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Subject: questions about boiling potatoes
Newsgroups: alt.cooking-chat,alt.creative-cooking,rec.food.cooking

============================

From: dh_ld[at]nomail.com
Date: Sat, 03 Apr 2004 16:24:07 GMT
--------
Hi again,

Can anyone share some tips about boiling potatoes?
I used to do it back when microwaves weighed a
hundred pounds and cost a hundred dollars, but for
the past several years have been microwaving them.
I do remember cooking them with the skins on, and 
that it often got the water dirty, plus it was a hot and
irritating experience to get the skins off when they 
finally got done. It also took a long time. Is it better
and faster to skin them first, or do they get all mushy
or something without the skins on? How about cutting
them up....is there a down side to that or is it about 
the same result in a shoter period of time?

Thanks for any help!
David

============================

From: wardna[at]aol.com (Neil)
Date: 03 Apr 2004 16:32:09 GMT
--------
>tips about boiling potatoes?

I always peel them first, if I intend to peel them at all, although it must be
acknowledged that removing the peel allows some trace vitamins to leach out as
they boil.  However, if you depend on potatoes for trace vitamins, perhaps your
whole diet needs to be looked at.

I've never noticed removal of the peel to expose potatoes to the danger of
mushiness; that depends on regulating the water temperature and removing them
at just the right moment.

Cutting large potatoes into chunks, of approximately golf-ball mass, is
sensible.  Just make sure all the chunks are about the same size.

============================

From: hahabogus <not[at]valid.invalid>
Date: Sat, 03 Apr 2004 19:04:33 GMT
--------
Neil wrote:
> I always peel them first, if I intend to peel them at all, although it
> must be acknowledged that removing the peel allows some trace vitamins
> to leach out as they boil.  However, if you depend on potatoes for
> trace vitamins, perhaps your whole diet needs to be looked at.
> 
> I've never noticed removal of the peel to expose potatoes to the
> danger of mushiness; that depends on regulating the water temperature
> and removing them at just the right moment.
> 
> Cutting large potatoes into chunks, of approximately golf-ball mass,
> is sensible.  Just make sure all the chunks are about the same size.

Salt the water and  make sure all the potatoes are uniform in size so they 
all cook in the same time. All the rest is choice of dish and personal 
likes. Oh and water to cover. 

Some think the potatoes are easier to peel after cooking, some don't think 
that.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 03 Apr 2004 19:35:14 GMT
--------
Neil wrote:
> I always peel them first, if I intend to peel them at all, although it
> must be acknowledged that removing the peel allows some trace vitamins
> to leach out as they boil.  However, if you depend on potatoes for
> trace vitamins, perhaps your whole diet needs to be looked at.

If they're to be peeled after boiling the vitamins and minerals will be lost
anyway, specially if you toss out the cooking water... other than carbs and
fiber there isn't much nutrition in a pared boiled potato... I often grind the
pared skins with the meat when I prepare meat loaf.... then the spuds get
mashed, and the cooking water goes into stock and used for baking.

============================

From: wardna[at]aol.com (Neil)
Date: 03 Apr 2004 19:48:47 GMT
--------
Sheldon wrote:
>other than carbs and
>fiber there isn't much nutrition in a pared boiled potato.

Not true.  Although heavy to carbohydrates, they have been an important protein
and vitamin source for most of northern Europe for three centuries.  A diet of
potatoes will keep you healthier longer than, for instance, a diet of tuna.

The skins are good for fiber and a few trace vitamins, but most of the protein
and vitamins are inside.  Boiling them with the skins on helps conserve what's
in the potato.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 03 Apr 2004 20:10:00 GMT
--------
Neil wrote:
>Not true.  Although heavy to carbohydrates, they have been an important protein
>and vitamin source for most of northern Europe for three centuries.  A diet of
>potatoes will keep you healthier longer than, for instance, a diet of tuna.
>
>The skins are good for fiber and a few trace vitamins, but most of the protein
>and vitamins are inside.  Boiling them with the skins on helps conserve what's
>in the potato.

