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Subject: How do I store potatoes????
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: tomkanpa[at]aol.comic (TOM KAN PA)
Date: 28 Oct 2002 14:41:29 GMT
--------
Potatoes (russet, Idaho, etc.) are dirt* cheap at the supermarket. But, you
have to buy at least a 5 pound bag, sometimes a 10 pound bag. When there's just
two of you, a bag can last a long time. What kind of a container/bag should
they be put in. And no, I don't have nor want a bin.
* pun intended.

============================

From: Jack Schidt 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 14:59:48 GMT
--------
Don't buy 'em. ;->  Seriously, if you're really wondering about storing food
items, then the quantity is too much and any money you think you're saving
will be tossed out later due to spoilage.

Otherwise, your options include storing them in the refrigerator (5 lbs
would take up a whole vegetable bin), preparing them all at once in various
recipes and freezing the cooked product, or eating potatoes every day.  I've
kept potatoes in the refrigerator for over 2 weeks; they weren't the
prettiest, but they were plenty good for soup.

Jack Spud

============================

From: Mike Reid 
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 10:36:13 +0000
--------
Following up to Jack Schidt 

>Otherwise, your options include storing them in the refrigerator (5 lbs
>would take up a whole vegetable bin),

this idea of refrigeration intrigued me, (I think we brits turn to the
fridge much less often), so I looked it up and found that Paul Gayler
in "A passion for potatoes" says that 7C 45F is ideal for potatoes and
that at fridge temperatures the starch will convert to sugar spoiling
the flavour. So know we know.

============================

From: Jack Schidt 
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 11:45:32 GMT
--------
Mike Reid wrote:
> this idea of refrigeration intrigued me, (I think we brits turn to the
> fridge much less often), so I looked it up and found that Paul Gayler
> in "A passion for potatoes" says that 7C 45F is ideal for potatoes and
> that at fridge temperatures the starch will convert to sugar spoiling
> the flavour. So know we know.

A while back I placed a thermometer in my refrigerator and found the temp to
be 45 degrees.  Of course, I lowered the temp so that now it reads 39 deg F.

Guess I previously had it set perfectly for potatoes, eh??

Jack Pot

============================

From: Mike Reid 
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 15:01:44 +0000
--------
Following up to Jack Schidt 

>A while back I placed a thermometer in my refrigerator and found the temp to
>be 45 degrees.  Of course, I lowered the temp so that now it reads 39 deg F.

patent it, the potato fridge!

============================

From: Jack Schidt 
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 15:06:50 GMT
--------
Mike Reid wrote:
> patent it, the potato fridge!

If only it were more portable......

Jack Takeout

============================

From: Mike Reid 
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 16:48:36 +0000
--------
Following up to Jack Schidt 

>If only it were more portable......

car boot potato fridge? Its a cracker!

============================

From: Pat Meadows 
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 15:26:30 GMT
--------
Mike Reid wrote:
>this idea of refrigeration intrigued me, (I think we brits turn to the
>fridge much less often), so I looked it up and found that Paul Gayler
>in "A passion for potatoes" says that 7C 45F is ideal for potatoes and
>that at fridge temperatures the starch will convert to sugar spoiling
>the flavour. So know we know.

Except that it doesn't happen.  

At least it's never happened in my house and I've been
keeping potatoes in the fridge for at least 40 years
(various houses, various fridges).  

============================

From: rosie readandpost 
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 15:51:05 GMT
--------
Pat Meadows wrote:
> At least it's never happened in my house and I've been
> keeping potatoes in the fridge for at least 40 years
> (various houses, various fridges).

hasn't happened here either................been keeping them in a refrig
drawer all my adult life!

============================

From: Mike Reid 
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 16:48:37 +0000
--------
Following up to Pat Meadows 

>At least it's never happened in my house and I've been
>keeping potatoes in the fridge for at least 40 years
>(various houses, various fridges).  

you *knew* I would have said 40 years is too long........:-)

Funny innit. UK eggs[1] potatoes on shelf
US in fridge (US is often warmer of course)

1]people put em in fridge because (US designed?) fridges have
somewhere to put them, but shops dont.

