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Subject: Potatoes are potatoes
Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking

============================

From: moosemeat <moosemeat[at]comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 19:19:28 GMT
--------
Irish, Redskin, Idahoes or Maines finest strip off their clothes, turn
up the lights and what do you have?  Voilla-just potatoes.
So why all the tumult and uproar in the recent poatoe salad thread
Or excuse me, is it potato?  Anyway I don't think there is any
difference; after all these "purists" (some of them anyway) have even
put carrots in their salad recipe whereas other "experts" have left
out hard boiled eggs.  It's a mad and crazy world out there, if you
don't believe it check out the  recent pizza thread. I think some
people would even argue over how to boil water.

============================

From: byakee[at]COLDmail.com (byakee)
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 19:38:18 GMT
--------
A shot rang out! And moosemeat said:
> I think some people would even argue over how to boil water.

You *have* to start on low heat, otherwise the water will boil 
too fast and evaporate... <g>

============================

From: hahabogus <not[at]valid.invalid>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 20:16:01 GMT
--------
byakee wrote:
> You *have* to start on low heat, otherwise the water will boil 
> too fast and evaporate... <g>

No!!! You use warm tap water to start with the burner on high.

============================

From: The Ranger <cuhulain_-98[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 13:30:19 -0700
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> No!!! You use warm tap water to start with the burner on high.

You're such a poser! You only use room-temp distilled, nuke it for 10
minutes, _THEN_ put it on the burner on high.

How many times we gotta go over this?!

============================

From: Jill McQuown <jmcquown[at]bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 15:36:02 -0500
--------
The Ranger wrote:
> You're such a poser! You only use room-temp distilled, nuke it for 10
> minutes, _THEN_ put it on the burner on high.
>
> How many times we gotta go over this?!

But, but... then you'd have "supercharged" water from the microwave which
might explode before you could put it on the burner!

============================

From: Reg <reg[at]nospam.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 20:39:33 GMT
--------
Jill McQuown wrote:
> But, but... then you'd have "supercharged" water from the microwave which
> might explode before you could put it on the burner!

That only adds to the flavor, as does adding in some moose/troll meat.

============================

From: hahabogus <not[at]valid.invalid>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 20:43:24 GMT
--------
The Ranger wrote:
> You're such a poser! You only use room-temp distilled, nuke it for 10
> minutes, _THEN_ put it on the burner on high.
> 
> How many times we gotta go over this?!

But do you use a Pot or a saucepan?

============================

From: Steve Calvin <calvins[at]optonline.net>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 16:50:14 -0400
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> But do you use a Pot or a saucepan?

I always liked pot personally... oh wait... that's another subject 
huh? ;-)

============================

From: jayjayjpg[at]nadasppam-yahoo.com (JJ)
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 17:04:06 GMT
--------
Steve Calvin wrote:
>I always liked pot personally... oh wait... that's another subject 
>huh? ;-)

>Steve
>I saw a woman wearing a sweat shirt with 'Guess' on it. So I said,
>"Implants?"

I use a naked 19 year old former high school cheerleader to boil my
water.  I let her do it how ever she wants.  I just watch, watch and
learn baby!

Jay the Pig

============================

From: Pennyaline <nsmitchell[at]spamspamspamspamspamqwestandspam.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 18:46:30 -0600
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> But do you use a Pot or a saucepan?

Just a pan, or a saucier?

============================

From: Pennyaline <nsmitchell[at]spamspamspamspamspamqwestandspam.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 18:47:50 -0600
--------
hahabogus wrote:
> But do you use a Pot or a saucepan?

A teakettle?

<is it electric... or gas... oh wait, that's another show>

============================

From: chandler2368[at]hotmail.com (Steve the Sauropodman)
Date: 12 Aug 2004 06:26:07 -0700
--------
Pennyaline wrote:
> A teakettle?

You use cold water, on high heat in a sauce pan, with a lid.  The lid
catches the evaporation, and you have a handle to grabs onto after the
water's boiled.

Also, I never use gas teakettles any more,  the fumes stink up the
kitchen and my wife hates the noise the motor makes.

============================

From: Wayne <waynebw[at]att.net>
Date: Fri, 13 Aug 2004 01:27:11 GMT
--------
Steve the Sauropodman wrote:
> You use cold water, on high heat in a sauce pan, with a lid.  The lid
> catches the evaporation, and you have a handle to grabs onto after the
> water's boiled.
> 
> Also, I never use gas teakettles any more,  the fumes stink up the
> kitchen and my wife hates the noise the motor makes.