Not a word of what you've written is true... you gotta be some dumb spud
worshiping Mick.

Potatoes contain very little protein, and is very low quality plant protein,
which is why it's typically served with animal protein.

Note that the nutritional data is for *raw* potato... much of the nutrition is
lost when potatos are boiled, whether skins on or not... what isn't destroyed
by heat is tossed out with the cooking water.

http://www.ida.net/users/potatoexpo/pages/nutrition.html

============================

From: wardna[at]aol.com (Neil)
Date: 03 Apr 2004 23:44:58 GMT
--------
Sheldon wrote:
>Not a word of what you've written is true... you gotta be some dumb spud
>worshiping Mick.

You are, as usual, mistaken noisily and obnoxiously.  Get better data, get
common sense, and look and European (and Peruvian) history.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <WayneBoatWright[at]SMN.worldnet.att.net>
Date: Sat, 03 Apr 2004 16:36:30 GMT
--------
dh_ld@nomail wrote:
> I do remember cooking them with the skins on, and 
> that it often got the water dirty, plus it was a hot and
> irritating experience to get the skins off when they 
> finally got done. It also took a long time. Is it better
> and faster to skin them first, or do they get all mushy
> or something without the skins on? How about cutting
> them up....is there a down side to that or is it about 
> the same result in a shoter period of time?

There will probably be a war over whether to boil potatoes with or 
without the skin.  I personally don't see a downside to the latter.  If 
you're going to use the potatoes for potato salad or other dish where you 
want the pieces to hold their shape, make sure you use a waxy-textured 
potato like red boiling potatoes or red new potatoes.  Many other 
varieties are mealy and will disintegrate.  

I'm very anal about having the potatoes for potato salad "just right".  I 
generally use red boiling potatoes, peel them, and cut them in as uniform 
size and shape pieces as possible.  As they cook, I check them for 
doneness frequently with the point of a thin sharp knife.  Bear in mind 
that potatoes will continue to cook slightly after draining, so pull them 
just before the point of doneness you want.

Boiling potatoes whole usually leaves a potato with over-cooked exteriors 
and firmer middles.  That's not to my liking.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 03 Apr 2004 16:37:32 GMT
--------
dh_ld NEWBIE crossposted:
>Can anyone share some tips about boiling potatoes?

Much depends upon which type of potato and for what the boiled potatoes will be
used.

============================

From: Steve Wertz <swertz[at]cluemail.com.gov.invalid>
Date: Sat, 03 Apr 2004 13:11:21 -0600
--------
dh_ld@nomail wrote:

>Can anyone share some tips about boiling potatoes?
>I used to do it back when microwaves weighed a
>hundred pounds and cost a hundred dollars, but for
>the past several years have been microwaving them.

I'm not even going to try and understand the above.

>I do remember cooking them with the skins on, and 
>that it often got the water dirty, plus it was a hot and
>irritating experience to get the skins off when they 
>finally got done. It also took a long time. Is it better
>and faster to skin them first, or do they get all mushy
>or something without the skins on? How about cutting
>them up....is there a down side to that or is it about 
>the same result in a shoter period of time?

Always cook them whole with the skins on.  Much more potato
flavor.

============================

From: Kate Dicey <kate[at]diceyhome.free-online.co.uk>
Date: Sat, 03 Apr 2004 21:11:36 +0100
--------
dh_ld@nomail wrote:
> I do remember cooking them with the skins on, and
> that it often got the water dirty, plus it was a hot and
> irritating experience to get the skins off when they
> finally got done. It also took a long time. Is it better
> and faster to skin them first, or do they get all mushy
> or something without the skins on? How about cutting
> them up....is there a down side to that or is it about
> the same result in a shoter period of time?