============================

From: Pat Meadows 
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 17:24:36 GMT
--------
Mike Reid wrote:

>you *knew* I would have said 40 years is too long........:-)

No, I walked right into it.... 

>Funny innit. UK eggs[1] potatoes on shelf
>US in fridge (US is often warmer of course)

Yes, the US is MUCH warmer in many places.

Not only that, our houses in colder areas tend to have
central heating and to be warm even in winter.  Many people
keep their house around 75 or 80 F in winter:  I hate this
and just roast if I'm visiting anyone like that.  

Also, our fridges tend to be larger than yours.  More room
to keep things.  

Pat (a Yank married to a Brit)

============================

From: Mike Reid 
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 18:28:32 +0000
--------
Following up to Pat Meadows 

>Also, our fridges tend to be larger than yours.  More room
>to keep things.  

ours is both small and full of booze, no chance for my just dug 4-5
sackfulls of potatoes!

============================

From: Thierry Gerbault 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 15:02:53 GMT
--------
TOM KAN PA wrote:
> Potatoes (russet, Idaho, etc.) are dirt* cheap at the supermarket.
> But, you have to buy at least a 5 pound bag, sometimes a 10 pound bag.
> When there's just two of you, a bag can last a long time. What kind of
> a container/bag should they be put in. And no, I don't have nor want a
> bin. * pun intended.

I know you're not supposed to, but I store bags of potatoes in the 
refrigerator and have had no "greening" or bad results.  Otherwise, a large 
bag of potatoes would go bad before I could use them all.

============================

From: Pat Meadows 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 22:54:02 GMT
--------
Thierry Gerbault wrote:
>I know you're not supposed to, but I store bags of potatoes in the 
>refrigerator and have had no "greening" or bad results.

I also keep potatoes in the fridge:  never a bad result.

============================

From: Peg Haine 
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2002 12:30:35 -0500
--------
Pat Meadows wrote:
> I also keep potatoes in the fridge:  never a bad result.

We keep our harvested potatoes in brown paper bags on the kitchen floor,
covered with linen towels to keep the light away from them. Our kitchen is
relatively warm, but they seem to last  for eating until February or so, when
they begin to sprout -- the sprouted potatoes are next year's seed potatoes.
From February on, we eat pasta. Works for us.

============================

From: Arri London 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 08:19:50 -0700
--------
TOM KAN PA wrote:
> Potatoes (russet, Idaho, etc.) are dirt* cheap at the supermarket. But, you
> have to buy at least a 5 pound bag, sometimes a 10 pound bag. When there's just
> two of you, a bag can last a long time. What kind of a container/bag should
> they be put in. And no, I don't have nor want a bin.
> * pun intended.

We two eat a lot of potatoes, so no they don't hang about
all that long. The ten-pound bags we buy certainly keep for
a few weeks without probs, provided the potatoes were good
quality in the first place. 

We store them out on the screened porch in a thick plastic
bin that was meant for something else. The plastic bag is
put open into a brown paper shopping bag; the paper bag is
folded over. The open-ended bin is lined with newspaper and
the paper bag is put in. That end of the porch is closed
off, so they are protected. Unless we get a hard freeze for
more than a few days, the potatoes keep well until we finish
the lot.

Potatoes need dry, dark and cool to stay their best. Indoors
in most American homes is just too warm for long storage.
You could always do the old thing of storing them outside in
a container of peat/sphagnum moss. That's often how loose
potatoes are sold in UK supermarkets; they don't turn green
that way and stay very fresh.

If you don't have ideal conditions, it's cheaper for you to
buy potatoes as you use them. Or you could split a large bag
with the neighbours, as we have done with 20-lb bags when
the potatoes were 0.10 a lb. We just charged them what we
paid and everyone was happy.

============================

From: Archon 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 18:22:19 +0100
--------
TOM KAN PA wrote:
> Potatoes (russet, Idaho, etc.) are dirt* cheap at the supermarket. But, you
> have to buy at least a 5 pound bag, sometimes a 10 pound bag. When there's just
> two of you, a bag can last a long time. What kind of a container/bag should
> they be put in. And no, I don't have nor want a bin.
> * pun intended.

