = mismatched cooking times.  By cubing them
up ahead of itme, I can be confident that the pieces are all closely
matched for size and therefore cooking time.  If a few get overcooked,
they'll just get mashed into the dressing anyway.

============================

From: Steve W. 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 18:43:43 -0400
--------
Jason Tinling wrote:
> I typically cube mine (no peeling) then cook.

Seems most folks cube there spuds. Does anyone besides myself slice 
them? I usually slice them then toss them in a ziploc with a little oil 
and Italian seasoning then toss them on the grill till they are soft. 
Then I use them to make the salad.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 6 Oct 2006 01:24:12 +0200
--------
Oh pshaw, Steve W. meant to say...
> Seems most folks cube there spuds. Does anyone besides myself slice 
> them? I usually slice them then toss them in a ziploc with a little oil 
> and Italian seasoning then toss them on the grill till they are soft. 
> Then I use them to make the salad.

I slice them for German style potato salad, and cube them for American 
style potato salad.

============================

From: Rick F. 
Date: Fri, 06 Oct 2006 16:09:08 GMT
--------
Jason Tinling wrote:
> Potatoes cubed and cooked, then set in the fridge for a day or so
> in ziplocs w/ a splash of cider vinegar.  Dressing is a mix of sour
> cream, mayo, and dijon.  Green onions chopped fine and crumbled bacon
> to finish the dressing, S & P as needed.  Even better the second day,
> if it lives that long. 

Jason,

Can you suggest a ratio of the sour cream/mayo/dijon?  I'm guessing less
of the dijon than the other two, but are the sour cream & mayo about the
same amount or do you just wing it and see how the flavor goes?  Just 
curious. 

============================

From: pfoley 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 20:46:49 GMT
--------
jay wrote:
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style? 

My mother made it this way, my aunt and I have been making this way for many
years now.  You don't have to use red potatoes, but I do because it is
easier.  Adding the sugar is something new I did this year.
Potato Salad
I use the red potatoes and leave the skins on; not necessary to peel.
I boil the halved potatoes.  When drained and slightly cooled,  I then pour
some oil over the potatoes.  I put them in the fridge overnight.
The next day I cut the cold potatoes into small cubes.  I  add a chopped
onion to the potatoes.  I add very little cider vinegar possibly 1/8 cup;
salt and pepper to taste and mayo.
This recipe is very good and simple to make.  I never put mustard in my
potato salad, because I don't like a mustard flavor in my salad. This year I
did add approx. 2 tablespoons of sugar. You can decorate the top of the
salad with sliced hard boiled  eggs and some parsley.
If you think the salad needs more zing, add a tad more vinegar and maybe
some salt.

============================

From: Kent 
Date: Thu, 5 Oct 2006 14:33:28 -0700
--------
jay wrote:
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style? 

I frequently make Julia Child's French potato salad. This is quite different 
than the usual potato salad with its lack of eggs, mayo, etc. It is, 
obviously very easy, and it is very heart healthy compared to the usual. I 
find it is great for barbecue because it doesn't fight with the meat. Julia 
also uses finely m;inced shallots, as an alternative for the green onions. 
Yukon gold, or other small firm potatoes are better, we think, than Idahos 
for potato salad. Don't overcook them. A bit of firmness is better than a 
bit of mushiness

Julia Child's French Potato Salad

2 lb boiling potatoes
4 Tbsp white wine or 2 Tbsp stock or white vermouth (I didn't have any of 
that so I substituted Rice Vinegar...good with a bit of a kick)
2 Tbsp white wine vinegar, or 1 Tbsp each: vinegar and lemon juice
1 tsp prepared mustard
1/4 tsp salt
6 Tbsp olive oil
Pepper
1-2 Tbsp minced green onion
1-2 Tbsp minced parsley or other green herbs 

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 17:35:46 -0500
--------
jay wrote:
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style? 

There's room to play with this one.  Read through to the variations at
the end.  Also, Crash has been requesting that I leave out the dill
weed lately.  

                      * Exported from MasterCook *

                           Dilled Potato Salad

Recipe By     :Carol Peterson
Serving Size  : 0     Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    : Potatoes                        Salads/Dressings
                Side Dishes                     Signature Dishes

  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
  8             medium  russet potatoes -- diced
  4              large  eggs -- hard cooked
  1                cup  mayonnaise
  1         tablespoon  prepared mustard
  3         tablespoon  dill pickle juice -- *
     1/2           cup  dill pickles -- minced
     1/2      teaspoon  dill weed
     1/2      teaspoon  onion powder
  1                     salt and pepper -- to taste

* If red potatoes are used, reduce pickle juice to 2 tbsp.