I never peel little new potatoes, for boiling or microzapping.  I just
wash them and we eat the skins.  For bigger ones, I peel first.  Whether
or not they fall to bits has a lot to do with the type of potato you
choose.  For mash you really want floury varieties like King Edward and
Maris Piper.  For just boiled, a waxy variety is better.  For little
spuds eaten whole in their skins, Pink Fir Apple and Charlotte are good.

If you want the spuds to cook quicker, cut them smaller.  In the M/W
size is less important, and once you have spuds for more than 3 people,
boiling them is as quick or quicker.  I prefer the taste and texture of
boiled spud: they lend to go a little leathery in the M/W

============================

From: Louis Cohen <louiscohen[at]alum.mit.edu>
Date: Sat, 3 Apr 2004 13:02:16 -0800
--------
I always leave the skins on, because I like to eat them with the skins on.

============================

From: Kate Dicey <kate[at]diceyhome.free-online.co.uk>
Date: Sat, 03 Apr 2004 22:37:52 +0100
--------
dh_ld@nomail wrote:
> Can anyone share some tips about boiling potatoes?

I never peel little new potatoes, for boiling or microzapping.  I just
wash them and we eat the skins.  For bigger ones, I peel first.  Whether
or not they fall to bits has a lot to do with the type of potato you
choose.  For mash you really want floury varieties like King Edward and
Maris Piper.  For just boiled, a waxy variety is better.  For little
spuds eaten whole in their skins, Pink Fir Apple and Charlotte are good.

If you want the spuds to cook quicker, cut them smaller.  In the M/W
size is less important, and once you have spuds for more than 3 people,
boiling them is as quick or quicker.  I prefer the taste and texture of
boiled spud: they lend to go a little leathery in the M/W

============================

From: Jerry Avins <jya[at]ieee.org>
Date: Sat, 03 Apr 2004 21:36:46 -0500
--------
dh_ld@nomail wrote:
> Can anyone share some tips about boiling potatoes?

My uncle lost a hand in an industrial accident. He used to peel his
cooked potatoes at the table by pinching them just so; the skin came off
in one piece. I never learned to do that, but I never had to.

I cook potatoes with the skins on because I notice that the water is
much less starchy that way, and I hoard calories. Peel them before
boiling -- in fact, cube them while still raw -- to reduce their
carbohydrate content.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 04 Apr 2004 02:44:31 GMT
--------
> Peel them before
>boiling -- in fact, cube them while still raw -- to reduce their
>carbohydrate content.
>
>Jerry-Atric

Then why bother, you senile bastard... they're potatoes, a STARCH. Idiot.

============================

From: Shawn Hearn <srhi[at]comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 04 Apr 2004 09:31:38 -0400
--------
dh_ld@nomail wrote:
>  Is it better
> and faster to skin them first, or do they get all mushy
> or something without the skins on? 

I don't think it makes a difference. Try boiling two or three
potatoes with the skin on, and try a few peeled potatoes. You
can than decide which you think works best.

============================

From: Steve House <sjhouse.remove.this[at]to.send.hotmail.com>
Date: 4 Apr 2004 11:09:12 -0500
--------
I personally prefer to boil them with the skins on until tender but not soft
and mushy and eat them skins and all.  Even mashy's I like to leave skins on
for the flavour and the food value.  Of course this presumes you're boiling
thin-skinned white or red potatoes.  Wash, remove eyes or blemishes, and
place 'taters in cold salted water, cover with the lid ajar and bring to a
boil, reduce heat and boil gently for about 20 minutes until a toothpick
passes in to the centre easily.  Drain and serve whole without peeling.

============================

From: Stephanie Stowe <stowe[at]whackthisvsac.org>
Date: Wed, 7 Apr 2004 15:59:38 -0400
--------
dh_ld@nomail wrote:
> Can anyone share some tips about boiling potatoes?