Guess your wife wouldn't like the TailGator then, the gas-powered 
blender.

http://www.tailgatorzone.com/features.html

============================

From: Dave Smith <adavid.smith[at]sympatico.ca>
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 22:08:55 -0400
--------
Wayne wrote:
> Guess your wife wouldn't like the TailGator then, the gas-powered
> blender.

I saw a variation of that, the Daquiri Wacker. A friend was given one as a
gift.  There's nothing quite like a bunch of drunks whopping it up at a bush
party like a gas powered blender.

============================

From: Bob Myers <nospamplease[at]address.invalid>
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 16:23:15 GMT
--------
byakee wrote:
> You *have* to start on low heat, otherwise the water will boil
> too fast and evaporate... <g>

Never!  Starting with the burner on full
sears the water and locks in the flavor!  And
anyone who disagrees is obviously a culinary
heretic know-nothing!!!!!

(Hey, this is fun...I feel kinda like the stereotypical
French chef from "Good Eats"....)

:-)

============================

From: Jessica V. <no[at]spam.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 15:42:29 -0400
--------
moosemeat wrote:
> Irish, Redskin, Idahoes or Maines finest strip off their clothes, turn
> up the lights and what do you have?  Voilla-just potatoes.
> So why all the tumult and uproar in the recent poatoe salad thread
> Or excuse me, is it potato?  Anyway I don't think there is any
> difference; after all these "purists" (some of them anyway) have even
> put carrots in their salad recipe whereas other "experts" have left
> out hard boiled eggs.  It's a mad and crazy world out there, if you
> don't believe it check out the  recent pizza thread. I think some
> people would even argue over how to boil water.

I'd agree with you.  Or at least would have until a week and a half ago. 
My mom made her usual potatoe salad, potatoe, onion, hard boiled egg, 
mayo, celery seed &amp; pepper, but used Yukon Gold potatoes.  Those were 
like lead, won't be repeating that experiment.

============================

From: The Ranger <cuhulain_-98[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 12:57:55 -0700
--------
Jessica V. wrote:
> My mom made her usual potatoe salad, potatoe,
> onion, hard boiled egg, mayo, celery seed &
> pepper, but used Yukon Gold potatoes.  Those
> were  like lead, won't be repeating that experiment.

"Lead?" How come? I tend to use whites first, news next because I
don't have to peel either. I haven't used Yukons for potato salad
because they cook up quickly and don't hold their form generally
(become "mashed") when stirred about.

============================

From: Jessica V. <no[at]spam.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 16:43:23 -0400
--------
The Ranger wrote:
> "Lead?" How come? I tend to use whites first, news next because I
> don't have to peel either. I haven't used Yukons for potato salad
> because they cook up quickly and don't hold their form generally
> (become "mashed") when stirred about.

Lead wasn't the texture, but the way they sat in the tummy.  Making for 
less "room" for the real barbequed chicken and pork. :(  The two of the 
eight that were at dinner that evening, whom didn't partake of the 
potatoe salad chowed down on the meats.

============================

From: darvell349[at]aol.com (Naomi Darvell)
Date: 11 Aug 2004 20:02:37 GMT
--------
moosemeat wrote:
>rish, Redskin, Idahoes or Maines finest strip off their clothes, turn
>up the lights and what do you have?  Voilla-just potatoes.
>So why all the tumult and uproar in the recent poatoe salad thread
>Or excuse me, is it potato?  Anyway I don't think there is any
>difference;

You're kidding, right? Potatoes vary a great deal in flavor and texture. 

============================

From: The Ranger <cuhulain_-98[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 13:26:53 -0700
--------
Naomi Darvell asked Moosemince with astonishment:
> You're kidding, right? Potatoes vary a great deal
> in flavor and texture. 

Always take what Moosemince writes as sodium-free. He regularly trolls
rfc but is quite brainless. His favorite dead horse to whip is
parboiling.

============================

From: address.in.sig[at]nyc.rr.com (Curly Sue)
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 12:16:46 GMT
--------
The Ranger wrote:
>Always take what Moosemince writes as sodium-free. He regularly trolls
>rfc but is quite brainless. His favorite dead horse to whip is
>parboiling.