I am just myself and I buy 10 pound bags and store them in a cupboard
under my kitchen table, in the original bag. I haven't had spoilage.
People with cellars here often store them there.

Michael Nielsen

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 28 Oct 2002 19:22:51 GMT
--------
TOM KAN PA wrote:
>Potatoes (russet, Idaho, etc.) are dirt* cheap at the supermarket. 
>But, you have to buy at least a 5 pound bag, sometimes a 10 pound 
>bag. When there's just two of you, a bag can last a long time. What 
>kind of a container/bag should they be put in. 

This is one of the best (and simplest) ways to use up lots of potatoes.  
I usually double this recipe, it freezes well.
I posted this recently, perhaps two months back.

Here's how it's made in New York City's famed Yoina Schimmel's:

          Yoina Schimmel's Potato Kugel (Potato Pudding)
         
3 lb Idaho Potatoes          1/8 tsp Pepper
4 Eggs                            1/4 Cup Onion, Grated
1/3 Cup Potato Flour        1/2 Cup Butter, Melted
11/2 tsp Salt
3/4 tsp Baking Powder

  Wash and peel the potatoes.
  Coarsely grate the potatoes into a large bowl filled with ice water.
  Let stand for at least 15 minutes.
  Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  Grease the inside of the (11/2 quart) baking dish.
  Drain the potatoes.
  Pat dry.
  You'll need about 5 1/2 cups of grated potatoes for 8 servings,
  adjust as required.

  Use the large bowl of an electric mixer running at high speed to beat
  the eggs until they are thick and light.

  Stir in the potatoes, potato flour, salt, baking powder, pepper,
  onions and half the melted butter.

  Mix well.
  Turn into the prepared baking dish.
  Bake, uncovered, for 30 minutes.
  Brush the top with melted butter.
  Bake, brushing the top with melted butter every 10 minutes, until
  the top is crusty and golden brown (roughly 45 minutes longer).

  From: Joel Ehrlich 

============================

From: darlaaz[at]aol.com (Darlaaz)
Date: 28 Oct 2002 19:29:26 GMT
--------
I put potatos in frig and it was like the starch turned to sugar - the flavor
changed dramatically.

============================

From: Pat Meadows 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 22:55:14 GMT
--------
Darlaaz wrote:
>I put potatos in frig and it was like the starch turned to sugar - the flavor
>changed dramatically.

I have read this before, from other people.  

I don't know why it has never happened to me.  I've been
keeping potatoes in the fridge for at least 40 years - and
it's never happened.  

============================

From: stenni[at]waynespenisyahoo.com (Hag)
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 22:53:29 GMT
--------
Sheldon wrote:
>This is one of the best (and simplest) ways to use up lots of potatoes.  
>I usually double this recipe, it freezes well.
>I posted this recently, perhaps two months back.
>
>Here's how it's made in New York City's famed Yoina Schimmel's:
>
>          Yoina Schimmel's Potato Kugel (Potato Pudding)


Now that looks good and Id like to give it a try, but
somehow I dont think im gonna come by Potato flour easily or
quickly hereabouts...Would there be an acceptable substitue?
Cornflower perhaps or just regular flour? Im hesitant as Im
not terribly familure w/ the properties of Potato
flour...Hag k

============================

From: Damsel in dis Dress 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 23:29:55 GMT
--------
Hag shared the following:

>Now that looks good and Id like to give it a try, but
>somehow I dont think im gonna come by Potato flour easily or
>quickly hereabouts...Would there be an acceptable substitue?
>Cornflower perhaps or just regular flour? Im hesitant as Im
>not terribly familure w/ the properties of Potato
>flour...

I wonder if you could take instant potato flakes and pulverize them in your
food processor.  I may be way off base, but who knows?  It could work!

