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Subject: Potato Salad tricks
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 07:15:48 -0500
--------
I saw MN Bob's Miracle Whip Defense for Potato Salad in another thread.
I remember eating potato salad at a friend's and it was really really 
good.  She boils red-skin potatoes and peels and slices them while hot 
(or at least warm), then dumps some Wishbone Italian over them in a bowl 
until they're cool, then adds the rest of her ingredients and dressing - 
mayo-type.  Something about that oil and vinegar dressing does a lot for 
the salad.

I made some potato salad last week just for the heck of it and 
discovered I didn't have any Wishbone Italian on hand so I dumped some 
cheap balsamic vinegar on the cooked spuds.  The vinegar was dark brown 
and didn't do a thing for the color of the salad.  It was right tasty, 
though.

============================

From: Rhonda Anderson 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 12:28:42 GMT
--------
My sister makes a potato salad that has bacon, hard boiled eggs and mint in 
it. It's really good, and she is required to make it each Christmas .

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 14:49:40 -0500
--------
Rhonda Anderson wrote:
> My sister makes a potato salad that has bacon, hard boiled eggs and mint in 
> it. It's really good, and she is required to make it each Christmas .

Oh, jeez, Rhonda!!  I thought you were my FRIEND!  MINT in potato salad?  
With BACON?  Lord, I'm going to need a burning permit for all the 
candles I'll be lighting. . . . buncha potato salad freaks.  Gotta save 
their souls.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 11 Apr 2006 21:56:27 +0200
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Melba's Jammin'? 
> Oh, jeez, Rhonda!!  I thought you were my FRIEND!  MINT in potato salad?
> With BACON?  Lord, I'm going to need a burning permit for all the 
> candles I'll be lighting. . . . buncha potato salad freaks.  Gotta save 
> their souls.

LOL!  While you're at it, Barb, you better light yet another one for me.  I 
hate hard-boiled eggs in potato salad. :-)

============================

From: Rhonda Anderson 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 00:30:25 GMT
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> Oh, jeez, Rhonda!!  I thought you were my FRIEND!  MINT in potato
> salad?  With BACON?  Lord, I'm going to need a burning permit for all
> the candles I'll be lighting. . . . buncha potato salad freaks.  Gotta
> save their souls.

I am your friend. And as your friend I accept these apparent pyromanic 
tendencies, just as you'll need to accept my apparently abnormal potato 
salad leanings . 

Actually, I'm not a big potato salad eater. I've tried one or two, and 
really like this one my sister makes. It only gets made once or twice a 
year, though, and I leave it to my sister to do it for Christmas. Pretty 
much all the variations that have been mentioned here sound fine to me 
though. 

============================

From: Harry Demidavicius 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 04:18:59 GMT
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>Oh, jeez, Rhonda!!  I thought you were my FRIEND!  MINT in potato salad?  
>With BACON?  Lord, I'm going to need a burning permit for all the 
>candles I'll be lighting. . . . buncha potato salad freaks.  Gotta save 
>their souls.

Dill Pickles? sauerkraut? Dill? Oil? onions?

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 12 Apr 2006 06:29:03 +0200
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Harry Demidavicius? 
> Dill Pickles? sauerkraut? Dill? Oil? onions?

Good one, Harry!

============================

From: Doug Kanter 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 12:35:12 GMT
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> I made some potato salad last week just for the heck of it and
> discovered I didn't have any Wishbone Italian on hand so I dumped some
> cheap balsamic vinegar on the cooked spuds.  The vinegar was dark brown
> and didn't do a thing for the color of the salad.  It was right tasty,
> though.

Try it with Newman's Caesar dressing (not creamy), instead of Wishbone. 
Nice! 

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 14:48:27 -0500
--------
Doug Kanter wrote:
> Try it with Newman's Caesar dressing (not creamy), instead of Wishbone. 
> Nice! 

Might could do that since I'm out of Wishbone.  

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 11 Apr 2006 21:55:26 +0200
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Melba's Jammin'? 
> Might could do that since I'm out of Wishbone.   Newman on grocery list and hopes to remember why when she's at Cub>

I guess I feel the same way about bottled dressings used for this purpose
as you do about chicken broth.  I would not want that favor in my potato
salad. 

