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Subject: A "Sandra Lee" sort of recipe - Potato-Ham Soup
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

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From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 29 Oct 2006 06:40:54 -0600
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I found this in one of those "local" cookbooks I posted about earlier.  I
have not tried it.  But I suppose it can't be all that bad if it's what you
have to work with.  I've bought the boxed mixes from time to time, not going
to deny it.

My interpretations are in brackets [ ].  Seems like this could easily be
converted to using regular potatoes and a couple of cups of grated American
cheese :)  I'd cube the potatoes, rather than use the slices the boxed mix
of potatoes contain, but that's just me.

Potato-Ham Soup

1 box of au gratin potatoes [such as Betty Crocker brand]
1-1/2 c. diced ham
1/2 c. shredded carrot
1/4 tsp. pepper
3 c. water
2 c. milk
1/4 c. chopped fresh parsley

In a large saucepan, combine [dehydrated] potato slices and seasoning packet
[dried cheese sauce mix] and everything but the parsley.  Bring to a boil.
Reduce heat to medium and cook 15 minutes or until potatos are tender
[essentially reconstituted].  Stir in parsley and serve.

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From: Sheldon 
Date: 29 Oct 2006 05:19:09 -0800
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Jill wrote:
> In a large saucepan, combine [dehydrated] potato slices and seasoning packet
> [dried cheese sauce mix] and everything but the parsley.  Bring to a boil.
> Reduce heat to medium and cook 15 minutes or until potatos are tender
> [essentially reconstituted].  Stir in parsley and serve.

Reconstituted means adding liquid back to condensed.  Adding liquid to
dehydrated is rehydrated... no essentially about it.

I see no reason one can't make soup from those boxed au gratin spuds,
often dehydrated potatoes are better than the so-called fresh (storage)
folks buy at the stupidmarket.  In the rendition above I'd add some
diced onion and celery... not much, like one rib celery and one
scallion.  And to truly make it a gratin it needs a topping, a handful
of croutons.

And you don't need to buy those expensive boxed dealies (paying for
seasoning packets and brand names), you can buy plain dehy potatoes in
slice and dice... in fact there are many veggies avaialble dehy, and
are excellent to keep as staples, they have a long shelf life....
perfect for the soup/stew lovers.

http://www.harmonyhousefoods.com/Dehydrated-Vegetables_c_1.html

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From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 29 Oct 2006 08:02:03 -0600
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Sheldon wrote:
> Reconstituted means adding liquid back to condensed.  Adding liquid to
> dehydrated is rehydrated... no essentially about it.

DOH!  See, I think of adding liquid as reconstituted, as in reconstituting
evaporated milk by adding liquid.  I don't think of it as rehydrating.  But
you're technically correct in that what you are doing with this particular
item is rehydrating.

> I see no reason one can't make soup from those boxed au gratin spuds,
> often dehydrated potatoes are better than the so-called fresh (storage)
> folks buy at the stupidmarket.  In the rendition above I'd add some
> diced onion and celery... not much, like one rib celery and one
> scallion.  And to truly make it a gratin it needs a topping, a handful
> of croutons.

Heh, add whatever you want :)  That's why soup is such a versatile thing.

> And you don't need to buy those expensive boxed dealies (paying for
> seasoning packets and brand names), you can buy plain dehy potatoes in
> slice and dice... in fact there are many veggies avaialble dehy, and
> are excellent to keep as staples, they have a long shelf life....
> perfect for the soup/stew lovers.

> http://www.harmonyhousefoods.com/Dehydrated-Vegetables_c_1.html

I checked out the link you provided.  Dehydrated broccoli florets cost much
more on this site than the frozen florets I can get at the grocery store
(two 16 oz. bags for $3) vs. $5.95 for 2 oz. of the dehydrated stuff.  Think
I'll stick with the grocery store florets.  I'm not buying their claims that
dehydrated is more healthy, either.  The potatoes might be a good buy if I
didn't have to pay for shipping but only if I didn't have to pay for
shipping.

I can buy the boxed mixes at the dollar store and toss the "mix" and use my
own cheeses and other ingredients, and add (as you suggested) some diced
vegetables (onion, garlic, celery, bell pepper).  Might just have to try
this.

Soups are all about creativity :)

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From: sf
Date: Sun, 29 Oct 2006 10:22:33 -0800
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Jill McQuown wrote:
>I checked out the link you provided.  Dehydrated broccoli florets cost much
>more on this site than the frozen florets I can get at the grocery store
>(two 16 oz. bags for $3) vs. $5.95 for 2 oz. of the dehydrated stuff.  Think
>I'll stick with the grocery store florets.  I'm not buying their claims that
>dehydrated is more healthy, either.  The potatoes might be a good buy if I
>didn't have to pay for shipping but only if I didn't have to pay for
>shipping.

As he mentioned, you can keep them on hand for emergencies.  You never
know when the next hurricane, tornado or earthquake will give you a
direct hit.

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 29 Oct 2006 12:34:53 -0600
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sf wrote:
> As he mentioned, you can keep them on hand for emergencies.  You never
> know when the next hurricane, tornado or earthquake will give you a
> direct hit.

I think the last thing I'd be worried about if a tornado or earthquake hit
was "where's my dehydrated broccoli?" LOL

============================

From: sf
Date: Sun, 29 Oct 2006 13:23:48 -0800
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Jill McQuown wrote:
>I think the last thing I'd be worried about if a tornado or earthquake hit
>was "where's my dehydrated broccoli?" LOL

I think you would if you had no way to get food for a week.

============================

From: Goomba38 
Date: Sun, 29 Oct 2006 16:57:33 -0500
--------
sf wrote:
> I think you would if you had no way to get food for a week.
 
But in that case, canned food might be better since you wouldn't have to 
commit some of your possibly precious water supply on rehydrating.

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Sun, 29 Oct 2006 16:42:24 -0600
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Goomba38 wrote:
> But in that case, canned food might be better since you wouldn't have
> to commit some of your possibly precious water supply on rehydrating.

Exactamundo, Goomba.  I have an earthquake preparedness kit which consists
of canned food, while not what everyone wants to eat, Beefaroni and stuff
like that.  Also crackers and chips.  Lots of water (gallons of it and it's
the cheap stuff, just water, not 'Evian' bottles), lots of batteries and
flashlights.  You don't want to use matches unless you're sure there isn't a
gas leak. Toilet paper, most people don't think about that.  A basic first
aid kit.  Dehydrated vegetables don't play a part in my emergency scenario.

============================

From: Sheldon 
Date: 29 Oct 2006 16:59:04 -0800
--------
Jill wrote:
> I checked out the link you provided.  Dehydrated broccoli florets cost much
> more on this site than the frozen florets I can get at the grocery store
> (two 16 oz. bags for $3) vs. $5.95 for 2 oz. of the dehydrated stuff.

You're not paying for the water! duh

You don't  comprehend reconstituted... whatever made me think you'd
understand dehydrated, my bad... oy vey. 

============================

From: Jill McQuown 
Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2006 01:51:55 -0600
--------
Sheldon wrote:
> You're not paying for the water! duh
>
> You don't  comprehend reconstituted... whatever made me think you'd
> understand dehydrated, my bad... oy vey. 

No, I'm not paying for the water.  I'm also not paying for dehydrated
broccoli florets to which I have to add (DOH!) water :)


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