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 29 Oct 2002 05:07:37 GMT
--------
Hag writes:
>Now that looks good and Id like to give it a try, but
>somehow I dont think im gonna come by Potato flour easily or
>quickly hereabouts...Would there be an acceptable substitue?
>Cornflower perhaps or just regular flour? Im hesitant as Im
>not terribly familure w/ the properties of Potato
>flour...Hag k

Where's "hereabouts"... potato flour is something I've been able to purchase in
every US stupidmarket I've ever frequented.  There are many on line sources for
potato flour and most so-called health food stores will carry it.

If you can't obtain potato flour then ordinary all purpose wheat flour will
surfice... I would not use corn starch.

============================

From: stenni[at]waynespenisyahoo.com (Hag)
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2002 05:57:14 GMT
--------
Sheldon wrote:
>Where's "hereabouts"... potato flour is something I've been able to purchase in
>every US stupidmarket I've ever frequented.  There are many on line sources for
>potato flour and most so-called health food stores will carry it.
>
>If you can't obtain potato flour then ordinary all purpose wheat flour will
>surfice... I would not use corn starch.

Im in Okinawa these days, and Im pretty sure the Comissary
dosnt carry it though I will check to make sure...It may be
available locally somwhere, but my proficiency in Japanese
isnt sufficient to make locating this an easy task...If you
have some suggestions for online sources Id love to check
them out, though this is also problematic as sadly an
awfully large number of companys are unwilling to ship to
FPO/APO addresses- they have to ship USPS vice UPS and fill
out some customs forms....SO much for supporting our folks
in the service...Ill try this out w/ regular ap flour, and
any info regards online sources to check out would be
greatly appreciated if youll post or email it...
Thanks, Hag k

============================

From: Christine Dabney 
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2002 00:15:29 -0800
--------
Hag wrote:
..SO much for supporting our folks
>in the service...Ill try this out w/ regular ap flour, and
>any info regards online sources to check out would be
>greatly appreciated if youll post or email it...

Maybe one of us could send you some?   I see it all the time in this
area...

============================

From: stenni[at]waynespenisyahoo.com (Hag)
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2002 23:37:56 GMT
--------
Christine Dabney wrote:
>Maybe one of us could send you some?   I see it all the time in this
>area...

Thanks for the kind offer Chris, I do greatly appreciate
it...Ill just go w/ the ap flour at this point and If I cant
mailorder some I can see if my folks can snag some for
me...Hag k

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 29 Oct 2002 14:10:07 GMT
--------
Hag writes:
>Im in Okinawa these days, and Im pretty sure the Comissary
>dosnt carry it though I will check to make sure...It may be
>available locally somwhere, 

I don't know how much you're willing to pay (shipping will cost more than the
product) but there seems to be tons of potato flour sources on line.
Go here: http://www.barryfarm.com

Personally I'd go with AP flour if obtaining potato flour presents a dilemma...
the flour is really just to blend with the egg (to absorb the extra liquid) in
holding it all together... you can even use matzo/cracker meal.  I wouldn't use
corn starch as that might create too gummy a texture.  When adding flour or
whatever you choose use less rather than more.  The quality of the potatoes is
what will be the major determinant defining the dish.... with practice you will
learn how to judge the potato water content, which will enable you to more
correctly determine how much/little flour to add that will create a product
pleasing to *your* taste.  I prefer my potato kugle somewhat on the light/airy
side so I go easy on the binder... I also have a tendancy to pig out on potato
kugle so I also go easy on the fat, reducing by as much as half, therefore I
use a richer flavored fat, chicken schmaltz instead of butter.  I can buy jars
of chicken schmaltz at the local market but I'm sure even in Japan you can
obtain chicken fat to render yourself.

============================

From: stenni[at]waynespenisyahoo.com (Hag)
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2002 23:57:05 GMT
--------
Sheldon wrote:
>Personally I'd go with AP flour if obtaining potato flour presents a dilemma...

