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Subject: Problems with my Scalloped Potatoes
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: alewine[at]phoenix.net (Lara Alewine)
Date: Sat, 18 Nov 1995 02:18:44 GMT
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Hi there.  Scalloped Potatoes are something I love but never tried to
fix until last night.  They didn't turn out to well.  Here's what I
did.  I peeled and sliced some potatoes, layered them in a 1 1/2 qt 
round casserole dish with skimmed evaporated milk and some cheddar and
swiss cheeses mixed and shredded.  I then baked it for about 1 hr and
45 min.  It turned out kind of dry, the potatoes were not done very
well and it just wasn't the magical yummy taste that I desired.  Can
anyone tell me what I am doing wrong or post a tried and true recipe
for Scalloped Potatoes or Potatoes Au Gratin?  A million thanks!  :-)

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From: rwexler[at]best.com (Veronica (Ronnie) Wexler)
Date: 18 Nov 1995 06:04:13 GMT
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What temp did you use?  If it was kinda high, 400 or so, that would dry
out the potatoes.  I'd keep the temp at 350 or 375, cover with foil and
uncover the last 15 minutes to brown.

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From: Kathy Czopek 
Date: 20 Nov 1995 03:40:39 GMT
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One thought about your scalloped potatoes:
How thick were the slices? 
Thinner would certainly cook better.
My mom always boiled the potatoes 
first, then sliced & layered them
in a baking dish with milk/chees/spice
mixture -- THEN baked. I guess that's
cheating? (sure tasted good -- mmmmm.)

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From: alewine[at]phoenix.net (Lara Alewine)
Date: Mon, 20 Nov 1995 18:58:09 GMT
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Kathy Czopek wrote:
>How thick were the slices? 

Thanks for the suggestion.  My slices were about 1/8"-1/4" thick.  I
thought about boiling them first but was too leary to.  Now that I
know that it works for you, I'll try it that way.  That would be the
solution to my problems.  :-)  Thanks again! 

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From: madelin[at]north.pacific.net (Madelin Holtkamp)
Date: 21 Nov 1995 17:53:22 GMT
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When you make scalloped potatoes, you need to put enough of the liquid to
come almost to the top of the potato layers.  The potatoes will soak up a
lot as they bake and some will evaporate.  I sometimes sprinkle the layers
of potatoes with a bit of flour (just a dusting) when I use cheese so that
the cheese doesn't separate from the liquid.  I find that most
temperatures work fine, but it your oven is on very hot because of
something else you're cooking, cover that scalloped potatoes during the
first half of cooking.

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From: padik[at]onion.com
Date: Sun, 19 Nov 95 23:01:06 EST
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Classical scallop potatoes have no cheese!  Also skimmed evaporated milk
leaves no moisture to cook the potatoes in!  Did you use salt, pepper &
onions?  I concur with the suggestion of covering for 1 hour and
uncovering for browing the last 15 minutes.  If you are trying to lower
fat just go with skimmed milk.  The classical Scallop Potatoes I made a
few weeks ago was actually made with a little 1/2 & 1/2!  If you are
lowering your fat intake make GOOD potatoes and eat less of them!

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From: katya[at]u.washington.edu (Linnie K. Gardner)
Date: 21 Nov 1995 06:14:01 GMT
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If you're using russet potatoes, you should boil them first.
I like yellow finn potatoes the best, and they only need to 
be about half-boiled. just slice 'em up and pour heavy cream 
over them. They turn out divinely that way, especially if
you layer in some bits of ham or some chanterelles. :)

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From: jmclarke[at]ccs.carleton.ca (Joan M Clarke)
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 1995 17:24:02 GMT
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Linnie K. Gardner wrote:
>  If you're using russet potatoes, you should boil them first......

Why not just zap them in the microwave instead of boiling.  That way,
they aren't already soppy with water when you put them in the baking
pan with all that other liquid?

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From: katya[at]u.washington.edu (Linnie K. Gardner)
Date: 22 Nov 1995 20:16:13 GMT
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Joan M Clarke wrote:
>Why not just zap them in the microwave instead of boiling.

Because our microwave doesn't work. :) Also, I think microwaved
potatoes smell a little odd. If you drain boiled potatoes in 
a colander, pat them dry, and then slice them, there's very little
water clinging to them.

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From: besko[at]pilot.msu.edu (Lisa Besko)
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 1995 13:57:35 GMT
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I usually put a few layers of velveta "cheese" and onion in.  I also
Salt and pepper them as I go along.  Then I heat the milk up an add
the flour to the warm milk  (about 1/2cup flour per quart of milk).
Pour the milk and flour mixture over the potatoes until covered or
nearly  covered and  bake at 350 until done.

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From: kpauley[at]freenet.columbus.oh.us (Kathy Pauley)
Date: 24 Nov 1995 07:59:46 -0500
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Ok, I'll offer a different version of my scalloped potatoes.  I take a can
of Cream of Celery soup, dilute with 1 can of milk and add onions.  I
layer the (thinly sliced - using a food processor works well) potatoes, soup
mixture, dabs of butter, salt and pepper.  Bake
for 1 1/2 to 2 hours at about 350.  These turn out nice and creamy.  You
can probably use a different "Cream of" soup if you prefer.


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