If the potatoes are to be used for potato salad, then they really need to be
cooked in the skin. Otherwise, chop 'em up and boil them. If you cut them
up, you will use less energy and time in their cooking.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <WayneBoatWright[at]SMN.worldnet.att.net>
Date: Fri, 09 Apr 2004 14:34:40 GMT
--------
Stephanie Stowe wrote:
> If the potatoes are to be used for potato salad, then they really need
> to be cooked in the skin. Otherwise, chop 'em up and boil them. If you
> cut them up, you will use less energy and time in their cooking.

Why?  If the right potatoes are used and are sliced or cubed uniformly, I 
find it much easier to peel first for potato salad.  In fact, the pieces 
of potato cook are more evenly cooked.  

============================

From: Kate Dicey <kate[at]diceyhome.free-online.co.uk>
Date: Fri, 09 Apr 2004 15:57:52 +0100
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Why?  If the right potatoes are used and are sliced or cubed uniformly, I
> find it much easier to peel first for potato salad.  In fact, the pieces
> of potato cook are more evenly cooked.

Why peel them at all?  Just eat the skins.

Cutting to a uniform size and shape has more effect on even cooking than
skin/no skin.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <WayneBoatWright[at]SMN.worldnet.att.net>
Date: Fri, 09 Apr 2004 15:23:18 GMT
--------
Kate Dicey wrote:
> Why peel them at all?  Just eat the skins.
> 
> Cutting to a uniform size and shape has more effect on even cooking
> than skin/no skin.

You're right, of course, Kate.  Perhaps I wasn't clear...I peel AND cut 
in uniform pieces before boiling.

That said, however, I do like and eat the skin on potatoes in many 
preparations.  I especially like to eat the skins on baked potatoes.  In 
traditional potato salad, however, I really prefer them peeled.  Somehow 
I don't care for potato peels and a mayonnaise-based dressing.  If I use 
red-skinned new potatoes, I leave the peel on and dress them with a 
vinaigrette and fresh herbs.

============================

From: Kate Dicey <kate[at]diceyhome.free-online.co.uk>
Date: Fri, 09 Apr 2004 23:42:25 +0100
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> That said, however, I do like and eat the skin on potatoes in many
> preparations.  I especially like to eat the skins on baked potatoes.  In
> traditional potato salad, however, I really prefer them peeled. 

I like Pink Fir Apple potatoes for salad, and I leave the skins on those
when dressing with a mayo based dressing.  They are very fine, with none
of the bitterness of some other varieties in their skins.  See here:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/plants/plant_finder/plant_pages/867.shtml

I rarely peel spuds at all, and never little new ones or jacket spuds. 
I can eat all types, but peeling them, or scraping new ones, brings my
hands out in itchy red blotches, then stains them a grubby brown.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <WayneBoatWright[at]SMN.worldnet.att.net>
Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 03:03:47 GMT
--------
Kate Dicey wrote:

> I like Pink Fir Apple potatoes for salad, and I leave the skins on
> those when dressing with a mayo based dressing.  They are very fine,
> with none of the bitterness of some other varieties in their skins. 
> See here: 
> http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/plants/plant_finder/plant_pages/867.shtml 

UK potatoes, of course, as I've never seen and probably never will see
them where I live in Arizona.  Doubtful, too, if I were inclined, that I
could even begin to grow potatoes here.  Sure sounds like a variety I
would like to try. 
 
> I rarely peel spuds at all, and never little new ones or jacket spuds.
> I can eat all types, but peeling them, or scraping new ones, brings my
> hands out in itchy red blotches, then stains them a grubby brown.

Definitely all good reasons to leave the peels on!

============================

From: Kate Dicey <kate[at]diceyhome.free-online.co.uk>
Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 20:20:13 +0100
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> UK potatoes, of course, as I've never seen and probably never will see
> them where I live in Arizona.