1. Hard cook the eggs; chill, remove shells, and cut in half. Remove
yolks
and dice the whites. Set aside
2. Cook potatoes in water until desired tenderness. Drain; rinse under
cold, running water to stop the cooking process.
3. While potatoes are cooking, combine mashed egg yolks with remaining
ingredients.
4. Combine chilled potatoes and the sauce mixture. Add egg whites.
5. Refrigerate for several hours or overnight, to allow flavors to
blend.
6. Check for moisture. If too dry, add more pickle juice or milk until
desired consistency is achieved.
7. Sprinkle paprika on top just prior to serving, if desired.

VARIATIONS:
- Use dill pickle relish instead of chopped pickles.
- Use fresh minced onions in place of onion powder.
- Add finely chopped celery for crunchiness.
- Add a dash of tabasco sauce for a little extra zing.

============================

From: Jack Schidt® 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 23:19:03 GMT
--------
jay wrote
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style? 

I'd suggest roasting and not boiling the potatoes.  It gives them an 
earthier flavor.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 6 Oct 2006 01:26:17 +0200
--------
Oh pshaw, on Thu 05 Oct 2006 04:19:03p, Jack Schidt® meant to say...
> I'd suggest roasting and not boiling the potatoes.  It gives them an 
> earthier flavor.

Where the devil have you been?  I don't think I've seen your posts here in 
over a year.

Good to see you!!!

============================

From: "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan" 
Date: Fri, 06 Oct 2006 00:38:47 GMT
--------
Jack Schidt® wrote:
> I'd suggest roasting and not boiling the potatoes.  It gives them an 
> earthier flavor.

OMG... I haven't seen you in these parts for ages. Good to see your post.

============================

From: Little.Malice[at]gmail.communge (Little Malice)
Date: Fri, 06 Oct 2006 00:52:30 GMT
--------
One time on Usenet, "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan" said:
> OMG... I haven't seen you in these parts for ages. Good to see your post.

Unfortunately, I think we're only seeing him via a.f.b; but I'm
with you, Michael -- I miss him posting in RFC... 

============================

From: The Bubbo 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 23:19:57 GMT
--------
jay wrote:
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style? 

This is my standard potato salad
http://www.velvet-c.com/2006/06/heathers_curried_potato_salad.htm
sorry about the link but I'm in a bit of a hurry and don't feel like re-typing
it and I have formatting issues when I copy and paste.

============================

From: jennakay 
Date: Fri, 06 Oct 2006 00:22:54 GMT
--------
Like to use red potatoes. Cook through but not until mushy, add one large
chopped onion and 2 celery sticks chopped. Make dressing using about 1 cup
of Hellman's, 1/4 c evaporated milk, 1/4 c vinegar, 1 T sugar, some salt and
pepper. Taste and see if it is slightly tangy. If so, add to potatoes and
add 2 hardboiled eggs chopped. Refrigerate overnight.

============================

From: sistersu 
Date: Thu, 5 Oct 2006 20:01:29 -0500
--------
I don't know how to make potato salad using 4 or 5  potatoes. When I make it
we always have a crowd & need a lot. So I use about five lb.. potatoes,
peeled & cut up for boiling. I use about 2-3 bunches green onions,(
chopped ) five or six dill pickles, ( chopped ) & about 6-8 boiled eggs (
peeled & chopped, I like large pieces ).  About 3/4 cup of mayonnaise and a
half cup mustard, I pour about 2 Tbs. vinegar into this mixture. If you
don't need this much salad, just cut every thing down. You will have to test
your salad to see if it is too dry, ( better to be a little too dry than too
moist ). If it is too dry add more mayonnaise & mustard. Not much you can do
except add more potatoes if you get it too moist. I know this is not a
standard recipe out of a cook book, but it has worked for me and I always
get asked to bring my potato salad to events. I even like to add green
olives to mine. Some like pimentos, I don't. My salad turns out yellow &
tart. Some people make white potato salad, ( I guess they just use
mayonnaise or Miracle Whip only ) . I  use real Mayonnaise in mine ( no
Miracle Whip for me, too sweet ). I hope this helps you out. Seems like you
have a lot of different opinions about potato salad. This is just plain
potato salad & good eating. I am trying to give my way of making potato
salad. I had no idea there was so many different ways to make it.

============================

From: Leonard Blaisdell 
Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2006 19:49:45 -0700
--------
sistersu wrote:
> I don't know how to make potato salad using 4 or 5  potatoes. When I make it
> we always have a crowd & need a lot. So I use about five lb.

Five pounds would be probably seven to ten large red or yukon gold 
potatoes. I have a large russet baking potato in the pantry right now 
that will be excellent for twice baked potato for two and is one and a 
quarter pounds. I just weighed it. 
Everybody makes potato salad for a crowd, even if they regret it later.

============================

From: hob 
Date: Thu, 5 Oct 2006 20:51:11 -0500
--------
jay wrote:
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style?