Actually, not.  He hasn't mentioned it since the first time.  It's
*other* people (for example, *you*  in this subject) who keep bringing
it up. :>

Moosie's posts are conversational gambits for those with a spry sense
of humor.

============================

From: The Ranger <cuhulain_-98[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 08:41:51 -0700
--------
Curly Sue chided in defense of Moosemince after I wrote:

>Actually, not.

Okay; I guess he does exhibit a multitude of brainless thoughts often
paraded with brazen pride.

> He hasn't mentioned it since the first time.  It's *other*
> people (for example, *you*  in this subject) who keep
> bringing it up. :>

Once boiled, forever stewed.

> Moosie's posts are conversational gambits for those
> with a spry sense of humor.

Moosemince is nothing less than a hack with regular indigestion and
chronic humorlessness. 

We at polar ends on this topic, Sue(tm); never shall we agree except
when we disagree. <G>

============================

From: address.in.sig[at]nyc.rr.com (Curly Sue)
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 15:49:40 GMT
--------
The Ranger wrote:
>> He hasn't mentioned it since the first time.  It's *other*
>> people (for example, *you*  in this subject) who keep
>> bringing it up. :>
>
>Once boiled, forever stewed.

Your complaint was that he was "beating a dead horse."  Now you change
your tune and try to justify the fact that *you're* the one who
brought it up.  Be consistent.

>We at polar ends on this topic, Sue(tm); never shall we agree except
>when we disagree. <G>

Maybe so, but it's not clear why you have such a problem with his
posts.  Do you have a potato farm?  Other people enjoy his posts and
your jumping into this subject by insulting him is puzzling.

============================

From: The Ranger <cuhulain_-98[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 09:38:15 -0700
--------
Curly Sue still didn't understand and asked:
> Your complaint was that he was "beating a dead horse." 
> Now you change your tune and try to justify the fact that
> *you're* the one who brought it up.  Be consistent.

If he only mentioned parboiling once, then I would quickly have
forgotten about it. It's been mentioned multiple times -- by him -- as
a proper cooking method just to troll. When others have pointed out
that it's not proper and a waste of meat, he yelps and has a couple
people come and act as his personal secret service body guards. So
I'll take some time out later today and actually dig up all his
previous references (if Google has them) on parboiling for your peace
of mind. (Not that this will change either of our opinions.)

> Maybe so, but it's not clear why you have such a problem
> with his posts.

The short answers were already provided:
> > "[..] he does exhibit a multitude of brainless thoughts often
> > paraded with brazen pride." and 
> > Moosemince is nothing less than a hack with regular
> > indigestion and chronic humorlessness. 

Those are generally enough to create antipathy (in and from me) for
posters that continue to show no growth or a blatant willingness to
stagnate. He performs both of these task with a tour de force. I
rarely filter someone and often choose to rattle their little cage. In
his case, a tin cup across his bars suffices.

> Do you have a potato farm? 

Non sequitur.

> Other people enjoy his posts
> and your jumping into this subject by insulting him is puzzling.

It's as deep a mystery to me why you and the handful defend him, too.
I find little worth firing one's imagination, refreshing, or
life-affirming from his posts. I _do_ find them impulsively repulsive,
pandering to provoke a response. It's enough to enjoy rattling a saber
in front of his face.

Our mysteries will just have to remain such. 

ObTopic: Reds, whites, and Yukons are currently stashed in Clan
Ranger's tuber case. I thought I had a 20-lb bag of Idaho's Finest but
due to more frequent flare-ups of Parentitis just don't remember
where. <sigh> 

============================

From: Peter Aitken <paitken[at]CRAPnc.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 16:44:18 GMT
--------
The Ranger wrote:
> If he only mentioned parboiling once, then I would quickly have
> forgotten about it. It's been mentioned multiple times -- by him -- as
> a proper cooking method just to troll. When others have pointed out
> that it's not proper and a waste of meat, he yelps and has a couple
> people come and act as his personal secret service body guards. So
> I'll take some time out later today and actually dig up all his
> previous references (if Google has them) on parboiling for your peace
> of mind. (Not that this will change either of our opinions.)

You bring a whole new level of meaning to the phrase "get a life."

============================

From: The Ranger <cuhulain_-98[at]yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 10:34:56 -0700
--------
Peter "Dolt" Aitken pathetically posted:
> You bring a whole new level of meaning to the
> phrase "get a life."