Excellent! I just finished puttin the potatos into the ice
water...Its a rainy day and cold here for once, It will make
comforting lunch for us and im sure ill pig out as I love my
potatos...chuckle...I think I will order a lb of the potato
flour, Im not sure that it will make an appreciable
difference in the rec, but it will be interesting to test
out...Not frugal perhaps, but thats not always the main
concern... Interestingly enough, the Commisary does carry
chicken schmaltz, but at a price that is laughable given the
easy w/ wich I can and do make my own...Grandpa's dumplings,
well they just wouldnt be Grandpa's dumplings with
out...Thanks for the info and link...Hag k

============================

From: jen 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 14:36:24 -0500
--------
i 2nd arri's advice.... anywhere dry, dark, cool.... and not humid/damp.

============================

From: Alan Zelt 
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2002 00:59:52 GMT
--------
TOM KAN PA wrote:
> Potatoes (russet, Idaho, etc.) are dirt* cheap at the supermarket. But, you
> have to buy at least a 5 pound bag, sometimes a 10 pound bag. When there's just
> two of you, a bag can last a long time. What kind of a container/bag should
> they be put in. And no, I don't have nor want a bin.
> * pun intended.

At Costco they come in 20 lb sacks. Just two of us here, too. What I do
is to only start buying them in the fall, when the temp starts to fall.
Then I store them in the garage. Make sure the sack is well ventilated
so they don't "sweat".

============================

From: Melba's Jammin' 
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 21:25:16 -0600
--------
TOM KAN PA wrote:
> Potatoes (russet, Idaho, etc.) are dirt* cheap at the supermarket. 
> But, you have to buy at least a 5 pound bag, sometimes a 10 pound 
> bag. When there's just two of you, a bag can last a long time. What 
> kind of a container/bag should they be put in. And no, I don't have 
> nor want a bin. * pun intended.

Cool (not cold) dark place.  Separated from the onions.

============================

From: gloria p 
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2002 03:28:04 GMT
--------
Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> Cool (not cold) dark place.  Separated from the onions.

Far from apples, too.  The ethylene given off by the apples
will cause the potatoes to sprout prematurely and most other
fruit and vegetables to ripen quickly.

============================

From: Kajikit 
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2002 19:39:00 +1100
--------
TOM KAN PA wrote:
>Potatoes (russet, Idaho, etc.) are dirt* cheap at the supermarket. But, you
>have to buy at least a 5 pound bag, sometimes a 10 pound bag. When there's just
>two of you, a bag can last a long time. What kind of a container/bag should
>they be put in. And no, I don't have nor want a bin.
>* pun intended.

We store our potatoes in a wire rack in the bottom of the pantry
cupboard. They keep for up to 3 or 4 weeks in there before they go
off. When we bought a giant sack of potatoes we stored the bulk of
them under the house in the cellar and just brought up a pound or two
at a time. 

I've never heard of refrigerating potatoes - I learnt that they want a
cool, dark, dry environment.

============================

From: Mike Reid 
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2002 10:08:37 +0000
--------
Following up to TOM KAN PA 
>Potatoes (russet, Idaho, etc.) are dirt* cheap at the supermarket. But, you
>have to buy at least a 5 pound bag, sometimes a 10 pound bag. When there's just
>two of you, a bag can last a long time. What kind of a container/bag should
>they be put in. And no, I don't have nor want a bin.
>* pun intended.

store potatoes in hessian sacks (not paper and NOT plastic) in a cool
dry dark place.
If you grow your own your unlikely to be able to put 100 lbs or so of
them in the fridge!

============================

From: Dan Goodman 
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2002 18:12:08 GMT
--------
Mike wrote:
> store potatoes in hessian sacks (not paper and NOT plastic) in a cool
> dry dark place.

I suspect hessian sacks are what's called burlap bags/sacks in the US. Are 
they made out of very coarse fabric?

> If you grow your own your unlikely to be able to put 100 lbs or so of
> them in the fridge!

============================

From: Mike Reid 
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 10:36:13 +0000
--------
Following up to Dan Goodman 

>I suspect hessian sacks are what's called burlap bags/sacks in the US. Are 
>they made out of very coarse fabric?

I believe thats the same thing, any open weave sacking or even the
plastic "artificial" ones you can now get here will do at a pinch, as
long as they "breath".