1) Let the made-salad sit for a day before serving.

2) Good mayo makes good potato salad

3) boil the potatoes in salted water. Low or no-salt water makes for bland
potatoes.

3) I prefer the cooked egg yolk, mustard, and onion mixed in with the mayo,
and radish slices as well as celery for "crunch".

============================

From: jay 
Date: Fri, 06 Oct 2006 01:55:11 GMT
--------
jay wrote:
> I am lighting up the pit this weekend and want to make some potato salad to
> go with the BBQ. 

Thanks for all the input!  I am still reading all the recipes and
suggestions.  Will give it a try in the morning and let you know if it
turns out..well worth a damn this time. If it's good you guys get the
blame. 

============================

From: n_cramerSPAM[at]pacbell.net
Date: 06 Oct 2006 02:42:20 GMT
--------
jay wrote:
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style? 

Did you see Saerah's Grandma Trudy's potato salad

10 pounds of potatoes, boiled, peeled, and cut into 6ths or 8ths depending
on size

a dozen hard boiled eggs, 2 sliced into wedges, the rest peeled and
cut into small chunks

a few green onions, cleaned and sliced the long way

5-6 cups of miracle whip (you can add a bit of vinegar and sugar to mayo
for a similar taste if you don't use mw)

a pound of bacon, cut into small pieces and fried up

two heaping cups of chopped celery

a heaping cup (or more, if you like onions) of chopped onion

when everything is cooled a bit, mix everything except the green onions and
egg wedges, and season with seasoned salt and pepper.  Use the egg wedges
and green onion for garnish, and sprinkle with paprika.

makes two big bowls worth of potato salad. Serve warm or cold.

============================

From: Ludmillia 
Date: 5 Oct 2006 23:29:50 -0700
--------
jay wrote:
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style?

This may not be much, but first, I put a little onion, boullion, and
salt 'n pepper in the water when I cook the potatoes, sometimes garlic
goes in there.  It gets very mild. (I hate big chunks of just potato
with no other flavor).

Then, I make the sauce separately and taste until I like it. Usually,
it has mayo, dry mustard, both sweet and dill pickle, a little green
onion, vinegar and paprika. Boiled egg is a must-have.  Sometimes, If I
have them, some good green olives or capers get sprinkled on the top,
or served on the side, but not mixed in.

Also, the flavor is better if refriged overnight.

I guess the trick is to mix a little sauce with a little potato, and
adjust until it tastes fine to you.  Sometimes people like big, al
dente potato chunks laced with sauce. At the other end of the spectrum
is almost mashed potato.

============================

From: Stan Horwitz 
Date: Fri, 06 Oct 2006 08:01:48 -0400
--------
jay wrote:
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style?

My mom's potato salad is always a big hit. Frankly, I have no idea why 
because its just cut up boiled potatoes, shredded carrots, thinly sliced 
onion, mayo, salt, pepper. She just takes a bunch of potatoes, boils 
them 'til they are soft, chills them for a couple of hours, then dumps a 
jar's worth of Hellmann's mayo into the bowl with the other ingredients. 
I don't think there's ever been any of that potato salad left after one 
of her parties. To me, its just potatoes with mayo mixed in.

On the other hand, a friend's mom makes awesome German potato salad. I 
won't repeat the recipe here, but its easy enough to find simply by 
googling "German potato salad" because she makes a very traditional 
version with sliced (not chunks) of potatoes, hard boiled eggs, and lots 
of bacon.

============================

From: "-L." 
Date: 6 Oct 2006 18:16:18 -0700
--------
jay wrote:
> Does anyone have some tips that may help or a recipe that they are proud of
> that is not German style?

I use Miracle Whip, a dash of yellow mustard, salt, pepper and celery
seed in my dressing.  I add chopped celery, chopped or grated carrots
and sometimes a little bit of green onion.  People *love* my potato
salad and request it often.

============================

From: Gregory Morrow 
Date: Sun, 08 Oct 2006 23:15:56 GMT
--------
-L. wrote:
> I use Miracle Whip, a dash of yellow mustard, salt, pepper and celery
> seed in my dressing.  I add chopped celery, chopped or grated carrots
> and sometimes a little bit of green onion.  People *love* my potato
> salad and request it often.

Sounds like a sure hit in the ghetto...

============================

From: Peter Aitken 
Date: Mon, 09 Oct 2006 12:06:46 GMT
--------
gregorymorrow says...
>Sounds like a sure hit in the ghetto...

Yes, I bet that such a moronic comment is in fact the best that you can 
do.

============================

From: Kevin S. Wilson 
Date: Tue, 10 Oct 2006 10:21:14 -0600
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
>Yes, I bet that such a moronic comment is in fact the best that you can 
>do.

Don't be too hasty. I have a feeling he hasn't even begun to plumb the
depths of his moronocity.


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