Dearest Fuck-face,

You promised to filter me once-upon-a-star, which has proven (yet
again) beyond your limited ability. Pay a stranger do it for you.

Yours in sincerity,
The Ranger

============================

From: Peter Aitken <paitken[at]CRAPnc.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 20:10:56 GMT
--------
moosemeat wrote:
> Irish, Redskin, Idahoes or Maines finest strip off their clothes, turn
> up the lights and what do you have?  Voilla-just potatoes.
> So why all the tumult and uproar in the recent poatoe salad thread
> Or excuse me, is it potato?  Anyway I don't think there is any
> difference; after all these "purists" (some of them anyway) have even
> put carrots in their salad recipe whereas other "experts" have left
> out hard boiled eggs.  It's a mad and crazy world out there, if you
> don't believe it check out the  recent pizza thread. I think some
> people would even argue over how to boil water.

There are significant differences between types of potatoes. If you make
potato salad from bakers (russets) you'll end up with an unappealing mess
that is more mayo-flavored mashed potatoes than potato salad. Red bliss give
much better results being firmer and giving you chunks of potato that stay
whole when mixed with the other ingredients. Yukon gold are not as firm but
have a nice flavor.

============================

From: Alan Zelt <alzelFINNFAN[at]tworldnet.att.net>
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 03:29:10 GMT
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
> There are significant differences between types of potatoes. If you make
> potato salad from bakers (russets) you'll end up with an unappealing mess
> that is more mayo-flavored mashed potatoes than potato salad. Red bliss give
> much better results being firmer and giving you chunks of potato that stay
> whole when mixed with the other ingredients. Yukon gold are not as firm but
> have a nice flavor.

I would have agree with you 100% until I received the Latest "Cooks 
Illustrated." Lo and behold, they argue for the lowly russet. Go figure 
(or read the article).

============================

From: Peter Aitken <paitken[at]CRAPnc.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 13:00:27 GMT
--------
Alan Zelt wrote:
> I would have agree with you 100% until I received the Latest "Cooks
> Illustrated." Lo and behold, they argue for the lowly russet. Go figure
> (or read the article).

In their cookbook the CI people pan the russet and praise the red bliss for
potato salad. Have they changed their minds?

============================

From: Alan Zelt <alzelFINNFAN[at]tworldnet.att.net>
Date: Fri, 13 Aug 2004 03:15:02 GMT
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
> In their cookbook the CI people pan the russet and praise the red bliss for
> potato salad. Have they changed their minds?

Yes.

============================

From: Peter Aitken <paitken[at]CRAPnc.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 13 Aug 2004 13:28:32 GMT
--------
Alan Zelt wrote:
> Yes.

Now I'm curious (I do not subscribe to CI any more). Every time I have tried
to make potato salad with russets I have ended up with a mushy unappealing
mess. Do they suggest any special techniques or anything else? Not that I
always agree with CI, but I usually find their ideas worth trying.

============================

From: zxcvbob <zxcvbob[at]charter.net>
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 11:58:52 -0500
--------
Alan Zelt wrote:
> I would have agree with you 100% until I received the Latest "Cooks 
> Illustrated." Lo and behold, they argue for the lowly russet. Go
> figure (or read the article).

So a CI article that contradicts your personal experience is enough to
change your mind?  That's interesting.

Best regards,
Bob

============================

From: jayjayjpg[at]nadasppam-yahoo.com (JJ)
Date: Fri, 13 Aug 2004 01:10:47 GMT
--------
zxcvbob wrote:
>So a CI article that contradicts your personal experience is enough to
>change your mind?  That's interesting.

Maybe he only agrees 98% now?  How interesting is that?

Jay the Pig

============================

From: Alan Zelt <alzelFINNFAN[at]tworldnet.att.net>
Date: Fri, 13 Aug 2004 03:16:55 GMT
--------
zxcvbob wrote:
> So a CI article that contradicts your personal experience is enough to
> change your mind?  That's interesting.

Now where did I say anything like that? I merely mentioned what they 
said. Or is that illegal?

============================

From: zxcvbob <zxcvbob[at]charter.net>
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 22:39:10 -0500
--------
Alan Zelt wrote:
> Now where did I say anything like that? I merely mentioned what they 
> said. Or is that illegal?