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 11 Apr 2006 14:44:56 +0200
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Melba's Jammin'?
> I made some potato salad last week just for the heck of it and 
> discovered I didn't have any Wishbone Italian on hand so I dumped some 
> cheap balsamic vinegar on the cooked spuds.  The vinegar was dark brown 
> and didn't do a thing for the color of the salad.  It was right tasty, 
> though.

I think it was in from an early edition of Joy of Cooking that I learned to 
generously sprinkle the hot potatoes with chicken broth and cider vinegar, 
and I've been doing it ever since.  If I'm using them, this is also when I 
add celery seed, dried dillweed, or othe dried herbs.

============================

From: Nathalie Chiva 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 18:42:15 +0200
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>I think it was in from an early edition of Joy of Cooking that I learned to 
>generously sprinkle the hot potatoes with chicken broth and cider vinegar, 
>and I've been doing it ever since.  If I'm using them, this is also when I 
>add celery seed, dried dillweed, or othe dried herbs.

Yup. I dump the as-hot-as-possible, peeled and sliced potatoes in
chicken broth, and leave them there till cool. Then I drain then and
season (sometimes with a sour cream dressing, sometimes with a
traditional French olive oil and vinegar dressing).
That technique makes for a very yummy and creamy salad, without having
to douse the potatoes in dressing.

Nathalie in Switzerland

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 14:47:28 -0500
--------
Nathalie Chiva wrote:
> Yup. I dump the as-hot-as-possible, peeled and sliced potatoes in
> chicken broth, and leave them there till cool.
> Nathalie in Switzerland

Oh, Alex!!!  Not you, too, Nathalie?  Chicken broth??  No can do.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 11 Apr 2006 21:54:07 +0200
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Melba's Jammin'? 
> Oh, Alex!!!  Not you, too, Nathalie?  Chicken broth??  No can do.

Don't knock it 'til you've tried it, Barb, but I know you won't try it. 


============================

From: Nathalie Chiva 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 22:15:47 +0200
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>Oh, Alex!!!  Not you, too, Nathalie?  Chicken broth??  No can do.

Just try it :-)

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 14:46:31 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> I think it was in from an early edition of Joy of Cooking that I learned to 
> generously sprinkle the hot potatoes with chicken broth and cider vinegar, 
> and I've been doing it ever since.  If I'm using them, this is also when I 
> add celery seed, dried dillweed, or othe dried herbs.

Chicken broth?  Why do you want with chicken broth in your potato salad?  
That Rombauer broad was whacked out on this one.  OTOH, I've never tried 
it.  Have to plan to, either.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 11 Apr 2006 21:48:59 +0200
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Melba's Jammin'? 
> Chicken broth?  Why do you want with chicken broth in your potato salad?
> That Rombauer broad was whacked out on this one.  OTOH, I've never
> tried it.  Have to plan to, either.

Well, I like it.  There are some other things that folks put in their 
potato salad that I can't fathom either, but someone must like it. :-)

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 22:44:14 -0500
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Well, I like it.  There are some other things that folks put in their 
> potato salad that I can't fathom either, but someone must like it. :-)

No doubt.  But I just don't think I can bring myself to put chicken 
broth on spuds for potato salad.  I can't get there, Wayne.  Ain't 
diversity swell?

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 12 Apr 2006 06:09:08 +0200
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Melba's Jammin'?
> No doubt.  But I just don't think I can bring myself to put chicken 
> broth on spuds for potato salad.  I can't get there, Wayne.  Ain't 
> diversity swell?

Understood.  There are lots of things that each of us can't get our head 
around.  For example, I can't stand hardboiled eggs in potato salad, while 
most others like it.  

============================

From: azazello[at]koroviev.de (Victor Sack)
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 23:48:54 +0200
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> Chicken broth?  Why do you want with chicken broth in your potato salad?

Chicken or beef broth is fairly standard in some Bavarian, Franconian
and Swabian potato salad versions.  Vinegar, as well as pickles or
chives are also present and the salad is usually served warm.  Versions
further north in Germany are often completely different, as they tend to
be more complicated, contain mayo, and are served cold.

Bubba

============================

From: Ward Abbott 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 13:17:14 GMT
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> She boils red-skin potatoes and peels and slices them while hot 
>(or at least warm), then dumps some Wishbone Italian over them in a bowl 
>until they're cool,

Barb...I discovered long ago that the texture of the potato is very
important to me.   Cooking a whole potato give you a mushy outside and
the center of the potato is not the same consistency.   So....I
started peeling and dicing my spuds to equal sized pieces.    Now
every piece has the same cooking time and the time cooked has been
reduced by at least half.  