We do seem to have a wider variety of names spuds here, both the big 'do
everything' types of generic red and white types, as well as things like
charlottes, King Edwards, Maris Piper, Jersey Royals, and some nice ones
that get imported fro Egypt just at the time when local potatoes are
reaching the end of their best seasons and the new ones are not quite
affordable.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <WayneBoatWright[at]SMN.worldnet.att.net>
Date: Sun, 11 Apr 2004 02:58:02 GMT
--------
Kate Dicey wrote:
> We do seem to have a wider variety of names spuds here, both the big
> 'do everything' types of generic red and white types, as well as
> things like charlottes, King Edwards, Maris Piper, Jersey Royals, and
> some nice ones that get imported fro Egypt just at the time when local
> potatoes are reaching the end of their best seasons and the new ones
> are not quite affordable.

Yes, you have an enviable variety!  My favorite US potato for general use 
is the Yukon Gold, pretty color and great flavor.  My favorite for potato 
salad or other uses where a firmer potato is desired is the Red Bliss.

============================

From: Stephanie Stowe <stowe[at]whackthisvsac.org>
Date: Fri, 9 Apr 2004 14:52:32 -0400
--------
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Why?  If the right potatoes are used and are sliced or cubed uniformly, I
> find it much easier to peel first for potato salad.  In fact, the pieces
> of potato cook are more evenly cooked.

I like the flavor the skins add.

============================

From: Wayne Boatwright <WayneBoatWright[at]SMN.worldnet.att.net>
Date: Sat, 10 Apr 2004 03:05:13 GMT
--------
Stephanie Stowe wrote:
> I like the flavor the skins add.

Hey, whatever floats your boat! <G>  As I said in an another post, I do 
like the skins, but not when mixed with a mayo-based dressing.  I like 
them both ways depending on how I use them.

============================

From: Tonya_049[at]webtv.net (T E)
Date: Fri, 9 Apr 2004 23:32:55 -0400
--------
Stephanie Stowe wrote:
> If the potatoes are to be used for potato salad, then they really need
> to be cooked in the skin. Otherwise, chop 'em up and boil them. If you
> cut them up, you will use less energy and time in their cooking. 

This post bought back nightmares when I was working at a local
coney island with b/f where we had to boil 500 pounds of potatoes with
skins on then peel cool then run through a slicing machine-hand manual-
for american fries. 
This amount was just for the Sunday crowd.
I did a few Hail Mary's when the owner kids switch over to those bags of
precooked sliced american fries-just lightly grill them- that even
tasted better not counting less labor costs and toll on my hands.

============================

From: Kiwi.n.Aussie <gregy[at]paradise.net.nz>
Date: Tue, 13 Apr 2004 11:39:19 +1200
--------
When mashing spuds I use a potato ricer not only do I not bother peeling 
them as the skin gets left behind. But the texture is lighter and 
fluffy. But gotta admit I would wash em.... cant imagine not washing em!

============================

From: calypso985[at]aol.com (Calypso985)
Date: 14 Apr 2004 21:38:05 GMT
--------
> Can anyone share some tips about boiling potatoes?

If you are boiling the spuds to make mashed potatoes, have you ever tried
making them WITH the skins?  I first had these at a terrific outdoor chuckwagon
supper in the Tetons.  I think the skins add a lot of flavor.  Naturally, a
good scrubbing prior to boiling them is in order, and I cut mine into about 4
to 8 large chunks, but I don't peel them.  When they are just fork tender, I
drain them and mash as usually (butter, salt, white pepper, hot milk).  Try
them and see if you don't enjoy the change of pace.  Anyway, the skins are
where all the good nutrients are, right??

============================

From: august <augie[at]thelanddownunder.com>
Date: Thu, 15 Apr 2004 07:48:10 +1000
--------
Calypso985 wrote:
||  If you are boiling the spuds to make mashed potatoes, have you ever tried
||  making them WITH the skins?

This is a common way of mashing potatoes in the area where I grew up. And 
that was many years ago ;)

============================

From: leebee <leebee[at]mymail.com>
Date: Thu, 15 Apr 2004 12:22:20 +1000
--------
august wrote:
> This is a common way of mashing potatoes in the area where I grew up.

mmm.. fibre.