Maybe I read it wrong.  You said, "I would have agree with you 100% 
until I received the latest..."

I wasn't trying to start a fight, I just thought your Cooks remark was 
very odd.

Best regards,
Bob

============================

From: Dave Smith <adavid.smith[at]sympatico.ca>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 17:00:10 -0400
--------
moosemeat wrote:
> Irish, Redskin, Idahoes or Maines finest strip off their clothes, turn
> up the lights and what do you have?  Voilla-just potatoes.
> So why all the tumult and uproar in the recent poatoe salad thread
> Or excuse me, is it potato?  Anyway I don't think there is any
> difference; after all these "purists" (some of them anyway) have even

All potatoes are potatoes, but they are not all the same.  There are
potatoes that are exceptionally well suited for some treatments but not
for others.  New potatoes and reds are especially good boiled. I like to
make extra and use the leftovers for home fries. t IMO, Yukons need to be
mashed or deep fried. New potatoes are not good for deep frying.  I was at
a dinner in Denmark a few years ago where there were two different courses
of potatoes, both boiled, but different varieties of spuds, and very
different.  In North America, people tend to lump them all together and
use whatever potatoes they purchase for all potato dishes, but more
discerning cooks would buy a particular variety for some dishes, or adjust
their treatment to the variety they have on hand.

It's not a matter of being anal. There really are differences.  I rarely
eat potatoes, but generally have at least two types on hand and will
select them on the basis of whether they are going to be baked, boiled or
fried.

> put carrots in their salad recipe whereas other "experts" have left
> out hard boiled eggs.  It's a mad and crazy world out there, if you
> don't believe it check out the  recent pizza thread. I think some
> people would even argue over how to boil water.

Well, there was some discussion on whether salt should go into the water
before or after bringing it to a boil.

============================

From: Dimitri <Dimitri_C[at]prodigy.net>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 22:20:01 GMT
--------
moosemeat wrote:
> Irish, Redskin, Idahoes or Maines finest strip off their clothes, turn
> up the lights and what do you have?  Voilla-just potatoes.

Nope.

potato
The ancient Incas were cultivating this humble tuber thousands of years ago.
The potato was not readily accepted in Europe, however, because it was known
to be a member of the nightshade family (as are the tomato and eggplant) and
therefore thought to be poisonous. In the 16th century, Sir Walter Raleigh
was instrumental in debunking the poisonous potato superstition when he
planted them on property he owned in Ireland. The Irish knew a good thing
when they saw it and a hundred years later were growing and consuming the
potato in great quantities. Today, hundreds of varieties of this popular
vegetable are grown around the world. In America, the potato can be divided
into four basic categories: russet, long white, round white and round red.
The russet Burbank potato (also simply called russet  and Idaho ) is long,
slightly rounded and has a brown, rough skin and numerous eyes. Its low
moisture and high starch content not only give it superior baking qualities
but also make it excellent for FRENCH FRIES. The russet Burbank was named
for its developer, horticulturalist Luther Burbank of Idaho. Although grown
throughout the Midwest, the russet is also commonly called IDAHO POTATO
(whether or not it's grown there). Long white potatoes have a similar shape
as the russet but they have thin, pale gray-brown skins with almost
imperceptible eyes. They're sometimes called white rose  or California long
whites , after the state in which they were developed. Long whites can be
baked, boiled or fried. The thumb-sized baby long whites are called finger
potatoes. The medium-size round white and round red potatoes are also
commonly referred to as boiling potatoes . They're almost identical except
that the round white has a freckled brown skin and the round red a
reddish-brown coat. They both have a waxy flesh that contains less starch
and more moisture than the russet and long white. This makes them better
suited for boiling (they're both commonly used to make mashed potatoes) than
for baking. They're also good for roasting and frying. The round white is
grown mainly in the Northeast where it's sometimes referred to by one of its
variety names, Katahdin . The round red is cultivated mainly in the
Northwest. Yukon gold potatoes have a skin and flesh that ranges from
buttery yellow to golden. These boiling potatoes have a moist, almost
succulent texture and make excellent mashed potatoes. There are a variety of
relatively new potatoes in the marketplace, most of which aren't new at all
but rather heritage vegetables that date back centuries. Among the more
distinctive examples are the all blue potatoes, which range in color from
bluish purple to purple-black. These small potatoes have a dense texture and
are good for boiling. Other purple potatoes have skin colors that range from
lavender to dark blue and flesh that can be from white to beige with purple
streaking. Among the red-fleshed potatoes are the huckleberry  (red skin and
flesh) and the blossom  (pinkish-red skin and flesh). New potatoes are
simply young potatoes (any variety). They haven't had time to convert their
sugar fully into starch and consequently have a crisp, waxy texture and
thin, undeveloped wispy skins. New potatoes are small enough to cook whole
and are excellent boiled or pan-roasted. Because they retain their shape
after being cooked and cut, new potatoes are particularly suited for use in
potato salad. The season for new potatoes is spring to early summer.
Potatoes of one variety or another are available year-round. Choose potatoes
that are suitable for the desired method of cooking. All potatoes should be
firm, well-shaped (for their type) and blemish-free. New potatoes may be
missing some of their feathery skin but other types should not have any bald
spots. Avoid potatoes that are wrinkled, sprouted or cracked. A green
tinge - indicative of prolonged light exposure - is caused by the alkaloid
solanine, which can be toxic if eaten in quantity. This bitter green portion
can be cut or scraped off and the potato used in the normal fashion. Store
potatoes in a cool, dark, well-ventilated place for up to 2 weeks. New
potatoes should be used within 3 days of purchase. Refrigerating potatoes
causes them to become quite sweet and to turn dark when cooked. Warm
temperatures encourage sprouting and shriveling. Potatoes are probably the
most versatile vegetable in the world and can be cooked in any way
imaginable. They're available in a wide selection of commercial products
including POTATO CHIPS, instant mashed potatoes (dehydrated cooked
potatoes), canned new potatoes and a plethora of frozen products including
HASH BROWNS, FRENCH FRIES and stuffed baked potatoes. Potatoes are not at
all hard on the waistline (a 6-ounce potato contains only about 120
calories) and pack a nutritional punch. They're low in sodium, high in
potassium and an important source of complex carbohydrates and vitamins C
and B-6, as well as a storehouse of minerals. Neither SWEET POTATOES nor
YAMS are botanically related to the potato.
 Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