You can take out one piece from the boiling water and verify it to be
al dente.   I like a bit of a crunch when you bite into the potato
dice.  There is nothing more nasty than overcooked  mashed potato
salad.   

After draining the potatoes, while still hot,  add the vinegar, sugar
and spices of your choice...mine being dill weed onions, celery and
boiled egg slices.  Add your Miracle Whip and if your salad is a
little to thick...use vinegar to thin the consistency.   Chill
UNCOVERED since you don't want any remaining steam to make the salad
watery.  

The Fine Art of Cooking involves personal choice.  
Many preferences, ingredients, and procedures 
may not be consistent with what you know to be true. 

As with any recipe, you may find your personal 
intervention will be necessary. Bon Appetit! 

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 14:45:05 -0500
--------
Ward Abbott wrote:

> Barb...I discovered long ago that the texture of the potato is very
> important to me.   

Yeah, me, too.  

>      Cooking a whole potato give you a mushy outside and
> the center of the potato is not the same consistency.   So....I 
> started peeling and dicing my spuds to equal sized pieces.    Now 
> every piece has the same cooking time and the time cooked has been 
> reduced by at least half.  

Mmmm, I want to be cooking my salad spuds with their jackets on.

> You can take out one piece from the boiling water and verify it to be
> al dente.   I like a bit of a crunch when you bite into the potato
> dice.  

Better you than me, darlin'.  I like tender, not al dente in my 
potatoes.  I find red-skin potatoes to be yust poifect.  And I try to 
select spuds of similar size so cooktime will be about the same.  If I 
get a couple out of size ones that I have to cook, I'm not above pulling 
the smaller ones out when they're tender (just) and leaving the others 
to continue to perfection.  :-)

>   There is nothing more nasty than overcooked  mashed potato
> salad.   
> 
> After draining the potatoes, while still hot,  add the vinegar, sugar
> and spices of your choice...mine being dill weed onions, celery and
> boiled egg slices.  

Dill weed, eh?  Good plan.  Next time.

> Add your Miracle Whip and if your salad is a
> little to thick...use vinegar to thin the consistency.   Chill
> UNCOVERED since you don't want any remaining steam to make the salad
> watery.  

Ack!  You're putting Miracle Whip and all the rest into the hot spuds?  
Eeew.  Obviously you love it, but it doesn't appeal to me.  At'all.
 
> The Fine Art of Cooking involves personal choice.  Many preferences, 
> ingredients, and procedures may not be consistent with what you know 
> to be true. 

What a nice way to say all that.

> As with any recipe, you may find your personal 
> intervention will be necessary. Bon Appetit! 

Gonna take more than intervention here, Ward.  I can see months of 
therapy after the intervention.  "-)

Dobru' chut'!

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 16:12:15 -0500
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>Better you than me, darlin'.  I like tender, not al dente in my 
>potatoes.  I find red-skin potatoes to be yust poifect.  And I try to 
>select spuds of similar size so cooktime will be about the same.  If I 
>get a couple out of size ones that I have to cook, I'm not above pulling 
>the smaller ones out when they're tender (just) and leaving the others 
>to continue to perfection.  :-)

I use russets.  They're more absorbent, and collect a lot more flavor
than the red'uns do.  Also more tender.  I may be the only one on the
planet who prefers them, though.  Besides Crash.

Carol

============================

From: notbob 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 17:24:00 -0500
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> I use russets.  They're more absorbent, and collect a lot more flavor
> than the red'uns do.  Also more tender.  I may be the only one on the
> planet who prefers them, though.  Besides Crash.

Nope!  I use them, too.  Only I use both, russets and red or yukon.
The waxy potatoes hold together while the russets break down to
provide a binder and flavor carrier with the mayo.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 17:27:23 -0500
--------
notbob wrote:
>Nope!  I use them, too.  Only I use both, russets and red or yukon.
>The waxy potatoes hold together while the russets break down to
>provide a binder and flavor carrier with the mayo.

Yeah, you've got to cook them until they are just barely soft, and run
them under cold water, pronto.  Mine hold their shape just fine.  I
always make my potato salad the day before it's going to be eaten, and
the potatoes have never broken down on me.