I remember the first time I was served roast pumpkin with the skin on at a
relatives house ( my mother would skin our pumpkin ).  I was 15 and
horrified.  My aunt told me to "eat it", and I was suprised at how much more
delicious pumpkin was with skin on.  I would never roast a pumpkin without
skin now... yummm...

============================

From: august <augie[at]thelanddownunder.com>
Date: Thu, 15 Apr 2004 12:46:47 +1000
--------
leebee wrote:
||  I remember the first time I was served roast pumpkin with the skin on at a
||  relatives house ( my mother would skin our pumpkin ).  I was 15 and
||  horrified.  My aunt told me to "eat it", and I was suprised at how much more
||  delicious pumpkin was with skin on.  I would never roast a pumpkin without
||  skin now... yummm...

Yes - pumpkin with the skin on is so much tastier!

I love a QLD blue or a  butternut roasted with my lamb, yum.

Have you tried thin slices brushed with Olive Oil and then a few minutes 
under the griller (turn and repeat?) Sweet potato as well. Delish!  

============================

From: leebee <leebee[at]mymail.com>
Date: Fri, 16 Apr 2004 17:29:31 +1000
--------
august wrote:

> Yes - pumpkin with the skin on is so much tastier!

I still scowled as I ate it, though secretly planning on telling my mum how
much nicer Aunty Flo made it ! <g>

> I love a QLD blue or a  butternut roasted with my lamb, yum.
>
> Have you tried thin slices brushed with Olive Oil and then a few
> minutes under the griller (turn and repeat?) Sweet potato as well.
> Delish!

Yummi.

============================

From: Peter Aitken <paitken[at]CRAPnc.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 14 Apr 2004 22:08:44 GMT
--------
Calypso985 wrote:
> If you are boiling the spuds to make mashed potatoes, have you ever tried
> making them WITH the skins? 

> Anyway, the skins are
> where all the good nutrients are, right??

I agree that skin-on mashed spuds can be great - but the "nutrients are in
the skin" claim is a myth.

============================

From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 14 Apr 2004 22:28:35 GMT
--------
Peter Aitken wrote:
>> Anyway, the skins are
>> where all the good nutrients are, right??
>
>I agree that skin-on mashed spuds can be great - but the "nutrients are in
>the skin" claim is a myth.

Actually it's not a myth if one discards the carbs, other than for carbs most
of the nutrients (the good nutrients) are contained in the potato skin.

Another way to put it is a pound of potato skin contains more nutrition than a
pound of skinless potato flesh... and yes, a pound of those itty-bitty skin
parings weighs exactly the same as a pound chunk of flesh.

============================

From: Alan Moorman[at]visi.com
Date: Sat, 17 Apr 2004 07:58:25 -0500
--------
Calypso985 wrote:
>If you are boiling the spuds to make mashed potatoes, have you ever tried
>making them WITH the skins?

I always leave the skins on -- they add flavor, and nutrition (so I
hear!)

Never cut them, though, because they absorb more water and seem
mushier.

Cook's Illustrated sez:  Mix the butter in first, then the liquid
because they will stay fluffier if the butter is in first.  Otherwise
the liquid will tend to make them soggy.

============================

From: Lewzephyr <lewiszephyr[at]clotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 17 May 2004 15:33:44 GMT
--------
I needed a Bable Fish to understand dh_ld@nomail:
>Can anyone share some tips about boiling potatoes?

While reading this thread, I have heard of various types of potato,
that I have no knowledge of.
Basically I knew of Regular potato (you know, various sizes brown,
good for baking) and the general red / new potato, small round and
lots of fun.
So, anyone know of a decent location to get the Lowdown of what is
what all about potato?

Your time and insight are appreciated.