============================

From: Old Dog Man 
Date: Sun, 10 Nov 2002 08:28:30 -0800
--------
Anyone ever hear of a "ROOT" cellar?? My family used to store several
hundred pounds of "spuds" every winter...
real old country boy

============================

From: rms[at]hywaaay.not (rms)
Date: Sun, 10 Nov 2002 16:49:48 -0000
--------
Old Dog Man says...
>Anyone ever hear of a "ROOT" cellar?? My family used to store several
>hundred pounds of "spuds" every winter...
>real old country boy

Noooooo, get John Denver out of my head.

So did you ever glean fields after the farmers went through?  They 
miss a lot of spuds.  I don't think we were that poor but it was a 
family outing and it let us know where our food came from.  Good deal 
anyway, they don't charge much for pick your own.  You also know that 
they are fresh out of the ground.  We just kept them in a bin in the 
cellar under the house.  

Damm that reminds me, I have to go dig up my sweet potatoes as soon 
as it gets dry enough.  It finally dawned on me why sweet potatoes 
are part of the traditional thanksgiving dinner.  I am about to have 
a big pile of them.  rms

============================

From: Kendall F. Stratton III 
Date: Sun, 10 Nov 2002 12:05:52 -0500
--------
Old Dog Man wrote:
> Anyone ever hear of a "ROOT" cellar?? My family used to store several
> hundred pounds of "spuds" every winter...
> real old country boy

Although born up here in 'Tater (Aroostook) County... I spent the first 15
years of my life on the southern New England coast (Fairfield County) in
Connecitcut, stroring lots of 'taters each winter.   We had a little corner
in the basement was was all "dirt"... no cement, no wood, no nuthin' but
rich soil.

We'd grab the 50# bags of 'taters and stack 'em in the "root cellar" and
they'd last almost all winter (along with the onions, parsnips, carrots,
garlic, and other root-veggies).

... lickin' my lips just thinking 'bout a New England Boiled Dinner!
Mmmmmmmm!!!

============================

From: edg[at]blueyonder.co.uk (Ed)
Date: 29 Oct 2002 09:26:57 -0800
--------
TOM KAN PA wrote:
> Potatoes (russet, Idaho, etc.) are dirt* cheap at the supermarket. But, you
> have to buy at least a 5 pound bag, sometimes a 10 pound bag. When there's just
> two of you, a bag can last a long time. What kind of a container/bag should
> they be put in. And no, I don't have nor want a bin.
> * pun intended.

Apart from keeping them cool, the key thing is to store them in heavy
paper bags, which exclude light but also breathe. Here in the UK we
have ideal garage temperatures of a few degrees above freezing even
when it's cold outside. So some people like us buy our potatoes in
25kg (approx 55lbs) sacks, from a farm shop or local store. Our family
of five get through 25kg in a month!

Washed potatoes do not store well.

============================

From: Pat Meadows 
Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2002 17:47:46 GMT
--------
Ed wrote:
>Apart from keeping them cool, the key thing is to store them in heavy
>paper bags, which exclude light but also breathe. Here in the UK we
>have ideal garage temperatures of a few degrees above freezing even
>when it's cold outside. So some people like us buy our potatoes in
>25kg (approx 55lbs) sacks, from a farm shop or local store. Our family
>of five get through 25kg in a month!

I wish we could do this, but the temperature in our garage
in winter is often way below freezing - and can be as low as
-20 F (or -20 C - they're fairly close together in that
range, and I think coincide at -30).

People often have cool cellars and those are good storage
places for potatoes, etc.  There's no cellar in our house,
though.

============================

From: Dimitri 
Date: Wed, 30 Oct 2002 01:08:32 GMT
--------
TOM KAN PA wrote:
> Potatoes (russet, Idaho, etc.) are dirt* cheap at the supermarket. But, you
> have to buy at least a 5 pound bag, sometimes a 10 pound bag. When there's just
> two of you, a bag can last a long time. What kind of a container/bag should
> they be put in. And no, I don't have nor want a bin.
> * pun intended.

Your ears?

:-)


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