============================

From: Kate Connally 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 14:22:57 -0400
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> I use russets.  They're more absorbent, and collect a lot more flavor
> than the red'uns do.  Also more tender.  I may be the only one on the
> planet who prefers them, though.  Besides Crash.

Nope, I and most of my family prefer russets.  I like them for
the same reasons you do.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 13:59:22 -0500
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
>Nope, I and most of my family prefer russets.  I like them for
>the same reasons you do.

I really, really don't care for potato salad made with waxy varieties.
I guess it's a matter of what you become accustomed to.

Welcome to the absorbent potato club!

============================

From: Nancy Young 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 15:06:41 -0400
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
> Welcome to the absorbent potato club!

Is that like Depends?

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 14:08:24 -0500
--------
Nancy Young wrote:
>Is that like Depends?

Better Depends than o.b.

============================

From: sf 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 12:52:06 -0700
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
>  I use russets.  They're more absorbent, and collect a lot more flavor
>  than the red'uns do.  Also more tender.  I may be the only one on the
>  planet who prefers them, though.  Besides Crash.

Count me in for russets.  Red potatoes are nice every now & then if
someone else serves them to me, but I don't even consider them when I
think about "potato salad" (and there are no pickles of any kind in
mine). 

 ;)

============================

From: Andy 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 15:05:46 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
> Count me in for russets.  Red potatoes are nice every now & then if
> someone else serves them to me, but I don't even consider them when I
> think about "potato salad" (and there are no pickles of any kind in
> mine). 

Is adding some portion of crushed potato chips at the last minute for 
crunch a bad idea?

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 12 Apr 2006 22:31:59 +0200
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Andy?
> Is adding some portion of crushed potato chips at the last minute for 
> crunch a bad idea?

For me, it would be a bad idea, as they would become soggy very quickly.  
Consider if you have a sandwich, chips, and a pickle on your plate, and how 
quickly the chips get soggy if the pickle juice touches them.  For crunch, 
consider crisp bacon (last minute), chopped water chestnuts, chopped 
jicama, etc. 

============================

From: dee 
Date: 13 Apr 2006 01:14:01 -0700
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> For me, it would be a bad idea, as they would become soggy very quickly.
> Consider if you have a sandwich, chips, and a pickle on your plate, and how
> quickly the chips get soggy if the pickle juice touches them.  For crunch,
> consider crisp bacon (last minute), chopped water chestnuts, chopped
> jicama, etc.

A friend once taught me the delicacy of banana and crisps sandwich..

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 13 Apr 2006 11:10:17 +0200
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it dee?
> A friend once taught me the delicacy of banana and crisps sandwich..

I'd like that.

============================

From: sf 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 13:39:39 -0700
--------
Andy wrote:
>  Is adding some portion of crushed potato chips at the last minute for 
>  crunch a bad idea?

I think the chips will get soggy immediately, better to eat them
separately.  If you want crunch, add some chopped celery and sliced
radishes to your potato salad mixture.

Here's a different idea: use those potato chips as the crunchy coating
instead of cornflakes for oven fried chicken.  Serve with a side of
potato salad.

============================

From: serene (Sandra Vannoy) 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 13:59:27 -0700
--------
Andy wrote:
>Is adding some portion of crushed potato chips at the last minute for 
>crunch a bad idea?

That's just bizarre enough to make me want to try it.  Well, maybe
not.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 15:09:59 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
>Count me in for russets.  Red potatoes are nice every now & then if
>someone else serves them to me, but I don't even consider them when I
>think about "potato salad" (and there are no pickles of any kind in
>mine). 

YAY!  We're not on the endangered list!

============================

From: sf 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 13:41:38 -0700
--------
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
>  YAY!  We're not on the endangered list!
  
Have you ever noticed that potato salad (our kind) and tomato sauce
are two things that always taste better the next day?

============================

From: Janet Bostwick 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 17:45:48 -0600
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> Ward Abbott wrote:
>> You can take out one piece from the boiling water and verify it to be
>> al dente.   I like a bit of a crunch when you bite into the potato
>> dice.

Oh, no-o-o-, that makes me gag.