============================

From: Wayne <waynebw[at]att.net>
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 02:06:47 GMT
--------
moosemeat wrote:
> So why all the tumult and uproar in the recent poatoe salad thread
> Or excuse me, is it potato?  Anyway I don't think there is any
> difference; after all these "purists" (some of them anyway) have even
> put carrots in their salad recipe whereas other "experts" have left
> out hard boiled eggs.  It's a mad and crazy world out there, if you
> don't believe it check out the  recent pizza thread. I think some
> people would even argue over how to boil water.

Hey, that's why we're here!

============================

From: fx199[at]aol.com (Fx199)
Date: 12 Aug 2004 02:58:06 GMT
--------
Wayne wrote:
>Hey, that's why we're here!

Seems like we'd all like Alton Brown then...why not?

============================
From: Alan Zelt <alzelFINNFAN[at]tworldnet.att.net>
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 03:27:20 GMT
--------
moosemeat wrote:
> So why all the tumult and uproar in the recent poatoe salad thread
> Or excuse me, is it potato?  Anyway I don't think there is any
> difference; after all these "purists" (some of them anyway) have even
> put carrots in their salad recipe whereas other "experts" have left
> out hard boiled eggs.  It's a mad and crazy world out there, if you
> don't believe it check out the  recent pizza thread. I think some
> people would even argue over how to boil water.

Well Moosie, I will keep the SBF from seeing your latest epistle. She 
would probably give you about ten pages in retort to your belief that a 
potato is just a potato.

And coming from a person who lives in the Northwest, just a big shame on 
you.

============================

From: Rodney Myrvaagnes <rodneym[at]attglobal.net>
Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 23:53:40 -0400
--------
moosemeat wrote:
>So why all the tumult and uproar in the recent poatoe salad thread
>Or excuse me, is it potato?  Anyway I don't think there is any
>difference; after all these "purists" (some of them anyway) have even

You don't think potatoes are different inside? Where do you get your
potatoes?

============================

From: BOB <low[at]slow.bbq>
Date: Thu, 12 Aug 2004 03:19:41 -0400
--------
Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:
> You don't think potatoes are different inside? Where do you get your
> potatoes?

Moose probably boils the sh*t out of his 'taters, along with his ribs.


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