============================

From: Wayne <waynebw[at]att.net>
Date: Mon, 17 May 2004 16:38:25 GMT
--------
Lewzephyr wrote:
> While reading this thread, I have heard of various types of potato,
> that I have no knowledge of.
> Basically I knew of Regular potato (you know, various sizes brown,
> good for baking) and the general red / new potato, small round and
> lots of fun.
> So, anyone know of a decent location to get the Lowdown of what is
> what all about potato?

From Harry &amp; David...

For all practical purposes, potatoes fall into two easy categories — 
baking potatoes and boiling potatoes. There’s also a middle ground, but 
we’ll get to that in a minute. 

Probably the chief difference between the two types is the amount and 
nature of starch each contains. Baking potatoes are relatively high in 
starch and it is called amylose starch. Boiling potatoes are low in 
starch and it is called amylopectin. This pectin (just as with fruit for 
jams) is what holds the potato together when boiling or in soup and 
stews. 

Baking potatoes 

These are also called starchy potatoes. They tend to be long and have a 
coarse, cork-like skin. They are high in starch, with a dry, mealy 
texture. But, they turn light and fluffy when cooked. 

They are ideal for baking, mashing and French fries. They are light and 
fluffy baked, light and creamy mashed, and frankly, the only potato worth 
frying. 

Some of the names you’ll see them under in the supermarket are Russet 
Burbank, Russet Arcadia, Norgold Russet, Goldrush, Norkotah, Long White 
(or White Rose or California Long White), and Idaho. 

Boiling potatoes 

These are also called waxy potatoes. They come in a variety of shapes and 
can be long or round. They have a thin, smooth skin and an almost waxy 
flesh. They are relatively high in moisture and sugar, but low in starch. 

They are ideal for soups, casseroles, potato salad, roasting, and 
barbecuing because of their tendency to hold their shape. You can mash 
them, but instead of smooth and creamy, the results tend to be thick and 
lumpy. 

You will find them sold as Round White, Round Red, Yellow Potato, Red 
Potato, Salad Potato, La Soda, Red La Rouge, Red Pontiac, Red Nordland, 
Red Bliss, Yellow Finnish, Ruby Crescent, and Australian Crescent. 

Now, there are some potatoes that fall in the middle, in the "all-
purpose" category, such as the Yukon Gold, Peruvian Blue, Superior, 
Kennebec, and Katahdin. They are moister than baking potatoes and will 
hold together in boiling water. They are particularly well-suited to 
roasting, pan frying, and using in soups, stews, and gratins. They can be 
baked, mashed, and fried, but will not produce the same results as the 
bakers. 

And finally, as you must know by now, a new potato is just that — an 
immature, small potato of whatever variety. Red potatoes may be the type 
most often sold, but that does not mean that a red potato is a new potato 
or that a new potato is a red potato. 

-- 
Wayne in Phoenix

Big on natural foods??   82.38% of people die of "natural" causes.

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From: Jerry Avins <jya[at]ieee.org>
Date: Mon, 17 May 2004 16:18:38 -0400
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Wayne wrote:

[All snipped]

Bravo for an excellent rundown!

>-- 
>Wayne in Phoenix
>
>Big on natural foods??   82.38% of people die of "natural" causes.

Most of my food is (and most of my friends are) cultivated.

Jerry
-- 
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

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From: Wayne <waynebw[at]att.net>
Date: Mon, 17 May 2004 20:52:27 GMT
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Jerry Avins wrote:
> Bravo for an excellent rundown!

Thanks, Jerry!  I found the article a while back when I was lamenting about 
the narrow offering of potato varieties in my local stores.

BTW, I like your tagline!

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From: penmart01[at]aol.como (Sheldon)
Date: 17 May 2004 22:14:44 GMT
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The most important thing when boiling potatoes is to start them in cold
water... same is true for other root veggies, like turnips, boiling onions,
carrots, etc.... so they'll heat evenly, otherwise the outside will become mush
while the centers are still raw.


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