> Better you than me, darlin'.  I like tender, not al dente in my
> potatoes.  I find red-skin potatoes to be yust poifect.  And I try to
> select spuds of similar size so cooktime will be about the same.  If I
> get a couple out of size ones that I have to cook, I'm not above pulling
> the smaller ones out when they're tender (just) and leaving the others
> to continue to perfection.  :-)

That's the way to do it, exactly.  Then if you are using pickles in your 
potato salad, pour a little of the pickle juice on the hot, peeled, cubed 
potatoes instead of salad dressing.
snip

> Dill weed, eh?  Good plan.  Next time.

Dill weed is nice.  I usually make a different potato salad when using dill 
weed. . .no pickles.

============================

From: Joseph Littleshoes 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 00:47:18 GMT
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>Better you than me, darlin'.  I like tender, not al dente in my
>potatoes.  I find red-skin potatoes to be yust poifect.  And I try to
>select spuds of similar size so cooktime will be about the same.  If I
>get a couple out of size ones that I have to cook, I'm not above pulling
>the smaller ones out when they're tender (just) and leaving the others
>to continue to perfection.  :-)

I do much the same thing with the white potatoes, but i only make potato 
salad cause the 'elderly relative' likes it so much, i prefer a nice 
pasta salad with smoked salmon and feta cheese.

============================

From: Nancy1 
Date: 11 Apr 2006 07:06:10 -0700
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> I made some potato salad last week just for the heck of it and
> discovered I didn't have any Wishbone Italian on hand so I dumped some
> cheap balsamic vinegar on the cooked spuds.  The vinegar was dark brown
> and didn't do a thing for the color of the salad.  It was right tasty,
> though.

My recipe always includes vinegar ... just regular vinegar, sprinkled
on the potatoes while they're hot, along with a tiny bit of sugar and
the relish.  After this has all cooled, I add the rest of the
ingredients and the mayo and a small amount of yellow mustard.

============================

From: sueb 
Date: 11 Apr 2006 09:21:07 -0700
--------
Nancy1 wrote:
> My recipe always includes vinegar ... just regular vinegar, sprinkled
> on the potatoes while they're hot, along with a tiny bit of sugar and
> the relish.  After this has all cooled, I add the rest of the
> ingredients and the mayo and a small amount of yellow mustard.

Pretty similar to what I do, just in a different order.  I make a
dressing with olive oil, red wine vinegar, garlic, mustard, and salt.
Cut red potatoes into chunks.  Boil, drain, put into the bowl.  Put the
dressing on while potatoes are hot, then put it into the refrigerator.
Keep stirring it until cooled.  Then add mayo, celery, eggs, onion,
pickles, etc.

What I don't ever understand is why people buy stuff like Wishbone
Italian dressing when it's so easy to make salad dressing with
ingredients that everyone has in their kitchen already.

Susan B.

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 14:39:25 -0500
--------
sueb wrote:
> What I don't ever understand is why people buy stuff like Wishbone
> Italian dressing when it's so easy to make salad dressing with
> ingredients that everyone has in their kitchen already.

Because I like it.  And my homemade doesn't taste as good as the 
Wishbone.  (Good Seasons?)

============================

From: Boron Elgar 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 16:50:35 -0400
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>Because I like it.  And my homemade doesn't taste as good as the 
>Wishbone.  (Good Seasons?)

Wishbone Italian is a staple in my house. I don't use it for regular
salad dressing, but I do use it in marinades or ingredient in other
dishes. I baste roast chicken and turkey with it, too.  I wouldn't be
without it.

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 22:42:00 -0500
--------
Boron Elgar wrote:
> Wishbone Italian is a staple in my house. I don't use it for regular
> salad dressing, but I do use it in marinades or ingredient in other
> dishes. I baste roast chicken and turkey with it, too.  I wouldn't be
> without it.

Thank you.  I am vindicated.

============================

From: George 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 17:17:57 -0400
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> Because I like it.  And my homemade doesn't taste as good as the 
> Wishbone.  (Good Seasons?)

Just add a bunch of salt and sugar to most anything homemade to 
approximate a bottled version.

============================

From: sf 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 12:44:16 -0700
--------
George wrote:
>  Just add a bunch of salt and sugar to most anything homemade to 
>  approximate a bottled version.

No salt is needed and only a pinch of sugar, so if that's what she
likes who are you to say it's wrong?

============================

From: George 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 16:33:11 -0400
--------
sf wrote:
> No salt is needed and only a pinch of sugar, so if that's what she
> likes who are you to say it's wrong?

