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Subject: salt potatoes?
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: xdmsx[at]aol.com (XdmsX)
Date: 13 Jun 2001 20:55:45 GMT
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Does anyone have a recipe for boiled potatoes where you use a pound or 2 of
salt in the boiling water for the potatoes?

Just want to be sure to get the quantities right.

Thanks,

Diana

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From: Laura 
Date: Wed, 13 Jun 2001 21:09:38 GMT
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my mother in law from north of syracuse always sais it is a pound of potatos
pound of salt.  IMO (from a someone who did not have salt potatoes till they
were an adult)  I use a LOT less salt - like 1/4 cup at most.

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From: Naomi Lynne Pardue 
Date: 14 Jun 2001 19:27:23 GMT
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> Just want to be sure to get the quantities right.

I never measure. And can't think why you'd have to. The only point is to
have a very salty potato. I find that a small handful of salt to a pint of
potatoes is about right. (I couldn't imagine using a pound of salt, unless
you are feeding an army on salt potatoes. There wouldnt' be room in the
pot for either potatoes or water.)

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From: Steven Grace 
Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 20:44:28 +0100
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I went to visit a work friend in Ireland (Co. Carlow) a few years ago and
was introduced to "spuds and dab dab". Small to medium potatos are boiled in
their skins until soft and are then lifted from the plate on a fork, peeled
with the knife (with some dexterity I may add) then rolled in butter before
dipping into a pile of salt on the side of the plate. I've visited my
Fathers village (Co. Kilkenny) on many occasions but have never witnessed
anything similar.

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From: Meg Jernigan 
Date: Fri, 15 Jun 2001 00:05:12 GMT
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A "proper" upstate New York salt potato has a crust of salt that forms on
the skin as it cools. The meat of the potato is actually not very salty. At
least that's how it's done in the part of upstate New York where I grew up.
:)

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From: Avpat 
Date: Thu, 14 Jun 2001 23:22:22 -0700
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Somebody wrote:


> A "proper" upstate New York salt potato has a crust of salt that forms on
> the skin as it cools. The meat of the potato is actually not very salty. 
> At
> least that's how it's done in the part of upstate New York where I grew 
> up.
> :)
So I'm not smart enough to figure out who sent it.  Could you please 
e-mail (avpat@ridgenet.net) me the address to accomplish those potatoes 
salty on the outside and not on the inside.  I will appreciate it.  
Thanks a lot

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From: Naomi Lynne Pardue 
Date: 15 Jun 2001 14:58:30 GMT
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Meg Jernigan wrote:
> A "proper" upstate New York salt potato has a crust of salt that forms on
> the skin as it cools. The meat of the potato is actually not very salty. At
> least that's how it's done in the part of upstate New York where I grew up.

I also grew up in upstate New York. What I recall from my childhood
(and attempt to replicate when I make salt potatoes today) is a thin,
whitish coating on the potato. You are correct that the inside of the
potato doesn't get salty, because the salt can't penetrate the skin.

Next time I talk with my mom I'll have to ask her how much salt she uses.

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From: Diane Feder 
Date: Fri, 15 Jun 2001 15:23:53 GMT
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I've never eaten (or even heard of) a salt potato.  Does all this salt make
the skins inedible?  Was it originally some kind of preserving technique?
Does it change the texture of the inside?  Does it matter what color or size
the potatoes are?  (I'm trying to figure out why someone would do this, but
I'm willing to try it.)

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From: Naomi Lynne Pardue 
Date: 15 Jun 2001 20:38:46 GMT
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Diane Feder wrote:
> I've never eaten (or even heard of) a salt potato.

I have no idea what the history of salt potatoes are. I doubt they'd
be done for preservation, since potatos, by their nature, keep for a long
time, and new potatos, by their nature, are meant to be eaten fresh.

I checked my copy of James Beard American Cookery,and he doesnt' list
salt potatos. They may be an extremely local dish.

A salt potato is simply a small new potato (we like the real tiny
marble-sized ones, but bigger ones would work too, though I wouldn't go
too big) boiled in extremely salty water (as I said, I usually use
probably 4-5 Tb for enough water to cover a pint of potatos). You cook
them like any potato boiled in its skin, just until done. When you drain
the taters, they end up with a white coating on them from the salt.
The skins are entirely edible (that's the whole point..) though obviously
quite high in sodium, so probably not somethign you'd want to eat
every day. 

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From: Diane Feder 
Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 04:07:53 GMT
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Naomi Lynne Pardue wrote:
> A salt potato is simply a small new potato (we like the real tiny
> marble-sized ones, but bigger ones would work too, though I wouldn't go
> too big) boiled in extremely salty water (as I said, I usually use
> probably 4-5 Tb for enough water to cover a pint of potatos). You cook
> them like any potato boiled in its skin, just until done. When you drain
> the taters, they end up with a white coating on them from the salt.
> The skins are entirely edible (that's the whole point..) though obviously
> quite high in sodium, so probably not somethign you'd want to eat
> every day.

Worth a try.  Thanks.

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From: David W. Swider 
Date: Thu, 21 Jun 2001 21:56:28 -0400
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Diana wrote:
> Does anyone have a recipe for boiled potatoes where you use a pound or 2 of
> salt in the boiling water for the potatoes?

To me, these are the "original" salt potatoes: Hinerwaldels, from
Syracuse, NY.

http://cnybiz.com/clambakes/hinerwadel_products_offered.htm

The package has, I believe, four pounds of potatoes,
and one pound of salt.
Very small, white potatoes, possibly culls.

Sometimes they are just small potatoes.
In that case, I like to think Hinerwaldels had a good year, sold out
of culls, and had to substitute real potatoes.

Served swimming in butter, or more likely a watery butter slurry,
they are a good, probably bad for you, treat.

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From: Laura 
Date: Thu, 21 Jun 2001 22:51:12 -0400
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David W. Swider wrote:
> To me, these are the "original" salt potatoes: Hinerwaldels, from
> Syracuse, NY.

lol - that's what my MIL sais.  She lives outside of Syracuse!  The actual
potatos she would get for this were very specific - small white waxy
(waxxy?).   Never saw anything like that in ohio, but new (baby) red
potatoes did well.  We though as I said earlier never use 1lb salt, 1/4 1/2
cup at most.  And lots of real butter at the end before serving..

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From: disharp[at]swbell.net (Richard)
Date: Fri, 22 Jun 2001 15:26:48 GMT
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David W. Swider wrote:
>To me, these are the "original" salt potatoes: Hinerwaldels, from
>Syracuse, NY.

Hello Dave,
 You bring up such wonderful memories. I was born and raised in
Syracuse and Hinderwadels was always a fun place to go. A lot of the
Volunteer Fire department around Syracuse has Field Days and salt
potatoes were often on the menue along with steamed clams.
 Good eating


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