But I didn't say anything about if she is right or wrong for liking it.

For some reason "wishbone" and similar bottled products seem be be 
regarded as having special qualities. All I did is mention that you can 
take any homemade recipe and add a bunch of sugar and salt and get the 
same result. Just read the label: oil, vinegar, corn syrup, salt, 
spices. Even in the case of their "robusto" product where you can see a 
huge amount of garlic in the bottle the garlic is noted after the corn 
syrup and salt.

============================

From: Nathalie Chiva 
Date: Thu, 13 Apr 2006 09:27:15 +0200
--------
George wrote:
>For some reason "wishbone" and similar bottled products seem be be 
>regarded as having special qualities. All I did is mention that you can 
>take any homemade recipe and add a bunch of sugar and salt and get the 
>same result. Just read the label: oil, vinegar, corn syrup, salt, 
>spices. Even in the case of their "robusto" product where you can see a 
>huge amount of garlic in the bottle the garlic is noted after the corn 
>syrup and salt.

Don't forget the xanthan gum and other niceties.
I used bottled dressing when we were renovating the kitchen (and thus
kitchenless for 4 weeks) 2 years ago. Yuck. Ended up throwing it all
(I had bought 3 different brand bottles) away and dressing the Italian
way, on the salad directly, with salt, pepper, balsamic vinegar and
EVOO. Muuuuuch better, and takes all of 30 seconds.

============================

From: sf 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 12:40:25 -0700
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>  Because I like it.  And my homemade doesn't taste as good as the 
>  Wishbone.  (Good Seasons?)

Probably Good Seasons.... I see it comes in bottles too.
http://www.kraftfoods.com/goodseasons/

============================

From: Lisa Smith 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 16:37:02 GMT
--------
Nancy1 wrote:
> My recipe always includes vinegar ... just regular vinegar, sprinkled
> on the potatoes while they're hot, along with a tiny bit of sugar and
> the relish.  After this has all cooled, I add the rest of the
> ingredients and the mayo and a small amount of yellow mustard.

The only potato salad recipe I do now is not traditional,  DH and I prefer
it to the regular stuff hands down. I can't remember off hand where I got it
from, but it was about 3 years ago that I started making it.
It has potatoes, bacon, egg, blue cheese and creamy dressing made from sour
cream, mayo, garlic Dijon mustard and S&P. Some people love it, others can't
get over the fact that it doesn't have celery or relish or that vinegary
tang associated with regular potato salad.

Lisa aka Pagemaster

============================

From: kilikini 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 16:50:29 GMT
--------
Lisa Smith wrote:
> The only potato salad recipe I do now is not traditional,  DH and I prefer
> it to the regular stuff hands down. I can't remember off hand where I got it
> from, but it was about 3 years ago that I started making it.
> It has potatoes, bacon, egg, blue cheese and creamy dressing made from sour
> cream, mayo, garlic Dijon mustard and S&P. Some people love it, others can't
> get over the fact that it doesn't have celery or relish or that vinegary
> tang associated with regular potato salad.

Ooooooh, that sounds wonderful, Lisa!  (Personally, I'd do without the blue
cheese, but that's just me.  )  That might even work with some tiny cubes
of cheddar instead.  I may have to try this.  Thanks!

============================

From: Lisa Smith 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 17:18:48 GMT
--------
kilikini wrote:
> Ooooooh, that sounds wonderful, Lisa!  (Personally, I'd do without the blue
> cheese, but that's just me.  )  That might even work with some tiny cubes
> of cheddar instead.  I may have to try this.  Thanks!

A sharp cheddar would be pretty yummy. I've made this with feta  and have
also made this with goat cheese. Ricotta salata could be interesting. I
personally love blue cheese but anything with a bit of a sharpness would
work.

============================

From: Jason Tinling 
Date: 11 Apr 2006 12:01:31 -0700
--------
Lisa Smith wrote:
> The only potato salad recipe I do now is not traditional,  DH and I prefer
> it to the regular stuff hands down. I can't remember off hand where I got it
> from, but it was about 3 years ago that I started making it.
> It has potatoes, bacon, egg, blue cheese and creamy dressing made from sour
> cream, mayo, garlic Dijon mustard and S&P. Some people love it, others can't
> get over the fact that it doesn't have celery or relish or that vinegary
> tang associated with regular potato salad.

I do a salad similar to yours, Lisa.

Red potatoes cubed and cooked, then set in the fridge for a day or so
in ziplocs w/ a splash of cider vinegar.  Dressing is a mix of sour
cream, mayo, and dijon.  Green onions chopped fine and crumbled bacon
to finish the dressing, S & P as needed.  Even better the second day,
if it lives that long.

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 14:37:35 -0500
--------
Lisa Smith wrote:
> The only potato salad recipe I do now is not traditional, It has 
> potatoes, bacon, egg, blue cheese and creamy dressing made from sour 
> cream, mayo, garlic Dijon mustard and S&P. 

I'll light a candle.

============================

From: Harry Demidavicius 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 04:23:06 GMT
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>I'll light a candle.

Go for Two . . . . 

============================

From: Ernest 
Date: 11 Apr 2006 14:04:50 -0700
--------
Lisa Smith wrote:
> The only potato salad recipe I do now is not traditional,  DH and I prefer
> it to the regular stuff hands down. I can't remember off hand where I got it
> from, but it was about 3 years ago that I started making it.
> It has potatoes, bacon, egg, blue cheese and creamy dressing made from sour
> cream, mayo, garlic Dijon mustard and S&P. Some people love it, others can't
> get over the fact that it doesn't have celery or relish or that vinegary
> tang associated with regular potato salad.

I've never been a big potato salad person myself, but that sounds
downright tastey.  Well, minus the egg, but I'm a bit weird in how much
I dislike boiled eggs.  I'll have to try it sometime.  :)

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 14:36:37 -0500
--------
Nancy1 wrote:
> My recipe always includes vinegar ... just regular vinegar, sprinkled
> on the potatoes while they're hot, along with a tiny bit of sugar and
> the relish.  After this has all cooled, I add the rest of the
> ingredients and the mayo and a small amount of yellow mustard.

Ah, you're a relish person.  Sweet or Dill?  I've never been wild about 
pickle relish in my potato salad - but then I don't come from it and 
I've never tasted yours.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 16:00:35 -0500
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>Ah, you're a relish person.  Sweet or Dill?  I've never been wild about 
>pickle relish in my potato salad

I use it when I don't feel like mincing pickles.  Dill.

Carol

============================

From: Kate Connally 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 14:26:46 -0400
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:

> I saw MN Bob's Miracle Whip Defense for Potato Salad in another thread.
> I remember eating potato salad at a friend's and it was really really
> good.  She boils red-skin potatoes and peels and slices them while hot
> (or at least warm), then dumps some Wishbone Italian over them in a bowl
> until they're cool, then adds the rest of her ingredients and dressing -
> mayo-type.  Something about that oil and vinegar dressing does a lot for
> the salad.

My family used to do that with Kraft Miracle French in place
of the Italian dressing.  We always put it on the potatoes while
they were hot and then let them cool before adding the mayo, etc.

> I made some potato salad last week just for the heck of it and
> discovered I didn't have any Wishbone Italian on hand so I dumped some
> cheap balsamic vinegar on the cooked spuds.  The vinegar was dark brown
> and didn't do a thing for the color of the salad.  It was right tasty,
> though.

That sounds yummy.

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 14:35:45 -0500
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
> My family used to do that with Kraft Miracle French in place
> of the Italian dressing.  We always put it on the potatoes while
> they were hot and then let them cool before adding the mayo, etc.

Is the Kraft Miracle French red/orange/pinkish?  Or basically an oil and 
vinegar dressing?  I'm thinking that the PS with a blush would be sort 
of unappealing to me.  About like the dark balsamic.  :-)

============================

From: Kate Connally 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 14:19:13 -0400
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> Is the Kraft Miracle French red/orange/pinkish?  Or basically an oil and
> vinegar dressing?  I'm thinking that the PS with a blush would be sort
> of unappealing to me.  About like the dark balsamic.  :-)

It's a deep orangey red.  But it gives the potato salad a nice
pale orangey color.  You don't use enough to make it really dark.
It's very pale.  I don't even know if you can get Miracle French
anymore.  I think they quit making it.  I've heard that Catalina
dressing is similar.

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2006 13:57:53 -0500
--------
Kate Connally wrote:
> I don't even know if you can get Miracle French
>anymore.  I think they quit making it.  I've heard that Catalina
>dressing is similar.

Catalina glows in the dark.  Can't belive it's the only dressing I'd
eat when I was a kid.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright 
Date: 12 Apr 2006 21:20:35 +0200
--------
Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Damsel in dis Dress?
> Catalina glows in the dark.  Can't belive it's the only dressing I'd
> eat when I was a kid.

Then you could eat salad in the dark!

============================

From: The Cook 
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2006 15:53:07 -0400
--------
My ISL makes a great potato salad with the following ingredients.

potato
eggs
celery
onion
Mayonnaise
salt
pepper
herbes de provence -- the real thing that a friend of theirs brings
back from France.  She shares with me.

I have adopted the recipe and use it all the time now.

============================

From: aem 
Date: 11 Apr 2006 13:10:52 -0700
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> I made some potato salad last week just for the heck of it and
> discovered I didn't have any Wishbone Italian on hand so I dumped some
> cheap balsamic vinegar on the cooked spuds.  The vinegar was dark brown
> and didn't do a thing for the color of the salad.  It was right tasty,
> though.

Vinegar seems standard, and the notion of adding it immediately to the
hot potatoes is excellent.  No doubt balsamic would be great but I
always use cider vinegar.  Another thread today got me looking at the
old cookbooks on line and I found this variation from 1886 featuring a
really special added ingredient.

from Miss Corson's Practical American Cookery and Household Management.
New York: Dodd, Mead & Co., 1886.

                       Beet and Potato Salad

"Use equal quantities of boiled new potatoes and new beets; peel them
while they are still hot, cut them in half-inch dice, season them with
salt and pepper, and dress them with vinegar and plenty of good
salad-oil; or with a salad-dressing made according to the recipe given
with the watercress salad."   [which is 3 TB oil, 1 TB vinegar, salt
and pepper]       -aem


============================

From: dee 
Date: 13 Apr 2006 00:44:30 -0700
--------
aem wrote:
> Vinegar seems standard, and the notion of adding it immediately to the
> hot potatoes is excellent. 

I had the impression that balsamic vinegar and extra virgin olive oil
is the standard for salad dressing, this might be because chefs do it
on tele numerous times.  Maybe potatoe salad is slightly different.  I
like wild rocket leaves in most salads; it has a nutty flavour.

============================

From: PickyJaz 
Date: 11 Apr 2006 14:17:24 -0700
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> I saw MN Bob's Miracle Whip Defense for Potato Salad in another thread....(snip)

I cannot tolerate Miracle Whip in place of mayonaise, with one
exception that also has an exception.  A former family member was
pretty much a horrid cook, but her potato salad was the best I'd ever
tasted.  Her recipe for same has become mine, and it's rather a puzzle
to me.  The salad is put together however one cares to, but the
dressing is made with Miracle Whip instead of mayo, and with just a wee
splash of vanilla extract that merely seems to snuff out the vinegar
bite M-Whip could normally distress me with.  Odd, eh?

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Thu, 13 Apr 2006 07:59:34 -0500
--------
PickyJaz wrote:
>   Her recipe for same has become mine, and it's rather a puzzle
> to me.  The salad is put together however one cares to, but the
> dressing is made with Miracle Whip instead of mayo, and with just a wee
> splash of vanilla extract that merely seems to snuff out the vinegar

Odd?  Odd?  ODD?  Odd doesn't even come close, Miz Jeanine!!  LOL!

============================

From: spope33[at]speedymail.org (Steve Pope)
Date: Thu, 13 Apr 2006 03:37:47 +0000 (UTC)
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
>I saw MN Bob's Miracle Whip Defense for Potato Salad in another thread.
>I remember eating potato salad at a friend's and it was really really 
>good.  She boils red-skin potatoes and peels and slices them while hot 
>(or at least warm), then dumps some Wishbone Italian over them in a bowl 
>until they're cool, then adds the rest of her ingredients and dressing - 
>mayo-type.  Something about that oil and vinegar dressing does a lot for 
>the salad.

It's definitely a good trick to dress the potatos (at least partially)
while they're still warm.  I will usually slice them before cooking them,
then dress them with olive oil and vinegar (often cider vinegar)
while still hot, then let them cool before assembling the salad.
You could do the whole thing warm but I worry they will mush
up too much.

After assembling it seems to take six hours of refrgeration
for it to set, or blend, or whatever.


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